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Annual Report 2013

40 jaar ZOA | P.O. Box 4130 | 7320 AC Apeldoorn | The Netherlands T +31 (0)55 36 63 339 | E info@zoa.nl

WWW.ZOA-INTERNATIONAL.COM

40 years

Annual Report 2013

40 jaar 40 years


ABBREVIATIONS

Abbreviations (not exhaustive) ACCTS/AWT CBO CLTS DEL DRU FAL HAP PTA SME VFI VSLA WASH ZOA

Arab Center for Training and Consulting Services / Arab Woman Today Community Based Organisation Community Led Total Sanitation Draagt Elkanders Lasten Foundation, meaning Carry Each other’s Burden Disaster Response Unit Functional Adult Literacy Humanitarian Accountability Partnership Parent Teacher Association Small and Medium Enterprises Vereniging voor Fondsenwervende Instellingen, Branch Organisation for Fundraising Village Saving Loan Association Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Zuid Oost Azië, meaning Southeast Asia, the region where ZOA started working in 1973

The cover photo shows the rehabilitation of a water cistern at Bait Ja’il, a conflict-affected village in Arhab District, Sana’a Governorate, Yemen. This activity also engaged youth who were gaining work experience as part of the Youth Economic Empowerment Programme in collaboration with UNDP. Access to water is an integral part of helping these communities rebuild their livelihoods. ZOA is running an integrated programme to construct/ rehabilitate water sources as well as provide vocational training for unemployed youth and health awareness to communities through the work of female hygiene promoters.

Colophon

© 2014 ZOA P.O. Box 4130 7320 AC Apeldoorn The Netherlands T +31 (0)55 36 63 339 F +31 (0)55 36 68 799 E info@zoa.nl

Supervisory Board Dr. ir. H. Paul MPA, chairman J.W. Boogerd Drs. B. Brand MPA MCM Drs. J. Kamphorst MPA Mr. B.J. van Putten, LL.M Ing. K.A. de Vries MEd Drs. A.W. Westerveld, MPH Chief Executive Officer J. Mooij MBA ING account number (for transfers in The Netherlands): NL46 INGB 0000 0005 50 ZOA is registered with the Chamber of Commerce under number: 41009723

Text: Theanne Boer, Geke Kieft, Els Sytsma, with regards to Hetty Vonk Photography: Jonneke Oskam: p. 27, 40, 43 (l), 93 Studio J&J: p. 28 Liesbeth Verduijn: p. 36 Dolf Hoving: p. 8, 72 Carel Schutte: p. 5, 7 Private collections: p. 31, 32 Gerrit-Jan van Uffelen: p. 94-95 Grzegorz Litynski, p. 101, 119 Design: IDD concept.communicatie.creatie I www.idd.nu Printed by: drukkerij De Bunschoter The information in this report may be reproduced (exluding the photos), provided ZOA is notified and this Annual Report is acknowledged as the source, ZOA would like to receive a copy of the publication.


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CONTENTS

1.

Introduction

Afghanistan 37

5

Burundi 41

2.

Statement Supervisory Board

7

Democratic Republic of Congo 45 Ethiopia 49

3.

Who we are

Liberia 53

9

CDN Myanmar 57

4.

Executive’s Report

13

South Sudan 61 Sri Lanka 65

5.

Report from the Supervisory Board

Sudan 69 17

Thailand 73 Uganda 77

6.

Organisation

10. Disaster Response

21

Haiti 82

7.

Our Approach

25

Jordan 84 Pakistan 86

8.

Funding, Communication and Awareness Raising 29

Philippines 88 Yemen 90

11. Financial Report 9.

ZOA Worldwide

35

93

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CHAPTER 1

1. Introduction During one of my visits this past year I went to a small field office in Sri Lanka. I asked staff there: ‘What were you most touched by in the recent past?’ One woman, a social worker, told me a very special story, one that we listened to intently. The people of a village had told her about a family that was suffering neglect. The woman was no longer taking care of herself or her children. She wasn’t cleaning the house any more, not taking care of herself, not sending the children to school. The villagers were concerned but did not know what to do. It was difficult to make contact with the woman, but then the ZOA worker had an idea. “Could I brush your hair?’ she asked. And she was allowed to and while the woman was enjoying the attention, she started to speak. About how she missed her husband who she had lost during the war. She didn’t know where he was or whether he was even still alive, but it was very likely that he was dead. It caused her great sorrow and pain. Thanks to the contact that arose, she allowed herself to be helped. She received help that allowed her to pick up her life again, soap and clothing for her daily care. And also a small loan which allowed her to start a shop. She is doing well now and her children have returned to school.

“Could I brush your hair”, she asked.

The story touched me deeply, it brought tears to my eyes. This staff member gave so much time and energy to this one woman and thanks to a simple solution of brushing her hair, found a solution to her problems. Nothing complicated, no project proposals or programme targets. Ultimately it is all about helping this one woman, giving her a future. Stories like these are most gratifying. This past year has been extraordinarily good for ZOA. In various ways we were able to reflect on our fortieth anniversary, and we were able to help more people than ever before. During encounters with the founders of ZOA and former staff I was again impressed by the fact that our mission has remained unchanged over these forty years. Much has changed and ZOA has grown strongly. But our mandate remains unchanged: giving hope to people who suffer from violence and natural disasters. We can get on with our work in 2014, in continued good spirits, with the help of God, and thanks to you all.

Johan Mooij General director


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CHAPTER 2

2. Statement of the Supervisory Board In the past few years, ZOA has expanded its work to be able to provide more relief, hope and recovery. This growth has been combined with organisational changes that aim to further improve ZOA’s programme quality and ensure the effective and efficient use of resources. We have succeeded in realizing this challenge, as both internal and external evaluations show. And we have earned growing respect from the (international) community for the work of ZOA. The Supervisory Board wishes to express their gratitude to CEO Johan Mooij, and to all ZOA employees and volunteers worldwide for their excellent work and commitment throughout 2013. The many challenges they face, sometimes due to the (extremely) harsh and insecure environment in which they operate, and the excellent results obtained in 2013 have not gone unnoticed. The Supervisory Board would also like to thank ZOA’s local, national and international partners, the many donors, both institutional and private, that support the organisation, and especially the governments of the ZOA host countries that allow ZOA to continue the work. Finally, the Supervisory Board is grateful to the constituency for their continuous confidence in and support of ZOA. ZOA’s constituency is very important for the organisation and the expressions of support and appreciation for ZOA’s work received from this group, greatly stimulates ZOA to continue to bring relief, hope and recovery to those who need it most.

With gratitude we approved the Annual Report in a meeting on 22 April 2014. The audit processes were positive and did not reveal any major weaknesses in the organisation, the internal audit work and risk management system. We are convinced that the income was spent effectively and efficiently. In view of this, the Annual Report, including the financial statements, as prepared by the CEO, was approved as submitted. In 2013 ZOA celebrated its 40th anniversary. Several celebratory activities were organized throughout the year, to which current and former employees, volunteers, the constituency, partners and donors were invited. It is wonderful to recognize God’s blessings to ZOA throughout the years and to see that ZOA has truly earned a place in the hearts and minds of many people. We thank God for all of this and are grateful to be a part of this organisation. On behalf of the Supervisory Board, Harry Paul


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3. Who we are Our name ZOA was founded in 1973 in The Netherlands. The three letters ZOA are the abbreviation of the Dutch translation of South East Asia, the area where the organisation started its initial activities.

Our mission ZOA supports people who suffer due to armed conflict or natural disasters, by helping them rebuild their livelihoods. We call on our constituency and partners, in the North and in the South, to take responsibility and become involved. We provide maximum added value to those we support and those who support us. Our mission can be summarized in three words: Relief, Hope, Recovery. Relief We provide relief to people affected by conflict or natural disasters. Hope We contribute to a new perspective of hope in which people work together for a promising future in dignity and mutual trust. Recovery Together with the affected communities we work on recovery of their livelihoods.

Our vision In a world full of conflict, injustice, poverty, and disaster, we want to contribute to signs of hope and restoration. We see this coming about where people experience

peace, justice, and mutual trust once again, and where they regain personal dignity and confidence. ZOA acts and contributes from the biblical perspective of God’s Kingdom, which will bring reconciliation and restoration to its full potential. Meanwhile, God calls us to seek justice and be faithful to those who need our support.

Our key values Human dignity All people are different, but everyone is made in God’s image. We treat all people equally. We dedicate ourselves to promote respect, mutual understanding and cooperation. Faithfulness Faithfulness means providing support that our beneficiaries can count on, honouring our commitments and being dedicated and accountable to them. Faithfulness means that we remain involved in conflict affected communities until they are ready to walk on their own again. Stewardship Stewardship encompasses both people and their environment. We promote solutions that are sustainable for both the people and their habitat. At the same time we seek to be good stewards of the resources delegated to us by using resources effectively and efficiently. Justice ZOA stands up for vulnerable and marginalized people. Through our programmes we combat injustice in the South. In the North we promote awareness of injustice and we call on our constituency to do right.

Our sectors ZOA’s sectoral focus is on livelihoods and food security, WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) and basic education. In the context of conflict affected fragility, livelihoods comprise how people access and mobilise resources that enable them to pursue the goals necessary for their survival and longer-term well-being, thereby reducing the vulnerability that is created and exacerbated by conflict. Given our specific experience and expertise in realising household shelter solutions in emergency situations, ZOA also focuses on ‘shelter’ in its emergency programming.

Dimensions of change ZOA uses a framework comprising three dimensions of community level change, to enable us to stay focused on what our work is really about. These dimensions are: • Access to basic resources and services • Community governance and inclusion • Peace and stability

Our constituency ZOA could not exist without a committed constituency of more than 40,000 private donors, companies, Business Ambassadors, schools and churches.


RELIEF

HOPE

We provide RELIEF to people affected by conflict or natural disasters.

We contribute to a new perspective of HOPE in which people work together for a promising future in dignity and mutual trust.


RECOVERY Together with the affected communities, we work on the RECOVERY of their livelihoods.


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CHAPTER 4

4. Executive’s Report 2013 was a special year for ZOA. We looked back to the time ZOA was established in 1973, now forty years ago. We have been able to achieve much in those forty years, and our organisation has grown in many ways. Much has changed, but our vision and mission have remained the same. For forty years now we have been supporting those who suffer from the consequences of armed conflict or natural disasters. We offer aid, give hope and work on reconstruction in areas where refugees and displaced persons live temporarily or where they return to their homeland. This clear mandate and defined target group stands firm and connects all ZOA staff worldwide.

40 years ZOA anniversary Evidence of these ties and loyalty were clearly visible during the various anniversary gatherings held this past year. With staff, former staff, donors and partners, here in The Netherlands, but also from the countries in which we work. In January we met with the founders of ZOA and their spouses, on the spot where it all began, in Groningen. It was there that the first copy of the commemorative anniversary book was presented. A symposium, organised together with fellow organisation Woord and Daad took place in June. Woord and Daad was also founded in 1973, as was our colleague organisation Tear. Topics of discussion during the symposium included the changes in humanitarian aid, in society and notably in the constituencies. Besides a staff-family day there was also a big reunion for former staff. Software company AFAS made its theatre and other facilities available to us for that

occasion. Many former staff members attended and their involvement with ZOA continues to be undiminished. Many recall their time at ZOA with great pleasure. We ended the jubilee year with a concert for all of our volunteers, held in the Eben HaĂŤzer Church in Apeldoorn, with thanks to God and thanks to all those who generously give of their time for the work of ZOA.

Growth 2013 was an especially good year for ZOA. The programmes flourished, we are carrying out more projects and have spent more funds than the year before, allowing us to help more people than ever. But there was also growth in terms of quality and organisational development.

Reorganisation Internal organisational changes were implemented as of 1 January, so to optimize support to the country programmes from The Netherlands, and to work on improvement of capacity within the country offices. The objective is to execute better programmes even better. Country support teams have been discontinued. Support from Apeldoorn is now given by sector specialists in three areas: water and sanitation, livelihoods (including food security) and primary education. This has resulted in an integral approach to programme areas, allowing us to have greater insight into all aspects that affect the wellbeing of our target group. Inclusion of these aspects in the programme plans has benefitted the quality of our work.

The new Audit and Evaluation department also monitors the programme areas, giving us an integral overview, both in terms of content and finances. The audit specialists support the country directors in carrying out analyses and in formulating clear points for improvement. Although the changes are only recent, the conclusion that can be drawn after this first year are positive. Our programmes worldwide have become more multi-facetted and more complete as a result of the development of this integral approach in each area. One of the positive effects is that it has become easier to find financing, both in numbers of donors and in longer lasting project periods. Apart from immediate emergency aid we no longer conduct short-term projects. It is our intention to have a presence in programme areas for longer periods of time. The importance of a sound internal organisation will lead to effective methods for the realisation of our objectives. It is beneficial to reexamine the internal organisation from time to time and make improvements. Much energy was devoted to this project in 2013, notably at ZOA-Netherlands. Where the reorganisation had consequences for personnel it is self-evident that this required much time and care. The risk that we were too focused internally at ZOA-Netherlands and not enough on the needs of those who suffer from violence or disaster, was real. In 2014 we can leave all this behind us and from a functional new structure direct our efforts primarily at support of the country offices in the execution of our programmes.


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Security In keeping with our mandate we work in fragile and often insecure situations. And yet we always succeed in finding committed people who want to do this work and support those who are faced with these insecure situations in their daily lives. As an organisation it is our utmost responsibility to protect our staff. Our security officer visits the ZOA teams to provide security training and give briefings, to review local security plans, to maintain day-to-day contact with staff in risk areas and to support staff in case of security incidents. The responsibility for the security of staff is certainly a limiting factor for the humanitarian sector, meaning we sometimes cannot start working in areas where needs are high. Inherent to being a humanitarian organisation is being aware of the immense needs and feeling the passion to support those who are most vulnerable. We are confronted by daily dilemmas in which we try to operate with wisdom. A Crisis Management Team was set up in 2013. Procedures have been established and members of the teams have had intensive training.

Partnerships

Executive’s Report

This consortium executed programmes in the Uruzgan province for four years. It ceased to function in 2013. The joint programmes worked well, each participant brought in own expertise and that proved to work very efficiently. With financing from AusAID we are able to continue our activities directed at water, sanitary facilities and peacebuilding in the region, at least for the time being. Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation: CARE Netherlands, Save the Children Netherlands, HealthNet TPO and ZOA. This consortium has been working in six African countries since 2011: Uganda, DR Congo, South Sudan, Sudan, Burundi and Liberia. Cooperation is especially successful there where organisations work in the same regions. It allows us to plan and discuss activities with the population. It was especially beneficial for the target group: they have one contact point and that is greatly appreciated. The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs is financing this programme until 2015. Dutch Emergency Relief Cluster of Christian NGOs: Woord en Daad, Red een Kind, Dorcas, Tear and ZOA. These five organisations have some overlap in terms of constituents. For a number of years now we have done joint fundraising when disaster strikes. This year we implemented relief activities to Syrian refugees in Jordan, together with Dorcas. After the typhoon Yolanda all members were involved in relief activities on the Philippines.

In 2013 ZOA worked together with many NGOs, at various levels, local, national and international. Increasingly we work in consortia, which brings various advantages. Knowledge and experience is shared, we supplement each other in the execution of programmes and jointly lobby for support for rehabilitation in fragile states from both politicians and the Dutch public.

Emergency Aid: Jordan and the Philippines

The three major consortia in 2013 were: Dutch Consortium Uruzgan: HealthNet TPO, Cordaid, Dutch Committee for Afghanistan, Save the Children Netherlands and ZOA.

In the first months of the year we joined forces with the emergency relief campaign of Dorcus for Syrian refugees in Jordan. We started fundraising among our own constituents and so could contribute to the distribution of emergency relief packages in the city of Mafraq. At

the same time we sought contact with possible local partners in order to start an own relief programme. This has led to cooperation with Arab Woman Today and the start of an emergency relief programme in Irbid The civil war in Syria and the needs of refugees is not foremost in the perception of most Dutch people. So, in June 2013, we invited six prominent Dutch Christian women to visit our relief programme in Jordan, with the aim of generating awareness and knowledge about the situation in their own network - politics, the church and the media, via the radio, newspapers and magazines, online and offline. In a very personal manner this led to a great deal of publicity about the problems facing Syrian refugees. After the typhoon that hit the Philippines in November 2013, all five of the organisations of the Dutch Emergency Relief Cluster of Christian NGOs worked together in their fundraising efforts for the first time. The response from the Dutch constituency was impressive. What was also special is that we did not only work together in The Netherlands, but also in the disaster area. A delegation of members of the organisations travelled from The Netherlands to the Philippines to assess the situation and visit possible partners, after which we arrived at an integral plan of approach for the area.

Thailand In 2008 ZOA decided to phase out of Thailand after handing the programme over to (local) partners. The process has for the most part now been completed and we can rest assured that we can leave matters in safe hands. The decision to leave Thailand is related to the choice to concentrate our efforts on refugees and displaced persons in fragile states.


CHAPTER 4

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Executive’s Report

Fundraising

Reporting

Satisfied staff

In terms of fundraising our income grew again this year, after seeing a drop in 2012. Institutional donors have become more demanding where project proposals are concerned. A proposal must meet high standards and that involves a great deal of work. But from experience we know that a good project proposal also leads to better quality of our work. Fortunately our project proposals usually pass the test, something for which we are grateful. The willingness to donate on the part of our private constituents has changed: they are giving in a more targeted manner, for a certain country or project, and less periodically.

In the coming year we will devote attention to our reports from the programme areas. The content must be improved, allowing us to share information with our constituents even better. Thanks to our new Audit and Evaluation Department more information is being measured and analyzed. That provides a wealth of data. The translation of these reports to our constituents must be improved in 2014.

A study among staff in 2012 showed that people like working for ZOA. In connection with two points for improvement from the study we were able to take important steps forward in 2013.

Communication An external marketing and communications agency specialised in non-profit organisations conducted a study on our behalf in order to make us more aware of and let us utilize opportunities directed at approaching our private constituents. An important conclusion from this study was that our communication about the needs of our target group is too laid back. We mainly gave information about what we do, why we do it and how we do it, while the actual urgency and the great suffering was almost missing in texts and images. On the one hand that was a conscious choice, in keeping with our key values of ‘human dignity’, not to portray our target group as ‘miserable’, but rather choosing for pictures of strong people who are taking on the task of rehabilitation and have something to show for it. The result is that the urgency is not explicit in our message. The dilemma is clear. In 2014 we will consider how the recommendations of the agency can be fitted into our communications.

Learning organisation Effective delivery of ZOA’s objectives is contingent upon our staff having the right skills and experience in the short, medium, and long term. As labour markets get ever tighter, well targeted and focused opportunities for staff learning and development therefore not only ensure high quality programme delivery today, but are a key strand in ZOA’s strategy to ensure continued development and desired impact going forward. To invest in the capacity development of ZOA’s international management members a two weeks training was held in The Netherlands. Furthermore, a Finance and HR training was organised in The Netherlands. In addition to ZOA’s trainee programme high potential trainees are offered a position as junior management members at the country level. A tailor made training programme enables them to grow towards full management level in two years’ time. This programme for competent young humanitarian professionals has proven to be very successful for ZOA as a pool of highskilled and well-trained staff. Good quality professional development opportunities linked to career planning has also proven to be a value element of the development opportunities ZOA is offering.

First of all, the office space was too small for the large number of staff. We have moved to larger premises close to our old office in Apeldoorn. A great improvement, allowing all staff to do their work with the necessary peace and quiet. We can now also devote more attention to sustainability and fairtrade (see chapter 6). Secondly, an organisation development programme was started up in the Fundraising, Communication and Awareness Raising department. The need was felt to denote various responsibilities more clearly. Changes have been introduced: three unit managers have been appointed, responsible for fundraising in The Netherlands and from institutional donors respectively and for matters of content and practical support of the organisation. An extensive evaluation will follow in 2014 (see chapter 8).

2014 In its 41st year ZOA will again do its utmost to provide relief, hope and recovery to refugees and displaced persons. Again in 2014 they will be there and they are entitled to our attention and care. We hope to be able to continue our work in the countries where ZOA can bring its expertise and experience and make an actual difference in the lives of many. A programme will be started up in 2014 in one of the countries where ZOA provides emergency relief. We will also initiate a study in a country where we do not have a presence as yet, to investigate whether there are possibilities to start up a new programme.


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CHAPTER 5

5. Report from the Supervisory Board The Supervisory Board is responsible for the supervision of the policies and plans of ZOA and for monitoring the identity of the organisation. In that sense, the Supervisory Board advises and assists the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) in finding the right course of action for the organisation in line with ZOA’s statutory obligations. The members of the Supervisory Board contribute their expertise from various fields to the best interest of the organisation. Besides their supervisory duty, the members also have more formal responsibilities such as appointing and assessing the CEO and approving the budget and annual report. Moreover, the Supervisory Board represents the constituency of ZOA and represents the society within the organisation. The CEO on the other hand is responsible for the executive decisions and daily management of the organisation. Through this separation of powers, ZOA meets the Dutch governance guidelines for charitable organisations as established in the Wijffels Code (Code Wijffels) which indicates the correct relationship between ‘management’ and ‘supervision’.

Members of the Supervisory Board The members of the Supervisory Board serve a term of five years and are eligible for reappointment once. They are selected based on the criteria mentioned in the general and specific profile of the Supervisory Board. In 2013, the Supervisory Board of ZOA consisted of seven members.

Mr. H. Paul MPA, chairman – Head of Agency, Netherlands Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority Mr. J.W. Boogerd, member – Retired banker Mr. B. Brand MPA MCM, member – Town clerk / general director of the municipality of Oldebroek Mr. J. Kamphorst MPA, member – Interim-manager and management consultant Mr. B.J. van Putten LL.M, member – Retired mayor Mr. K.A. de Vries MEd, member – Geography teacher at Prins Maurits Christian Highschool in Middelharnis Mrs. A.W. Westerveld MPH, member – Physician in preventive healthcare at Provincial Health Care Fryslân Remuneration committee: Mr. H. Paul (chair) and mrs. A.W Westerveld. Audit committee: Mr. J. Kamphorst (chair), mr. J.W. Boogerd and mr. B. Brand. At www.zoa-international.com the period of service is indicated for each of the members, as well as the additional offices that the members hold. The members of the Supervisory Board do not receive financial compensation for their work. They can claim the expenses incurred during the course of their duties as Supervisory Board members. In that case the same rules apply to their claims as those that apply to the claims of ZOA employees.

The Supervisory Board has two committees; the Remuneration Committee and the Audit Committee. The Remuneration Committee, which is formed by two members of the Supervisory Board, including the chairman, represents the Supervisory Board in matters relating to the appointment of the CEO and arranges the terms of employment. Moreover, the Committee assesses the functioning of the CEO and, based on that, determines his salary at the beginning of each year. At the beginning of the year, after an assessment interview and upon recommendation of the Remuneration Committee, the Supervisory Board determined the salary and additional benefits of the CEO. In doing so, the Supervisory Board adheres to the VFI’s Advisory Scheme for the Remuneration of Management of Charitable Organisations (Adviesregeling Beloning Directeuren van Goede Doelen) and the Wijffels Code (see www.vfi.nl). The Supervisory Board also concluded that the additional offices held by the CEO are compatible with his work as CEO of ZOA. Moreover, the additional offices of the CEO are considered of great value for ZOA, because of the possibilities it provides for the organisation. The Audit Committee is made up by three members of the Supervisory Board, and focuses on strengthening the internal audit function of the organisation. In 2013 the Committee came together three times and discussed the


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CHAPTER 5

following subjects: • The annual report (at this meeting the external auditor was present) • The reports of the internal auditor • The internal audit plan • The year budget • The quarterly reports

The Supervisory Board in 2013 In 2013 the Supervisory Board met five times, each time with the CEO present. Besides the regular subjects on the agenda, such as the approval of the annual accounts of 2012, the budget and annual plan for 2014, the salary and assessment of the CEO, the risk analysis and risk control and the meetings with the Works Council (twice) and the Management Team (twice), there were also some specific subjects the Supervisory Board looked at during 2013. One of these was the issue of ‘professionalization’ of the Supervisory Board. This process was initiated in 2012, as a direct consequence of the increasing scope of ZOA, and further developed in 2013. During a retreat at the beginning of the year, the Supervisory Board discussed issues such as its size, competences, frequency of meetings, and especially the role and tasks of the members as supervisors of a fast growing organisation in a complex (inter)national environment. These challenging circumstances demand a higher quality of supervision. Based on the reflections done during that day, and the subsequent individual meetings of the chairman with the members, a number of changes were introduced. These will be executed in 2014 and include among others: - reduce the number of members of the Supervisory Board, from seven to five members; - invest more time and energy in common vision and opinion development;

Report from the Supervisory Board

- reflect further on the role of the members of the Supervisory Board as representatives of ZOA’s constituency; - complement the profile of the Supervisory Board with specialized knowledge / experience from the international arena. Besides this, the Supervisory Board also looked into the issues of the housing of the ZOA Netherlands office, as well as the continuous organisational developments. With regard to this first topic, the Supervisory Board approved the acquisition of the new office for ZOA Netherlands, based on the needs to move to a bigger building in order to comply with national employment legislation and respond to the needs expressed by the staff. On the issue of organisational development, initiated to further improve ZOA’s programme quality, effective and efficient, the Supervisory Board was informed on a regular basis by the CEO, to ensure their close involvement. The Supervisory Board fully endorses this strategic development and the choices being made. During 2013, some members of the Supervisory Board had the opportunity to meet with the International Management Team during the Interregional Meetings that took place in March and October. These meetings provided for excellent opportunities to get more information from the field and increase their knowledge about the many opportunities and challenges that they face. In addition, three members of the Supervisory Board visited ZOA countries. The chairman brought a visit to ZOA Ethiopia, while two other members went to visit ZOA in South Sudan. This gave them the opportunity to see for themselves how ZOA really makes a difference for the people that we serve.


