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UK Consumer Electronics Intelligence Report September 2012 - September 2013


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What will you get from this report? •

A ‘who’s who’ in consumer electronics.

In-depth market analysis covering the period between September 2012 and September 2013.

More than 200 individual pieces of key insights & over 77 pieces of statistical interpretation.

Analysis of the top retailers, manufacturers, aggregators and reviewers, using the top 200 consumer electronics keywords.

Top Insights ‘Click and collect’ forms a fundamental part of the purchasing cycle for offline retailers. •

The growth of ‘click and collect’ services are allowing traditional High Street retailers to offer a holistic consumer experience, of which online is often the initial customer touch point. The growth of this service looks set to continue with 14% of consumers planning to use click and collect for their next purchase, compared to 8% previously (Source: YouGov, Rise expected for devices bought through ‘click and collect’, 14 June 2013).

The popularity of click and collect is fuelled by the desire to avoid the £792m cost of missed home deliveries in 2011 (Source: IMRG figures, Internetretailing.net, 5 August 2011).

Digital content is driving the development of new product areas within the sector. •

The newest and fastest growing market in the consumer electronics sector is in ‘tablets and eReaders’, with the market being dominated by Apple and Amazon.

The drive towards tablets and eReaders is driven by a concerted push towards digital content. This is driven by opportunities for additional revenue (through the sale of applications, books and other content) as well as long-term customer retention, through the use of digital rights management and platform specific applications.

This is a trend that is also being seen in the PCs and laptops market, through the promotion of direct-download applications and the video games market, through the purchase of in-game content.

A clear consumer demand for expert opinion and product information allows review sites and aggregators to take considerable click share from retailers. •

The presence of review sites in the organic click share index demonstrates a key demand from consumers for reliable, expert product advice and knowledge.

Throughout the sector, review sites account for 13.78% of the overall organic click share but in some markets, this increases to more than 40%. This represents a clear opportunity for retailers to engage with key review publishers to connect with users in the early stages of the purchasing process, and to increase the levels of consumer focused content on their own digital properties.


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“The growth of ‘click and collect’ services are allowing traditional High Street retailers to offer a holistic consumer experience, of which online is often the initial customer touch point”

Key Findings •

There is a higher search impression volume for ‘Tablets & eReaders’ (45.56%) than for any other keyword market, reflecting the fact that this is the fastest growing consumer electronics sector.

Manufacturers hold 72.51% of brand search impression volume, only challenged by review sites which hold 21.11%.

There are high unit search volumes for iPad mini (19.11%) and Kindle (15.11%), with most keywords based around either consoles or tablets and eReaders.

The most visible brand across all ten sub-verticals is Amazon, but this is enhanced by its use as an order platform by thirdparty retailers. It ranks first for the highest keywords by volume including iPad mini, iPad 4 and iPad 3.

Argos (13.93%) ranks highly due to its high visibility for keywords such as iPod and cameras. Its own click and collect service grew share of sales from 28% to 31% in Q4 2012, with 42% of sales now online.

PC World manages to outrank Amazon in the ‘Laptop & PCs’ sub-vertical for keywords such as computers and desktop.

Apple performs well as both a leading retailer and manufacturer, with the highest search impression volumes based predominantly around its products, such as iPod and iPad mini.

Currys with 11.59% of the leader board owes its performance to keywords such as sat nav and digital camera. They also saw sales grow 8% in the eight weeks to January 2013 due to both the click and collect model and the collapse of Comet, HMV and Jessops.

Phones4U lead the aggregated click share index for mobile phones. While they have a respectable second place in paid search their domination of the organic index has allowed them to be a leading brand within the market. This is even more impressive when we consider the high competitive nature of the mobile phone market and types of brands that they are competing against i.e. Apple, O2, Samsung and 3.

eBay, the world’s largest online auction site performs poorly with just 2.33% of aggregated click share. This is due to the brand ranking poorly across all verticals. It is also set to increase its dealer fees for electrical accessories in September 2013 from 6% to 8%, missing out on much of the third-party traffic that Amazon benefits from.

Halfords introduced a click and collect service two years ago and 86% of its online sales are through this service. It comes second only to Amazon in the ‘GPS, Sat Nav & Car Accessories’ aggregated click share.


Executive Summary


Online consumer electronics is made up of a diverse set of keywords that are designed to reflect the different stages within the consumer lifecycle. Success is centred on building a blended search strategy across all types of keyword categories, including Generic and Brand terms. Within this section we reveal the most visible brands across both paid and organic search.


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Executive summary

Introduction to the Consumer Electronics Market The consumer electronics sector is made up of a diverse array of keywords that are designed to reflect the different stages within the customer lifecycle. These include unit phrases such as computers and desktop PC, as well as accessory specific terms such as laptop bags and pc speakers. Unit terms are typically used to develop search exposure and help initiate the search journey, while accessory terms are more niche and are often the direct result of a previous unit purchase. 45.56% of search impression volume is based around the vertical ‘Tablets & eReaders, closely followed by ‘Video Games & Consoles’ (see Figure 1). There are also high unit search volumes for iPad mini (19.11%) and Kindle (15.11%), with most keywords being based around either consoles or tablets and eReaders (see Figure 2). For simplicity, the report focuses its analysis on the top unit terms. Unit keywords are based around a primary device such as a console (PlayStation 3) or an entire entertainment system (hi fi systems). Accessories terms are usually the secondary device that a consumer will either purchase with a unit or add at a later date; examples include headphones or digital audio cable. As a result, unit terms are highly influential to the visibility of accessory keywords, as interest in the latter assumes ownership of the former. This symbiotic relationship can be seen between the terms iPod and iPod docking station. It is important to note that the consumer electronics sector encompasses a wide range of long tail phrases within each of these verticals. Therefore, the keyword terms within the report are by no means exhaustive. It is also important to note that more specific keyword coverage is dependent on whether an individual brand manufactures a particular product. The consumer electronics market comprises 10 primary sub-verticals, including: 1.

Tablets & eReaders

2.

Video Games & Consoles

3.

Mobile & Home Phones

4.

Personal Audio Units

5.

Cameras & Camcorders

6.

Laptops & PCs

7.

Televisions / Digital TV

8.

Home Audio

9.

DVD / Blu-ray / Home Cinema

10. Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories Our findings will detail tactics and strategies, as well as revealing the most visible operators within organic search and PPC (Pay Per Click).


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Figure 1: % Split of search impression volume by keyword market % Split Tablets & eReaders Video Games & Consoles Mobile & Home Phones Personal Audio Units Cameras & Camcorders Laptops & PCs Televisions / Digital TV Home Audio DVD / Blu ray / Home Cinema Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories 0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Source: Google keyword estimation tool

Figure 2: % Split of search impression volume for the top 10 Unit phrases Unit Keyword

% Split

ipad mini

19.11%

kindle

15.11%

ipad 4

13.85%

kindle fire

9.22%

wii u

8.34%

ipad 3

8.21%

ipod

7.66%

xbox 720

7.28%

mobile phones

5.81%

playstation 4

5.43%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool


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Executive summary

How do we measure the search market? Search Impression represents the number of times a website page is displayed within the search results. It is only after the results are displayed that visitors are able to click on either a PPC advert or an organic link. Therefore, “click share” represents the act of a visitor clicking on a PPC advert or an organic link and is calculated as follows: •

Organic Click Share is the number of clicks that an individual operator has achieved against a keyword, as a measure of where they rank for that keyword.

PPC Click Share is the number of clicks that an individual operator has achieved against a keyword as a percentage of their Share of Voice (SOV). SOV is a measure of how often an operator’s PPC ad appears.

For more information see Appendix A: Search Impression and Click Share Methodology

Search Impression Volume There is a diverse range of consumer electronics brands, each offering a multiplicity of products with many specialising in a particular service offering. The sector is divided with mass market retailers such as Amazon and Currys/PC World, alongside niche specialists such as Bose and Garmin. This report also includes review sites which are influential to the conversion process. From the perspective of online presence, it is clear that manufacturers lead total brand related search impression volume with 72.51%, closely followed by review sites representing 21.11%. What is interesting is that although retailers are only representative of 6.02% of brand search impression volume, they often lead the click share indexes for product categories (see Figure 3). Aggregators do not have the dominance over the consumer electronics sector that they have over other sectors of the UK economy. This is because many sub-verticals in consumer electronics have reached saturation point based around a few dominant international brands. This means that consumer comparison is relatively easy with fewer variables than the service industries such as law and insurance (see Figure 4).

Role of review sites within the buying cycle Review sites have positioned themselves as a critical part of the buying cycle, providing consumers with a reliable and trustworthy overview of quality versus price considerations when purchasing a product. Often they also have advance reviews of products yet to come onto the market, building up anticipation of a product launch (witness the recent hype over the launch of the Xbox One). This is particularly apparent in the market for tablets, personal audio devices and video games, where some of the leading websites for online visibility are review sites. Given the fact that they are a key part of the conversion process, they are often competing with direct online retailers for premium position within the search engine results pages (SERPS).


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Figure 3: Brand related search impression volume by constituent service offering

Manufacturer - 72.51%

Reviewer - 21.11%

Retailer - 6.02%

Aggregator - 0.36%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool Figure 4: Brand search impression volume by operator for each constituent service offering (excluding Amazon) Manufacturer Brand

% Split

Reviewer Brand

% Split

Apple

32.43%

Ign

57.53%

T-Mobile

26.49%

Cnet

38.81%

Dell

11.92%

T3

1.40%

Samsung

9.74%

Geek

1.05%

Garmin

5.33%

Eurogamer

0.38%

Sony

4.36%

Slashgear

0.31%

Bose

2.91%

Techradar

0.21%

Nintendo

2.91%

VG247

0.17%

Panasonic

1.95%

Oxm

0.09%

HTC

1.95%

Pocket-Lint

0.06%

Retailer Brand

% Split

Aggregator/Specialist Retailers

% Split

Game

28.90%

Mobiles

32.29%

Mp3

19.26%

Pixmania

21.16%

Play

15.85%

Moneysupermarket

14.48%

Sky

12.96%

Pricerunner

14.48%

Comet

7.09%

Phones4U

9.80%

Tesco

4.75%

Carphonewarehouse

3.56%

Argos

4.75%

Dialaphone

1.89%

Asda

2.59%

E2Save

1.22%

PC World

2.12%

DigitalCameraWorld

0.81%

Debenhams

1.73%

BuyMobilePhones

0.31%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool


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Executive summary

Most Visible Consumer Electronics Brands In Search •

The most visible brand across all ten sub-verticals is Amazon, which benefits from a large presence for all consumer electronics products analysed and a consistent performance across both organic and paid search. This position is enhanced by its use as an order platform by third-party retailers (see Figure 5a).

Second place on the leader board is claimed by Argos with 13.93%, followed by Currys with 11.59%. This is a result of their consistent growth of the click and collect service (Argos, 28% to 31% in Q4 2012) (Source: Telegraph, Argos and Dixons lead fightback for the high street, 17 January 2013).

Apple has a click share of 6.96%, which is 21.73% behind the leader although it is still the highest performing manufacturer in the aggregated leader board index. It benefits from its products having high search impression volumes for keywords such as iPod, iPad mini and iPad3.

John Lewis is an example of a high-end retailer that doesn’t specialise solely in consumer electronics. It gains an aggregated click share of 5.93%, which is supported by second place position for paid search in half of all verticals.

Amazon dominates the organic leader board with 23.14%, closely followed by Currys and Argos with 10.23% and 10.03% respectively (see Figure 5). Tesco ranks in the top five for 60% of our verticals, ranking third in the ‘personal audio’ and ‘Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories’ verticals (see Figure 5b).

PC World struggles within the organic leader board because its online visibility is split across two brands that are part of the same ownership. However, individually they rank highly across verticals, with PC World outranking Amazon for the ‘Laptops & PCs’ vertical.

Play holds 3.28% of the organic search leader board; a respectable showing given that it is only present in 40% of sub-verticals.

Four brands in the organic leader board are purely from the mobile & home phones vertical, reflecting the high-level of competition within this market and the desire for contract and price comparison by the consumer.

Amazon, Argos, Tesco and Currys all feature highly in both the organic and paid leader boards, mostly due to their presence across all verticals (see Figure 5c).

John Lewis’ aggregated presence is largely due to strong performance in paid search. The retailer often fails to rank in organic listings.

Asda, Pricerunner, Dell and LG are other brands that appear within the paid search leader board but they lack organic presence, leading to them to miss out on any aggregated click share presence.

“The most visible brand across all ten sub-verticals is Amazon, which benefits from a large presence for all consumer electronics products analysed and a consistent performance across both organic and paid search.”