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20

Organisation chart Supervisory Board

CEO

Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation

Management Support

Human Resources

Audit and Evaluation

Funding, Awareness Raising and Communication

Programmes

Disaster Response Unit

Institutional Donors

Fundraising and Awareness Raising

Finance

Finance and IT

Support

Finance Support

Programme Countries

Ha誰ti

Pakistan

Yemen

Jordan

Philippines

Afghanistan

Burundi

DR Congo

Ethiopia

Liberia

Sri Lanka

Sudan

South Sudan

Thailand

Uganda

Myanmar


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CHAPTER 6

6. Organisation Organisational structure See figure on page 20. The country organisations have their own Country Management Teams and operate largely independently, enabling them to accommodate local developments. The International Management Team meets half-yearly at the Interregional Meeting. The meeting is instrumental in sharing best practices and policy development. ZOA-Netherlands supports the country organisations with policy cohesion and continuity, quality control, exchange of knowledge, financial management, fundraising, communication and staff recruitment. In 2013 the role of the Programme Department has been redefined as a staff role. The support team structure ceased to exist. As a result line duties and support duties have been better separated. The Programme Department provides support to ZOA country programmes both ondemand and on its own initiative. The types of support given are both programmatic - such as programme area development - and sectoral – such as support on Agricultural issues or Peacebuilding issues. Staff In 2013 an average of 73 people worked at ZOANetherlands (approx. 60 fte). The male-female ratio is 53/47. There were 22 expats (trainee and junior staff excluded) working in sixteen ZOA countries in 2013. With trainees and junior staff included, 34 expats were working with ZOA during at least part of 2013. ZOA-staff totaled 1,024 on 31 December 2013, with local staff accounting for the majority of this group.

Volunteers Volunteers add considerable value to the organisation and their contribution is very much appreciated. Thirteen volunteers worked at the office of ZOA-Netherlands. Four volunteers were involved in translating English reports into Dutch for our donors, and a few dozen volunteers were involved in the Walk4Water event. Seven accountants from an accounting company in our constituency were available for unpaid internal audits in the programme countries. In The Netherlands, 579 local volunteers (11 more than in 2012, and 23 more than in 2011) organized a door-to-door collection in their communities. It is a time-consuming job to organize, and we are grateful for the commitment of those involved. All together they motivated 16,755 people nation-wide to go door-to-door. The huge numbers of people involved and the financial result makes the doorto-door collection a valuable campaign. However, the number of collectors dropped by 1.1% compared to 2012. It requires more and more effort to attract and retain volunteers for this kind of voluntary commitment.

Statement of accountability ZOA subscribes to the following principles: • Within the organisation, supervision (adopting or approving plans and carefully reviewing the organisation and its results) is kept separate from governance i.e. execution. • The organisation continuously strives to allocate resources optimally so to enable ZOA to operate effectively and systematically in achieving its objectives. This is set forth in our quality and control model.

• The organisation aims to optimize relations with stakeholders. ZOA focuses on information provision to gather and register wishes, questions and complaints. Both in the Netherlands and in the areas where ZOA operates, the entire organisation is in constant contact with stakeholders to make ZOA’s work possible. The detailed statement of accountability can be found in full on our website www.zoa.nl (in Dutch).

Quality standards and codes ZOA has committed itself to the following external codes of conduct and standards: • Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and NGOs in Disaster Relief • People in Aid Code of Best Practice in the Management and Support of Aid Personnel • The Good Governance Code for Charities (Wijffels code) • The VFI fundraising code of conduct • 2010 Humanitarian Accountability Partnership (HAP) Standard on Accountability and Quality Management. ZOA’s quality management is certified according to the ISO 9001:2008 standard. In 2013 an external follow-up audit was conducted by KIWA, which resulted in positive conclusions about ZOA’s management system. ZOA possesses the hallmark of the Central Bureau of Fundraising (CBF).

Partnerships and networks We cooperate with other NGO’s wherever possible, and we do so increasingly, soliciting for funds, raising awareness among the public, sharing knowledge and experience on implementation and security, lobbying


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among policymakers and supplementing each other in the implementation of programmes.

A learning organisation Much attention was devoted to the development of auditing within the new Audit and Evaluation department. The auditing of programmes in our work areas and the processes at ZOA-Netherlands are imbedded in a learning and improvement cycle. From our own audit functionality we can get a clearer image of our own activities. That does not only concern meeting financial and other requirements which, among other, are required by donors. It is also about planning and demonstrable realization of output and of contributions to the outcome. The latter means not only looking at schools we have built, for example, but also at our contribution to the improvement of the education system and the percentage of children that actually receive a diploma. It allows us to analyze the relatively weak points within the organisation more closely and understand how these can be improved. This makes an appeal to our capacity of being critical and learning, and so it should.

Organisation

Environmental responsibility ZOA aims to provide sustainable staff accommodations. The move to new office premises was reason to actively examine the sustainable of our premises and the use of the building. Energy-savings were realized by installing led lighting and sensors throughout the new building. The climate control system was optimized and many plants were placed throughout to cleanse the air. A great many fair trade and organic products were already being bought in 2013; our goal is to expand on that in 2014. All stationery materials are bought bearing the FSC mark. Our cleaners have agreed to use only biologically degradable cleaning products. In the framework of socially responsible enterprise ZOA uses local services and suppliers where possible. Where possible refuse is separated for recycling, so to reduce the waste flow. A clean desk policy has also been introduced, information is saved digitally where possible and printing is reduced to the bare minimum. Energy supplies are green and the costs are watched closely in terms of benefits. In 2014 we will investigate the option of solar panels.

It has become evident that countries want to have interim audits and controls, allowing them to take timely measures. In view of this requirement we have started integral audits, whereby aspects in the area of programme management, human resources and security are combined with the financial aspects. Together with the country directors we annually also examine whether goals are being met and what the primary risks are that stand in the way of realization. Are we doing our utmost in order to achieve the required results? And does that fit the general vision of ZOA? This reinforcement of the audit function also helps to monitor that ZOA is continuing to meet ever stricter donor requirements.

CO2-compensation Since 2010 the air miles of ZOA staff are compensated for in our own reforestation project in Ethiopia. Trees have been planted on the grounds of a former refugee camp where ZOA was active in providing aid to Sudanese refugees during the civil war. This has resulted in cooperation with the local authorities to start up a tree nursery, while also training the forest rangers. They ensure that a reforested area of some 600 hectares of saplings is protected against illegal logging. The woods are thus maintained, thereby ensuring employment and promoting better climate conditions in the area.

Integral auditing will be further expanded in 2014 and the findings of 2013 will be followed up.

The Works Council represents ZOA staff members with a Dutch employment contract and stands up for their inte-

The Works Council

rests. The Works Council regards members of the management teams in the programme countries as constituents as well, regardless of whether they hold Dutch or local employment contracts. The Works Council as a representative of ZOA staff is involved in several organisational and policy developments within ZOA. The Works Council has a diverse range of rights. It has the right to be informed about issues concerning the organisation, such as financial policy. It has the right to approve or disapprove measures concerning staff policy. In other aspects it has an advisory role. The Works Council consists of five members. Three work at ZOA-Netherlands, two work abroad (Sri Lanka and DR Congo). One of the members stepped down in 2013. A new Works Council member was appointed, after elections. In 2013 the Works Council was involved with organisational developments at ZOA - Netherlands. Those concerned the Country Support Teams and the structure of the Fundraising, Awareness Raising and Communication Department (FoVo). The reduction in income in 2012 was also a point of attention because it also meant that a vacancy stop was imposed from 2013. This resulted in increased work pressure for some ZOA staff and meant that various spending cuts had to be made in the course of the year. The Works Council was closely involved and had an advisory role to management in these issues. The acquisition of larger office premises in Apeldoorn last year was a happy occasion. The Works Council played an advisory role in the purchase and furnishing of the new building. In 2013 the Works Council was also involved in looking at the internal complaints procedure and the appointment of a trusted counselor, as well as new pension provisions and revision of the General Conditions for Employment.


CHAPTER 6

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Organisation

ZOA Networks and Partnerships

International Management Team per 31 December 2013 The International Management Team consists of the management team of ZOANetherlands, combined with all Country Directors. They meet twice a year, during the Interregional Meetings in March and October.

National networks

In February 2014 Ingeborg Ponne took over office from Maureen Graybill in Ethiopia.

• ZOA is member of People In Aid - an international, not-for-profit membership organisation.

• Member of Prisma – Association for Dutch Christian NGO’s involved in the flied of development assistance and international diaconate.

• ZOA is member of Humanitarian Accountability Partnership

• Member of VFI – Branch Association for Dutch charity organisations

Dutch Partnerships

• Member of steering committee of the Dutch Security Network – network of 34 Dutch NGO’s with a focus on security.

Management ZOA – Netherlands • Johan Mooij, Chief Executive Officer • Arco van Wessel, Director of Programmes • Dirk Koelewijn, Director of Finance • Leo den Besten, Director of Audit and Evaluation • Ewout Suithoff, Director of Funding and Communication • Wil Omlo, Director of Human Resources Country Directors • Joop Teeuwen, Afghanistan • Geoff Andrews, Burundi • Jan Huls, DR Congo • Maureen Graybill, Ethiopia • Tsjeard Bouta, Liberia • Kevin Beattie, CDN-Myanmar • Bart Dorsman, South Sudan • Guido de Vries, Sri Lanka • Tim Rae, Sudan • Duangporn Saussay, Thailand • Gerard Hooiveld, Uganda

• Member of Partos – Association for Dutch NGO’s working in international development.

• Member of Agri-ProFocus (APF), a partnership of Dutch organisations and companies that promotes farmer entrepreneurship in developing countries. • ZOA participates in the Platform Humanitarian Action – Netherlands (PHA-NL), a platform of Dutch NGO’s active in emergency relief. European networks

• ZOA is the lead agency of DCR - Dutch Consortium of Rehabilitation, consisting of ZOA, Save the Children Netherlands, CARE Nederland and HealthNet TPO, funded by the Dutch government, implementing programmes in six African countries for the period 2011 – 2015. • Together with Red een Kind, ZOA forms CDN – Consortium of Dutch NGO’s, working in Myanmar.

• Member of EU-CORD – a platform of 22 European Christian relief and development agencies.

• ZOA cooperates with Red een Kind, Dorcas, Woord & Daad and Tear, in a Dutch Emergency Relief Cluster of Christian NGO’s.

• Member of VOICE - Voluntary Organisations in Cooperation in Emergencies, a network representing 83 NGO’s from 18 European countries, active in humanitarian aid worldwide. International networks

• ZOA organises with Woord and Daad the “Be Fair” campaign, an awareness raising campaign at high schools on sustainability.

• Member of ICVA – International Council of Voluntary Agencies. A global network of NGOs that advocates for effective and principled humanitarian action in coordination with UN agencies (UNHCR, UNOCHA, IASC).

• ZOA is a member of the steering committee with Aqua for All, AKVO, Simavi and Amref Flying Doctors, for organizing ‘walk for water’, a fundraising and awareness raising event in Dutch primary schools once a year.

• ZOA has a special Consultative Status with ECOSOC - Economic Social Council of the UN. • ZOA is an Observing Member of ALNAP – Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action.

• Participating in IS-Academy on Human Security in Fragile States - a collaborative research project between Disaster Studies at the Wageningen University, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the five Dutch NGO’s Cordaid, ICCO, Netherlands Red Cross, Oxfam Novib and ZOA.

Partnerships (international)

• ZOA has Memorandums of Understanding with World Renew (Canada / USA), Medair (Switzerland), Stromme Foundation (Norway) and CASA (India).


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CHAPTER 7

7. Our Approach Fragile environments

Three dimensions of social change

ZOA works in countries known as fragile states, where society has been disrupted by conflict, violence and natural disasters.

To programme, monitor and evaluate change at community level ZOA uses a three-dimensional change framework. The three dimensions enable us to remain focussed on what our work is all about.

Factors that determine whether to start working in a country are: • Conflict and instability as well as the lack of capability in communities and on the part of authorities in dealing with local conflicts constructively. • Lack of access to basic resources and services, particularly among poor and vulnerable groups. • The level of support that the local authorities or organisations are able to provide for the population. • The number of persons affected.

Programmatic approach We implement our programmes using a programmatic approach. Without aiming to be exhaustive, the following characteristics of the programmatic approach can be mentioned: • Focus on a specific geographical area, and awareness of its specific context • Ownership and community participation including accountability to beneficiaries • Shared vision between ZOA, beneficiary groups, partner organisations and other stakeholders on desired changes • Focus on outcome defined as change at community and beneficiary level • Added value of collaboration with other actors • Building local capacities and resilience for future risks.

Access to basic resources and services Households should have sufficient access to food, water, education, health care, shelter and clothing. The realizable quantity and quality of these resources may vary between programme areas. They are nonetheless based on national and international standards, although the specific context of each programme area is taken into account. Under this dimension, there are four aspects that deserve specific attention: food production and income, basic services, public information, and resilience to external shocks and adaptation to long term changes. Community governance and inclusion This dimension examines social organisation at a community level. Without community level organisation, social cohesion and the active inclusion of the most vulnerable and otherwise excluded people in community-based organisations, improvements in livelihoods are unlikely to reach the entire community. Three aspects are of particular interest here: organisation, inclusion and networking with external actors. Peace and stability Apart from the larger (political) conflicts that affect many of the communities that ZOA works with, conflictinduced social disintegration and scarcity of resources like land and water can lead to a host of local conflicts

that, in turn, can seriously undermine people’s opportunities to rebuild their lives and livelihoods. This third dimension examines these local conflicts and focuses on two complementary aspects: conflict management and peaceful coexistence. ZOA considers contributing to peace a crucial strategy for strengthening livelihood opportunities among people living in situations where conflict is closely linked to livelihood restrictions.

Core sectors Within the larger framework of our programmatic approach, we have developed some specific fields of sectoral expertise and experience. Livelihoods and food security ZOA’s main contribution to community level change is in the field of livelihoods and food security. In the context of conflict affected fragility, livelihoods comprise how people access and mobilise resources that enable them to pursue the goals necessary for their survival and longer-term well-being, thereby reducing the vulnerability that is created and exacerbated by conflict. ZOA’s focus on livelihoods and food security covers three main clusters of activities: - Agriculture production support - Income support - Market support We are aware that our contribution to private sector development is modest, because processes of economic development require ongoing involvement in long term development programmes. Nonetheless, we believe that we can make an essential contribution to the engagement of households and community organisations in


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CHAPTER 7

economic processes, and help them shift their mindsets from daily survival to economic recovery. Basic education ZOA believes that education is crucial for the promotion of independence, hope and long term improvement of livelihoods. Our overall vision for education, therefore, is that all school-age children within a community receive education. In order to achieve this, communities should have access to sufficient and sustainable resources for education, and they should actively participate in the planning and monitoring of education services. Moreover, local government agencies often need support in order to be able to take responsibility for education. ZOA’s main focus in education is on basic education, both formal and informal, which includes primary education, lower secondary education, and functional adult literacy. Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) ZOA strives to promote equitable access to safe drinking water and sanitation , and the practice of hygiene within communities, at a level that is conducive to living healthy lives. ZOA’s focus in this respect is on safe and basic water, sanitation, and hygiene. This includes the construction or repair of water points and latrines, and the formation and training of WASH-related communitybased organisations (CBOs) to manage and maintain common facilities and promote and monitor their equitable access and use. Hygiene awareness training is also included. Sector choices in relief ZOA’s sectoral focus on livelihoods and food security, education, and water and sanitation applies to both rehabilitation and emergency programming. Given our specific experience and expertise in realizing household shelter solutions in emergency situations, ZOA also focuses on shelter in its emergency programming.

Our Approach

Gender equality Communities in fragile settings are confronted with a variety of common social issues and problems that go beyond sector-specific areas of attention. With respect to these so-called cross-cutting issues ZOA pays specific attention to gender equality in its programmes.

Environment Many of the target group’s problems arise from being extremely vulnerable to forces of nature. Drought, floods and scarcity can cause upheaval. That is why we contribute to averting the exhaustion of soil and depletion of wells by protecting the natural environment and by diversifying sources of income.

Multi-stakeholder approach ZOA applies a multi-stakeholder approach: ZOA formulates programme objectives together with all of the stakeholders. In each situation ZOA determines how best to work towards these objectives and complement what is already there. ZOA works with local authorities, with local organisations, companies or groups of farmers, while in other situations it works primarily with its own staff. Local presence with own staff generates a major advantage in the development of knowledge about, and sensitivity to the local context and the dynamics between all actors present. A local presence also provides us with the flexibility to launch and implement programmes in areas where no suitable partner organisation is present.

Beneficiary Accountability The HAP (Humanitarian Accountability Partnership) Standard is an international quality standard in the humanitarian sector to which ZOA has committed itself. The standard is translated into concrete criteria which are utilized to test own quality. HAP is primarily about reinforcement of the position of those they want to help.

The key word is: accountability. That means: The right to have a say (for our beneficiaries) and a duty (for us) to respond. It concerns questions such as: How closely are we listening to our target group, how are we informing them about who we are, what are we doing and how we can help them? How are we involving them in designing our programmes and are we building on the capabilities of the people themselves? Are we open, as an organisation, for feedback so that our programmes are better attuned and lead to better results? To answer these questions an investigation is carried out per country, whereby communities, local partners and own staff are involved. The investigations lead to an analysis and the formulation of action points per country. To date five countries have been involved in the execution of action points, four countries are half way through the investigation process, and three countries are starting a self assessment in 2014. Work shops have been given in Sri Lanka, Ethiopia, DR Congo, Yemen, Jordan and Uganda to make staff and partners aware of our commitment to accountability and to train in attitudes befitting that commitment. This is how we can ensure that the voice of the people we want to help are heard and that our contribution is attuned to their voice and their capabilities.


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8. Funding, Communication and Awareness Raising ZOA is funded by more than 40,000 private donors in the Netherlands, by institutional donors, partner organisations and external fundraising organisations (third party activities). Within the group of private donors we distinguish individual donors, business ambassadors, major donors, companies, funds, churches and schools. Account managers maintain contact with these various groups to raise funds and then communicate the results of projects to which they have contributed. Fundraising usually also has a strong awareness-raising component. Among our institutional donors we find the Dutch government, the European Commission including ECHO, the Australian government through AusAID, the US government with USAID, as well as multilateral agencies like UNHCR, UNICEF, WFP and WorldBank. ZOA is thankful to maintain good relationships with partners that organise external fundraising campaigns for ZOA-projects, among them Draagt Elkanders Lasten (Carry Each Other’s Burdens), EO-Metterdaad and Happy Gift.

Developments within the Fundraising and Communication department For the Fundraising and Communication department 2013 was a year of reflection. Parties from outside were

invited to look over our shoulder, both at the internal organisation and our communication and fundraising. In 2014 we will be translating the recommendations into practice, so that changes will become visible in our communications to constituents. The objective is growth of our private income, and a stronger bond with our constituents. To this end we will continue work on existing successful concepts, such as the annual door-todoor collection that is done by thousands of volunteers, and the ZOA Business Ambassadors concept.

Campaigns The Fairplee campaign, aimed at the lack of and awareness raising about sanitary facilities world-wide, has been stopped. The campaign was good in terms of

content, but proved to generate insufficient funding. The annual spice nuts campaign was again hugely successful. ZOA will continue and expand it in the year ahead. Walking for Water for elementary schools was another successful campaign. It is an excellent combination of raising awareness and generating funds. Our own annual Walk4Water event offers a great opportunity for meeting constituents and shared experiences. It has become a recognized event among our constituents. Besides the major Radio Kootwijk event, two local events in Bunschoten and Middelharnis also proved successful. This regional approach will be rolled out further.

3.6% 5.2% Expenses ZOA in 2013

91.2%

Spent on objectives 91.2% Fundraising costs 5.2% Costs of management and administration 3.6%


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Funding, Communication and Awareness Raising

well under way by the end of the year. The effect of this emergency relief campaign on general income is clearly visible from the tables on page 111.

1.4%

Fundraising in The Netherlands

1.7% Income ZOA in 2013 24.8% 72.1%

Wees Eerlijk (Be Fair) is a campaign that aims to raise awareness among young people. Through workshops, role play, films and lesson materials pupils are challenged to become aware of the problems of development countries. They also can discover the value of a sustainable lifestyle in terms of energy consumption and spending habits. Wees Eerlijk is subsidized by the Dutch government, however, funding is soon to end. ZOA will continue the campaign in 2014 because we recognize the value of promoting awareness among young people. We intend to review our strategy regarding raising awareness and make choices regarding projects, target groups and budget. In the past year ZOA also participated in the Micah Sunday, a national campaign of Micah Netherlands. On October 20 many churches and communities devoted attention to poverty and injustice world-wide. The biblical call to care for those in need is clearly manifest and ZOA is eager to join forces with colleague organisations in The Netherlands for this worthy cause.

Fundraising for emergency campaigns Two emergency relief campaigns were started in 2013.

Income own fundraising activities 24.8% Income from third party campaigns 1.7% Project Grants 72.1% Others 1.4%

In January a campaign for relief to refugees from the civil war in Syria got under way. That war and the plight of the refugees is far removed from the reality of most Dutch people. So, in June 2013, we invited six prominent Dutch women to visit our aid programme in Jordan, thereby aiming to raise awareness and knowledge about the situation Syrian refugee women are facing. The participants shared their experiences with their own networks - politics, church and media - on the radio, in newspapers and magazines, online and offline. Much publicity was generated about the problems facing the Syrian refugees, and from very close up and personal encounters. The results of this awareness raising trip was very worthwhile in our view. The emergency relief campaign for the victims of the typhoon in the Philippines received a totally different response. The Dutch people donated spontaneously and in large numbers and much money was collected in a very short space of time. In terms of both fundraising and programming ZOA worked together with four other organisations from the Christian emergency relief group. Our constituents donated generously. After a joint assessment in the disaster area the relief effort was

An external marketing and communications agency implemented a commercial audit aimed at keeping our private income up to par and once again realizing growth. The campaigns and other forms of communication were examined and their revenues analyzed. The Dutch private donors were also considered and a comparison was made with a number of fellow organisations. The study showed that the corporate ZOA campaign is strong in terms of content. The motto – Relief, Hope, Recovery – expresses very clearly what ZOA endeavours to achieve. However, the recommendation was that in order to grow the revenues communication about ZOA’s target group and work should come across with greater urgency, be more relevant and appeal more to the generosity of donors. In the course of 2014 these aspects will be included in a fundraising campaign for the coming years. At the end of the year we released a corporate film via our own channels as also through commercial online and offline advertising. The film was made in Cambodia where we rounded off our programmes in 2012. The film shows how we were able to work on the rehabilitation of a devastated country and it asks for support so that we can continue this work in other stricken areas. The response to the campaign was positive and resulted in generous gifts of approximately 25% more than estimated.

Fundraising from Institutional Donors Thanks to carefully calculated proposals and well completed project plans, more and larger contracts than ever could be signed. New connections were made with institutional donors such as TEAR Australia and the


CHAPTER 8

Dutch embassies of Burundi and Ethiopia. The number of donors is growing, meaning that we are able to stay in places longer and able to achieve more in a larger geographical area. Donors are clearly setting higher requirements for project proposals. ZOA sees this as an opportunity to improve its own quality and expertise. Partners are eager to work with us because we are specialized in working in fragile states and because our community change method works well. We are very grateful for these good results.

Funding, Communication and Awareness Raising

In close cooperation with the ChristenUnie political party, we did our utmost this year to get the plight of Syrian refugees in Jordan on the agenda. We also made concrete project proposals. In part this resulted in 50 million extra funding (not only via ZOA) for this vulnerable group of people in the region.

Communication: our constituents Using detailed mail request registration, we serve our constituents with information according to their wishes.

31

The ZOA magazine is issued three times a year to our individual donors. Circulation is approximately 40,000 copies. The Dutch ZOA-website is meant to provide background information on our programme countries, our organisation, campaigns and activities for and by the constituency. The international ZOA-website is meant to serve mainly institutional donors, governments, partner organisations and candidates for vacancies with


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Funding, Communication and Awareness Raising

information about our organisation, our programmes, sectors and track record. The ZOA-Facebook page is used to create a sense of commitment and community. With regular updates, photos, personal stories from our programme countries, and from fundraising activities, the community has grown by 62%: from 1,448 to 2,352 friends. We still see potential in expanding this medium and using it to strengthen the ties with our constituency. The use of ZOA’s Twitter is limited, usually for formal announcements such as vacancies, invitations for meetings or hyperlinks to interesting articles. Still, the number of followers is growing, with 1,906 followers compared to 1,367 in 2012.