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Figure 5: Search Marketing Leader Board Index 5 a Aggregated Leader Board Index Amazon Argos Currys Apple Tesco John Lewis TechRadar PC World Nintendo Play Halfords Phones4u Dell Ebay Carphone Warehouse

5 b Organic Search Leader Board Index Amazon Currys Argos Tesco TechRadar Apple PC World Nintendo Richer Sounds Sony Play Trusted Reviews Phones4u Halfords Whathifi

5 c Paid Search Leader Board Index Amazon Argos John Lewis Currys Apple Ebay Pricerunner Tesco Halfords Play Dell Carphone Warehouse ASDA LG PC World

% Split 28.69% 13.93% 11.59% 6.96% 6.73% 5.93% 4.65% 3.87% 3.03% 2.78% 2.63% 2.61% 2.39% 2.33% 1.88%

% Split 23.14% 10.23% 10.03% 9.06% 8.41% 7.97% 5.30% 4.59% 3.86% 3.80% 3.28% 3.21% 2.58% 2.38% 2.16%

% Split 29.05% 15.56% 11.63% 10.85% 4.78% 4.68% 3.68% 3.13% 2.62% 2.56% 2.51% 2.50% 2.24% 2.13% 2.08%


UK SEARCH VOLUME AND CLICK SHARE ANALYSIS


A holistic approach is crucial to maximising search visibility across all keywords verticals. However, there are niches within each keyword category where brands focus their strategies. This section takes a granular view of some of the more specific keywords used by brands to identify who is getting what click share across both ppc and organic search, as well as examining strengths and weaknesses.


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UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Tablets & eReaders Search Impression Volume •

Tablet devices and eReaders represent one of the fastest growing markets within the consumer electronics sector, with tablets overtaking the combined PC and laptop markets by volume in 2012. (Source: Mintel, Desktop, Tablet and Laptop Computers, August 2012). However, research from Mintel suggests that just 20% of internet users own a tablet (against 79% who own a laptop), indicating that the market is still some distance from maturity. The tablet and eReader sector has enjoyed rapid growth since first emerging in 2010 with the launch of the iPad (announced in January 2010). Since then, products such as the Amazon Kindle, Kobo and similar devices have driven growth in this sector (ibid).

Tablets and eReaders represent a huge opportunity for brands to drive additional revenue from consumers through the sale of digital content and to increase customer retention (through the use of digital rights management). With this in mind, it is no surprise to see both Amazon and Apple, two of the world’s largest content providers, dominating the sector (Source: Google Trends and Mintel, Desktop, Tablet and Laptop Computers, August 2012).

Apple dominates the tablets and eReader sector with combined ‘iPad’ related terms representing 56.37% of search impression volume. The iPad mini is the leading device within this sector with a search impression volume of 22.56%, ahead of Kindle (17.86%) and iPad 4 (16.42%). The notable difference in search volumes between iPad mini and the next highest ranking iPad term can be attributed to the fact that the iPad mini represents a lower-cost entry point for consumers looking to enter the ‘iPad family’ of luxury, fashionable products (ibid).

Organic Click Share •

As developers of the leading devices in the market, Apple (iPad) and Amazon (Kindle) combine to hold more than 55% of the overall organic click share although Amazon lead by some margin (see Figure 6).

Amazon’s position as a distributor of both the iPad and Kindle products allows it to hold a notable advantage over Apple, with the retailer featuring in the top positions for 80% of keywords in this vertical (see Figure 6).

The technology review site TechRadar takes up important organic online real estate, enjoying 7.87% of organic click share. This demonstrates that consumer trust in product review content is particularly high in this relatively new sector and, as products within this sector continue to emerge, evolve and develop, direct comparisons between products and independent opinion is highly valued.

Paid Click Share •

The presence of retailers such as Carphone Warehouse and Vodafone in paid search highlights the number of ways in which tablet devices are being sold to consumers (see Figure 7).

With traditional mobile phone retailers, there is an emphasis on selling tablets on a contract basis alongside a monthly internet data package, rather than as a single purchase. These brands are typically only visible in the paid search click share index. Additionally, this could be reflective of the higher product margins that result from selling a low-margin product, such as the iPad tablet alongside profitable data plans. This would allow these retailers to offer consumers an alternative and arguably more attractive proposition (for example, ‘iPad for £26 per month’) and to increase aggression on paid activity.

“Review site TechRadar takes up significant online real estate, enjoying 7.87% of organic click share.”


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Figure 6: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Tablets & eReaders vertical 2012-13 % Split 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 7: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Tablets & eReaders vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 8: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Tablets & eReaders vertical 2012-13 % Split 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5

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UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Video Games & Consoles Search Impression Volume •

Whilst the video games market is firmly established, it is a market that experiences very pronounced and high-profile phases of development, fuelled predominantly by new console launches. During this survey period, new consoles were announced or launched by each of dominant developers; Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony. The significance of new products is demonstrated by the dominance of Nintendo, which features highly despite declining brand equity. This presence within search is attributed heavily to the launch of the Wii U console, which was the focus of significant attention in the media and online discussion on social platforms.

Similar patterns emerged following the announcement of the PlayStation 4 console, with Sony experiencing a significant spike in interest. However, what is clear is that in both instances, brands have struggled to retain those interest levels beyond the initial surge. Overtime, Nintendo in particular has seen a decline in interest since the launch of the Wii U console, with the brand experiencing a notable decline (Source Mintel, Video Games & Consoles, February 2013). Sony, on the other hand, has been able to sustain interest as coverage of its upcoming console launch continues. It is anticipated that in the next intelligence report, Nintendo will experience a notable decline in click-share whilst PlayStation is anticipated to see an increase.

Reflecting their announcement during the survey period, terms for Wii U and PlayStation 4 have a significant search impression volume, with 42.85% and 27.92% respectively. This clearly demonstrates the impact that anticipation for new upgrades and products can have on consumers in this vertical (see Appendix A2).

Nintendo appears to have adopted a successful brand protection strategy, dominating search rankings for its own brand terms; Wii U, Nintendo 3ds and Nintendo Wii.

Organic Click Share •

Review sites once again occupy significant real estate within this market with TechRadar, T3, Ign and Trusted (see Figure 9) reviews accounting for more than a quarter of the total click share. This can be attributed to significant levels of content being published by these platforms in response to forthcoming console launches, as well as consumer trust in such reviews. Additionally, a constant demand for game review content, particularly around prominent titles (such as the FIFA Football, Call of Duty and Grand Theft Auto franchises) continues to drive traffic for review sites.

Click and collect retailers feature highly with Game, Sainsbury’s and Argos ranking in the top ten. However, it is worth nothing that Game was the subject of significant media coverage during the survey period as a result of the retailer entering administration, which may have inflated its overall click share.

Paid Click Share •

Argos features highly in the paid click share behind Amazon, holding 60% of unit related terms (see Figure 10). It also manages to outrank Amazon for the term Wii U, a keyword that experienced an increase in August.

Although Nintendo and Amazon lead the aggregated stats, their position is being challenged by click and collect retailers such as Argos and Game, as well as review sites. (see Figure 11).