48.5%

On a few occasions in 2013 we experimented with using film material as a supplement or even in the place of written reports to donors. We plan to continue these efforts, but due to technical glitches here and there film material will not replace written reports for the time being.

Communication: media Despite the choice for a reactive approach to the media, we see that both Christian and secular media know where to find us when there is a crisis situation in one of our programme countries, as in Yemen in August and in South Sudan in December.

Income designation in 2013 Income with designation 48.5% Income without specific designation 51.5%

51.5%

Communication: reporting The commitment of our constituency is precious to us and something we want to nurture. Through reports from the field we are able to inform them directly about our target groups and results. We strive to provide information tailored to the donors, media and other interested parties. That means we must have an even clearer picture of our constituents and the varieties of information they require. Extra attention will be given to this issue in 2014.

33

Much attention was devoted to our 40th anniversary, notably in the Christian press. We also joined in with colleague organisations Tear and Woord en Daad who also celebrated 40th anniversaries in 2013. The Women for Syria trip in June received much publicity in various media.

Communication: Complaints management ZOA has a formal procedure for dealing with complaints from Dutch constituents. In general, ZOA will respond by telephone. Explanation of a situation and swift resolution of the problem usually proves to be satisfactory. In 2013 we received a total of 77 complaints. That number was down significantly in categories such as the spice nuts campaign, the door-to-door collection, telemarketing and direct debits. Only the number of complaints about mail delivery remained the same: 10 both in 2012 and 2013. We will devote extra attention to the management of our address files in the year ahead.

Volunteers In the course of the year a number of talented volunteers

offered their services to ZOA. With their know-how and skills they can mean a great deal to our organisation. They will become active in areas of education, the organisation of events, the translation of reports and administrative work at the office. These people also form a link to their own networks. ZOA plans to actively recruit more volunteers in the future from among its constituents, practically giving us a connection to them and offering them the opportunity to contribute to our work.


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9. ZOA Worldwide AFGHANISTAN

JORDAN SUDAN

HAITI LIBERIA

SOUTH SUDAN DR CONGO

MYANMAR PAKISTAN

YEMEN ETHIOPIA BURUNDI

PHILIPPINES

THAILAND SRI LANKA


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CHAPTER 9

Afghanistan


CHAPTER 9

37

Afghanistan

Afghanistan Supporting victims of war, drought and floods towards better livelihoods ZOA has been active in Afghanistan since 2000. The many returnees are straining the resilience of the already impoverished population. In our programmes in the North (Saripul and Jawzjan Provinces), the South (Uruzgan Province) and in Kabul Province, we focus on WASH-activities, livelihoods and occasionally emergency relief. We also pay a great deal of attention to capacity building of local NGOs and local governance structures at village level.

ZOA Afghanistan in 2013 After a few years of relative stability, Afghanistan has had to deal with deteriorating security in anticipation of the major events due in the upcoming year 2014, when presidential elections will take place and the international military forces will withdraw. Many people from rural areas continue to become displaced, looking for safety and jobs near the cities. Unemployment, especially among the youth, is a huge problem (as 60 percent of the population is under 25). This also influences the overall security situation because joining the Taliban groups could seem an attractive alternative to unemployed youth. Afghanistan had reasonable harvests this year and no major natural disasters like droughts and floods. ZOA was able to implement its programmes as planned. Our intensive cooperation with local communities resulted in very good relationships at local level, which in turn is instrumental in precarious security situations. The four-year programme with the Dutch Consortium for Uruzgan, financed by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign

Affairs, has finished, with positive results. The people in Uruzgan, including the local government, proved to be very eager to work with and learn from us. Good hygiene practices are visibly being applied. Our female staff from Kabul succeeded in working with female beneficiaries, even better so than expected. Drinking water facilities and irrigation systems have been restored. We implemented peaceful conflict resolution programmes in dozens of villages, and in the course of this year we were approached by other village leaders who requested us to implement these programmes in their village too. It is a hopeful sign; the people in Uruzgan are tired of conflicts and are looking for a way ahead. We were able to continue our programme this year in Uruzgan with funding from AusAID, focusing on WASHactivities. In North Afghanistan we started a ‘water for peace’programme, also financed by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. It is very interesting to work with the combination of local committees and engineers, mapping the social and technical problems that are associated with water scarcity. Farmers upstream are starting to realize that their use of water influences the availability of water downstream and impacts the social relations between their communities. We are looking forward to continuing this programme in the coming year. The programme in Deh Sabz district, Kabul Province, is really exciting. We started the programme with a whole new team and they are doing an excellent job. Through implementing CLTS (Community Led Total Situation) and hygiene training we have achieved very visible

results: much less human excrements in the public areas and children are now wearing slippers to prevent foot infections.

“It is not a drop in the ocean” Joop Teeuwen, Country Director ZOA Afghanistan: “Yes, sometimes it is hard to work in Afghanistan, but the Afghan people keep me going. They are so friendly, well humoured, and motivated to move forward. That makes it a joy and very inspiring to work with them. The positive results make me happy, even if you could argue it is just a drop in the ocean. It is not: look at local level, at personal level. I see the improved health of young children, I see the crops in the field, I work with motivated local committees, wanting to improve their communities – and I am proud and happy that I can be part of it, together with the ZOA team!”


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Afghanistan

ZOA Afghanistan Worked in:

Southern Programme: Uruzgan province | Northern Programme: Jawzjan and Saripul provinces | Central Programme: Deh Sabz district in Kabul province

Focused on:

WASH | Food security / Livelihoods | Special attention to community governance by capacity building for Community Development Committees and local government and establishing peace and water committees.

Results included the following:

Northern Programme: At output level a total of 433 CDCs’ subproject proposals were submitted in 2013 and 80 projects were completed | 2 Food for Work-projects with 100,080 beneficiaries working for 2 months | 94 wells rehabilitated and 8 new wells constructed, giving 2,700 families access to clean water | 26 water committees established (14 male, 12 female) | 32 peace shuras established (18 male, 14 female) Central Programme: Through improved irrigation water losses decrease and supply to grapevines has increased with 50% | Intensive hygiene training through CLTS: first 82%, now 7% of households did not put their garbage in a separate place | latrine usage rose from 72% to 97% | 93%, up from 21%, of the people know how to make water safe for drinking Southern Programme: 101 wells with handpumps constructed, water committees established. At the end of the year all wells and committees were functioning | 101 communities were trained on peace building and conflict resolution

Worked with:

The local departments of the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL) in all four provinces. In Central and South ZOA also deals with the Provincial Governor. In the North, Sanayee Development Organisation (SDO, a local NGO) is implementing the peace building component of Water for Peace. ZOA’s South Region staff works with one local NGO: ARPD. For reporting purposes ZOA reports to the Afghan Ministry of Finance, the Ministry of Economy and the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development.

Staff 31 December 2013:

233

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | WorldBank | WFP | AusAID | USAID | ZOA Netherlands (emergency funds, Third Parties: Happy Gift and Aqua for All)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 3,561,685

Budget 2014:

€ 4,465,970


CHAPTER 9

39

Afghanistan

In Gorgal, Uruzgan, fifteen families now have an income from this former barren ground. “We had a good life.” My name is Abdulla Hedayat* and I live in Deh Sabz district. We are originally from Jalalabad, and we had a good life there. But we lived as refugees in Pakistan for many years. That was a hard life. Recently, my family and I returned. We are living in this tent, because we don´t have the means to build a proper shelter. In this area our main problem is safe drinking water, but because of ZOA we have two wells now in this village. The other problem here is unemployment. We need jobs. Then we can earn some money, on the one hand for our daily cost of living and also on the other so we can build our village and our country. * pseudonym

Barren ground became fertile area The villagers in Gorgal, Uruzgan, were so enthousiastic about the plan to build a dam in a nearby river, that they provided a lot of the materials, labour and half of the costs. After the construction of the dam, 30 hectares that had been barren for decades now can be worked on because of the dam and the irrigation system. Fifteen families are working on the once again fertile fields and have an income from selling their produce. Local farmer Haji Mohammed Naim: “It has given our village so much more than we ever thought it would!”


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Burundi


CHAPTER 9

41

Burundi

Burundi Increasing production and promoting peace ZOA has been involved in Burundi since 2010, supporting repatriates in Makamba returning from Tanzania. The programme has largely been funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, so a challenge for 2014 is to diversify the donor portfolio.

ZOA Burundi in 2013 ZOA Burundi welcomed a new Country Director in 2013, and opened a second programme area in Cibitoke, along the Congolese border. We implement our programmes through local partners. For the first time, the major expenses went through these partners. We organized a ZOA-Burundi conference in August, with 26 participants, including leaders from each of the four partner organisations. Makamba programme We successfully consolidated the DCR-programme, funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The programme, that runs to 2015, is based on the combination of sharing the land between repatriates and the host population and on increasing land productivity. So far 1,500 farmers have participated in the programme, and they were able to realize harvests up to 600 percent higher than before. However, these farmers continue to be dependent on rain-fed agriculture, which makes them vulnerable. In response to an analysis on profitability and in discussion with farmers, ZOA now supports banana production in place of maize, a change that also contributes to reduction of erosion. We also started a new three year land registration project. The project supports a national programme to give land owners a legal ownership certificate. Land conflict is a major problem in this densely populated country, so

this project is expected to reduce conflict and encourage farmers to invest more in their land. We are thankful for the strong commitment of ZOA Business Ambassadors, who funded a Functional Adult Literacy project, complementary to the DCR-programme. 163 smallhold farmers were taught basic mathematical skills so to improve the management of their farms and households. The conclusion of an independent internal review showed the project to have been highly successful. A new project started in the same four villages trains trainers who in turn will train 240 smallhold farmers in basic mathematics. The Dutch farmers’ cooperative Agrifirm enabled a seed multiplication centre to produce seed potatoes, wheat, beans and peas, including a demonstration of good practice, use of fertilisers and planting distances. Two local farmers’ cooperatives took over the management of the centre. Cibitoke programme We work across the Burundi/DR Congo border together with ZOA DR Congo, because of the potential for increased cross border economic activity and to build trust between communities. To improve peace and social cohesion, we focus on unemployed youths, ex-combatants and marginalised women. We aim to increase their income through agricultural productivity and commercial activities. We also organized workshops with the leaders of the youth wings of the Burundian political parties in the area. These leaders participated in the peace committees which were trained in all of the villages where the project operates, so to enable communities to resolve their many conflicts.

Lasting positive impact Geoff Andrews, Country Director ZOA Burundi: “Burundi is a country with major concerns. 58% of the children under 5 years suffer from chronic malnutrition, almost 30% suffer from irreversible stunting which affects both physical and intellectual development. The population density is very high. This is a potential source of new violent conflicts as people compete for land and water. These circumstances motivate me deeply to be involved in food security and peace building in this beautiful country. It pleases me to see the lasting positive impact on the lives of ZOA’s beneficiaries: after our support ended they continue to follow the practices we taught them, and their neighbours have adopted the new techniques too. So even with limited resources, the positive effect on these vulnerable families continues to spread.”


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CHAPTER 9

Burundi

ZOA Burundi Worked in:

Makamba Province and Cibitoke Province

Focused on:

Food security I With special attention to peace building, community cohesion and inclusion

Results include the following:

Makamba 1,299 new farmers were supported, bringing the total to 1,454 I overall production of a variety of crops increased by 360% from an average of 47 kg per month to 216 kg per month I 506 households received certificates from CNTB to show that they have resolved their land disputes I a seed centre is supported I 8 barns were built and handed over, at the end of 2013 over 100 ton of food was stored in the barns I management committees being established and trained to manage the barns Cibitoke 3,500 farmers received 1,000 cassava cuttings each I fertiliser, manure and certified maize seed distributed to 1,000 farmers I 175 people have been trained as social mobilizers I 28 Income Generating Associations have been formed I 56 groups for vocational training I 600 illiterate people participate in classes in 18 locations I film on tolerance and inclusion shown in 6 villages I 24 km of track for use by cattle herder identified to prevent cattle damaging crops

Worked with:

National NGO’s: MiPAREC, Réseau Burundi 2000+, Consedi, Prefed I Commission National des Terres et Autres Biens (CNTB) I District and provincial government authorities I DCR partners I Agrifirm

Staff 31 December 2013:

21

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs I Royal Netherlands Embassy Burundi I ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, Agrifirm, private donors)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 1,377,750

Budget in 2014:

€ 2,392,600


CHAPTER 9

Burundi

43

Sophie: “Thanks, ZOA! I will definitely continue with what I learned!”

The skills to manage Part of the test at the end of the basic mathematical skills training to manage farms and households: 370 + 1834 = 1834 – 374 = 75 x 16 = How many grams of beans does a person need per day to eat? Give the distance for beans between the lines and between the seeds in the lines when planting beans. As a professional farmer: when will you sell your beans of agricultural season B? Give the differences between a professional farmer and an ordinary farmer. Give the quantity of fertilizer that you put in every pocket for beans and Irish potatoes? What is the importance for a farmer to learn the units of measure of length, weight, volume and surface? What crops might be interesting for you to bring to the market for the season A?

We shared the plot Sophie Simiremena (51) is a married woman with eight children. In 1973 her family received a plot from the government. Sophie: “I always knew the owner would return from Tanzania. When he did, in 2009, we received him well and shared the plot.” Sophie is enthusiastic about ZOA’s agricultural programme. “ The harvest was about seven times more than I had ever seen, even though the plot is smaller. It is more labour-intensive, with weeding and sowing in lines, but with this result that is already forgotten!” After harvest Sophie does not sell immediately, but she stores her surplus in the communal barn built by ZOA. Post-harvest loss because of rot or infestation is limited and she sells her produce for a better price. “Thanks ZOA, I will definitely continue with what I learned in the programme!”


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CHAPTER 9

Democratic Republic of Congo


CHAPTER 9

45

Democratic Republic of Congo

Democratic Republic of Congo Rebuilding livelihoods in fragile peace ZOA has been working in the Democratic Republic of Congo since 2008, supporting returnees, IDPs and the host population in improving livelihoods in South (Fizi District) and North Kivu (Lubero District). In 2013 we started a programme in Uvira District, close to Burundi. The basis for food and income for many households is very weak, due to lack of means and lost skills following displacement. Continuously promoting community governance, peace and stability in these fragmented communities is a challenging but essential part of ZOA’s programme. The strong involvement of the Business Ambassadors’ team is enabling us to implement pilot projects and have access to bigger funds through successful implementation.

ZOA DR Congo in 2013 There was violence around Goma again this year. The existence of various armed groups continues to impact the daily concerns of the Congolese people. ZOA was, however, able to continue to support them. Thousands of families in Fizi and Lubero improved their livelihood this year through our agricultural interventions; tools, training and seeds, fishing materials, goats, support for small businesses and the set-up of village saving systems. Communities owned the development processes through Village Development Committees, Project Management Committees and Peace Committees, that were democratically elected and received training on management skills, planning and implementation. A recovery programme has started in 16 villages in Uvira District, while ZOA Burundi works with villages across the

border. Due to ethnic tensions, meetings with Burundi staff had to be postponed. However, the programme started well, supporting 3359 small farmers households. Two hundred Village Savings Groups started, half of which consist of marginalized women and unemployed youth, preparing to generate income through small businesses. 532 children of marginalized women were supported with school materials and school fee contributions. Working with people who experienced decades of conflict and displacement is certainly challenging, but we experience that learning by doing in groups is a successful approach. We see their self-confidence grow; they begin to realize they do not need professors or expatriates, but that they themselves have access to most relevant local knowledge. The Village Saving Loans Associations have proved to be very successful, especially due to our combination with agricultural extension and agricultural inputs. New initiatives have started and dependency on external sources is diminishing. These group processes are also essential for creating mutual trust. Local partners In line with our strategic choices, we are implementing our programmes through local partners – 15 NGOs in 2013. This has significant advantages. Working with partners contributes to the local capacity which is so much needed for the recovery of Congolese society. They are also able to work in areas that are inaccessible for foreign NGOs. In this way we can reach people who would otherwise lack any assistance. We were pleased with how our partners continued implementation even during short periods of evacuation of ZOA staff.

Strong and capable Congolese! Jan Huls, Country Director ZOA DR Congo: “Congo is a country blessed with huge natural resources, fertile climatological conditions and many well-educated and experienced people who are willing to work for their people and their country. I am amazed and impressed by the endurance of so many Congolese, and their attitude not to throw in the towel, but to get to work and invest in the future. It is such a joy to work on capacity building with them, because whatever happens and wherever they will have to go, this will stay with them forever. Strong and capable people will be less hard hit by instability, which no doubt will remain in several locations for a while.”


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CHAPTER 9

Democratic Republic of Congo

ZOA DR Congo Worked in:

Fizi district I Lubero district I Uvira district

Focused on:

Livelihoods / Food security I Education I With special attention to inclusion and peaceful conflict resolution

Results included the following:

Fizi 10,763 households received direct support in agricultural production I households increased their production with 76 – 101 % I 758 other households were supported in animal husbandry I 2,079 households joined 61 Village Saving Loan Associations, which arrived at a portfolio of an average 631 US$ per group I 599 children successfully completed their remedial primary education I 687 children are in the 2013-14 remedial education programme I 9 community- / peace hut groups were capacity-built on peaceful conflict resolution I 207 conflicts were identified, 140 have been resolved. Lubero Of 8,502 households trained in 2012 and 2013, 4,846 vulnerable households integrate the taught agricultural methods I Food Consumption Score was significantly improved I 1,556 households have joined savings and loan associations I 36 radio broadcasts and 4 mass mobilization campaigns have been organized on peaceful conflict resolution I 28 radio programmes were broadcast and one theatrical piece presented on gender in farming activities I 50 young once- combatants or teenage mothers were trained in carpentry and dressmaking, now active in 8 operational sewing-shops and 5 carpentry shops. Uvira 3,261 vulnerable households are identified, mainly marginalized or under-employed youth and demobilized women I They are supported with the crops maize and peanuts, according to their preference. Because of the security situation they could not be reached before late 2013. I 22 traditional chiefs participated in training on tenure security and land conflict management.

Worked with:

Local NGO’s: BDR 8e CEPAC I Geades I CEPROF I Asmaku I HUMAC I ADA I 8e CEPAC Fida I ACPDI I CEAPRONUT I SOFEJEP I SYDIP I COPPI I ADED I IJED SANGE I Provincial Inspectorate of Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock I Tearfund UK, Tear Netherlands I DCRpartners

Staff 31 December 2013:

62

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs I USAID/OFDA I I Turing Foundation I ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, emergency funds, churches, third party EO-Metterdaad)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 2,987,476

Budget in 2014:

€ 4,107,964


CHAPTER 9

47

Democratic Republic of Congo

Ebinda: “This project will contribute to peace in our village. Thank you!” God never forgets anyone

The consequences of conflict

Egera Yalala (38) is married and has eight children. She lives in Lulinda (Fizi). In 2000 she fled, and returned two years later. During later periods of violence she would hide in the bush with her family. Before she had a little restaurant. “But when most fishermen fled the area we were forced to close it, because of lack of customers. Then, since God never forgets anyone, ZOA was sent to us. The project to improve fishing has done a lot of good to the village. We received canoes, fishing materials and training, and they supported us to organize a fisheries committee. I now work selling the fish, and earn an income without difficulties. We are all very pleased.”

Ebinda Euba Laheli is 52 and married to Eca Wa Eca since 1975. They are farmers in the village Ake and have five children. “I was very happy with the lessons on gender relations and the consequences of conflicts. I know more now about how men and women can cooperate in a pleasant way, for the good of the family. And that boys and girls should have equal rights, like in education and inheritance. I think it is important to continue awareness raising about these issues, because it is not well known. On behalf of all women in Ake I can tell you that we are happy with this initiative, and we are confident that this project will contribute to peace in our village. Thank you very much!”


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CHAPTER 9

Ethiopia


CHAPTER 9

49

Ethiopia

Ethiopia Relief and recovery in a disaster prone country ZOA has been working in Ethiopia since 1993, undertaking activities in the sectors of livelihoods development, food security, water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), education, and environmental protection with displaced people, host populations, and returnees, focusing on contributing to enhance community cohesion as preconditions for people to rebuild their lives and strengthen their livelihoods. ZOA Ethiopia supports people as they rebuild their lives and become better prepared for the impact of conflict and natural disasters.

ZOA Ethiopia in 2013 In 2013 ZOA Ethiopia implemented activities in the Somali National Regional State of Ethiopia and the Gambella National Regional State of Ethiopia. In the Somali region ZOA operates from three programme areas: Jijiga, Dollo Ado and Hudet. The Gambella region programming included projects in Bonga, Itang kir / Therphan, Wanthowa and Akobo. ZOA Ethiopia’s Jijiga programme office has, for many years now, worked with internally displaced people residing in the Hartisheik displacement camp and their host community. ZOA assisted these communities to move from emergency water trucking support to a sustainable long term water solution, and supports a voluntary assisted ‘return and reintegration’ programme designed to assist those who have been displaced for many years return to their original locations. This programme has supported over 1,230 families to return to their home areas, to rebuild their livelihoods, improve access to safe water, and to reintegrate in their former communities. It is overwhelming to experience the joy and power of

people not being aid dependent any longer. ZOA has been operating in the Dollo Ado area of the Somali region since 2009. The escalation of the humanitarian crisis in Somalia, aggravated by the limitations of the Transitional Federal Government and the Islamist movements, fuelled a sharp influx of Somali asylum seekers into the Somali Regional State of Ethiopia in 2011. In response, ZOA increased its activities significantly. The Dollo Ado District is currently host to nearly 200,000 Somali refugees, and more arrive daily. In Hudet, ZOA is committed to a large population of internally displaced people from the Gabra clan, and to the drought affected host community members, to rebuild their lives and livelihoods and assist them to be more resilient to external shocks. For them ZOA supports improved irrigation and rain-fed farming techniques, diversification of food sources, increased livestock production, improved accessibility of potable water, better understanding of basic sanitation and hygiene, and primary school education. In the Gambella region ZOA has a long standing commitment to people displaced by spill-over conflict from South Sudan, working with Dutch businesspeople on supporting a rural farming community move from dependency to independence, and developing a carbon sequestration project in Bonga. When several thousand South Sudanese fled into Gambella in late December 2013, ZOA became involved in emergency life-saving support activities in the Akobo woreda.

The needs are immense Maureen Graybill, Country Director ZOA Ethiopia: “Ethiopia is a country with many challenges. The needs are immense and every week I am confronted with new requests for assistance. People throughout the country are suffering from drought, flooding, conflict and displacement. The work is challenging, and very fulfilling. Think of the people whose lives are on hold because they are displaced and imagine the surge of hope they experience when they are assisted return home in a way that lets them rebuild their lives and take care of their own families again. I am aware of the great needs, and our limited capacity, but I get up energetically every day because of what we as ZOA can do!”


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CHAPTER 9

Ethiopia

ZOA Ethiopia Worked in:

Dolo Ado | Gambella | Hudet | Jijiga

Focused on:

Livelihoods / Food Security | WASH | Educatio | With special attention to community governance, inclusion, peace and stability and environmental protection

Results include the following:

Dolo Ado: 270 individuals (among them host community members, youth and women) received Business Skill Training and ongoing coaching | 366 households that received goats last year continued to receive coaching | 2 teaching preparation blocks are constructed in two refugee camp schools | 4 gender segregated latrines and 6 hand washing basins were constructed | a hygiene and education programme reached 3,000 children | 40,000 trees (8 species) were raised and distributed Gambella: 3,000 households received seeds and farm tools | one fishing group established and provided with a canoe I 2 schools constructed | 10 boreholes constructed | 10 new private environmental friendly businesses initiated | increased capacity of relevant leaders to prevent and mitigate conflict | community cohesion meetings set-up | sport matches organized Hudet: 6 water pumps are bought and distributed | both irrigation scheme and rainfed agriculture beneficiaries received training on improved agricultural practice, and seeds, hand tools and other inputs | a goat banking system has started | 150 households received 13 goats each | 36 community animal health workers are trained and provided with a veterinary kit | 27 health extension workers have been trained and provide sanitation and hygiene training to their community members Jijiga: 6,500 households have access to water after the rehabilitation of the two hafir dams | 8 strong water management committees are functional | 600 households received agricultural training and 200 IDP households received business skill training and a seed capital | 1,256 received goats, farm tools and 15 kg improved seed | CLTS has been ignited in 47 woredas | 1,670 households have constructed their own toilet | majority of the IDP- children attend school. We constructed one primary school and furnished it with 200 combined desks | 136 marginalized host communities households received donkeys

Worked with:

Save the Environment | Internal Displaced Urban and Rural Under-Served Development and Welfare Association (IDURUSDWA) | Beza Community Development Rehabilitation | Rehabilitation and Development Organisation (RaDo) | ARRA I Somali Region Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Bureau | UN OCHA / HRF | UNICEF | UNHCR | USAID | TEAR Australia | Handicap International | Save the Children | Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | Royal Netherlands Embassy

Staff 31 December 2013:

92

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | Royal Netherlands Embassy | UNDP I UN OCHA | USAID/CMM | TEAR Australia | RAIN | FHI360 | Aqua for All | Woord en Daad | ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, emergency funds, Rotary Vlaardingen, Help2Change Foundation)

Expenditures in 2013:

â‚Ź 2,318,448

Budget in 2014:

â‚Ź 3,047,978


CHAPTER 9

Ethiopia

51

Durbe: “I believe I can build up a good life now, even if I am displaced.”

I am proud!

Rebuilding a good life

Fadumo Abdi Adilahi is a mother of four. She tells: “When ZOA started to talk about our sanitary habits, I did not like to think and talk about it. But when they made clear what consequences bad hygiene can have, I was the first of my village to build my own latrine, with ZOA’s support. It stimulated my fellow villagers to build a latrine too. I am really proud that I have a latrine now and do not have to go out in the bush anymore. No more shame, no more disease. I would like to thank ZOA, because you have opened my eyes for the importance of hygiene and good sanitary habits.”

Durbe Satu Hoqo, part of the Gabra tribe, lived a peaceful life in Surepa Keble, until one night men from the Borena tribe raided the village. They all fled, without time to collect any animals. Durbe’s brother was shot and killed. Durbe, now in Hudet, takes care of his brothers’ family as well as his own. Because he was taking care of two families he was placed on a list of those most vulnerable, and became a beneficiary of ZOA. He received some cash, non-food items, shelter materials, seeds and tools. Durbe joined with four other men and they were provided with a pair of oxen. He is grateful to ZOA and now believes that he and his family will build a good life for themselves, even if they are displaced.


52

CHAPTER 9

Liberia


CHAPTER 9

53

Liberia

Liberia Improving livelihoods in fragile peace ZOA has been working in Liberia since 2003. The fourteen years of civil war in the country, as well as violence in the neighbouring countries, caused massive displacement. Liberia is still suffering from the many consequences of war. Severe poverty, tribalism, corruption, political instability, illiteracy and lack of employment opportunities continue to undermine the fragile peace. ZOA started its work in 2003 with emergency relief to refugees and displaced persons. From there the work evolved towards rehabilitation.

ZOA Liberia in 2013 During 2013 we continued the activities of the years before, with special attention for the quality of the programmes. We intensified the capacity building for local partner organisations. Liberia is past the relief phase and is moving forward to a development phase. The cooperation with local partners is extremely essential to this process, because it increases their capacities to contribute to the development of their own country. It is therefore very positive that we have found sufficient capable partners to work with. We were happy to have found a new donor in the European Union, who is funding a cassava production, processing and marketing project, and equally pleased with the ZOA Business Ambassadors, who committed themselves to co-funding part of this programme. We see real potential in developing processing businesses and discovering and developing production chains, and are excited about funds and private partners in the Netherlands who are willing to support these developments. The programme of the Dutch Consortium for Rehabili-

tation, financed by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, was in its third year. Together with CARE and Save the Children, ZOA supports some 100 communities in agriculture, livelihoods, primary education and community governance. As ZOA we mainly focus on agriculture, along with a series of integrated activities. In a two-year cycle we provide farmers with training sessions in the first year, and coaching visits in the second year. They can also take functional numeracy and literacy classes. With these farmers we then work on forming cooperative groups to market their produce together. This requires training in group processes, management and marketing knowledge. Emphasis on such group training took place in the second half of 2013. We will monitor the results during 2014. Throughout all of our activities with farmers we work on mutual trust building. We are confronted with the deep pain and mistrust within communities on an almost daily basis. By training local facilitators and by using a community-based approach we contribute to rebuilding confidence and social coherence in these communities. In 2013 we also started with Village Saving and Loan Associations activities. It is once again a step further from a relief to a development mode; instead of receiving microcredits they experience that they can organize the means for investments by themselves. Though formal evaluations are not due until 2014, anecdotal evidence shows that the integrated approach of agricultural training, functional numeracy and literacy and farmer groups combined with trust building is becoming a success.

Inspired by people like her! Tsjeard Bouta, Country Director ZOA Liberia: “As always it will be a few individuals who take up the chance and start the change. We need these people, because as early adapters they will inspire others, who will follow their example. It is such a joy to work with these enthousiastic, motivated, powerful people! Like the woman who initiated a cassava processing company. She is convinced that she has a good product and can sweep Monrovia’s markets. We supported her to expand her business, and were present at the opening ceremony. It inspires me to be able to support people like her, full of initiative and energy for their business and their country!�


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CHAPTER 9

Liberia

ZOA Liberia Worked in:

Margibi I Montserrado I Bong

Focused on:

Livelihoods / food security | WASH | with special attention to functional literacy, access to credit through village saving and loans schemes, land rights, and trust building

Results included the following:

4,250 vulnerable households have been supported with cultivating food crops | marketing and business skills support to farmer groups started | cassava value chain development project started with selection of 1,500 producers, 300 small processors, and 6 big processors to be supported | village saving and loans groups started up | land rights support to fragile communities continued | functional adult literacy courses in almost 70 villages | 80 Village Development Committees are established and trained. Midterm review showed that 83% of the VDC’s have an appropriate management structure in place | land rights training contributes to empowerment | socio-therapy contributes to safety, trust and care, first at group level, then affecting peace and (agricultural) cooperation in the communities

Worked with:

NAEAL | FORDH | SHIFSD | DEN-L | DCR-partners | Ministries of Agriculture | County Development authorities in Margibi and Montserrado Counties

Staff 31 December 2013:

23

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | EuropeAid | World Renew | Hofstee Foundation | Van Oord | ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, churches, schools)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 1,179,310

Budget in 2014:

€ 1,187,747


CHAPTER 9

55

Liberia

Hawa: “I learnt how to talk to people who are in confusion.”

Musu in her garden

The peace maker

Musu (43) lives with her son (18) and three daughters (15, 12 and 8). The father left. She was displaced during the war and never went to school. With her husband she used to do rice farming. But rice farms are labour intensive, so when he left, for her as a woman alone, with young children, it was a mission impossible. She then only grew vegetables in her garden, for own consumption and to sell.

In August 2013, DCR initiated a sociotherapy pilot in Margibi, a model for improving community social cohesion and as such a conflict prevention strategy. Hawa (32 years) was selected as sociotherapy facilitator. She is a mother and sells charcoal and bakes bread for sale. “When the training started I was shy”, she tells. “But then I realised that it was really interesting. I learnt how to talk to people when they are in confusion”. Confusion is the Liberian expression for conflict. Hawa explains how her participation brought changes to her family. She had a problem with one of her sisters, but now they talk and her sister even asks Hawa for advice. “People in the community call me the peace-maker now!”

When ZOA came to the community she felt encouraged to cultivate a bigger plot of land. She attended the workshop and learned about “modern methods”. Together with her son, she prepared the land and planted corn and cassava. She is also involved in the new nursery.


56

CHAPTER 9

CDN Myanmar


CHAPTER 9

CDN Myanmar

57

Myanmar (with CDN) Relief with perspective for rehabilitation CDN, Consortium of Dutch NGOs, has been working in Myanmar since early 2008. CDN is a cooperation of three Dutch organisations, Red een Kind (Save a Child), Woord en Daad and ZOA. CDN is involved in assistance to victims of displacement and natural disaster in Ayeyarwady Division, Rakhine, South Shan and Kayin States. CDN is working to improve food security and the water, sanitation and hygiene and is doing that currently in many emergency settings, but with the perspective for rehabilitation.

funds, there is some imbalance between emergency and rehabilitation funding. We will have to devote attention to that issue in 2014.

Improving livelihoods

CDN Myanmar in 2013 Relief activities

In Southern Shan State, that is dealing with dramatic changes in rainfall patterns, we are supporting a local research institute to develop a potato variety that is better adapted to periods of drought. 131 farmers were provided with training and supportive input such as potato seed tubers, fertilizers and tools for land preparation. They tested a new potato variety that is resistant to blight and drought diseases.

The biggest challenge for 2013 was to maintain quality while the relief operations were rapidly expanding. Response to the displacements in Rakhine State picked up and a great deal of work was done by CDN. CDN expanded its target area to two more townships in eastern Rakhine where some 22,000 internally displaced persons and hosting communities have suffered from internal violence.

In Kayin state, CDN provided small business development training, vocational training on sewing, motorbike repair training and Myanmar food and snack making training. CDN provided start-up capital and material and follow-up support for altogether 65 beneficiaries. Beneficiary monitoring revealed that incomes increased by at least 40%.

Our projects in these areas were very successful despite difficult circumstances. In January 2013 a survey revealed that 37 percent of children younger than five were suffering from severe diarrhea. CDN started a water and sanitation programme consisting of intensive hygiene education and distribution of water filters, since the IDPs did have water but of poor quality. In January 2014 a follow-up survey revealed a reduction of 95.6 percent in severe diarrhea cases among children under five. CDNstaff was quite proud of this achievement. Because the funds that CDN obtained were all short term emergency

In Ayeyarwady, CDN reached out to 530 landless poor households who now grow vegetables in an innovative manner through Multi-Storey Gardening (MSG). CDN provided training, and inputs such as seed, tools and container materials. As a result, the beneficiaries reflected that it contributed to improved nutrition and health as they can now eat a variety of fresh and chemical free vegetables. Additionally, growing their own vegetables has reduced the costs of buying vegetables. Some of the beneficiaries can now even sell the extra vegetable products and are providing income for their family.

Kevin Beattie, Country Director CDN as of December 2013: “Myanmar is at a very interesting time in its history with very welcome changes in the direction of moving towards democracy. Despite vast natural resources, many people live below the poverty line and there are many ethnic conflicts. CDN is playing a key role in providing humanitarian WASH facilities to approximately over 20,000 displaced men, women and children in Rakhine State and is also involved in Food Distribution in coordination with WFP. We have some food security programmes in Kayin and Shan States, and it is this early recovery and development side that we wish to expand in 2014.�


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CHAPTER 9

CDN Myanmar

Myanmar (with CDN) Worked in:

Ayeyarwaddy Division I Rakhine State I South Shan State I Kayin State

Focused on:

Food security / livelihoods I Water, sanitation and hygiene I With special attention to moving towards rehabilitation from an emergency situation

Results include the following:

Ayeyarwaddy 530 landless poor families reached with training, seeds and materials for multi-storey gardening Rakhine State 1,107 latrines constructed I 10,935 ceramic filters distributed I construction or rehabilitation of 592 water points I decrease of diarrhoea among children under five with 95.6% I construction of 29 ricebanks I 1,850 farmers received seeds and fertilizers as starting capital for 52 rice banks I cash for work for construction of 2 irrigation dams I decrease of 28% of people that need to borrow money for food Kayin State 65 beneficiaries received small business development planning training, vocational training on sewing, motorbike repair training and food and snack making training, including start-up capital and follow-up support I income increase among participants of at least 40% Southern Shan State 131 potato growers received training and inputs such as potato seed tubers, fertilizers and for land preparation I support to a local research institution to produce and multiply new varieties of potato seeds

Worked with:

Local NGO: Myanmar Heart Development Organisation I Government Agencies: Water Resources Utilization Department I Myanmar Agricultural Services I Irrigation Department I Minister of Border Issues I HeHo Research Center I International organisations: World Concern I Save the Children I Solidarité International

Staff 31 December 2013:

2

Received donations from:

ECHO I EuropeAid I OCHA I WFP I UNICEF I DFID I Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT) I International Rescue Committee (IRC) I World Renew I Red een Kind I ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, private donors, emergency funds, Happy Gifts)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 920,564

Budget in 2014:

€ 1,000,000


CHAPTER 9

59

CDN Myanmar

Diya is now leading a life in dignity!

A life in dignity

Changed for the better

Diya The Wai (40, not the person in the picture) is a widow with four children and lives in Rakhine state. She used to cultivate upland rice, which provided enough food for only two months per year. The rest of the year she was a casual labourer, every day hoping to find a little job. In March 2013 CDN started a cash-for-work project in her village. Diya was able to work on the construction of an irrigation dam for two months. She purchased three bags of rice and a new set of clothes for each child. The three bags of rice allowed her to sell her harvest and as a result she was able to purchase another 730 kilos of rice. Her children are now attending school, and Diya is leading a life in dignity.

Thein Nyan Arjun (30, not the person in the picture) has a wife and two children. With rice farming he could only feed his family for six months per year. He wanted to do animal husbandry as a second income source, but he had no money to buy animals. In 2013, Thein was able to work on the construction of the Oke Taung dam for CDN. With his income he purchased 4,100 kg of paddy rice, half of which was to feed his family for an entire year, while he traded the other half. He then purchased potato seeds and eight hens. He sells chickens now. He has continued and has started growing papaya, beans, pineapple, taro and mango trees. His life has changed for the better!


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CHAPTER 9

South Sudan


CHAPTER 9

South Sudan

61

South Sudan Providing relief and hope, staying faithful The end of the year 2013 cast a dark shadow over the young nation of South Sudan. Erupting conflict among different groups within the government and the army spread throughout the country and resulted in massive fighting, killing and displacement. Since the end of the last century ZOA has been committed to the Southern Sudanese people, who have suffered from conflict for decades now. Since the birth of the independent Republic of South Sudan, we have been involved in the recovery of civil society, with primary attention to food security and livelihoods, water and sanitation, education and capacity building. In 2013 we worked in Central Equatoria (Katigiri, Lainya, Terekeka, Juba-West) and Jonglei (Pibor, Bor, Akobo).

ZOA South Sudan in 2013 For the Southern Sudanese 2013 was a difficult year. The oil flow stopped and led to severe financial austerity. It affected everyone, because the prices of goods, food, fuel and services rose, while the level of basic services declined, because the governmental lacked the means to pay for them. Under these harsh everyday conditions ZOA continued to support the people in earning an income, growing their own food and rebuilding their communities. We completed a Food Security programme in Katigiri, funded by the European Union, and were very pleased with the results of our efforts and the positive independent evaluation. Our wash-programme in Terekeka, funded by TEAR Australia, was evaluated by TEAR and by an independent consultant, and they likewise concluded that we had done a good job.

Funding for early recovery diminished during the year, with the emphasis once more being placed on emergency relief in areas such as Jonglei and along the border with Ethiopia and Sudan. ZOA’s challenge is to remain loyal to the people in Central Equatoria, even though many other organisations now work more in the northern regions. We are very grateful for the start of an enthusiastic ZOA Business Ambassadors team who have committed themselves to food security in Central Equatoria. The province is the potential grain basket for the country which, if developed well, would reduce the need to import food. However, at the end of the year the region received many internally displaced people, challenging food and seed stocks. From June our operations in Pibor were put on hold because of security reasons, negatively impacting the reconstruction programme in this area. In the second half of December the heavy fighting in and around Bor led to the evacuation of all staff and the postponement of activities. In Bor and Terekeka we focused on working with farmer groups, peace building, human security and water for cattle and irrigation. All these programme components were aimed at conflict reduction at local level. We worked with many motivated Southern Sudanese, who want to rebuild their communities. The eruption of new violence is bringing these positive developments to a stop, which is deeply sad for the families who simply want to raise their children in peace. ZOA’s staff in South Sudan is ever more committed to bringing relief, hope and recovery to the suffering people of this beautiful country.

Kevin Beattie, ZOA’s Country Director South Sudan until November 2013 “We have invested a great deal in development of our own staff. It is a joy to see national staff growing skills and achieving higher positions: five in 2013! Our staff are also widely sought after because of their ZOA experience and skills development. This is just one way we contribute to the capacity and skills pool of the country. One of our national staff, who earlier had been promoted to a senior management level, asked me if it was all right if he would name his new born daughter after my mother, who had recently passed away. I was moved, because it showed that it was not just capacity building we were working on, but also having good relationships with each other as staff, which made working here a real joy.”


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South Sudan

ZOA South Sudan Worked in:

Tali | Lainya | Katigiri | Maridi | Jonglei

Focused on:

Livelihoods / Food Security | Education | WASH | Emergency relief | With special attention to community and governmental governance and peace building

Results include the following:

Katigiri: Concluded project: 2,288 farmer group members were reached with improved agricultural practices | 15% increase in food production from improved farming practices and 100% increase in production from increased acreage | food gap reduced from 3.2 months to 1.2 months on average | increase from 50% to 90% of beneficiaries that had an acceptable dietary diversity score | 3 successful seed multiplication systems established. | New project: 12 farmer groups received training on agricultural topics | 30 progressive farmers were selected for additional training ‘farming as a business’ | training for 10 community mobilizers on project activities | the Wonduruba Farming Association is established and functioning Lainya: Enrollment of children in school increased with 29% from 1,199 to 1,551 | 4 schools were rehabilitated and 5 schools were equipped with learning materials and 14 teachers were trained | 764 adults participated in literacy and numeracy courses | 1,700 people and 5 schools have now access to safe drinking water | 7,072 people were reached with hygiene promotion through house to house campaigns | 673 hectares were opened up for production by 1,000 farmers | 2,000 pineapple suckers and 475 banana suckers were distributed to diversify crops | 1,040 people participated in a VSLA, 80% of them run a micro income generating activity now | 81 CBO’s of beneficiary groups are trained and functioning well Jonglei: The project is in its early stage. The following activities are carried out: 2 soccer tournaments with peace messages, the main theme was ‘One people, one county’ | 17 farmer groups received seeds and farming tools | 2 demonstration plots established on which small scale irrigation was piloted | 3 community projects started | Training for local government and ZOA partners on identified gaps Tali/ Bor: The project is in its early stage. The following activities are carried out: 53 trained community leaders reached over 1,500 community members with messages of peace | 600 youths of different tribal backgrounds met in games and sports activities | 34 new farmer groups with 694 members were formed, trained and provided with farming tools and seeds | 4 new boreholes reach 2,000 people | 329 household latrines constructed | A resolution for 3 out of the 11 tribal conflicts was facilitated. Maridi: 2,500 HIV positive people were served with HCT service through both static and mobile service delivery facilities | more than 1,000 expectant mothers received PMTCT services (Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission) | 22,500 people reached with HIV/Aids awareness.

Worked with:

COMPASS | Tali Youth Association (TAYA) | ACROSS | Rural Development Initiatives | Agency for Social Transformation and Development (ASTAD) | SUHA | IPCS | SALT | Nile Hope Development Forum | CMA | IAS | DCR-partners

Staff 31 December 2013:

74

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | WFP | UNICEF | EuropeAid | TEAR Australia | ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, emergency funds, third party Draagt Elkanders Lasten)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 2,672,015

Budget in 2014:

€ 3,579,148


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South Sudan

Alier: “Our community could have split on this issue. But we gained insight during the Warring Chiefs Reconcile

‘We are making money!’

ZOA organized peacebuilding training in Kolnang Payam which targeted local government, traditional, youth, church and women leaders, and the police. After the explanation of ‘connectors’ and ‘dividers’ two participating chiefs, Mayom and Alier, suddenly realized that there had been a ‘divider’ in their community who had managed to destroy their formerly good relationship. Someone wanting the position of Cattle Camp chief for himself caused distrust about Mayom towards his good friend Alier. They did not speak to each other for nine months. During the training they gained insight in what had happened at the time. Alier: “Our community could have split on this issue. But Mayom kept his promise to me which enables me now to forget the past and to restore our relationship.”

Aputo Lino, chair person of the Kudele-Comboni farmer group, says: “We thank you for your support to the group and especially for the support with assorted vegetable seeds! We now understand the benefit of vegetable production since we harvested more than six basins of tomatoes and fifteen heads of cabbages. We sold the cabbages for four pounds each, so for 60 pounds in total and this was just the first harvest!” The group has discovered that investing in assorted vegetable production has a greater economic benefit than investing in other crops. Individual farmers have also seen the benefit of group work since the training and exposure taught them new skills on planting methods and land management.”

training and restored our relationship.”


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Sri Lanka


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Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka Development after civil war and natural disasters ZOA has been working in Sri Lanka from 1995 onwards. Since the end of the conflict in 2009, ZOA has supported returnees and host communities in the sectors livelihoods and economic development, community enhancement and shelter / infrastructure in its programme areas in the North and East of Sri Lanka.

ZOA Sri Lanka in 2013 The transition from relief towards development-oriented programmes continued throughout the year. We are still involved in emergency relief occasionally, most notably in the Mullaithivu district - the area that witnessed the final battle of the conflict. But in most districts we are now focusing on longer-term rehabilitation and development issues such as rebuilding civil society and strengthening value chains. A country in transition also means that our own staff has to adjust to different working methods. We have, therefore, invested a great deal in capacity building for staff this year, training them extensively on promoting and supporting entrepreneurial skills and community development. A second point of particular interest this year was to give more priority to the gender agenda within programmes as well as for staff. Traditional gender roles have changed during the conflict of the past decades. Once the conflict is over, this might cause tensions within families and communities, because gender roles are no longer automatically as they were before. We have sensitized our staff to make them aware of possibly changed roles and to be able to deal with the current situation. We

also worked on creating favourable conditions for female staff, especially in our site offices. Most of the population we work with find employment in the agricultural sector. We have developed new initiatives to stimulate the so-called backyard economy; home gardens which produce for household needs and where surplus production can be sold to local or regional markets. The results are positive and we will continue to bring the people together to increase their bargaining powers. Among the vulnerable families that we aim to support, we find many female headed households. They are not only vulnerably physically, but also socially disadvantaged. So we organize meetings in a way that makes women feel comfortable to speak up. The great thing is that especially women groups are very energetic and come up with structural and practical ideas to move forward, for example on water management or education. It is very encouraging to see their energy and hope, and to work with them towards their future. Reconciliation and mutual trust are still fragile, four years after the civil war has come to an end. ZOA Sri Lanka will continue to support people in rebuilding their livelihoods and communities.

From implementer to facilitator Guido de Vries, Country Director Sri Lanka: “I arrived just under one year ago and one of the first things I noticed was the disconnect between, on the one hand, tourists visiting the South and Middle parts of the country and, on the other hand, the dire needs and unresolved obstacles for a durable solution in the North and East. We have a large and committed team of ZOA staff on the ground. Community change is very much a mental process as well; coming from a dependency situation to taking responsibilities in your own hands. For our staff it means taking a step back sometimes; from implementer to a facilitating and mobilising role. This is a gradual process and exiting to be part of as we are working in a very dynamic context with different actors with sometimes different goals. The results of climate change also have a direct impact on the crops and harvest of the people, so creating resilience to overcome these shocks is very much integrated in our work�.


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Sri Lanka

ZOA Sri Lanka Worked in:

North: Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mullativu, Vavuiya and Anuradhapura districts I East: Trincomalee, Batticaloa, Ampara and Polonnaruwa districts

Focused on:

Livelihoods I WASH I Shelter I With special attention to community coherence, inclusion and peacebuilding

Results include the following:

North: Percentage of households being dependent on unskilled labour dropped from 29% in 2012 to 14% in 2013 I number of hygiene-related diseases dropped from 189 to 95 among adults and from 119 to 86 among children I 86% of boys (6-18) attend school. In 2012 it was 78%. For girls the numbers are 84% in 2012 and 92% in 2013 I the percentage of households that never receive government services dropped from 42% to 5%. East: Percentage of households being dependent on unskilled labour dropped from 24% to 12% I School attendance of boys increased from 47% to 72%, for girls it increased from 72% to 78% I In 2012 only 69% of households were living in a safe living space, it increased in 2013 to 81% I People depending on unsustainable strategies to overcome the lean season – like borrowing money or reducing meals – dropped from 84% to 40% I 52% of CBO-leaders could give verifiable examples of how they resolved conflicts without violence.

Worked with:

Srilankan Ministries of Agriculture, Fisheries, Education and Livestock I Local government district authorities I International government and non-government organisations: ILO I IOM I UNDP I GIZ I Oxfam I The Asia Foundation I Woord en Daad I National NGO’s: MDT I CRADA I MARDAP I ORHAN I Familian I YGRO I ESCO I LEADS I FOOSDOO I PUHALIDAM I ECRDF I JUGAS I ELUWAN I Amanthy Tendral I CBO’S: RDS I WRDS I sector-specific CBO’s like farmer organisations and cooperative societies I Self Help Groups

Staff 31 December 2013:

177

Received donations from:

FAO I ECHO I EuropeAID I USAID I AusAid I DFID I World Renew / Government of Canada – Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development I DevXchange I Skantrae I ICCO / Kerk in Actie I ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, third party EO-Metterdaad, emergency funds)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 5,008,940

Budget in 2014:

€ 3,703,137


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Sri Lanka

Annalethumy: “I lost everything. Now ZOA has provided me with a ‘palace’. I am very Annalethumy’s ‘palace’

Release from middlemen

Kanthaiah Annalethumy is a widow from Killinochchi who lost all she had in the war and was displaced in 2007. She was resettled in 2011, but didn’t have a proper place to live. She has one daughter, who lives in Jaffna, also a widow and very poor. Annalethumy could not even think of constructing a shelter. ZOA selected her as she was a conflict-affected vulnerable woman, a group which ZOA passionately serves through its work. She received a transitional shelter. Even though the assistance is relatively minor in the scope of solving all of her problems, it ensured a secure environment for the widow. She said: “I lost everything and I did not know what to do. Now ZOA has provided me this ‘palace’. I am very grateful!”