“Although Nintendo and Amazon lead the aggregated stats, their position is being challenged by click and collect retailers such as Argos and Game.”


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Figure 9: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Video Games & Consoles vertical 2012-13 % Split 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 10: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Video Games & Consoles vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 11: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Video Games & Consoles vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

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UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Mobile & Home Phones Search Impression Volume •

Mobile phone sales reached a plateau in 2009 after the market reached maturity with nine out of ten consumers owning a mobile phone handset (Source: OFCOM, Consumer Report 2011). The market has since been reinvigorated somewhat with the widespread adoption of smartphones. This has intensified competition with specialist retailers, network providers and review sites all competing for prime digital real estate within the vertical.

Once again, the consumer demand for advice and product comparison is evident with TechRadar, Trusted Reviews and PC Advisor combining to hold 28.85% of the organic click share. This consumer need is also reflected in the low click shares of those retailers that do not have a physical high street presence such as Amazon.

The most important terms are branded with iPhone and Samsung having a collective search impression volume over 90%(see Appendix A3). The top generic terms include mobile phones as well as cheap mobile phones. This is unsurprising given the fact that the mobile phones market, as discussed in the introduction, has reached saturation point. This has led competition to focus around prices from established brands and an emphasis on tariff-related offers such as cashback deals and free gifts (e.g. tablets and games consoles).

Organic Click Share •

Phones4u dominates the organic click share index holding 19.70%. This position is aided by the retailer ranking highly for 80% of unit keywords and being the top brand for the term cheap mobile phones. Their organic strategy is also aided by strong rankings for longer tail terms, including pay as you go phones (see Figure 12).

Phones4u has been successful in building a notable margin in this competitive sector over its competitors, with Apple and TechRadar holding very similar shares of the organic search traffic.

Paid Click Share •

The prominence of mobile phone networks is notable in the paid click share index, with T-Mobile, Three, Orange, EE (a brand that was officially launched in October 2012) and Virgin Mobile all highly active in paid search. By comparison, O2 is the only network that is capturing any notable organic click share. This is perhaps reflective of the fierce competition in organic click share not only from retailers but also from review sites, which will naturally attract quality links and social recommendation due to the nature of their content.

Whilst Phones4u retains a strong paid presence, other retailers appear to struggle to attract click share through paid search. Carphone Warehouse attracts 7.90%, marginally ahead of the comparison site BuyMobilePhones (see Figure 13). Apple only appears in 40% of unit terms, giving it only 6.06% of the paid click share index.

Phones4U lead the aggregated click share index with an impressive 20.17%. While they have a respectable second place in paid search their high overall click share of the organic index has allowed them to be a leading brand within the market. This is even more impressive considering the highly competitive nature of the mobile phone market and the types of brands that they are competing against i.e. Apple, O2 and Amazon (see Figure 14).

“With an aggregated click share of 20.17% Phones4u are the leading online brand for the mobile phones keyword market.”


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Figure 12: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Mobile & Home Phones vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 13: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Mobile & Home Phones vertical 2012-13

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UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Personal Audio Search Impression Volume •

The launch of the iPod represented a marked change in the adoption and use of personal audio devices with the Apple product establishing itself as the leading personal music player in the market. It is therefore unsurprising that Apple is extremely prominent in the market, taking more than a quarter (26.73%) of the organic click share and 23.59% of the organic click share (see Figure 15). However, the personal audio player has come under intense competition from the widespread adoption of smartphones as audio devices. As a result of this competition, there has been a notable shift towards high quality accessories, particularly headphones, to differentiate the market from smartphones. This is evident from the growth that accessories brands such as Bose and Beats by Dr Dre have seen, which are growing ahead of the overall sector (Source Google Trends and Mintel, Audio Equipment, September 2013).

A total of 80.14% of search impression volumes in this vertical are dominated by iPod-related terms, representing the strength of the Apple brand in this sector. In essence the term ‘iPod’ has become the synonym for ‘mp3 player’. These keyword volumes are led individually by the terms iPod and mp3 with 63.43% and 18.14% of keyword volumes respectively (see Appendix A4).

Organic Click Share •

The strength of the iPod brand, and the volume of iPod related searches in the sector, allows Apple to hold 26.73% click share in this market. On more generic terms, such as mp3 players, Apple does not rank as prominently (see Figure 15).

Amazon is the second more dominant brand with a 17% click share, whilst major retailers such as Tesco, Currys and PC World lead the competition for the remaining click share. While owned by a single operator both Currys and PC World have a separate online presence in which they capture 9.84% and 9.08% of the market respectively. However, as a combined entity this identifies them as a key player within the market putting them in second place ahead of Amazon (see Figure 15).

Paid Click Share •

Apple has a much smaller presence in the paid search index, indicative of the overall strength of its organic performance and the strength of its iPod brand. This allows Amazon to dominate the paid search market, with a 28.41% click share (see Figure 16).

Despite this, Apple still leads the aggregated click share, with both Apple and Amazon dominating the market. Combined, the two brands take almost half (45.81%) of the overall click share (see Figure 17).

John Lewis, alongside its successful strategy of in-store advice, are pursuing an aggressive PPC campaign with 15.13% of the paid click share index. It ranks for 80% of unit terms, coming second behind Amazon for the terms iPods.

Supermarket brands also feature very heavily within this index, with both ASDA and Tesco featuring in fifth and seventh positions respectively. This is underpinned by ASDA coming fourth for the keywords iPod and iPods.

“The strength of the iPod brand and the volume of iPod related searches allows Apple to hold 26.73% click share.”


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Figure 15: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Personal Audio Units vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 16: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Personal Audio Units vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 17: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Personal Audio Units vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

Source: Stickyeyes 2013

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22

UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Cameras & Camcorders Search Impression Volume •

The market for cameras and camcorders declined by 5.1% in 2012, with ownership of devices falling from 70% to 63% between 2012 and 2013 (Source: Mintel, Digital Cameras, April 2013). However, as mobile phones have captured an increasing share of the market for low cost ‘point and shoot’ cameras, there has been a marked shift in the market for higher quality and higher specification products. This has provided an opportunity for traditional retailers to capture a significant proportion of market share through the strength of their respective brands and the ability to provide in-store advice through the use of ‘click and collect’ services.

The desire amongst consumers for practical advice and product information is once again reflected by the prominence of review sites, with Trusted Reviews, Digital Camera World and TechRadar all featuring in the top ten for organic click share.

Unlike other areas of consumer electronics, no one brand dominates the sector. Manufacturers in particular have a low profile within the market and the vertical is dominated by generic keywords.