Jeyaranji Selvakumar (29) is the manager of the fisherman’s co-operative society in Illupakadavai. What is the most important change you have observed as a result of ZOA’s work, Mrs. Selvakumar? “The ability to sell our fish for much better prices. We have so long been in the grip of middlemen who quoted fixed, exploitative rates. We thought we would be indebted to the middlemen for ever and were at their mercy. We had no idea there was another way of selling. When ZOA first explained the idea of auctioning, we thought it would be bothersome. Only now, after two months of successfully running auctions, do we realize how much we were being cheated before. ZOA’s intervention has made us see that we were needlessly indebted.”

grateful!”


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Sudan


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Sudan

Sudan Supporting recovery in harsh circumstances ZOA has worked in Sudan since 2004, starting in SouthDarfur. Since then, the work has expanded - in 2013 we worked in three Darfur States (East, South and North) as well as in Gedaref in the East of Sudan. In Darfur, ZOA supports the sustainable recovery of conflict-affected rural communities, focusing on education, WASH and food security. In Gedaref, ZOA contributes to improved food and economic security for rural communities.

ZOA Sudan 2013 The population of Darfur were faced with unpredicted breakouts of violent intertribal conflicts in 2013, as well as conflicts between government and rebel troops. New conflicts caused almost 300,000 new displacements. While other NGOs provided the necessary assistance to the new IDPs, we were still able to make good progress with the programmes that contribute to recovery in the relatively stable areas. Since the Doha Peace Agreement in 2011 the international donor community is committed to the rehabilitation of Darfur. We are very pleased with the funds that have become available for multi-year programmes, switching the focus from relief to recovery. ZOA Sudan has become a member of several consortia, which will enable us to combine forces and enlarge the scale of our programmes. This year we focused on developing our agricultural strategy, which started in Gedaref. Our aim is to introduce new farming techniques and technologies to enable farmers to increase their productivity. At community level, farmer groups have been established to strengthen the purchasing power of the farmers and to stimulate demand

for agricultural services provided by the private sector. As a result of the positive experience with this new approach we are now also applying it in Darfur. Much has been invested in quality of education in our programmes in the Darfur region. New classrooms, trained teachers and access to water improved the quality of education and will eventually lead to better enrolment and reduced drop-out numbers. We now also introduce drinking water components in the education programme. In Northern Darfur we rehabilitated a hafir (a traditional water basin), but unfortunately it did not provide the drinking water we had aimed for. Reasons were the lack of rain, a too intensive use by cattle and a too thin layer of clay, causing leaks in the hafir itself. The people in the surrounding villages moved back to the camps because of the lack of water. We are looking for ways to provide sustainable access to water for these communities, so they can eventually return and stay in their places of origin. Integrated attention for harmony and cohesion This year we trained our staff intensively in community development; and they applied their knowledge in their daily work to increase ownership and sustainability. Throughout our agricultural, WASH and education programmes, we work with the communities on harmony and cohesion. Improved access to basic services will help to prevent conflicts about scarce resources, but only if the community has the commitment and the capacity to include the different stakeholders. We support them in doing so, allowing the people of Darfur to regain harmony and hope for the future.

Change on ground level Bart Dorsman, Country Director ZOA Sudan until October 2013: “The future development of Darfur depends on the presence of harmony and cohesion. The vulnerability of the region is a fact. In situations like this of scarce resources and a growing population, stability is essential to development that includes all Darfurians. Even if the infrastructure is there, it is the people who will have to connect with their neighbours from a different tribe or political preference again. We believe we can contribute to that change at ground level, standing beside people in their harsh circumstances and providing assistance in a professional manner. The whole team is very committed to supporting people to improve upon their lives.�


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Sudan

ZOA Sudan Worked in:

Darfur: South, East and North | Gedaref

Focused on:

Agriculture / Food Security | Wash | Education | with special attention to community cohesion and non-violent conflict resolution

Results included the following:

Darfur: Food security and Livelihoods: Seed provision for 6.516 farmers | 307 households participated in fertilizer demonstrations and saw a significant increase in production | Starting up of 16 small businesses | 12 Village and Loan Saving Association started, empowering over 260 participating women | the supported households were more food secure compared to not-supported households (ZOA Survey 2013/2014). Education: distribution of 2,038 student kits and 831 school uniforms | Formation of 10 new schools | 47 classrooms constructed | 28 schools reached with hygiene campaign | over 500 pupils enrolled the enrolment in new schools of over 500 pupils who did not have access to education Gedaref: Food Security and Livelihoods: 491 farmers in 5 villages reached by the programme aiming at increased production | 1,031 ha ploughed with improved ploughing techniques | 10 demonstration plots were developed to show the benefits of conservation agriculture, and received higher than average yields | 14 VSLA are operational with 514 members (363 F, 151 M) Wash: in cooperation with the local government in Gedaref State the main waterpipe is connected to El Deheama South, where ZOA had constructed a water tank. This enables at least 5000 people to have access to safe water.

Worked with:

Solo | PODR | CDF | Voluntary Network | SOS Sahel | Ma’an | Zenab | DCR-partners

Staff 31 December 2013:

93

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | Royal Netherlands Embassy | UNICEF | EuropeAid | USAID / OFDA | ZOA-Netherlands (emergency funds)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 2,848,188

Budget in 2014:

€ 4,995,000


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Sudan

“I learned to improve my lessons and to support my students in learning. Thank you, “Not an emperor”

“I am very happy!”

Adam Sabiel from North Darfur is one of the 89 teachers who attended the 6 months-teacher training. Sapiel: “The curriculum was very good, with progressive training methods.” Though he has been a teacher for 23 years already, he learned a lot. As he summarizes it for himself: “I learned what an ideal lesson looks like, and how to prepare it. I learned how to improve the learning environment, and how to develop good relations with my head teacher, colleagues, children and the community. I learned I am not an emperor to my students, but more like a father, supporting them in learning. I was able to pass on the knowledge I received from this training to 24 teachers in my area. Thanks a lot for ZOA’s work!” * In the picture: Adam Sabiel among other trainees, front row, in the white dress.

Nadia (10) is a pupil of a newly built school close to El Fasher in North Darfur. She also received books, a uniform, backpack, exercise books and a geometry set. She tells: “I also went to school before, but actually it was not a school, just a hut. I am very happy I can go to a good school now. And later I want to become a teacher myself.” Her normal breakfast is just some water, and at school she gets a glass of milk. During lunchtime she goes home and eats aseeda with her parents and her eight siblings. “We eat it every day, and it is very tasty”, she smiles. “About once a week my mother buys some meat. Only rich people can eat meat twice a week!”

ZOA!”


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Thailand


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Thailand

73

Thailand Handing over responsibly ZOA Thailand has been supporting refugees from Myanmar residing in camps in Thailand since 1984. After launching a hand-over process in 2009, ZOA worked towards achieving its exit strategy by closing down programme implementation by March 2014 and finalizing asset transfer by June 2014. With this objective in mind, ZOA has gradually scaled down its programme content as well as handed over its education and livelihood activities to partners.

ZOA Thailand 2013 In 2013, ZOA supported the refugee community in the camps to take on the implementation of education and livelihood activities. Meanwhile, ZOA’s plans and resources were shared with NGO partners to ensure that the support to the community for programme implementation would not be discontinued. Working on the hand-over process has meant constant communication internally and with external organisations, a key factor for a smooth handover. Throughout the year specific activities in basic education were maintained and jointly implemented with the BEST (Basic Education Support towards Transition Project) consortium: SCI, ADRA, RTP and JRS. For instance, the activity of school renovation in Umpiem camp was handled by ZOA and the activity was taken over by ADRA for the other camps. The skills acquired from agriculture and livestock activities were useful in preparing Myanmar refugees for their future. ZOA has subsequently engaged partners to take on the support of livelihood activities for refugee communities. Supporting partners ZOA Thailand is committed to supporting the NGO consortium to take on camp education services. In general,

ZOA shared information, resources and networks with the partners. At field level, the staff of NGO partners have been learning from and shadowing ZOA staff on various activities, from the distribution of school materials, payment of teacher stipends to the provision of teacher training. Throughout the year ZOA continued providing basic services and capacity building to Karen Refugee Committee Education Entity, Office of Camp Committee Education Entity, school management and PTAs in all seven camps. These groups are the key actors for managing the education system in the camp context and in Myanmar when voluntary repatriation is realized. For the livelihood project, the Livelihoods Camp Committees were supported to take on more of a management role and the subsequent responsibilities. The support from ZOA for the project ended in December and the farm management and equipment have been handed over to the refugee community. Durable solutions A UNHCR-survey conducted in Mae La in 2013 showed that only 10 percent of the respondents were willing to return to Myanmar. Certain serious concerns related to land rights and rights for ethnic minorities. Basic services of education and health have to be resolved between the Myanmar government and ethnic groups. Regarding education language issues, accreditation of teachers’ and students’ learning are real concerns for integration into Myanmar society. It is, therefore, important to prepare teachers and students to cope with new challenges before return happens.

Committed staff for a successful hand-over Duangporn Saussay, Country Director ZOA Thailand: “I am delighted to acknowledge the endless efforts of my ZOA Thailand colleagues in providing support and building capacities of camp communities, on sustaining camp education and livelihood activities and management. Moreover, my team shares essential information and extensive experiences with partner colleagues. Every now and then, I receive gratitude and compliments from the refugee community and partner organisations for the great support given by our colleagues. It is not easy to watch the colleagues leaving the organisation because of our phase-over strategy. On the other hand I feel proud that each of them is willing to face a new path of life and many of them will continue to work with the Myanmar refugee community after their employment with ZOA Thailand ends.”


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Thailand

ZOA Thailand Worked in:

Mae Hong Son Province: Mae Ra Ma Luang and Mae La Oon refugee camps I Tak Province: Mae La, Umpiem and Nu Po refugee camps I Kanchanaburi Province: Don Yang refugee camp I Ratchaburi Province: Tham Hin refugee camp

Focused on:

Education I Livelihoods I With special attention to capacity building and handing over

Results included the following:

33,000 refugee children have access to basic education with provision of facilities, materials, resources and support I 1,400 camp material sets provided to teachers I 1,190 teachers and education staff received subsidy I 354 new teachers received pre-service training I 500 teachers attended in-service methodology training I 1,092 teachers trained on subject matter across all subjects I throughout the year support is provided to the BEST consortium to take on basic education activities I 50 PTAs and 16 school management committees were set up in the camp schools and trained to assist with management of school during handover 517 refugees received training and skills development support from farm projects I 1,175 refugees and 596 Thai villagers received fruit trees as additional nutritious foods I support to 3 agricultural sites in Tak and transferred to TBC in 2014

Worked with:

NGOs and IOs: Education: BEST (SCI, ADRA, RTP, JRS) I Health: HI, IRC, MI, PU-AMI I WASH: SI, ARC, IRC I Protection: COERR, UNHCR I Livelihoods: TBC, other CCSDPT Community Based Organisations: KRCEE I LCC Thai Governmental agencies: Ministry of Education I Forestry Department I One Tambon One Product (OTOP) I Agricultural Training College (TAK) I Royal Project I Livestock Department I District Agriculture Department

Staff 31 December 2013:

29

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs I EU I ECHO I UNHCR I ZOA-Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, schools, Happy Gift)

Expenditures in 2013:

â‚Ź 1,814,116

Budget in 2014:

â‚Ź 125,000


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Thailand

“I am really pleased with the training. Now I earn an income for my family.” Providing for my family Than Kyaw (46) lives with his wife, two daughters and one son in Umpium camp. “With ZOA’s agriculture and animal husbandry training I learned how to make compost and produce and use organic pesticides. I have been trained on livestock and prevention of animal diseases. I am really pleased with this training. Now I raise pigs, ducks and chickens at home, which we can sell. Before this training I had no income at all, now I earn money for my family.”

Improving the living standard Paw Cherry, 32 (at the photo right): “In 2000 I arrived from Myanmar in Mae La camp. There I was able to continue my education and since 2005 I have been working as a teacher in Mae La high school. While teaching I continued to receive Resident Teacher Training from ZOA, like refresher courses, methodology, lesson planning etcetera. We as teachers learned how to teach in different ways, also using activities and games. Then in March 2012, I became the secretary of the OCEE: Office of Camp Education Entity. This is the office supporting the management of education and school administration in the camp. I strongly believe that the high level of education improves the living standard in the camp!”


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Uganda


CHAPTER 9

Uganda

77

Uganda Water, education and livelihoods: a new start made possible ZOA has been working in Uganda since 1998, when we started supporting Southern Sudanese refugees in the West Nile region. In 2007 a new programme was started in Pader, assisting Ugandese displaced persons and returnees. In 2013 ZOA worked in Pader, Nwoya and with conflict affected people in Amudat.

been extended with hygiene and life skill lessons. We see active parents participating in developing multi-year policy, engaging in enrollment campaigns or starting ideas on school gardens. The water situation could still be improved but new funding is hard to find, so the Pader team has been scaled down during the past year.

ZOA Uganda in 2013

The programme in Nwoya is comparable to the one in Pader, but started a few years later, in 2011. Working with farmer groups is one of the pillars for improving agricultural productivity, contributing to social cohesion and starting up economic activities in the returnee communities. However, climate change complicates the daily life of farmers. The weather pattern is disrupted. That makes it hard for farmers to start investing in new crops, because unexpected rainfall or even hail (like this year in Pader) can destroy everything.

We were able to re-start working in the West Nile region, funded by the Dutch Embassy. The area has seen many refugees from the DR Congo and South Sudan in the past decades. The host population was, however, usually not included in the assistance, although they experienced negative consequences of the presence of refugees. We were therefore happy to be able to start our programme in this region in June 2013, supporting young males in finding sources of income, and supporting farmer groups to improve farming and marketing processes. Then, at the end of 2013, conflict erupted in South Sudan again, and once more the West Nile region faced the influx of thousands of refugees. Already present in the area, ZOA Uganda was able to respond quickly. The programme in Pader is nearing its end. The results are truly positive. We have been working here on improvement of education, agricultural production and the water and sanitation situation, since 2007. Water wells are now well maintained, villages are cleaner, latrines have been built, children are visibly healthier compared to a number of years ago. We are also noting huge improvement in education. It is not just that we have provided class rooms, but also that we have succeeded in improving enrollment, that qualified teachers are available, that the curriculum has

We have adjusted our programmes in such a way that people are more prepared to confront unexpected setbacks like floods or drought. The introduction of crop diversification and Village Saving Loan Associations are very functional in reducing vulnerability. In our programme in Amudat we were also confronted with the consequences of climate change, because the construction of subsurface dams – necessarily done in the dry season – was heavily damaged and delayed because of unexpected heavy rains during the construction period.

Gerard Hooiveld, Country Director ZOA Uganda since 2013: “There is a lot of development in our programme areas that really touches my heart. The healthier children, the people taking up responsibilities for their communities and schools together, it is a real joy. Still, there are a lot of concerns in Uganda. The country is developing quickly, but the profits are not being invested in better education, roads or health services. This hampers rural development. With improved production, farmers need roads to bring their products to market. The limitations of what we as an NGO can do, is sometimes frustrating.”


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Uganda

ZOA Uganda Worked in:

Pader | Nwoya | Amudat

Focused on:

Livelihoods – Food Security | Education | Wash | with special attention to community coherence and Disaster Risk Reduction

Results include the following:

Pader: More than 80% of the targeted households meet their food need | 40% of the farmer groups are engaged in collective marketing | 240 members of SMCs/PTAs received training on literacy and numeracy | 624 households out of 1,000 targeted households have access to clean and safe water | increasing numbers of people use latrines | 48%% of income generating groups started an alternative IGA and earn an income out of that, 22 groups are engaged in beekeeping, 70 in piggery, 54 in goat rearing | 40% of the individuals with disability participate in local community groups Nwoya: Groundnut, rice, soy bean and maize had an average yield increase of 42,5% | Due to the dry spell most groundnuts in Nwoya did not mature, but the farmers supported by ZOA had good harvests because of seed selection and early planting | farmers of the 80 Farmer Field Schools diversify their income and start bee keeping, fish or poultry activities | 38% of the groups included vulnerable members like people with disabilities | 96 groups for community activities are formed, dance and drama groups, rotational farming or local savings | 9 cases of land disputes out of 40 were resolved in a non-violent way, a slight reduction due to training given to local land and court committees. Amudat: 705 of the Agro-Pastoral Field Schools (42%), with 1580 households practice best animal husbandry practices | Amudat District no longer depends on Mbale District for vegetables | 84% of 1680 households are involved in saving on weekly basis | these 1680 farmers are also trained in Community Managed Disaster Risk Reduction | 6 class rooms and school administration offices constructed and furnished | number of FAL classes increased from 12 to 24, with 776 learners (45% M, 55% F) | constructed a subsurface dam, providing 5 villages with water | a simplified legislation pack has been used for community sensitization on e.g. land policy | 16 CBOs are actively involved in none-violent conflict resolution | reformed warriors, run-away girls (escaping FGM) and boys (escaping forced labour) are involved in development activities and vegetable growing

Worked with:

Ceford | CCF | Kwal Ryeko | Fokapawa | Kica Ber Support war victims | POZIDEP | AIDI | Vision Care | several Vocational Training Institutes

Staff 31 December 2013:

137

Received donations from:

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs | FAO | World Bank | EuropeAid | World Renew | Diakonia | ICCO | Heemskerk | MWH Foundation | Liberty Foundation | Wees een Kans Foundation | ZOA Netherlands (Business Ambassadors, Driestar college, schools)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 2,643,982

Budget in 2014:

€ 2,782,698


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Uganda

Sharon: “I attribute the change to ZOA’s training on life skills as well as through career Independent and confident

I want to become an engineer

“The Agro Pastoral Field School removed my total dependence on my husband”, says confident Cheposogwon Ngalimal (26). “Before I just had to wait until he would give me money to buy household items. Now I grow my own vegetables, and sell vegetables and goats at the Amudat market, and I have enough vegetables and other food items at home. Sending our children to school is no longer a problem. I can also now identify and treat animal diseases like heart-water (Chepirpirmot) and East Coast fever (Lokit). I intend to diversify my production with onions and cabbages next.”

“I used to be a stubborn girl”, says Sharon Adong, student at the Olwoo Community School in Nwoya, honestly. “But after attending the training from ZOA my life has changed positively. I attribute this change to the training we received from ZOA, on the spread and prevention of HIV/Aids, on life skills as well as through career guidance. I now find studying very interesting and I would like to complete my studies and become an engineer. I also talk to parents freely. The training has empowered me with knowledge and skills of facing any challenge which will come my way.” As people from Olwoo were returning from the IDP-camps, they started the community primary school to respond to the needs of their children. ZOA supports this initiative with hardware and training activities.

guidance.”


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10. Disaster Response The fragile countries we work in are often prone to substantial natural or conflict-related disaster. When this happens in a country where ZOA is already involved in longer term rehabilitation programmes, relief operations can be embedded within the country programme. In areas where ZOA is not yet involved, ZOA can decide to provide relief and set up disaster response operations, adding value by being an experienced partner in the implementation of relief programmes in areas affected by conflict and natural disaster. ZOA implements relief activities preferably by working alongside local partners or through international partners with a proven track record. If local capacity is limited or lacking, ZOA can make disaster response capacity available, while at the same time seeking active collaboration with partners. New strategic alliances are sought with international partners seeking implementation capacity in disaster response initiatives outside regular ZOA countries. Depending on the nature and magnitude of the disaster, ZOA’s involvement in disaster response programmes may last up to three years. In order to maintain an appropriate balance in our programmes and to fulfill our dual mandate of relief and recovery, the combined volume of disaster response programmes is limited to a maximum of 25% of ZOA’s total activities. ZOA’s special unit for disaster response has been operational since 2011. This Disaster Response Unit (DRU) enables us to provide relief for a maximum of three years in countries where ZOA has no long term presence. This unit allows for a

stronger position as an effective and reliable implementing partner to other organisations in the Netherlands and abroad without affecting the long term programmes. In countries where ZOA is already operational, the DRU can assist with staffing, knowledge, expertise and searching for funding opportunities. The unit is involved in all of ZOA’s core sectors (WASH, livelihoods, education) plus shelter. Newly established disaster response programmes outside existing ZOA countries fall under direct supervision of the DRU in the Netherlands.

Disaster Response Unit in 2013 The Disaster Response Unit operates with four permanent staff members: a manager, a programme officer, a general affairs officer and a communication officer. DRU also has access to short term staff through a pool of experienced staff on stand-by, to be able to respond quickly in times of sudden crisis. During 2013 we finalized two programmes, continued one and established two new programmes. Haiti and Pakistan As of 31 December 2013 ZOA has closed down operations in Haiti and Pakistan, where the DRU approach started out in 2011. To increase the sustainability of our programmes, ZOA worked along local partners and community based organisations, thus allowing continuation after ZOA’s withdrawal. Yemen In Yemen ZOA will continue to improve the living conditions of the conflict affected communities in Arhab and Bani

Garmouz (sub)districts of Sana’a governorate through a WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) intervention. Jordan A new programme started in Jordan in February 2013 due to the increasing humanitarian crisis in war-torn Syria. ZOA supported a distribution in Mafraq through Dorcas which addressed immediate needs of the refugee families. We started working alongside local partner ACCTS/AWT. Focus is on the refugees living in urban areas that need relief goods and psycho-social support. Philippines On 8 November 2013 super typhoon Yolanda hit the central part of the Philippines, the Visayas. Over 14 million people were affected and more than 1 million people’s houses were either damaged or destroyed. In collaboration with AMG Philippines, a local organisation, ZOA set up a shelter programme in Eastern Samar. Campaigns were launched in The Netherlands for both new programmes, with several (Jordan) or all (Philippines) members of the Christian Relief Cluster: Dorcas, Red een Kind, Tear and Woord and Daad.


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ZOA Haiti Worked in:

Léogâne: sections Grand Riviere, Palmist a Vin, Fond de Boudin, Petit Riviere, and Petit Harpo.

Focused on:

Livelihoods | With specific attention to peace and stability

Results included the following:

Total results of the Livelihoods for Earthquake Affected People (LEAP): Micro Credit Programme 1,000 clients received micro loans; 346 male, 654 female. Business Development 60 small and medium entrepreneurs (SMEs) completed the 12-day business sessions | 57 new jobs were created. Sustainable Agriculture 4,423 farmer-families assisted by LEAP | 22 Farmer Associations are functioning | 22 Local Agricultural Technicians were trained | 60 local veterinarians | 9 communities conduct regular veterinary clinics I 17 functional seed banks | 21 communities now implementing Sloping Agricultural Land Technology (SALT) | 22 communities have their own communal vegetable gardens | 17 community nurseries

Worked with:

World Renew – International Disaster Response. ZOA’s programme manager for the LEAP-programme was seconded to the World Renew- Disaster Response team | Léogâne local CASEC government | Farmers Associations | PWOFOD: Programme Formation Dyak | Partners Worldwide (PWW) – Haiti

Staff 31 December 2013:

1

Received donations from:

ZOA Netherlands (Emergency Funds)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 68,242

Budget in 2014:

€0


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Disaster Response

Haiti Recovery from disaster, hope for the future ZOA implemented a three year programme in the Léogâne area, the epicenter of the January 2010 earthquake: Livelihoods for Earthquake Affected People (LEAP). The objective of ZOA’s programme, that started in January 2011 and ended in December 2013, was to assist 6,700 households till they have the same level of income as before the earthquake – and preferably above that level. In total 5,300 households have been provided with relevant and effective assistance to livelihood recovery, slightly less than targeted due to achievement being slower than expected, especially in business development.

ZOA Haiti in 2013 LEAP consists of three major components: micro-enterprise development, business development and sustainable agriculture, all contributing to the improvement of livelihood.

Micro-enterprise In total, a number of 1,000 micro-entrepreneurs have received loans to start or continue their business. Recipients have acknowledged the impact of the loans, some stated they are now able to send their children to school and others mentioned they were able to reconstruct their houses or even start a second business. Loans are distributed over a 6-month period, which is one loan cycle. Almost half of the entrepreneurs have renewed their loans and are already in their second, third or even fourth cycle. Almost 80% of the entrepreneurs have fully paid off their loans. PWOFOD, a local organization implementing this component, will continue this micro-enterprise programme in 2014, in collaboration with twelve local churches that recruit and select participants from the entire community.

Business development ZOA decided to scale down the cooperation with Partners World Wide on the Business Development component as of January 2013. PWW trained 60 Small and Medium Entrepreneurs so far. The long-term approach of PWW turned out to be less complementary to our mid-term disaster response programme. The project manager was still involved in the loan committee to review business plans. PWW continues to support the SMEs and the entrepreneurs already created 57 jobs. A network of SMEs has been registered and fully recognized by the government.

Sustainable agriculture Evaluation showed that the programme has effectively delivered an impressive quantity of both livelihoods and asset recovery and related longer term community development in 22 communities. Each community now has a trained agricultural technician and many of them have nurseries and seed banks which will increase opportunities for long-term impact and sustainability. Already existing Community Associations have received valuable training to manage activities such as seed banks, goat schemes and promoting community development. Due to the after-effects of the two heavy tropical storms in 2012, farmers were in need of supplies since most of their harvests had been destroyed. Therefore, also in the final year, farm tools and seeds were distributed and cash for work activities were initiated. After three years we say farewell to Haiti with the words of Programme Manager Jeff C. Cosico: “May the seeds we planted be nurtured and bear more fruits, you will continue to be in my heart”.

Big dreams start small New and existing micro-entrepreneurs have received loans, just like Esther Omesse. She is running a cassava mill which she started in 2011 which was so successful that she has now started a store as well. She started out with little but she proudly presents her shop which has only opened recently. She sells drinks and snacks from a shipping container, but this is just the beginning: “After 5 years, God willing, our goal is to have our own Family Omesse complex and to expand the store, upstairs we will have a beauty salon. It will be beautiful!” On the container Esther has painted ‘Sel Dye..’ which means ‘Only God’ and she means to add ‘..konsa!’ to say ‘Only God is like this!’ since she is grateful for all she has received.


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ZOA Jordan Worked in:

Northern Jordan: • Mafraq • Irbid • Hosson

Focused on:

Emergency response

Results included the following:

Mafraq Emergency Response 516 families received mattresses and kitchen equipment, 258 families also received gas stoves and gas bottles. Irbid and Hosson Emergency Response • Distribution of relief packages to 2,000 households. • Two events for in total 300 children: Syrian refugee children and children from the Jordanian host community. • Trauma Healing Workshops for 700 women. Capacity building of local organisation AWT/ACCTS

Worked with:

Dorcas, CMA Church Mafraq, Food for the Hungry, World Renew ACCTS/AWT, local churches

Staff 31 December 2013:

No permanent local presence

Received donations from:

Deputaatschap Bijzondere Noden, ZOA Netherlands (Emergency funds, private donors, Hersteld Hervormde Kerk)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 252,525

Budget in 2014:

€ 38,667


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Disaster Response

Jordan Relief for the victims of civil war in Syria A new programme was started up in Jordan in February 2013 due to the increasing humanitarian crisis in war-torn Syria. Protests that started in Syria in March 2011 have progressively developed into a widespread armed conflict. Humanitarian consequences in Syria, Jordan and other neighboring countries are severe. The influx of refugees has increased tremendously in the course of 2013, with over 2 million people crossing the borders since the start of the conflict. ZOA aims to strengthen the humanitarian response effort to those affected by the current crisis. Focus is on the refugees residing in urban areas in Jordan who are less visible and therefore often overlooked by aid agencies.

ZOA Jordan in 2013 ZOA supported a distribution centre in Mafraq through Dorcas and the local CMA church which addressed immediate humanitarian needs. 516 families were able to receive relief goods such as mattrasses and kitchen equipment, half of them received a stove and gas bottle. Not only did this project answer the urgent needs of the families, it also strengthened the role of the local church in assisting refugees and has positively contributed to their position in the community. ZOA started working alongside local partner ACCTS/AWT, a local NGO focusing mainly on the position of women in Arab societies and previously involved in distributions to refugees. During an intensive training programme ACCTS/ AWT was trained to organise a professional selection and distribution process. The programme was able to mobilize churches and church volunteers due to the valuable

relations that ACCTS/AWT has with the local protestant churches in Jordan. Subsequently the local capacity to reach out to refugees in the cities was increased. In a next step ZOA successfully invited Tearfund UK and World Renew to participate in the programme and support ACCTS/AWT. Together they supported the ACCTS distribution and psycho-social facility with € 816,000 in 2013. The organisation was able to distribute food and other relief goods in the border towns Irbid and Hosson. The focus is on those families that are waiting to be registered with the UNHCR, which could take several months. Unregistered refugees are vulnerable and do not have access to aid. Not only the refugees are in need, the Jordanian host community is also greatly affected by the influx of half a million refugees due to job competition and higher rents for apartments. On average almost 8% of the goods have been distributed to poor Jordanians. Since ACCTS/AWT has expertise in psycho-social support we organized workshops for 700 women in Irbid and Hosson. Although material needs remain, many women suffer from war traumas and so do their families. By strengthening the women, the whole family benefits. Two events for children were organized for 300 Syrian and Jordanian youngsters. By playing games and enjoying the entertainment together, children of both communities could mingle and build bridges together. Just to be able to face the world as any ordinary child, even for one day.

Hassan’s heartbreak “I was playing soccer with some friends and neighbors in Damascus when a car stopped at the end of the street. A man came out and started shooting. My friend Ismael was hit in his stomach by two bullets. Nobody went to him, until his mother came outside and held him in her arms. Seeing dead bodies on the street became normal. It made me think that this is how I would end up one day. It is terrible and heartbreaking.” Hassan represents the many Syrian refugee children whose youth has been violently disrupted by the ongoing civil war in a country that once had great opportunities. Although his eyes have seen images no child should ever see, his dreams have not been destroyed. He wants to become a doctor. In Jordan he is rebuilding his life, together with his family.


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ZOA Pakistan Worked in:

Rahim Yar Khan and Muzaffargarh, both located in Southern Punjab

Focused on:

Livelihoods (agriculture) | WASH | Emergency Shelter | With special attention to capacity building of civil society and peace and stability and Disaster Risk Reduction

Results included the following:

Rahim Yar Khan • Training and agricultural support for 250 Community Based Organisations • Training for 250 Female Based Groups • 6162 female beneficiaries received vegetable seeds • 5547 beneficiaries received hygiene packages • Legal registration of 250 CBOs as CCBs (Citizens Community Boards) with the District Social Welfare Department Rahim Yar Khan, Government of Pakistan. Muzaffargarh Empowerment of 18 communities in disaster management and practices, reducing vulnerability, and increasing resilience by: • Formation of Disaster Management Committees (DMCs) in 18 communities • Capacity building of the DMCs on Emergency Response & Disaster Mitigation • 528 members participated in training courses on Community Disaster Preparedness Plans including 258 females • Conduct awareness raising on disaster preparedness issues to the community members • Development of Community Disaster Preparedness Plans (CDPP) • Communities are linked to existing early warning systems

Worked with:

Local NGOs: Interfaith – League Against Poverty (I-LAP) | ZOR Engineering | Sustainable Development Organisation (SDO)

Staff 31 December 2013:

1

Received donations from:

ZOA Netherlands (Emergency Funds, churches), Woord en Daad Expenditures in 2013

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 462,749

Budget in 2014:

€0


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Disaster Response

Pakistan Moving from insecurity to stability This year marked the final year of ZOA’s Disaster Response Programme in Pakistan following the flooding in August 2010. The programme is continuously carried out in cooperation with local partner I-LAP (Interfaith - League Against Poverty). An early recovery mission assisted in preparing the fields and repairing the irrigation system of the most vulnerable people. After this, shelter was provided for more than 750 households and Community Based Organisations (CBOs) and Female Based Groups (FBGs) were established in order to socio-economically empower the people of Rahim Yar Khan.

ZOA Pakistan in 2013 This year we have continued training the 250 CBOs and their female counterpart: 250 FBGs. Among the training topics of the CBOs; good governance, financial management and community organization. The women were trained on sanitation and hygiene practices, peace, tolerance and interfaith harmony. These trainings have helped farmer families to organize themselves, be more resilient to disaster and improve hygiene practices. A new training module for the CBOs has been launched this year to create ownership for the development of the community. By designing so-called Self Help Plans, the community came up with ideas to improve their own environment. A variety of plans were initiated, such as construction of roads, schools and cleaning of water channels. Although training of CBOs should have ended in June, we were able to continue the trainings for three more months due to the fact that costs were lower than expected. By doing so, trainers could elaborate on highly important

sections of the training and add new sessions, mainly on Disaster Risk Reduction. To ensure the continuation of the CBOs, all are registered with the government which gives them a legal status and allows them to open a bank account. Last year ZOA has finalized the construction of 753 shelters including latrines. This year, some of these houses were in need of improvements due to construction errors which were discovered during an external auditing process. These improvements have been satisfactory carried out by a local engineering company.

Confident in Disaster Risk Reduction A new project started with local partner organisation SDO in Muzaffargarh, a flood-prone area as well, on the banks of the Indus river. The 5-month project aimed to empower 18 communities in disaster management and practices, reducing vulnerability and increasing resilience. All villages now have active Village Disaster Management Committees in place, which are responsible for designing disaster preparedness plans and to deliver training. The communities are linked to existing early warning systems to take timely measures when flooding occurs. Evaluation of the project showed that, compared to the past, all communities have significantly improved their preparedness and response and feel confident about their role. They know which hazards can be expected, will receive timely warnings and will implement their plans when flooding occurs.

Help us to help ourselves Before attending training on Disaster Risk Reduction Ghulam first teaches the children in his village. He is not only the President of the CBO, but also the teacher of the local school which recently started as a ‘Self Help Project’. Asked about the situation before the training and the situation now, he answers: ”We feel positive changes in our lives. Now our situation and the way of living is better than in 2010. There is a change in how we deal with health and hygiene and we have acquired more knowledge in the agricultural field. We also have peace together now in our community. We sit together, share our problems and discuss them with each other.”


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Disaster Response

ZOA Philippines Worked in:

Eastern Samar

Focused on:

• Emergency relief • One Room Shelter

Results included the following:

• Assessment with all members of the Christian Relief Cluster • Start-up of local country office in Borongan • Identifying most affected communities • Designing a transitional shelter construction to benefit 800 households and repairing 400 houses. • Seed distribution to 700 rice farmers

Worked with:

AMG Philippines, World Renew

Staff 31 December 2013:

1

Received donations from:

Netherlands (Emergency fund, private donors)

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 22,483

Budget in 2014:

To be defined


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Disaster Response

Philippines Building back better On the morning of 8 November, super typhoon Haiyan, locally known as Yolanda, made landfall in the Philippines, a densely populated country of almost 100 million people. Haiyan was the most powerful storm recorded in recent years, devastating areas in 44 provinces in the Visayas. Not only were lives lost; over a million houses were damaged, leaving 4 million people displaced, many of whom lost their source of livelihood: fishing and coconut farming. The Filipino spirit is remarkably resilient – as is their faith. It sustains them even though they might have lost all their physical possessions. Such a disaster would have reduced other people to despair; but not the Filipino. Affected communities are trying to rebuild their lives with the few resources they have, creating make-shift homes from whatever there is to be found amongst the rubble and debris. The task is enormous and it was clear that this time outside support would be needed. Filipinos from nonaffected areas are doing all they can to help their fellow countrymen. It is inspiring to see that the majority of people will not ask for anything, but when offered, are enthusiastic and feel blessed.

ZOA Philippines While launching a joint fundraising campaign immediately after the disaster struck, ZOA teamed up with the other four members of the Christian Relief Cluster to conduct an initial assessment: Dorcas, Red een Kind, Tear and Woord en Daad. As a result, the

five organisations and their partners adopted a joint programme plan with a geographical focus on Eastern Samar, aimed at the sectors education, livelihoods and shelter. This is a unique response, in the sense that the Christian Relief Cluster goes further than cooperation in the Netherlands. The cluster works together on the ground as well, creating more impact as we work alongside each other, benefitting from each other’s strengths and expertise. This is an ambitious move and it will be challenging to implement, but all of the members are determined to make this work, for the cause of the Filipino people. ZOA coordinated the activities in the field and has started a transitional shelter programme for 1,200 people affected by Haiyan. Together with AMG Philippines and the municipal engineer, a prototype model of a one-room-shelter was designed. Several features of the house help to make it more resistant to hurricanes, for instance by using diagonal beams, cement footing and hurricane straps to tighten the roof. Three municipalities have been identified in close collaboration with the local government: Hernani, Giporlos and Quinapondan. In 2014 ZOA will continue with the construction of shelter and carry out repairs to partially damaged houses. Activities in livelihoods will be further assessed and initiated. Taking a holistic approach, the people will benefit on different levels to build stronger and even more resilient communities.

Touched by compassion Roque is the first owner of a house in the shelter programme. He was identified by the community itself as a person most in need and most ‘deserving’. He lives in one of the communities that has been ‘completely washed out’ by Haiyan, causing the death of 24 people. Among them, Roque’s wife and 21-year old daughter who had just graduated as a midwife. For Roque and many others this house makes an immense difference . “I am grateful that people have so much compassion for us. This great help soothes my grief . It is a gift from God”


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ZOA Yemen Worked in:

Sana’a Governorate: Arhab district and Bani-Garmoz sub-district

Focused on:

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)s With specific attention to: Basic Services | Capacity building of local organisations and community structures Livelihoods | Youth Economic Empowerment

Results included the following:

WASH: Construction of cisterns in 20 villages, including the setting up of Water User Committees. | Construction of 148 rooftop water collection systems and 100 dry pit latrines. | Training of 40 female Community Health Volunteers who conduct health and hygiene awareness sessions. | Distribution of 2,000 silver filters and hygiene kits by Community Health Volunteers | Production of demonstration video for silver filter on how to use and maintain the filter. Livelihoods: Vocational, WASH-related training to 70 unemployed youths who are enrolled in the Youth Economic Empowerment Project. | Part of the project is ‘cash for work’, UNDP will increase savings to almost 700 euros (200.000 YER) and ensure that participants receive business skills training. Organisational capacity building: Training on Humanitarian Accountability for staff of partner organisation. | Finance training and organisational management training for two Community Based Organisations including project management, humanitarian standards and community mobilization. Advocacy and training for Sana’a Basin Management: Lobby for the Sana’a Basin Management Approach to improve the water quality by advocating an increase of treatment of sewage water by the water treatment plant since only 40-50% is treated. | Training of 35 Water User Committees and linking them to Sana’a basin management committee.

Worked with:

Vision Hope International (INGO), implementing partner | UNDP | Jamaiyya Arhab (CBO) | Jamaiyya Bani Al-Harith (CBO) | GARWSP (General Authority for Rural Water Supply Project)

Staff 31 December 2013:

4

Received donations from:

UNDP I Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Yemen I ZOA Netherlands

Expenditures in 2013:

€ 518,955

Budget in 2014:

€ 1,251,470


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Disaster Response

Yemen Recovery from conflict, restoring living conditions As a result of the Arabic uprising serious problems arose in the deeply impoverished country of Yemen. Behind the political crisis there are other problems related to continuous refugee influx, tribal conflicts, overpopulation and depletion of resources, all contributing to an ever increasing, merely forgotten crisis, causing severe and widespread chronic vulnerabilities. Yemen is one of the most water stressed countries in the world, more than 10 million people are malnourished, which is half of the population. Unfortunately, over the last year, there has been a deterioration in the security situation. This is the result of a number of factors including the political transition, the absence of rule of law, and a broader increase in the level of criminality and violence.

ZOA Yemen in 2013 This year was the first full year of the Disaster Response Operation in Yemen in Sana’a Governorate, in cooperation with Vision Hope International (VHI). Focus is on improving the living conditions of the conflict affected communities in Arhab and Bani Garmouz through a WASH intervention. In 2013 the inception phase for this project has finished and the project moved on to the implementation phase. Meanwhile we explored new target areas, such as Hajja and Al Hudaydah governorates, which belong to the highest malnourished areas in Yemen.

Arhab and Bani Garmouz After experiencing violent clashes and fighting in 2011, many families within these districts had no other option than to seek refuge elsewhere. Fights between the

government army and tribal groups have decreased, although the situation remains tense. ZOA focuses on families struggling to resume their lives. Since infrastructure is damaged and wells have been destroyed, it has become very difficult for people to support themselves. Farmers rely on this well water to irrigate crops. Although the main focus is on domestic water use through improved rainwater catchment methods, ZOA will make sure that also farmers will benefit from the repaired wells to restart cultivating their land. The depletion of sub-surface water resources and ever growing dependency on water trucking ask for more sustainable solutions like rain water catchment and storage. Hygiene conditions are a major concern in many communities; awareness raising, preferably through women can help change behavior. We work closely together with two Community Based Organisations (CBOs) to implement the project activities. CBOs are trained to improve their organizational capacity and accounting skills. Seventy unemployed youths from the target area have received a short training to carry out ‘cash for work’ related to the WASH construction activities. Furthermore, they will be enrolled in a business skills training and will receive vocational training related to WASH, so that they can start up their own business in the near future. For 2014, funding has been approved to start a women empowerment project in Hajjah. Livelihoods will be improved by providing twenty women with training in sewing and the means to start a small business.

Fatima (50) from Hawm, Arhab. Her wrinkled face shows the marks of the hard life in this arid environment, like sunbeams running down from the corners of her eyes. “All my life I have lived in this town. Besides one school, there are no facilities: no electricity, no doctor. Still, before the conflict, life was easy compared to today. There is less work, and gasoline and food have become much more expensive. Water is scarce. Every day I fetch my water from the well, half an hour from my home, carrying a jerry can on my head. We depend on the rainfall, and in dry times we all pay to hire a small truck that will deliver water.” A more reliable source of water is very welcome in Fatima’s village, as well as knowledge on health and hygiene practices.


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11. Financial report 11.1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION In 2013 the total income of ZOA, excluding MFS-2 partners’ income, grew to € 35.9 million (2012: € 34.5 million). That is 4.3% higher than in 2012. Income of € 8.2 million of MFS-2 funds was received on behalf of the partners in the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (DCR). ZOA is legally responsible for this programme as a whole and therefore reports the annual income 2013, including the contractual income of the DCR partners CARE Netherlands, Save the Children and Healthnet TPO. Recognition of income in this manner is in line with Dutch accounting principles. Income from own fundraising increased by € 2.1 million compared to last year. The increase is mainly due to the major emergency relief fundraising campaign in 2013 for Jordan and the Philippines. The income from governments and other subsidies stood at the same level in 2013 as in 2012. But compared to the budget of 2013 the income is € 6.0 million lower. This is due to certain potential project grants being approved later than expected and some not yet being approved. Lower implementation of project volumes in 2013 in ZOA programme countries compared to budget, resulted in lower income recognition in 2013. Total expenditures spent on objectives decreased to a level of € 39.8 million (2012: €40.9 million), including € 8.2 million spent for MFS by DCR partners. Excluding these expenditures, ZOA’s expenditures spent on objectives decreased by 3.6% to

a level of € 31.6 million, mainly due to lower expenditures on education and awareness raising in the Netherlands. ZOA’s programme countries abroad realised their programme objectives in 2013, resulting in a country office deficit of € 0.9 million while a deficit of € 0.5 million was forecasted in the budget. This higher deficit was mainly due to losses on differences in exchange rates of outstanding dollar receivables from donors and also to a high indirect cost level in the South-Sudan, Afghanistan and Ethiopia programme. The coverage by donors of indirect costs in these countries was limited in 2013. In the ZOA Netherlands organisation the costs for preparation and coordination in 2013 are in line with the amount budgeted for 2013. In the other cost categories changes were made in cost allocation. The costs of education and awareness raising therefore decreased compared to 2012 and the budget 2013. The costs of fundraising and management and administration increased due to the new allocation method of costs. At the same time the CBF percentage (own fundraising costs) of 17.4% stands at the same level as in 2012. The higher fundraising costs are compensated by the higher income from emergency campaigns for Jordan and the Philippines in 2013.

Income ZOA excl. MFS-2 partner income (x € 1.000)

Spen

35000 Income ZOA excl. MFS-2 partner income (x € 1.000)

94% Spen

35000 30000

94%

30000 25000

92% 92%

25000 20000 20000 15000 15000 10000 10000 5000 5000 0 0

90% 18.811 18.811

23.405

25.729

25.870

90%

23.405

25.729

25.870

88%

610

88%

1.162

816

1.162 8.504

816 8.136

1.503 6.798

8.897

86%

8.504 2010

8.136 2011

6.798 2012

8.897 2013

0

2012

2013

2011 2010 Project grants Action parties Project3rd grants Own fundraising Action 3rd parties Own fundraising

1.503

610

86%

0


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Financial report

Changes in net results compared to budget In comparison to the budget, the change in net result (adjustment to the reserves) can be explained as mentioned below.

Budgeted result 2013 allocated to reserves (€)

-115.000

Exceptional benefits in The Netherlands

373.433

Higher income without specific designation

332.495

Lower operational and overhead costs in The Netherlands

255.186

Higher contributions from countries to cover the costs in The Netherlands

12.508

Additional contribution to funds

-49.537

Lower interest benefits

-127.274

Additional contribution to programme reserves

-145.811

Lower country results abroad including release of other reserves

-427.452

Actual results 2013 allocated to reserves

108.548

The exceptional benefits in The Netherlands include a profit from the sale of the old-office building of € 0.1 million and € 0.2 million gain from a VAT receipt from previous years. The lower operational and overhead costs in The Netherlands can be explained by cost reductions. The lower country results abroad are due to losses on exchange rate differences and uncovered indirect costs in the SouthSudan, Afghanistan and Ethiopia programme. The lower interest benefits are due to the fact that more money is outstanding from donors and therefore less money was deposited on interest-bearing accounts. Another effect was that the interest % on interest bearing accounts was lower than budgeted. The total surplus as a result of income and expenses is € 1.2 million, which is far from the expected deficit in the budget 2013. This is mainly due to the high amounts received from the emergency campaign at the end 2013 which will be

spent in coming years. Therefore, € 1.1 million of the current year’s surplus has been added to the programme funds. The allocated reserves within ZOA are relatively low given the risks ZOA faces, particularly in the countries. It is, therefore, ZOA’s objective to allocate results to the reserves, which is the surplus or deficit remaining after all liabilities have been covered. In 2013 an additional amount was added to the programme guarantee reserve and also to the disaster response reserve. Additional information is included in the explanation of the reserves.

Liquidity position At the end of 2013 more receivables were outstanding with different donors, decreasing the cash position per 31 December 2013 compared to last year. At the same time the pre-payments by donors were higher than in 2012. The expectation is that these receivables will be paid in 2014. The liquidity position of ZOA is sound.


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Financial report

11.2 ANNUAL ACCOUNTS 2013 BALANCE SHEET AS PER 31 DECEMBER (â‚Ź) (after appropriation of the result)

Assets

31-12-2013

31-12-2012

Tangible fixed assets Land

349,000

-

Building

1,062,927

326,417

Inventory & equipment

208,218

222,727

Vehicles in programme area's

379,940

612,278

Receivables

2,000,085

1,161,422

10,559,073

5,919,357

Cash and cash equivalents

10,697,247

15,148,776

Total assets

23,256,405

22,229,555

31-12-2013

31-12-2012

5,396,167

5,396,167

Reserves and liabilities Reserves and funds Continuity reserve Allocated reserve Programme guarantee

356,228

284,541

Disaster response

676,453

631,006

Other

267,529

276,114

Programme funds

1,300,210

1,191,661

4,502,099

3,385,929

11,198,476

9,973,757

Short-term liabilities Taxes and social security contributions

187,414

158,872

Accruals to donors

8,541,997

7,171,316

Other liabilities and other accruals

3,328,518

4,925,610

Total reserves and liabilities

12,057,929

12,255,798

23,256,405

22,229,555


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Financial report

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES (â‚Ź) Income

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Income own fundraising activities Door to door collection

851,329

920,000

925,207

Legacies

247,376

375,000

347,531

Contribution, donations, gifts

7,797,962

5,282,011

5,525,040

Income from third party campaigns

8,896,667

6,577,011

6,797,778

610,304

1,000,000

1,502,718

Project grants from government for MFS-2 partners

8,227,091

8,175,164

8,091,621

Project grants from government (other)

25,870,133

31,913,924

25,729,483

Project grants total

34,097,224

40,089,088

33,821,104

Interest

102,726

230,000

250,414

Rate differences and other income

412,786

-

144,982

44,119,707

47,896,099

42,516,996

Total income


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97

Financial report

Expenditures

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Spent on objectives Project spenditures through MFS-2 partners

8,227,091

8,175,164

8,091,621

Own spenditures on objectives

28,769,583

35,602,689

29,698,406

Spent on objectives in countries Preparation and coordination from The Netherlands Education/awareness raising Total spent on objectives

36,996,674

43,777,853

37,790,027

2,237,078

2,231,116

2,032,294

600,068

1,128,318

1,042,765

39,833,820

47,137,287

40,865,086

Spent on fundrasing Expenses own fundraising

1,549,273

Expenses participation in external campaigns

80,373

85,573

84,356

Expenses received project grants

198,227

322,503

223,203

Management and administration

Total expenditures

Surplus / -deficit

17.4%

1,235,650

18.8%

1,182,625

17.4%

1,827,873

1,643,726

1,490,184

1,233,296

1,150,341

1,211,190

42,894,989

49,931,354

43,566,460

1,224,718

-2,035,255

-1,049,464

1,116,170

-1,920,255

-985,680

Added to / -withdrawn from Funds Reserves Continuity reserve

-

-

175,677

Programme guarantee

71,686

-

-87,984

Disaster response

45,447

-115,000

-148,632

Other allocated reserves

-8,585

-

-2,845

Total change in reserves and funds

108,548

-115,000

-63,784

1,224,718

-2,035,255

-1,049,464


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Financial report

CASH FLOW OVERVIEW

CASH FLOW OVERVIEW Cash flow (â‚Ź)

Actual 2013

Actual 2012

Out of own fundraising

9,050,213

6,797,778

Out of third party campaigns

610,304

1,502,718

Out of project grants

22,584,588

23,687,643

Other income

453,385

254,700

Cash flow from operating activities Received

32,698,490

32,242,839

Payments Programme and coordination costs

34,405,267

30,734,046

Fundraising, management and administration costs

1,416,624

2,454,511

Cash flow from operating activities

-35,821,891

-33,188,557

-3,123,401

-945,718

Cash flow from investments: Assets sold / -bought

-1,743,676

-790,425

Disposals of tangible fixed assets

415,548

95,000

Change in cash equivalents

-4,451,529

-1,641,143

Cash and cash equivalents 31 December

10,697,247

15,148,776

Cash and cash equivalents 1 January

15,148,776

16,789,919

Change in cash equivalents

-4,451,529

-1,641,143

The cash flow statement is according to the direct method. The change in cash position can be explained by outstanding payments from institutional donors and large pre payments of MFS-2 project in 2012 for the year 2013.