Keywords in this vertical are dominated by very generic phrases, such as camera, digital camera, cameras and digital cameras, which hold a combined 67.99% of search impression volumes. However, due to the competition from smartphones in the lower end of the market, keyword strings are diversifying into more specialist terms, such as SLR camera, waterproof camera, video camera, underwater camera and DSLR camera.

This semantic shift in the market appears to have opened the market up to specialist, high-end retailers. Park Cameras feature in the top ten for organic click share alongside review sites which are meeting a significant demand for specialist advice in this developing sector. Mainstream camera retailers such as Jessops also feature, although it should be noted that during the survey period, the Jessops brand received high-profile media coverage following the retailer’s decision to enter administration, which may have affected its search impression volume.

Organic Click Share •

Organic click share is led by Amazon (22.69%) although there is strong competition from Currys, Argos and Jessops, all of who are utilising ‘click and collect’ services to support consumers with in-store advice (see Figure 18).

Jessops and Park Cameras are the only specialist retailers in the organic click share top ten, although their presence is reflective of the demand for specialist, higher value technology. Sony, despite being a leading manufacturer, does not have a strong organic presence within the index. It does however appear for 75% of unit keywords and it ranks outside the top five for three keywords including digital camera, cameras and digital cameras.

Paid Click Share •

Following Amazon, John Lewis has a strong presence in the market through paid search, with a 15.73% click share. John Lewis is included in the aggregated click share index purely due to paid activity, as is Panasonic, ASDA and the price comparison site Pricerunner (see Figure 19).

Currys performs well in this vertical with a balanced, holistic approach based around both organic and PPC. This leads it to hold second place on the aggregated click share index with 17.38% of click share (see Figure 20).

“Unlike other areas of consumer electronics, no one brand dominates the sector. Manufacturers in particular have a low profile and the vertical is dominated by generic keywords.”


23

Figure 18: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Cameras & Camcorders vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 19: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Cameras & Camcorders vertical 2012-13 % Split 20 15 10 5

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Figure 20: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Cameras & Camcorders vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

Source: Stickyeyes 2013

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24

UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Laptops & PCs Search Impression Volume •

The home computing market is an area in which a large number of competitors have forced down product profit margins, particularly for the traditional retailers. Despite this, ‘bricks and mortar’ retailers such as PC World have retained a strong online presence, with a 26.01% organic click share.

This dominance can be attributed to consumer demands for both convenient delivery (in this case, through the use of click and collect services) as well as expert advice, particularly in a dynamic market with ‘big ticket’ products. In this market, we see that review sites have struggled to gain any significant level of click-share amid fierce competition from retailers. For online retailers to combat this, a greater emphasis needs to be placed on consumer advice and there is opportunity for retailers to capitalise on the absence of review sites and provide expert, detailed consumer advice that supports the customer journey.

The dominance that PC World has over the vertical is attributed to the fact that is has large brand visibility for 80% of unit keywords in this vertical. The unit keyword terms are dominated by computers and desktop pcs which hold 22.34% and 18.55% of unit search impression volume (see Appendix A6). The fact that personal computers are a high cost unit that has a long replacement cycle has resulted in high search volumes for terms such as refurbished laptops (15.69%).

Organic Click Share •

PC World dominates the organic click share, attracting more than a quarter (26.01%) of the market. This is followed by Amazon, which is in close competition with Dell (see Figure 21).

Laptops Direct (9.92%) is present for over 60% of our unit keywords and is the leading brand for the keyword refurbished laptops. Dell also ranks highly for the keyword refurbished laptops. Dabs’ position in the index is largely due to strong rankings for the terms computers and pc monitors.

Paid Click Share •

Dell’s approach to paid search appears to be much more aggressive than its organic approach, with the brand taking 18.07% of the paid click share. This activity makes it the second biggest brand in this sector by aggregated click share, ahead of PC World and Amazon. Brands such as John Lewis, DinoPC and Misco are also present in paid search (see Figure 22).

Brands such as Intel, a processor manufacturer, and more specialist retailers such as Misco and DinoPC have a presence. This suggests that paid activity within the sector is being targeted at much more targeted audiences, such as those looking for upgrades or for high-end systems.

The appearance of Microsoft in the top ten for paid search has been attributed to the launch of Windows 8, which launched in October 2012.

If we factor PC World click share with its online sister brand Currys this puts their combined aggregated click share at 31.25%, a massive 12.84% ahead of their nearest rival Dell (see Figure 23).

“PC World dominates the organic click share, attracting more than a quarter of the market. ”


25

Figure 21: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Laptops & PCs vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 22: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Laptops & PCs vertical 2012-13 % Split 20

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Figure 23: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Laptops & PCs vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

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26

UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Televisions / Digital TV •

As with other markets, we see a diverse range of operators in the sector, with organic listings featuring a mixture of retailers, review sites and manufacturers. This is again reflective of demands from consumers for quality advice and guidance in the purchasing process, with sites such as TechRadar, and Trusted Reviews able to take up prime real estate in the organic listings.

Click and collect retailers also appear prominently, reflecting consumer demand for convenient delivery and an opportunity to inspect the product prior to committing to purchase.

There is a notable absence of specialist retailers within the click share indexes within the sector, with the click share index for both paid and organic being dominated by mainstream retailers and manufacturers. This, combined with an apparent reduction in interest for terms relating to 3D television, suggests a reluctance from consumers to adopt this type of technology.

Search Impression Volume •

Currys, Argos and Tesco all manage to join a highly competitive top four for organic rankings. This is due to these brands being highly visible for the keywords blu ray player, 3d blu ray player, home cinema systems and portable DVD player.

It is clear that unit search volumes are based around the drive for new technologies by the consumer, with 3D TV, plasma and internet TV responsible for 26.33%, 21.42% and 20.95% of search impression volumes (see Appendix A7). These terms rank more highly than the term cheap televisions (11.34%) and screen size terms, such as 50 inch TV and 40 inch TV on 8.48% and 7.48% respectively.

Organic Click Share •

Currys leads the organic click share index, attracting one fifth of the market, with Sony and Argos competing for second place on 14.57% and 14.19% respectively.

Tesco ranks highly for the unit keywords cheap televisions and 50 inch tv. These have high search impression volumes and Tesco has consistently increased its ranking for 3d tv and accessory term hdmi cable over the last year.

Argos ranks third for the terms 40 inch tv and 50 inch tv and underpins this with increased rankings for a whole host of keywords.

Paid Click Share •

Currys and Argos manage to outrank specialists such as Finlux Direct, holding 20.58% and 14.95% of paid click share respectively (see Figure 25).

John Lewis (9.82%) ranks highly due to it being in the top five for the unit keywords 3d TV, 40 inch TV and 50 inch TV.

In the aggregated click share index it is Currys, Argos, Amazon and Sony that all lead with holistic strategies based around both organic and paid search (see Figure 26).

“In the aggregated click share index it is Currys, Argos, Amazon and Sony that all lead with holistic strategies based around both organic and paid search.”


27

Figure 24: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Televisions/Digital TV vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 25: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Televisions/Digital TV vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 26: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Televisions/Digital TV vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

Source: Stickyeyes 2013

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28

UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Keyword Market: Home Audio Search Impression Volume •

Home audio units have come under pressure from home computers and DVD players, leading to a marked decline in the market. The increased adoption of interactive (smart) TVs is only likely to exacerbate this overall trend in the future.

There is a move towards a ‘media hub’ model in many affluent households which is, in essence, reducing the number of devices required in typical households. As consumers move away from physical media to digital forms of content, the role of the typical ‘Hi-Fi’ system has evolved.

This dramatic shift in consumer behaviour is reflected in the online click share market, where there is a notable lack of major brands and instead, a greater prominence of more specialist brands, such as Richer Sounds, Sevenoaks, Superfi, HiFi Tower and Sonos, as well as review sites such as What HiFi.

When it comes to unit keyword terms, the vertical is dominated by hi fi, hi-fi systems and hi fi systems, which hold the top three with a combined 58.71% of search impression volume (see Appendix A8). These still manage to outrank terms like CD players and DAB radios, which manage to hold 16.47% and 9.52%.

Organic Click Share •

The presence of established review publications in this sector, such as What HiFi, suggests a well-informed audience of consumers looking for specialist equipment and this is reflected in the prominence of brands such as Richer Sounds, Superfi and HiFi Tower (see Figure 27).

Amazon does take a significant proportion of the organic click share (22.13%) and brands such as Currys and Argos are visible, but there is a clear presence of smaller, more specialist retailers which isn’t necessarily replicated in other sectors.

eBay ranks tenth with a small organic presence (3.21% of click share in the index), despite being present for 75% of unit keywords.

Paid Click Share •

The paid market provides additional opportunity for niche retailers in this sector, with Sevenoaks Sound and Vision, Stone Audio and Sonos taking a notable proportions of click share (see Figure 28).

Once again, Amazon is pursuing a very aggressive paid search campaign, with 27.75% of paid click share rate. This is underpinned by leading for all but one keyword in the paid ranking.

Debenhams is one of the department stores that is present for both paid and organic search in home audio, in which it has good visibility for terms like hi fi, DAB radios and hi fi systems (see Figure 29).

The presence of Pricerunner in the paid index again suggests an informed audience that is focused on sourcing particular models at the best possible price.

“The presence of Pricerunner in the paid index again suggests an informed audience that is focused on sourcing particular models at the best possible price.”


29

Figure 27: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Home Audio vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 28: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Home Audio vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5 o

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Figure 29: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Home Audio vertical 2012-13 % Split 35 30 25 20 15 10 5

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30

UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

DVD / Blu-ray / Home Cinema Search Impression Volume •

In contrast to the music market, the film industry has yet to offset losses though physical sales with a move towards downloads and streaming. This is in part because of the complications arising from a diverse market with various issues relating to digital rights management (DRM). Attempts to establish agreements between producers, manufacturers and providers on a common standard, as part of the Ultraviolet initiative, continues to be affected by disputes over copyright and revenue. (Source: cnet.com, Will Hollywood’s ‘ultraviolet’ plan replace the DVD?, 5 January 2011).

Unit terms in this sector are dominated by blu-ray terms, with blu-ray and blu ray player ranking highly. However, most searches in the DVD format are highly specialised, reflecting the fact that the market has reached saturation point and is in decline, following pressure from the blu-ray format and the growth of digital content distribution. These terms include portable DVD player (22.29%) and DVD recorder (19.77%) (see Appendix A9).

Organic Click Share •

Whilst Amazon once again dominates the sector (22.62% click share), there is a relatively competitive battle for click share behind the retailer, with Argos, Currys, Tesco and Richer Sounds all visible in the sector (See Figure 30).

The leading four brands in particular are highly visible to for the leading keywords blu ray player, 3d blu ray player, home cinema systems and portable DVD player.

Once again, there is a strong presence for review sites with the presence of What Hi-fi and TechRadar, indicative of the developing state of this market, through innovations such as 3D TV and digital streaming, and the desire from consumers for expert advice and product guidance.

Paid Click Share •

Once again, Amazon is pursuing a very aggressive paid search campaign, with more than a third of paid click share rate (see Figure 31). This, coupled with their organic rankings give them an unassailable lead in this market (See Figure 32).

Currys manages to rank second with 12.49% of paid click share to outrank fellow ‘click and collect’ brands such as Argos and John Lewis, which hold 12.37% and 5.83% respectively. This position is underscored by appearing in 90% of unit keywords and holding high rankings for terms such as home cinema systems and 3D blu ray player.

The presence of Pricerunner, a price comparison site, and eBay in the paid search index is perhaps indicative of the decline of the DVD market. As the consumer demand for DVD products continues to fall, it is highly likely that there will be a stronger focus on discount sites in the future.

“Amazon, Argos, Currys and Tesco dominate organic search terms within this category, managing to outrank both specialist and review sites such as Richer Sounds and TechRadar.”


31

Figure 30: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the DVD/Blu-ray/Home Cinema vertical 2012-13 % Split 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 31: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the DVD/Blu-ray/Home Cinema vertical 2012-13 % Split 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 eB uy er

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Figure 32: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the DVD/Blu-ray/Home Cinema vertical 2012-13 % Split 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 is Le w

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32

UK Search Volume & Click Share Analysis

Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories Search Impression Volume •

Sat Nav and GPS devices have been one of the success stories of recent years, with rising volumes and increased market penetration (see Appendix B7). There has also been a move to give consumers the incentive to move up the technology chain, with larger 3D screens and in-car movie streaming. An example of this is the ‘Give a Garmin’ campaign in the run-up to Christmas 2012, with radio ads, online and billboards (Source: Marketing Week, Customer journey starts in the great outdoors, 18 April 2012).

Despite this Garmin and TomTom, the lead manufacturing brands in this vertical, lose out to ‘click and collect’ retailers in this vertical, with Halfords, Argos and Tesco all leading both organic and paid click share. This is particularly important for critically important search terms such as sat nav, best sat nav and cheapest sat nav. Garmin only manages to lead for the term GPS.