Ratio liquidity

Actual 2013

Actual 2012

Liquidity expressed by ACID ratio

176%

172%

Receivables and Cash

21,256,320

21,068,133

Short-term liabilities

12,057,929

12,255,798

ACID ratio measures the ability of ZOA to use its near cash or quick assets to extinguish or retire its current liabilities immediately. Based on the liquidity ratio of 176%, ZOA has sufficient funds available to cover all obligations on the short term. The long-term obligations are covered by the total reserve and funds of â‚Ź 11.1 million.


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Financial report

EXPLANATORY NOTES TO THE ANNUAL ACCOUNTS 2013 General The annual accounts have been prepared in accordance with the Guideline 650 of Fundraising Organisations (RJ 650). All indicator percentages are excluded for the income and expenditures of Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (DCR) partners with respect to the MFS-2 project. The annual accounts have been prepared on a historical cost basis. Unless indicated otherwise, assets and liabilities are presented at face value. Income and expenditure are allocated to the period to which they relate. The Annual accounts are presented in Euros. Reporting period These annual accounts have been prepared based on a reviewed period of one year. The financial year coincides with the calendar year. Transactions in foreign currencies Transactions in foreign currencies are converted against the exchange rate applicable at the time of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities in foreign currencies are converted on the balance sheet date in the functional currency against the rate applicable on this date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities in foreign currencies that are presented at historical cost are converted into euros at the exchange rates applicable on the transaction date. Differences in exchange rates appear as a result in the statement of income and expenditures. Use of estimates The preparation of the annual accounts requires the Chief Executive Officer to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that influence the application of accounting principles, as well as the reported value of

assets and liabilities and income and expenditure. The actual outcome may deviate from these estimates. The estimates and underlying assumptions are continually assessed. Revised estimates are used in the period that the estimate changes and in future periods where the revision may have consequences. Impairment If the carrying amount of an asset exceeds the higher of the direct sales value and the estimated present value of the future cash flows, impairment is charged which is the difference between the carrying amount and the recoverable amount. Financial instruments During the normal course of business, ZOA uses various financial instruments that expose the organisation to market and/or credit risks. These relate to financial instruments that are included on the balance sheet. Receivables in the balance sheet mainly relate to donor receivables and are mainly from large institutional third parties. Therefore the credit risks on these receivables are limited. ZOA has a very limited interest rate risk, as ZOA has no interest bearing loans. The market value of the financial instruments stated on the balance sheet is approximately equal to their carrying amount. ZOA does not trade in financial derivatives. Changes in allocation method (model c) In accordance with RJ 650 model c has been included in the financial statements. In 2013 the allocation method has been revised to give a better overview of the cost per objective. In 2012 the allocation method was based on an estimated allocation per department. From 2013 the allocation is based on an estimated allocation per employee, to be more accurate. The actual figures 2012 and the budget 2013 have not been adjusted according to this new methodology.

Accounting principles for the Balance sheet Tangible fixed assets The buildings, refurbishments, fixtures and equipment and means of transport in programme areas are valued at acquisition or manufacturing cost minus the cumulative depreciations and/or accumulated impairment losses, if any. Maintenance expenses will only be capitalized as assets if they extend the economic life of the object. Depreciations are calculated as a percentage of the acquisition price according to the straight-line method based on the estimated useful lives of the assets. Land, tangible fixed assets for sale are not depreciated. Land: Buildings: Refurbishments: Inventory and equipment: Vehicles in programme areas:

0% 3 1/3 % 10 % 25 % 33 1/3 %

Receivables, prepayments and accrued income Receivables are valued at face value minus a provision for non-recoverability. Provisions are determined according to individual assessment of the collectability of the debts. Reserves and funds The reserves and funds of ZOA are in place in order to achieve ZOA’s objectives. They can be summarized as follows: Continuity reserve The general part of the continuity reserve enables the organisation to meet its commitments towards employees during a (temporary) stagnation of income. The restriction on spending the reserve for special purposes has been determined by the Chief Executive Officer.


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CHAPTER 11

Allocated reserve The allocated reserves are earmarked by the Chief Executive Officer and consist of programme guarantees, disaster response activities and other earmarked reserves relating to assets in countries. Programme Funds Funds concern funding acquired with a specific use designated by third parties, but not yet spent by ZOA. Personnel remuneration/pensions Obligations relating to contributions to pension schemes based on defined contributions are presented as expenditures in the statement of income and expenditures in the period that the contributions are due. In addition, a provision is included for existing additional commitments to employees, provided it is likely that there will be an outflow of funds for the settlements of the commitments and it is possible to reliably estimate the amount of the commitments. Liabilities ZOA enters into donor obligations in the areas abroad where ZOA is implementing programmes. A donor obligation is recognised after the Chief Executive Officer has passed a resolution on this and has communicated it to the grant recipient, often the target group represented by a local organisation or government agency, which leads to a legally enforceable or actual obligation. This obligation is presented in the balance sheet as a liability if the total contract value of donors is insufficient to cover these programme obligation.

Accounting principles for the Statement of Income and Expenditures All proceeds are entered as income for the gross amount, unless this chapter explicitly states otherwise. Costs necessary to realise certain income are presented as expenditure in the statement of income and expenditures.

Financial report

Income from own fundraising activities Income from own fundraising activities is recognised as income in the year of receiving, or moment of signing a specific contract. It includes the income from door-to door collection, legacies, contributions, donations and gifts. Donations in kind are valued at the actual value in The Netherlands. Legacies are recorded as income when they can be reliable estimated.

will not be accounted for in the statement of income and expenditures.

Income recognition programmes implemented by partners Income recognition related to programme implemented by partners is based on the periodically received expenditure reports.

Spending toward objectives Expenditures spent on objectives include amounts allocated toward activities designed to meet the objectives during the financial year, as well as implementation costs. Expenditures include subsidies to local partners, relief goods and food purchased, cost of deployed personnel, transport costs, local accommodation costs and office expenses. It also includes the acquisition costs of the means of transport and office inventory, which will be made available to the local partner after the programme has ended.

Income from third party campaigns The contributions from other fundraising organisations are accounted for as ‘income from third party campaigns’ for the amount received by the organisation. They are recognised in the year that the income from the campaign by third parties was received or pledged by this third party. Campaigns by third parties only include campaigns for which ZOA does not bear risks. Project Grants from governments Operating grants are recognised in the statement of income and expenditures of the year that included the subsidised expenditure. Losses are taken into account if they originate in the relevant financial year and as soon as these are anticipated. Project grants of MFS-2 consortium partners are fully recognised on a contractual cash basis, because ZOA acts as the legal responsible lead agency. Project Grants in kind The received grants in kind, often food and relief supplies, are valued at the cost stated in the contract relating to the goods. If the contract does not provide for this, the goods will be valued at market value at the place of delivery. If the received goods are not based on a contract and a reliable valuation is lacking, the transaction

Costs Since third parties also wish to gain insight into the level and composition of the costs of fundraising organisations, the notes provide a specification of these costs in accordance with model C of the RJ-650 guidelines.

Costs fundraising organisation All costs, incurred for activities with the aim of persuading people to donate money for one or more of ZOA’s objectives, are earmarked as costs of fundraising income. This means that the costs for publicity and public relations are regarded as costs of fundraising income, unless they are information costs. The activities will often be mixed: information and fundraising at the same time. In such cases, the part of the costs relating to the information activity will be allocated to this activity. Depending on the specific information objectives, the allocation formula is decided in advance for each situation. Costs of management and administration Costs of management and administration are the costs that ZOA incurs for the (internal) management and administration and which are not allocated to ZOA’s objectives or fundraising income.


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Financial report

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102

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NOTES TO THE BALANCE SHEET AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2013 Tangible fixed assets (€)

Land

Building

Inventory &

Vehicles

Equipment

Total

Total

2013

2012

At 1 January 2013 Acquisition value

-

933,902

1,348,720

2,277,544

4,560,166

4,028,734

Cumulative depreciation

-

607,485

1,125,993

1,665,266

3,398,744

3,062,386

Correction acquisition value

-

-

1,354

737,649

739,003

-

Correction cumulative depreciation

-

-3,000

5,235

736,768

739,003

-

Book value

-

329,417

218,846

613,159

1,161,422

966,348

349,000

1,084,545

152,454

314,679

1,900,678

790,425

Disposals

-

933,902

747,366

217,945

1,899,213

258,993

Depreciations

-

21,618

159,559

533,380

714,557

595,351

Depreciations disposals

-

604,485

743,843

203,427

1,551,755

258,993

349,000

733,510

-10,628

-233,219

838,663

195,074

349,000

1,084,545

755,162

3,111,927

5,300,634

4,560,166

-

21,618

546,944

2,731,987

3,300,549

3,398,744

349,000

1,062,927

208,218

379,940

2,000,085

1,161,422

Changes in book value: Investments

Balance At 31 December 2013 Acquisition value Cumulative depreciation Book value

The tangible fixed assets include an investment in a new office in ZOA Netherlands for a total investment including land of € 1.3 million. The Supervisory Board approved the purchase and realization of the new office. The total value of the land is € 0.4 million and is valued based on an actual valuation report. Land will not be depreciated. The previous office building was sold for € 0.4 million resulting in a disinvestment result of € 0.1 million recognized under other income.

Also included in the investment of buildings is the donation of a residential house. This house was valuated based on the taxation report for a total value of € 0.2 million. It is to be expected that the house will be sold for a higher value at a future time and for that reason it has not been depreciated. The residential house is currently still in use by the previous owner - usufruct.

The other investments in inventory and vehicles are replacements of computers and vehicles directly contributing to the programmes abroad. In the opening balance 2013 a correction was made on the acquisition value and the cumulative depreciation to reflect the gross book values of tangible fixed assets per the financial administration. The correction does not have an impact on the net book values of the tangible fixed assets.


CHAPTER 11

Receivables (€)

Financial report

31-12-2013

31-12-2012

- USAID

3,172,492

1,572,372

- European Union

2,687,100

1,616,990

- MRRD (Afghan governement)

1,295,925

361,202

- Ministry of Foreign Affairs

606,358

157,168

- UN-organisations

345,369

322,591

- DFID

156,982

-

- Red een Kind

145,656

85,655

- AusAID

122,820

-

- World Renew

72,708

99,768

- MWH foundation

71,888

157,065

- Deputaatschap Bijzondere Noden

50,000

125,000

- EO-Metterdaad

48,872

-

- Thai Birmese Border Consortium

24,372

45,000

- Woord en Daad

-

114,424

- TEAR Australia

-

43,417

- PSO

-

23,660

111,214

279,504

980,273

231,986

122,175

208,490

-

10,546

544,869

464,519

10,559,073

5,919,357

Receivables from donors:

- Other donors Prepaid project expenses Interest to be received Receivable legacies Other receivables and pre-payments

103

Donor receivables relate to project contributions from institutional donors not yet received by ZOA. Programmes are already implemented and pre-financed by ZOA. The position has significantly increased compared to last year. • The USAID receivable of € 3.2 million is due to finalisation of formal procedures at USAID and is expected to be received in 2014. As these amounts are outstanding in US dollars ZOA faces a currency risk for the outstanding position. • The receivable outstanding from MRRD € 1.3 million is related to NSP project in Afghanistan and is pre financed by ZOA. Of the outstanding amount of € 1.3 million €0.6 million are approved milestones and invoiced to the donor, the remaining € 0.7 million is not approved at year end and approval is expected in 2014. The receivable to MRRD is in US dollars and ZOA faces a currency risk for the position. In 2013 the activities through local partners have been increased resulting in an increase in the prepaid project expenses.


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Financial report

Cash and cash equivalents (â‚Ź)

31-12-2013

31-12-2012

6,454,097

12,839,789

1,277,369

827,276

Amounts in euros The Netherlands Programme countries

7,731,466

72%

13,667,065

90%

Amounts in foreign currencies The Netherlands Programme countries

Total

ZOA aims to keep cash balances in euros wherever possible. US dollar contracts with institutional donors result in currency positions in US dollars that can lead to rate differences. In general, these do not influence the programmes activities, since most of the expenditures are also paid in US dollars.

Reserves (â‚Ź) Continuity reserves Total

ZOA aims to maintain a reserve that counterbalances the general financial and operational risks of the organisation and the specific risks inherent in realising the programmes abroad.

Continuity reserve General A surplus on exploitation will be added to this reserve when the total amount of the continuity reserve does not meet the required level. The surplus on the continuity

99,753

319

2,866,028

1,481,392

2,965,781

28%

1,481,711

10%

10,697,247

100%

15,148,776

100%

The decrease in cash position can be explained by spending programme funding in the current year which was already received in prior years. Also the decrease of receivables from donors and investments made for tangible fixed assets, such as the new office building decreased cash position.

31-12-2012

Added to

Spent on objectives

31-12-2013

5,396,167

-

-

5,396,167

5,396,167

-

-

5,396,167

reserve will be added to the other reserves. In 2013 it was decided by the CEO not to add any surpluses to the continuity reserve.

operating organisation. This percentage is based on the risk profile of the organisation, the surroundings in which it operates and the internal control measures adopted.

Coverage of organisational costs To hedge short-term risks and ensure that the organisation is able to meet its commitments in the future, the CEO and the Supervisory Board have set a target amount for the continuity reserve at a maximum of 100% (VFI guideline for Good Causes: 150%) of the annual expenses of the

More detailed explanations of the risk profile and internal management can be found in chapter 6 of the annual report.


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Financial report

105


106

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Financial report

Coverage organisational costs (€)

Actual 2013

Calculated reserve

Actual 2012

Calculated reserve

Own costs of the organisation - Personnel costs The Netherlands

100%

3,290,988

3,290,988

3,053,754

3,053,754

- Expat costs

100%

2,295,320

2,295,320

2,076,660

2,076,660

- Personnel costs abroad

50%

4,995,850

2,497,925

4,408,180

2,204,090

- Office costs not related to programmes

50%

310,653

155,327

230,036

115,018

100%

18,545

18,545

8,183

8,183

- Other fundraising costs Target level to be covered

8,258,105

7,457,705

Actual continuity reserve

5,396,167

5,396,167

65.3%

72.4%

Coverage ratio

The continuity reserve covers 65.3% of the target level, based on normalised organisational costs in 2013. This is lower compared to the level of 72.4% mainly due to growing organisation cost. In particular salary costs. ZOA does not strive for a maximum reserve as set by VFI (Vereniging Fondswervende Instellingen), because it

Allocated reserves (€)

subsequent to the public debate about reserves held by charity organisations, ZOA will continue to review its policy. Currently ZOA is in compliance with the maximum level of the continuity reserve set by the VFI.

does not want to block reserves unnecessarily that can be used in project activities. The Supervisory Board has established a target level of 100% to ensure that the ongoing obligations can be met. The level of the reserves is, however, an important point of attention for the ZOA organisation. Both from the risk perspective and

31-12-2012

Added to

Spent on objectives

31-12-2013

Programme guarantee

284,541

145,811

74,124

356,228

Disaster response

631,006

125,391

79,944

676,453

Other

276,114

-

8,585

267,529

Total

1,191,661

271,202

162,653

1,300,210

Allocated reserves The restriction on spending of the allocated reserve has been determined by the Chief Executive Officer. It does not constitute an obligation; the Chief Executive Officer is able to change this restriction. In general a review of these reserves is made annually.

Programme guarantee The Chief Executive Officer defined this reserve for specific programme risks where a guarantee is given to a country programme. Large institutional donors fund the programmes substantially. Without guarantees there is a risk of losing these donors, which could have a major impact on the continuity and sustainability of the programme. Risks may also vary depending on

the fields where ZOA operates. Even without direct external financing, some programmes may be carried out by internal pre-financing from this reserve. All these programme guarantees are assessed annually • The guarantee related to the programme in Sri Lanka is allocated for specific programme objectives. • We expect that the country office cost in Myanmar in


CHAPTER 11 Programme guarantee (€)

107

Financial report 31-12-2012

Programme Sri Lanka

Spent on programmes

145,462

Programme Myanmar

Additional

31-12-2013

32,017

177,479

100,000

100,000

Programme Thailand

50,000

3,952

46,048

Programme Burundi

25,000

15,000

10,000

Programme Uganda

2,954

2,954

Programme Cambodia

15,000

15,000

0

Co-funding SBOS

26,670

26,670

0

Other

22,409

13,502

10,840

19,747

Total

284,541

74,124

145,811

356,228

2014 cannot be completely covered by donor income. For that reason an additional guarantee of € 100,000 has been set to cover the costs needed to bring the programme to the right level and ready for the near future. • The guarantee for Thailand is made in regard to expected costs related to the phase out in 2014. Activities in Thailand will be transferred to other NGOs and the ZOA programme in Thailand will be ended. Disaster Response This reserve was established at the initiative of the Supervisory Board of ZOA. The Chief Executive Officer allocated this reserve given the fact that provision of emergency relief is a core activity of the ZOA organisation. ZOA must be financially able to respond to requests for aid without delay. Funding drawn from the emergency relief fund is, however, considered to be a form of pre-financing that has to be compensated afterwards as much as possible through earmarked donations received through emergency relief campaigns.

In 2013 the disaster response unit was involved in several emergency situations in DR Congo, Yemen Sri Lanka Jordan and The Philippines. To fund these projects funding has been withdrawn from this reserve. For countries such as The Philippines and Jordan the costs of the department have been allocated directly to the project funds obtained. As ZOA sees this as a strategic task going forward the CEO decided to add an additional € 113,394 to this fund. Of the total department costs in 2013 only € 17,224 could not be covered from project funding and for that reason has been withdrawn from the disaster response fund. The spend on programmes for DR Congo and Sri lanka are allocated to the programme fund. From the programme fund costs are allocated to the projects. Other Other reserves have been created for specific purposes in the programme countries. These are mainly used to replace tangible assets (mainly vehicles) in the near future.

Disaster response (€) At 1 January 2013

631,006

Spent on programmes Diaster response unit Netherlands

17,224

Emergency project DR Congo

29,162

Emergency project Sri Lanka

20,375

Emergency project Yemen

13,183 79,944

Additional Received from own fundraising Added from result 2013

11,997 113,394 125,391

At 31 December 2013

676,453


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CHAPTER 11

Programme Funds (â‚Ź)

Financial report

31-12-2012

Received money Third Parties Own Fundraising

Spent on projects

Contribution reserves

31-12-2013

Afghanistan

41,252

134,942

279,188

337,077

-

118,305

Burkina Faso

20,613

-

6,727

-

-

27,340

Burundi

157,337

-

45,872

183,153

-

20,056

Cambodia

16,888

-

275,702

124,083

-

168,507

DR Congo

115,590

1,667

134,718

178,319

-29,162

102,818

1,405,340

259,795

279,882

953,634

-

991,383

123,794

-

50

68,564

-

55,280

Jordan

-

116,053

567,889

267,918

-

416,024

Liberia

329,741

-

146,456

249,116

-

227,081

Myanmar

122,373

30,000

81,882

107,688

-

126,567

Pakistan

276,139

-

17

234,265

-

41,891

-

-

1,397,391

22,512

-

1,374,879

350,932

20,400

184,833

434,792

-20,375

141,748

18,629

17,447

67,354

34,802

-

68,628

175,676

-

85,246

102,842

-

158,080

Thailand

23,553

30,000

163,003

89,160

-

127,396

Uganda

60,709

-

547,992

454,710

-

153,991

-

-

5,000

-

-

5,000

3,238,566

610,304

4,269,202

3,842,635

-49,537

4,324,974

5,505

-

-5,505

-

-

-

SHV Fund

71,858

-

-5,000

-

-

66,858

J.M. Bogman Fund

70,000

-

40,267

-

-

110,267

3,385,929

610,304

4,298,964

3,842,635

-49,537

4,502,099

Ethiopia HaĂŻti

Philippines Sri Lanka South-Sudan Sudan

Yemen Subtotal countries Gift Certificate Fund

Total


CHAPTER 11

Programme Funds The funds for programmes include available financial means that donors or contributors have allocated towards a particular programme or project. Because donor funding is not always available at regular intervals, the pattern of income may fluctuate. That is particularly evident in the level of the allocated reserve. Surpluses and deficits will be settled as much as possible within the funds and within projects with a similar goal. The remainder will be added or withdrawn from other reserves.

109

Financial report

Ethiopia In 2011, ZOA received â‚Ź 1.7 million out of own fundraising to help the people in the Somalia region in Ethiopia. This money will be allocated to and spent on specific projects in 2014. Jordan/Syria In 2014 ZOA started a campaign to give attention to the Syrian refugees in Jordan. The money obtained from this campaign will be spent, in coming years. Philippines In November 2013 the Philippines where affected by a hurricane. ZOA, together with other Christian NGOs,

Short term liabilities Taxes and social security contributions Concerns taxes and social security contributions still due as at 31 December 2013. Personnel costs Concerns an accrual for annual leave, including social premiums payable as at 31 December 2013. The pension agreement of ZOA is a defined contribution arrangement. Therefore no provisions are necessary according to Dutch accounting standards. Accruals Donor contributions received in advance that will be spent after the year 2013 appear as liabilities. ZOA received these payments based on programme proposals and contracts. The organisation is required to spend the money accordingly and to return the money to the donor if the commitment is not fulfilled. The main position is outstanding towards the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Currently the income of ZOA depends significantly on funding from this donor, mainly related to MFS-2 and the Reconstruction tender. These projects have a long term objective until 2016 and that explains the high liability.

Accruals to donors (â‚Ź)

started a campaign to raise money for this natural disaster. It was decided that the funding received together with other Christian NGOs will be spent in a joint project. It is the first time that Christian NGOs in the Netherlands have worked so closely together in one emergency project. South Sudan An ethnic conflict arose in South Sudan in December 2013. ZOA started a campaign to raise funding for the affected Sudanese people in South Sudan, Ethiopia and Uganda.

31-12-2013

31-12-2012

6,930,667

4,610,472

- AusAID

736,569

771,583

- ICCO Kerk in Actie

306,137

107,123

- UN (OCHA/UNHCR)

215,902

332,167

- EU (ECHO/EuropeAid)

159,873

990,212

- Woord en Daad

105,814

-

- Tear Australia

30,830

-

11,210

93,798

- DFID

-

112,777

- PSO

-

2,266

44,995

150,918

8,541,997

7,171,316

- Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs

- World Renew (CRWRC)

- Other donors Total


110

CHAPTER 11

Other liabilities (€)

Financial report

31-12-2013

31-12-2012

1,846,868

1,941,443

300,000

-

Annual leave accrual

253,811

242,289

Programme related liabilities

187,998

241,502

Accrual holiday allowance

162,449

140,633

Creditors

151,316

155,527

Programme liability World Renew (CRWRC) Haiti

49,315

280,019

Payable MFS-2 partners

-

1,418,078

Programme liability World Renew (CRWRC) Uganda

-

21,436

376,761

484,683

3,328,518

4,925,610

Liabilities abroad Alpha Omega Fund received in advance

Other liabilities and accruals Total

Liabilities abroad These liabilities refer to project costs to be paid in the ZOA countries as well as liabilities towards local employee benefits.

Off balance sheet liabillities (€) Liabilities shorter than 1 year Liabilities longer than 1 year Total

31-12-2013

31-12-2012

1,449,000

479,000

139,000

203,000

1,588,000

682,000

Liabilities not presented in the balance sheet mainly relate to partner contracts, lease contracts of premises and cars abroad. The increase in 2013 is due to the fact that partner contracts with implementing partners have been signed in Burundi relating to the implementation of projects. ZOA is the lead agency within the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (DCRconsortium) and therefore legally responsible towards the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs with respect to all liabilities of the MFS-2 project of DCR as a whole.

Alpha Omega Fund received in advance Income received from Alpha Omega Fund has supported ZOA for a number of years and the liability is related to prepaid funding financial year 2014. Programme related liabilities These liabilities relate to the risks of implementing projects in the areas where ZOA is working. Different kinds of circumstances (security, weather circumstances, lack of resources) could cause programme delays in realising the planned objectives. This could in turn cause a discrepancy between available budget and the projects still to be realised. This additional contribution is expected to enable the programme to realise its objectives and consequently make the results more sustainable for the target group. Creditors These include regular liabilities to suppliers, both in the programme areas and in The Netherlands. Payable MFS-2 partner In 2012 we received a € 1.4 million instalment from MFS funding to be transferred to the partners working with ZOA in the consortium. The instalment for the period 2014 will be received in January 2014 and for that reason we do not recognize a liability on the balance sheet.

Co-financing liabilities A co-financing liability is a liability to fund a specific project additional to funds provided by a main donor, with income from other resources. From the end of 2013, ZOA has had co-financing liabilities for projects in DR Congo, South Sudan, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Uganda, Sudan and Myanmar for an approximate total of € 0.5 million (2012: € 1,6 million). With external donor funding ZOA has already covered € 0.1 million (2012: € 0,1 million) of this co-financing liability.