The dominant unit terms in this vertical are sat nav and GPS. The generic nature of these keywords allows them to hold 37.51% and 20.44% of keyword volumes respectively (see Appendix A10). These terms are closely followed by ‘cheap’ unit terms such as cheapest sat nav (8.69%) and sat nav deals (5.71%). There is also a clear consumer demand for updated maps and software, with the term sat nav updates

Organic Click Share •

The organic market is incredibly competitive between the three dominant brands; Amazon, Halfords and Tesco. Halfords, as the market leader in automotive products, trails Amazon yet leads Tesco, which has 16.99% of the click share index (see Figure 33).

Halfords, as the market specialist, is in a strong position to support its sales in-store advice and it would appear that once again, there is a clear demand for this from consumers, evidenced by the presence of TechRadar and PC Advisor in the click share index.

Despite the consistent interest on Google for the terms sat nav and GPS (see Appendix B16), Garmin and TomTom only rank fourth and seventh in the click share index. Despite Garmin being the lead brand for the terms GPS, they do not rank for many long-tail keywords, suggesting a clear gap in their organic search strategy.

Paid Click Share •

Amazon and Halfords lead the paid market in this sector, with Amazon alone taking more than a quarter of the paid click share (see Figure 34). This holistic approach allows both brands to dominate the aggregate click share index, with Amazon holding 26.05% of the click share index and Halfords 20.33% (see Figure 35).

Halfords once again ranks highly due to it being the leading brand for the term sat nav and coming second behind Amazon for the terms best sat nav and cheapest sat nav.

Whilst specialists in this sector, such as SatnavEasy maintain a paid presence, neither Garmin nor TomTom are visible in the paid index. TomTom do not appear for any keywords in this sector whilst Garmin only appear for 30% of unit keywords.

“Halfords ranks second for the vertical based upon it being present for all unit keywords and being the leading brand for the term cheapest sat nav.”


33

Figure 33: Organic click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories vertical 2012-13 % Split 20

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Figure 34: Paid click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

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Figure 35: Aggregated click share index for the top 10 most visible brands in the Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories vertical 2012-13 % Split 30 25 20 15 10 5

Source: Stickyeyes 2013

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APPENDIX A Most Visible Keywords within Search Marketing


36

Appendix A

Appendix A: Search Impression and Click Share Methodology Search impression volume Search Engine Marketing (SEM) seeks to promote websites by increasing their visibility in Search Engine Result Pages (SERPs) through the use of paid placement (Pay Per Click) and unpaid placement (organic). Search impression represents the number of times a website page is displayed within the search results. It is only after the results are displayed that visitors are able to click on either a PPC advert or an organic link. Therefore “click share” represents the act of a visitor clicking on a PPC advert or an organic click and is calculated as follows: •

organic listings - the part of the pages listing results from a search engine query. These are displayed in a sequence according to relevance of the match between the keyword phrase typed into a search engine and a web page according to a ranking algorithm used by the search engine.

paid listings - a relevant advertisement (typically text-based) with a link to a destination page. This is displayed when the user of a search engine types in a specific phrase.

Measuring organic ranking and click share Organic click share is the number of clicks that an individual brand has achieved against a keyword as a measure of where they rank for that keyword. Average keyword ranking is achieved by tracking the hourly positions and fluctuations for each keyword vertical over a period of time. Combining click volume estimation and average rank, the data then trends organic click share by position and measures this against potential missed clicks or in other words missed market share.

Measuring PPC Share of Voice (SOV) and click share PPC click share is the number of clicks that an individual brand has achieved against a keyword as a percentage of their SOV. SOV is a measure of how often their PPC ads appear. SOV is calculated by measuring the following: 1.

average position.

2.

display frequency.

3.

search volume.


37

Appendix A: Reference and Sources

ONS Figures

IMG figures, Internetretailing.net, 5 August 2011

YouGov, Rise expected for devices bought through ‘click and collect, 14 June 2013

CBRE, The internet leviathan slows, May 2013

BBC, Argos sees successful transition to click-and-collect, 17 January 2013

FT, Shutl agrees nationwide deal with Argos, 18 December 2012

Tamebay.com, eBay Electronics Fees raised 60% in September

FT, John Lewis to expand click and collect, 22 February 2013

The Grocer, Tesco gives click and collect boost to third party sellers, 27 July 2013

Telegraph, Argos and Dixons lead fightback for the high street, 17 January 2013

Econsultancy, 40% of shoppers used reserve and collect over Christmas, 15, January 2013

Econsultancy, Why is multichannel customer service important? 15 September 2011

Marketing Week, Customer journey starts in the great outdoors, 18 April 2012

GFK, UK: wireless audio technologies aid market sales, 4 March 2013

cnet.com, Will Hollywood’s ‘ultraviolet’ plan replace the DVD?, 5 January 2011

Mintel, Digital Cameras, April 2013

Mintel, Desktop, Tablet and Laptop Computers, August 2012

Mintel, Video Games & Consoles, February 2013

Mintel, Audio Equipment, September 2013

Mintel, Televisions, September 2012

Kantar Media TGI (Target Group Index)

OFCOM, Consumer Report 2011


38

Appendix A

Appendix A 1: Search Impression Volume for the top 10 Tablets & eReaders terms Unit Keyword

% Split

ipad mini

22.56%

kindle

17.86%

ipad 4

16.42%

kindle fire

10.94%

ipad 3

9.78%

ipad 2

5.39%

kobo

5.36%

samsung galaxy note

4.89%

tablets

4.57%

mini ipad

2.22%

Appendix A 2: Search impression volume for the top 10 Video Games & Consoles terms Unit Keyword

% Split

wii u

42.85%

playstation 4

27.92%

nintendo 3ds

10.23%

playstation 3

10.00%

nintendo wii

4.97%

playstation vita

2.33%

play station 4

0.55%

nintendo wii console

0.50%

ps3 consoles

0.33%

xbox 360 with kinect

0.32%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool


39

Appendix A 3: Search impression volume for the top 10 Mobile & Home Phones terms Unit Keyword

% Split

iphone 5

51.36%

samsung galaxy s3

15.41%

samsung galaxy s4

10.31%

iphone 4s

8.42%

samsung galaxy s2

4.62%

mobile phones

3.77%

mobile phone deals

2.53%

iphone 5 deals

1.69%

phone

1.13%

cheap mobile phones

0.76%

Appendix A 4: Search impression volume for the top 10 Personal Audio Units terms Unit Keyword

% Split

ipod

63.43%

mp3

18.14%

ipod touch 5g

9.06%

ipods

5.42%

ipod touch 4g

2.23%

best mp3 player

0.53%

best mp3 players

0.49%

8gb mp3 player

0.33%

mp3 player reviews

0.23%

cheap mp3 players

0.15%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool


40

Appendix A

Appendix A 5: Search impression volume for the top 10 Cameras & Camcorders terms Unit Keyword

% Split

camera

28.99%

digital camera

17.54%

cameras

15.02%

digital cameras

6.44%

slr camera

6.22%

waterproof camera

5.97%

video camera

5.73%

camcorder

5.60%

underwater camera

4.57%

dslr camera

3.92%

Appendix A 6: Search impression volume for the top 10 Laptops & PCs terms Unit Keyword

% Split

computers

22.34%

desktop pc

18.55%

netbooks

16.90%

refurbished laptops

15.69%

desktop

13.34%

pc monitors

9.52%

refurbished pc

1.36%

refurbished desktop pc

1.05%

windows desktop

0.74%

convertible laptops

0.51%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool


41

Appendix A 7: Search impression volume for the top 10 Televisions / Digital TV terms Unit Keyword

% Split

3d tv

26.33%

plasma

21.42%

internet tv

20.95%

cheap televisions

11.34%

50 inch tv

8.48%

40 inch tv

7.48%

3d tv without glasses

3.64%

freest

0.34%

freeview

0.01%

digital set top boxes

0.01%

Appendix A 8: Search impression volume for the top 10 Home Audio terms Unit Keyword

% Split

hi fi

22.01%

hi-fi systems

19.12%

hi fi systems

17.58%

cd players

16.47%

dab radios

9.52%

clock radio

5.51%

digital voice recorder

5.02%

wireless speaker

3.40%

cassette players

1.00%

wireless hi-fi systems

0.36%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool


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Appendix A

Appendix A 9: Search impression volume for the top 10 Televisions / Digital TV terms Unit Keyword

% Split

blu-ray

28.11%

portable dvd player

22.29%

blu ray player

19.77%

dvd recorder

9.85%

home cinema systems

4.97%

3d blu ray player

4.01%

best blu ray player

3.22%

portable dvd players

3.10%

soundbars

2.57%

blu ray player software

2.12%

Appendix A 10: Search impression volume for the top 10 Sat Nav, GPS & Car Accessories terms Unit Keyword

% Split

sat nav

37.51%

gps

20.44%

cheapest sat nav

8.69%

gps tracker

6.76%

best sat nav

6.46%

gps reviews

6.00%

sat nav deals

5.71%

sat nav sale

4.18%

sat nav systems

3.10%

gps tracking

1.15%

Source: Google keyword estimation tool


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About Stickyeyes

About Stickyeyes Stickyeyes is an international digital marketing agency with a pedigree in search. Alongside the usual shopping list of services you’d expect - SEO, PPC, PR, content, design and development, insight, blogger engagement and social media - we continually invest in research, groundbreaking technologies and unique products - Roadmap, Market Defender, Reach. And we mix and match all or any of these to create the ROI our clients are looking for. But, don’t just take our word for it: •

Named by The Sunday Times as ‘one of the UK’s fastest growing technology, media and telecoms companies’.

We’re the first agency in Europe to be MMA-accredited (Mobile Marketing Association).

We were awarded a global Econsultancy Award for ‘Innovation in Online PR’ for the first ever Foursquare check-in at the North Pole.

Multi-award winners at the UK Search Awards.

Discover all our latest news and top up your knowledge with our latest intelligence reports at:

W : stickyeyes.com T : twitter.com/stickyeyes L : linkedin.com/company/stickyeyes

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Philip McGuin, Head of Insight and Market Research at Stickyeyes has 15 years’ experience in the areas of online marketing, performance based lead generation as well as, data analysis techniques including web metrics, portfolio score carding, attribution, econometrics and statistical modelling. He has worked both client and agency side for a range of sectors including public bodies such as European Parliament, European Commission promoting the EU’s policy on Information and Communication Technology (ICT ) as well as the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), marketing policy on e-Government. He also has extensive experience in the private sector as Head of Marketing for an enterprise software provider as well as the Head of Online Marketing for one of the UK’s first private online higher education training providers. Prior to his career in the private sector Philip worked as a doctoral research fellow in Economics, Politics, Public Policy and Administration. Michael Hewitt is the Content Marketing Manager at digital marketing agency Stickyeyes, responsible for the brand content strategy for the agency. Michael joined Stickyeyes in 2007 after previously working in digital journalism and media relations and has gone on to develop award winning content-led campaigns. Michael has developed content strategies across a wide range of sectors, including retail, personal finance, travel, gaming and legal, utilising both written and multimedia content.


Other reports in the market intelligence series

OTHER REPORTS IN THE MARKET INTELLIGENCE SERIES 1.

UK Online Gambling: This report analyses the search marketing and social media strategies of the leading gambling brands between the period January 2012 to December 2012. Also available for 2011.

2.

UK Legal Services: Online Personal Injury: This report analyses the search marketing and social media strategies of the leading Legal Services brands within online personal injury between the period March 2012 to March 2013. Also available for 2011

3.

UK Online Clothing Retail Womenswear: This report analyses the search marketing and social media strategies of the leading online womenswear clothing retailers between the period October 2011 to March 2012.

4.

UK Online Consumer Finance: This report analyses the search marketing and social media strategies of the leading online consumer finance brands between the period December 2011 to May 2012.

5.

UK Online Travel and Tourism: This report analyses the search marketing and social media strategies of the leading online travel and Tourism brands between the period December 2011 to May 2012.

6.

UK Beds and Mattresses: This report analyses the search marketing strategies of the leading bed and mattresses brands between the period January 2012 to December 2012.,

If you would like to request a copy of any of the above reports visit www.stickyeyes.com/contact

Want to know more? If you have any questions on the findings or would like to speak to one of the team about maximising the ROI of your search and social strategies please contact:

Glen Conybeare

Chief Commercial Officer 0113 391 2929 glen.conybeare@stickyeyes.com

DisclaimeR The information contained in this report is for reference purposes only. Although every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of data, the analysis is Stickyeyes own interpretation and the company cannot be held liable for any subsequent business decisions implemented. The content of this market intelligence report remains the copyright of Stickyeyes. Permission is given for the report to be circulated within your own business for information but its content should not be reproduced without prior agreement.

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46

Notes


Notes

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West One, Wellington Street, Leeds, United Kingdom LS1 1BA T +44 (0)113 391 2929 F +44 (0)113 391 2939 33 Glasshouse Street, London, United Kingdom W1B 5DG T +44 (0)20 300 86501 E hello@stickyeyes.com W www.stickyeyes.com @Stickyeyes linkedin.com/company/stickyeyes

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Stickyeyes UK Consumer Electronics Intelligence Report - Sept 2012-13