CHAPTER 11

111

Financial report

NOTES TO THE STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES Income Income in percentage of total income Income own fundraising activities Income from third party campaigns Project grants Others Total

In order to respond to the needs of the beneficiaries in our programme areas, we aim to have at least 25% income from own fundraising. The increase from 20% in 2012 to 25% in 2013 is mainly due to income received on the Jordan and Philippines emergency response. Such responses were not applicable in 2012.

income from own fundraising (â‚Ź)

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

25%

17%

20%

2%

2%

4%

72%

80%

75%

1%

1%

1%

100%

100%

100%

The amounts granted by one donor to one country programme should not exceed 35% of the programme, to avoid donor dependence.

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Door to door collection

851,329

920,000

925,207

Legacies

247,376

375,000

347,531

Individuals

2,738,644

962,511

1,236,334

Churches and schools

1,264,518

740,000

712,035

Companies, charity funds & other

1,722,484

1,479,500

1,402,271

Private donors

1,433,464

1,300,000

1,334,639

Mailing actions

638,852

800,000

839,761

8,896,667

6,577,011

6,797,778

Contributions, donations and gifts

Total

The income from door to door collection is declining due to lower average income per collector. Gifts and donations from individuals, churches and schools increased compared to 2012, also because of the emergency campaign related to the Philippines. Total income received for the emergency of the Philippines was â‚Ź 1.4 million and is

allocated under the programme funds. Gifts from private donors have increased. It is more and more an objective of ZOA to link specific projects to private donors. The effect of this plan can be seen in the increase of income from this type of funding. ZOA will continue this approach in 2014.


112

CHAPTER 11

Income designation (â‚Ź)

Financial report

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Income with designation

4,310,961

48%

2,323,800

35%

2,449,189

36%

Income without specific designation

4,585,706

52%

4,253,211

65%

4,348,589

64%

Total

8,896,667

100%

6,577,011

100%

6,797,778

100%

Due to the impact of the emergency campaign in the Philippines the ratio has changed significantly compared to last year. Income without specific designation is used for preparation and coordination and is spent on projects in ZOA countries.

Income from third party campaigns (â‚Ź)

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Deputaatschap Bijzondere Noden

225,000

475,000

Aqua for All

1 61 ,1 1 1

286,666

Happy Gift

90,000

65,065

EO-Metterdaad

86,851

178,631

4,942

35,106

Draagt Elkanders Lasten

-

346,000

Deputaatschap Christelijk Gereformeerde Kerken

-

100,000

Tear Nederland

-

10,000

42,400

6,250

Wilde Ganzen

Other Total participation in external campaigns

These amounts concern income from campaigns by fundraising organisations in The Netherlands in order to support ZOA programmes and projects. Draagt Elkanders Lasten supports ZOA for specific campaigns. Income from Deputaatschap Bijzondere Noden was higher in 2012 due to specific campaigns in that year.

610,304

1,000,000

1,502,718


CHAPTER 11

113

Financial report

Project grants governments and other institutions

Donors (€)

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

DMH/VG (MFS-2)

4,433,302

4,817,783

DMH/VG (Reconstruction)

3,841,035

227,738

969,851

1,732,755

87,923

71,034

Royal Netherlands Embassy Sudan

1,363,805

857,929

Royal Netherlands Embassy Yemen

529,287

-

Royal Netherlands Embassy Ethiopia

214,050

-

Royal Netherlands Embassy Afghanistan

133,764

839,087

3,024

-

-

239,771

DSH-HO (Emergency) DMH/VG (Other)

Royal Netherlands Embassy Burundi Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs-Capacity-building Total Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs donors

11,576,041

16,237,000

Europe Aid

3,510,989

3,523,202

ECHO

1,341,864

1,781,833

Total EU donors

4,852,853

4,483,000

8,786,097

5,305,035

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

416,727

771,546

United Nations Office for the Coordination of

381,192

733,679

World Food Programme (WFP)

193,371

121,893

UNICEF - Sudan

130,661

-

UNHCR - Thailand

128,536

296,377

Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)

109,096

143,703

International Organisation for Migration (IOM)

-

255,219

UN Emercency Relief Fund (ERF)

-

137,878

UNICEF - South Sudan

-

118,689

UNICEF - Liberia

-

83,280

UNICEF - Thailand

-

40,354

UN Office for Project Services (LIFT)

-

Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)

Total UN donors

1,359,583

16,131 Table continuing next page 2,686,000 2,718,749

This income reflects contributions from the Dutch government, the European Union and United Nations organisations, such as UNHCR, UNDP, UNICEF, WFP and others. It is difficult to anticipate in the budget whether donors are willing to contribute to an emergency situation during the year in areas where ZOA operates and for what amount. Part of the grants received for the current financial year will be spent in the following financial year. With contributions from donors that arise from spending committed under contract, the resources that still need to be spent are presented under “Short-term liabilities” as “Accruals”. Income from institutional donors has increased compared to the previous year, partly as a result of a focused and professional donor approach by the Institutional Donor Relation department of ZOA. Changes between donors can be explained by their change in priorities in the choice of geographical areas and sectors where they work. It is ZOA’s intention to partner and collaborate with donors when their priorities meet the programme goals and priorities of ZOA.


114

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

Table continued from previous page

Donors (â‚Ź)

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

1,959,472

3,445,598

Australia Government Aid Programme (AusAID)

1,883,453

1,521,274

Ministry of Rural Rebabiliation & Development (MRRD / Afghanistan)

1,654,560

724,100

-

160,482

181,353

153,536

Japan International Coorporation Agency (JICA)

-

25,615

Australian Embassy

-

17,347

Directie-Generaal Ontwikkelingssamenwerking (DGD) Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom

Total governmental donors

5,678,838

6,465,000

6,047,952

World Renew (CRWRC)

645,382

548,789

Woord en Daad

494,467

582,412

ICCO / Kerk in Actie

491,943

41,482

MWH Foundation

301,123

414,000

TEAR Australia

125,984

830,750

Diaconia

101,199

59,611

Triodos Facet BV

83,718

-

Red een Kind

79,833

197,262

Koornzaaier

39,822

62,577

International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC)

-

76,959

Dorcas

-

7,113

39,347

50,695

Other Total others

Total project grants

2,402,818

2,043,000

2,871,650

25,870,133

31,914,000

25,729,483


CHAPTER 11

115

Financial report

Expenditures Cost structure of the organisation

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

83.0%

85.3%

83.7%

Education and awareness

1.7%

2.7%

2.9%

Programme preparation and coordination in The Netherlands

6.5%

5.3%

5.8%

91.2%

93.3%

92.4%

Fundraising costs

5.2%

3.9%

4.2%

Costs of management and administration

3.6%

2.8%

3.4%

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Spent on objectives in countries (excl. MFS-partners)

Total spent on objectives

Total costs of the organisation

It is ZOA’s aim to spend at least 88.0% of its resources on programme objectives. With 91.2% in 2013, ZOA has exceeded that level. The lower percentage compared to 2012 can be explained by lower objective expenditures on education and awareness over 2013 in The Netherlands. Another important indicator that should be mentioned in this regard is spent on objectives as a percentage of total income:

Indicator spent on objectives (€)

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Spent on objectives

31,606,729

38,962,123

32,773,465

Total income

35,892,616

39,720,935

34,425,375

88.1%

98.1%

95.2%

Spent on objectives as percentage of total income

The decline compared to last year and budget is mainly due to the amount of emergency money received for Jordan and the Philippines € 1.9 million which amounts will be spent in the years 2014 to 2016. Excluding the income from emergency campaigns for Philippines and Jordan the percentage in 2013 is 92.3%


116

CHAPTER 11

Overview spent on objectives (â‚Ź)

Financial report

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

Afghanistan

3,561,685

3,736,000

4,348,014

Burundi

1,377,750

1,706,000

622,869

Cambodia

112,155

-

383,521

DR Congo

2,987,476

4,167,000

2,483,735

Ethiopia

2,318,448

4,282,000

2,425,155

68,242

90,000

62,538

Jordan

252,525

-

-

Liberia

1,179,310

1,471,000

1,215,720

Myanmar

920,564

1,712,000

1,570,159

Pakistan

462,749

623,000

1,667,461

22,483

-

-

Sri Lanka

5,008,940

4,184,000

4,571,662

Sudan

2,848,188

3,995,000

2,757,025

South Sudan

2,672,015

3,463,000

2,673,902

Thailand

1,814,116

2,171,000

2,556,340

Uganda

2,643,982

2,644,000

2,233,234

518,955

1,199,000

86,646

-

159,689

40,425

28,769,583

35,602,689

29,698,406

Preparation and coordination The Netherlands

2,237,078

2,231,116

2,032,294

Education and Awareness raising The Netherlands

600,068

1,128,318

1,042,765

31,606,729

38,962,123

32,773,465

8,227,091

8,175,164

8,091,621

39,833,820

47,137,287

40,865,086

HaĂŻti

Philippines

Yemen Other

Project Spent through MFS-2 partners

Spent on objectives The budget of ZOA is compiled in September and based on contract portfolio and opportunities known at that time. During the financial year ZOA depends on the situation in the country, government approvals and approval of donors to start the programme activities. The implication can be that project programmes start later than initially planned. The overview of expenditure per country shows that there are considerable differences between the aid that was planned and the aid that has been delivered.


CHAPTER 11 Preparation and Coordination from The Netherlands This accounts for the costs of the MFS-2 and RECON coordination teams and the disaster response team of ZOA. The costs of the Programme Department and the Department Audit & Evaluation are also partly included.

117

Financial report

The increase of cost regarding preparation and coordination in The Netherlands can mainly be explained by an increase of allocated salary costs of the finance department.

Preparation and coordination The Netherlands (€)

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

1,749,441

1,677,027

1,539,348

MFS-2 coordination costs

284,580

294,873

343,126

RECON coordination costs

203,057

259,216

7,034

-

-

142,786

2,237,078

2,231,116

2,032,294

Preparation and coordination cost Netherlands

PSO project costs Preparation and coordination The Netherlands

Education and awareness raising This includes the costs for education and raising the awareness of young people in schools, the general public

and of ZOA constituents in particular. Due to changes in cost allocations and cost savings these costs are lower compared to 2012.

Spent on fundraising (€) Expenses own fundraising Expenses participation in external campaigns Expenses received project grants Total costs fundraising

Total income own fundraising Spent on fundraising in percentage of own fundraising income (CBF%) Spent on fundraising in percentage of total income (excl. MFS-2 partners)

Cost rate of fundraising For 2013 the cost rate of fundraising (the ‘CBFpercentage’) is at 17.4% which is in line with the previous year and slightly lower than budget. The Supervisory Board of ZOA aims at a fixed annual standard of 16.0%.

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Actual 2012

1,549,273

1,235,650

1,182,625

80,373

85,573

84,356

198,227

322,503

223,203

1,827,873

1,643,726

1,490,184

8,896,667

6,577,011

6,797,778

17.4%

18.8%

17.4%

5.1%

4.1%

4.3%

Management and Administration Costs of management and administration are the costs that the organisation incurs for (internal) management and organisation that are not allocated to the objective or to fundraising.

As a percentage of total costs, the management and administration costs increased slightly to a level of 3.5%, which is below the allowed maximum of 4.0%.


118

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

ATTRIBUTION OF COSTS 2013 Attribution of costs 2013 (€)

Objectives

Fundraising

Programmes

Coordination

Education

Own

External campaigns

Project Grants

Management & Administration

Total 2013

Budget 2013

Total 2012

20,376,400

-

185,141

-

-

-

-

20,561,541

26,249,933

22,633,625

7,801,502

1,774,150

349,421

619,785

57,503

114,951

959,181

11,676,493

13,182,994

10,556,154

Direct costs

-

-

-

795,146

12,264

62,105

-

869,515

787,750

717,606

Accommodation costs

-

53,670

7,084

13,708

1,616

3,221

28,191

107,490

48,367

48,534

Office costs and other general costs

-

350,039

49,499

104,032

6,994

13,968

126,711

651,243

747,330

825,179

Audit costs and Annual Report

-

-

-

-

-

-

87,059

87,059

90,000

98,390

591,681

59,219

8,923

16,602

1,996

3,982

32,154

714,557

649,816

595,351

28,769,583

2,237,078

600,068

1,549,273

80,373

198,227

1,233,296

34,667,898

41,756,190

35,474,839

8,227,091

8,227,091

8,175,164

8,091,621

36,996,674

42,894,989

49,931,354

43,566,460

Own programmes/projects Personnel costs

Depreciation and Interest Total Project spent through MFS-2 partners Total incl. MFS-2

Costs are allocated to the objectives, fundraising and management and administration according to the recommendation ‘Allocation of costs of Management and administration’ of the VFI. Costs have been allocated according to the following criteria: A) Spent on objectives in programmes/countries The expenditure accounted for under this entry mainly concerns the personnel costs of posted fieldworkers and the office expenses on location. This expenditure is directly related to the implementation of the programme in the countries (outside The Netherlands) where ZOA is active. Costs of own organisation abroad are fully allocated to objectives.

B) Costs own organisation in The Netherlands The costs own organisation in The Netherlands fall into two categories of expenditure: B1) Implementation costs that are directly attributable Costs that are directly related to the implementation of the objectives. Categories that are accounted for under implementation costs that are directly attributable are: • The preparation and coordination of rehabilitation (mainly the costs of the Programme department and support) and emergency relief (mainly the costs of the Disaster Response Unit) • The direct costs relating to information and awareness raising • The direct costs of own fundraising, campaigns by third parties and grants

B2) Allocated implementation costs This includes expenditure that could be allocated (directly or indirectly) to objectives based on prudential criteria (number of work places, deployment of staff, etc.) and according to a steady course. These costs include the costs of Management Office, facilities, ICT and general costs. Last year the general cost allocated to management and administration was 33%. No other changes were made.


CHAPTER 11

Cost allocation to management

Financial report

%

Notes

General

26

based on number of workplaces

Finance

50

50% is direct support country programme

Facilities

90

based on number of workplaces

IT

90

based on number of workplaces

Human Resources

75

Executive Board (including secretary)

95

and administration Costs of operations at ZOA NL

Supervisory Board

5% is fundraising institutional donors

100

Standard for costs of management and administration Based on the nature of the organisation as described before in this annual report, the Chief Executive Officer has set the standard for the management and administration costs at 4.0%. The development over time of this indicator is given in the multi-annual overview and forecast on page 124.

119


120

CHAPTER 11

Remuneration Supervisory Board and Chief Executive Officer ZOA’s Supervisory Board members receive no compensation. The position and powers of the Chief Executive Officer (sole officer) have been determined based on a management protocol. The Chief Executive Officer bears ultimate responsibility for the operational organisation as a whole. The salary of the CEO has been set in accordance with the Remuneration decree for state civil servants (BBRA 1984), Grade XVI. The fee for the remuneration of the Chief Executive Officer is set well below the guideline of the Dutch Fundraising Institutions Association for management salaries. Changes in remuneration package are initiated and approved by the supervisory board of ZOA as part of the annual performance review.

Financial report

Personnel costs management (€)

Actual 2013

Actual 2012

Permanent

Permanent

40

40

100%

100%

1/1 - 31/12

1/1 - 31/12

91,596

86,004

Vacation bonus

7,328

6,880

End-of-year bonus

7,633

7,1 6 7

Total gross salary

106,557

100,051

8,343

8,750

20,167

17,154

135,067

125,955

Name Function

Other information

Appropriation of results The result has been appropriated according to the breakdown indicated in the Statement of Income and Expenditures.

Chief Executive Officer

Employment Kind (validity) hours / week PT-percentage period

Number of staff As per 31 December 2013, ZOA employed 1,024 people based on headcount (2012: 906).

J. Mooij

Remuneration (€) Gross salary

Social premiums Pension premiums Total remuneration


CHAPTER 11

121

Financial report

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT To: The Supervisory Board and Chief Executive Officer of Stichting ZOA

Report on the financial statements

The Executive Board is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements and for the preparation of the Executive’s Report, both in accordance with ‘Richtlijn voor de Jaarverslaggeving Fondsenwervende Instelligen (RJ 650)’ of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. Furthermore, The Executive Board is responsible for such internal control as it determines is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by The Executive Board, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Auditor’s responsibility

Opinion

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Dutch law, including the Dutch Standards on Auditing. This requires that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

In our opinion, the financial statements give a true and fair view of the financial position of Stichting ZOA as at 31 December 2013 and of its result for the year then ended in accordance with ‘Richtlijn voor de Jaarverslaggeving Fondsenwervende Instellingen (RJ 650)’ of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board.

We have audited the accompanying financial statements 2013 as set out on pages 95-120 of Stichting ZOA, Apeldoorn, which comprise the balance sheet as at 31 December 2013, the statement of income and expenditures for the year then ended and the notes, comprising a summary of the accounting policies and other explanatory information.

The Executive Board’s responsibility

Report on other legal and regulatory requirements We have no deficiencies to report as a result of our examination whether the Executive’s Report, to the extent we can assess, has been prepared in accordance with ‘Richtlijn voor de Jaarverslaggeving Fondsenwervende Instellingen (RJ 650) of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board’. Further, we report that the Executive’s Report, to the extent we can assess, is consistent with the financial statements. The Hague, 22 April 2014 KPMG Accountants N.V. J.A.A.M. Vermeeren RA


122

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

APPENDIX STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES BUDGET 2014 Income (â‚Ź)

Budget 2014

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Income own fundraising activities Door to door collection

850,000

851,329

920,000

Legacies

260,000

247,376

375,000

Contribution, donations, gifts

5,480,000

7,797,962

5,282,011

Income from third party campaigns

6,590,000

8,896,667

6,577,011

1,000,000

610,304

1,000,000

Project grants from government for MFS-2 partners

8,175,164

8,227,091

8,175,164

Project grants from government (other)

31,448,536

25,870,133

31,913,924

Project grants Total Interest Rate differences Total income

39,623,700

34,097,224

40,089,088

100,000

102,726

230,000

-

412,786

-

47,313,700

44,119,707

47,896,099


CHAPTER 11

123

Financial report

Expenditures (â‚Ź)

Budget 2014

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Spent on objectives Project spenditures through MFS-2 partners

8.175.164

8.227.091

8.175.164

Own spenditures on objectives

34.142.795

28.769.583

35.602.689

Spent on objectives in countries

42.317.959

36.996.674

43.777.853

Preparation and coordination from The Netherlands

2.385.845

2.237.078

2.231.116

517.937

600.068

1.128.318

45.221.741

39.833.820

47.137.287

Education/Awareness raising Total spent on objectives Spent on fundrasing Expenses own fundraising

1.307.430

Expenses Participation in external campaigns

87.744

80.373

85.573

Expenses received Project Grants

231.928

198.227

322.503

Management and Administration

Total expenditures Surplus/-deficit

Added to / - Withdrawn from (â‚Ź) Funds

19,8%

1.549.273

17,4%

1.235.650

18,8%

1.627.102

1.827.873

1.643.726

1.238.118

1.233.296

1.150.341

48.086.961

42.894.989

49.931.354

-773.261

1.224.718

-2.035.255

Budget 2014

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

-617.261

1.116.170

-1.920.255

Reserves Continuity reserve

-

-

-

Programme guarantee

-36.000

71.686

-

Disaster Response

-120.000

45.447

-115.000

Other Allocated reserves

-

-8.585

-

Total change in reserves and funds

-156.000

108.548

-115.000

-773.261

1.224.718

-2.035.255


124

CHAPTER 11

Financial report

LONG-RANGE OVERVIEW AND ESTIMATE ( â‚Ź x 1.000) ZOA determined the financial indicators that define the quality of a country programme. This revealed that an optimal country programme amounts to approximately â‚Ź 3.5 million and has a staff of 3 to 4 expats assisted by locals.

Indicators Number of programme countries

A country programme of this scale is able to operate effectively and is able to accommodate setbacks without compromising the leverage of the organisation. ZOA aims to have every country programme at this level.

This principle is the base for the multi-year projection. The number of countries where ZOA aims to operate combined with the cost ratios deemed acceptable by the board, help to determine the multi-year ambition.

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

12

12

12

11

12

12

12

12

2,225

2,475

2,397

3,104

3,250

3,250

3,500

3,750

28%

25%

28%

20%

25%

25%

25%

25%

14%

17%

17%

20%

16%

16%

16%

16%

4%

4%

5%

4%

6%

6%

6%

6%

4%

3%

4%

3%

4%

4%

4%

4%

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

9,126

8,696

10,023

7,690

8500

9,000

10,000

11,000

23,405

25,729

25,870

31,449

36,000

37,000

38,000

39,000

8,393

8,092

8,227

8,175

8,000

40,924

42,517

44,120

47,314

52,500

46,000

48,000

50,000

(excl DRU countries) (Target) Volume per country Percentage income non-project grants (excl. MFS-2) Norm cost percentage own fundraising (CBF) Norm cost percentage total fundraising Norm costs of management and administration

Income Income own fundraising and participation in third party campaigns (2014 onwards excluding emergency campaigns) Project grants For MFS-2 partners Total income


CHAPTER 11 Expenditures Total spent on objectives For MFS-2 partners Spent on own fundraising

125

Financial report Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

29,585

32,773

31,607

37,047

42,000

42,000

45,000

48,000

8,393

8,092

8,227

8,175

8,000

-

-

-

1,627 20.0%

1,700

20.0%

1,238

1,300

3.0%

14.4%

1,458

17.4%

1,490

17.4%

1,828

19.8%

3.3%

1,218

3.4%

1,211

3.6%

1,233

3.1%

1,800 19.0%

1,900

18.2%

2,000

1,350

1,400

2.8%

1,450

(2014 onwards excluding emergency campaigns) Management and

2.9%

2.9%

administration Total expenditures Surplus/-deficit

Added to /

40,654

43,566

42,895

48,087

53,000

45,150

48,300

51,450

270

-1,049

1,225

-773

-500

850

-300

-1,450

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

-241

-986

1,116

-617

100

450

-700

-1,850

Reserves

511

-64

109

-156

400

400

400

400

Total change In reserves

270

-1,049

1,225

-773

500

850

-300

-1,450

Actual

Actual

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

Estimate

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Percentage spent on objectives

92%

92%

91%

94%

90%

90%

90%

90%

Spent on objectives in percen-

91%

95%

88%

96%

90%

90%

90%

90%

203%

172%

176%

210%

230%

235%

240%

245%

- withdrawn from Programme funds

and funds

Other indicators

tage of income Liquidity


ABBREVIATIONS

Abbreviations (not exhaustive) ACCTS/AWT CBO CLTS DEL DRU FAL HAP PTA SME VFI VSLA WASH ZOA

Arab Center for Training and Consulting Services / Arab Woman Today Community Based Organisation Community Led Total Sanitation Draagt Elkanders Lasten Foundation, meaning Carry Each other’s Burden Disaster Response Unit Functional Adult Literacy Humanitarian Accountability Partnership Parent Teacher Association Small and Medium Enterprises Vereniging voor Fondsenwervende Instellingen, Branch Organisation for Fundraising Village Saving Loan Association Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Zuid Oost Azië, meaning Southeast Asia, the region where ZOA started working in 1973

The cover photo shows the rehabilitation of a water cistern at Bait Ja’il, a conflict-affected village in Arhab District, Sana’a Governorate, Yemen. This activity also engaged youth who were gaining work experience as part of the Youth Economic Empowerment Programme in collaboration with UNDP. Access to water is an integral part of helping these communities rebuild their livelihoods. ZOA is running an integrated programme to construct/ rehabilitate water sources as well as provide vocational training for unemployed youth and health awareness to communities through the work of female hygiene promoters.

Colophon

© 2014 ZOA P.O. Box 4130 7320 AC Apeldoorn The Netherlands T +31 (0)55 36 63 339 F +31 (0)55 36 68 799 E info@zoa.nl

Supervisory Board Dr. ir. H. Paul MPA, chairman J.W. Boogerd Drs. B. Brand MPA MCM Drs. J. Kamphorst MPA Mr. B.J. van Putten, LL.M Ing. K.A. de Vries MEd Drs. A.W. Westerveld, MPH Chief Executive Officer J. Mooij MBA ING account number (for transfers in The Netherlands): NL46 INGB 0000 0005 50 ZOA is registered with the Chamber of Commerce under number: 41009723

Text: Theanne Boer, Geke Kieft, Els Sytsma, with regards to Hetty Vonk Photography: Jonneke Oskam: p. 27, 40, 43 (l), 93 Studio J&J: p. 28 Liesbeth Verduijn: p. 36 Dolf Hoving: p. 8, 72 Carel Schutte: p. 5, 7 Private collections: p. 31, 32 Gerrit-Jan van Uffelen: p. 94-95 Grzegorz Litynski, p. 101, 119 Design: IDD concept.communicatie.creatie I www.idd.nu Printed by: drukkerij De Bunschoter The information in this report may be reproduced (exluding the photos), provided ZOA is notified and this Annual Report is acknowledged as the source, ZOA would like to receive a copy of the publication.


Annual Report 2013

40 jaar ZOA | P.O. Box 4130 | 7320 AC Apeldoorn | The Netherlands T +31 (0)55 36 63 339 | E info@zoa.nl

WWW.ZOA-INTERNATIONAL.COM

40 years

Annual Report 2013

40 jaar 40 years


Jaarverslag ZOA 2013  
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