Page 1

LIGHT & SOUND SPACE & SPAN

:

Production and Collaboration Facilities for Iceland’s Creative Economy

WINTER SEMESTER PORTFOLIO [2017] Student: Steven Hung [7658848] Studio Crit: Herbert Enns University of Manitoba Course: ARCH 7060


PORTFOLIO SCHEDULE 1st YEAR MASTER: Faculty of Architecture University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB WINTER 2017

preliminary design

P1

schematic design

design development

THEMES

P] T]

Jan.25.2017 - Feb.15.2017 a > Immersion b > Site Selection c > Site Re-Interpretation

P2

: Phases : Trips

STRATEGIES

Mar.03.2017 - Mar.17.2017 a > Inspiration b > Landscape C > Roof

P3

EMPHASIS

Mar.20.2016 - April.24.2017 a > Building Development b > Programming

P4 a b

DETAILS > Undulating Ceiling Slates > Spider Glazing

T1 a b C

STUDIO TRIP

- // > Reykjavik, Iceland > Videy Island, Iceland > Vik, Iceland

{]

FINAL REVIEW

April.24.2017


INTRODUCTION “Architecture has the capacity to extend both the physical and social faculties of those who experience it, and as such, it can also be understood as a mechanism to build the culture of a place. The practice of architecture within cultural programs is the project of a building, the project of the institution it hosts, and the project of the city it defines. Here, architecture plays a fundamental role: it is the device to expand our collective culture as well as the understanding of the place in which we live.� Iceland has had a perilous economy in recent years, and is remaking itself in the 21st century as a centre for culture and creativity as well as a model for environmental sustainability. The dynamic and constantly renewing cultural advance is driven largely by an intense creative sector. In support of culture the government has invested significantly in the Creative Economy. The harbour front of Reykjavik is contested territory with a mixed program - working harbour and shipyard, tourism a large transportation hub for the ferries. It is now poised to absorb intensive hotel and condominium development. *excerpt from brief This studio project intention is to investigate this culmination of different economies, culture and lifestyles that has found a unique equilibrium within this hotly contested area of Reykjaviks Old Harbour in a comphrehensive building design.


P1 THEMES Immersion

THEME The preliminary exploration of this semesters project dealt with the gathering of three vastly different industries within Reykjavik all which have had seperate paths of sucess, and all extremely influential to the future development of the city. A

Fishing and Boating Industry --> The fishing and boating industry has long been Icelands largest grossing industry the two go hand in hand with one another and it’s economy has been imbedding within the Icelandic history and culture. While the two industries have fluactuated with changes in the environment and new industries pushing into traditional areas meant for them it has no doubt left a large mark in the Reyjavik and the country as a whole and should be respected.

DIGITAL ARTS ECONOMIC GROWTH

es m a rg

te pu

g in ish l b pu

of

m co

Tourism --> Since the economic downfall in 2008 Iceland’s tourism industry has been a stabilizing factor within the countries economy. The massive growth in the tourism sector has spark a lot of debate internally of how to benefit the most from visitors. While Iceland is still largely known for their environments and landscapes work is being done to create a hotbed for cultural events such as music festivals and galleries that will also attract others to come to Iceland. b

C

Creative Industry --> While Iceland lack the wealth of natural resources and crops, the country has seen a massive influx of people in the creative industry become successful. The close proximity of the city and a growing tightly knit community of creators has made Reykjavik a central hub for artist, musicians and story tellers. The creative economy has also been given a boost with recent backing from the government to invest in the Industry as a way to diversify the Icelandic economy. While the creative industry might be the youngest of the three industries within this project it is also in a time of exponetial growth and potential making it a highly contested topic and teeming with possibilities.

motion picture, video and television, programme production activities retail sale of clothing in specialised stores

printing

sound recording and music publishing software publishing motion picture projection

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009


INTERSECTION Immersion STRATEGY With the richness of multiple industries in close proximity with one another the project delve into how to create a space that would encourage growth in all three sectors. How could design respect the intentions of these different sectors and also expose to the value of these industry within each other?

INTERSECTING INDUSTRIES

Early exploration sought to understand all three economies and what they stood for individually and has a collective. Due to the structure of the studio brief emphasis was given to the creative economy as the sector that the being the least developed in Reykjavik would be given priority, however it was important that whatever interventions would take place that the other two sectors would play a large role in it’s intention and placement.

FISHING & SHIPPING INDUSTRY

p

Icelandic band Hórmónar performing at KEX Hostel

TOURISM

p

Icelandic signer/songwriter Prins Póló performing at KEX Hostel

<--THE DIGITAL MEDIA While Iceland has produce a wealth of artists and mucisian finding success globally, the largest growth within the creative industry has been software and digital publications. There is however a smaller community and less infrastructure developed around the digital media economy, thus it is the hope of this project to provide spaces for these digital creators to grow.

CREATIVE ARTS INDUSTRY (specifically digital arts)


REYKJAVIK, ICELAND Immersion

POPULATION: 123 000 AREA: 273 km2

THE CITY Reykjavik is the captial of Iceland, situated in the southwest region on the Faxa Bay, it is highly sought tourist destination and is the hub centre of the country. Presently the city has made strong convictions to redevelop the harbour front to densify the city and welcome the influx of visitors that keeps grow every year.

REYKJAVIK’S SUNPATH DIAIGRAM

REYKJAVIK’S AVERAGE WIND DIRECTION

INDUSTRIAL SECTOR


REYKJAVIK, Iceland

p

OLD HARBOUR

Area of Focus

t

Harpa Concert Hall

Sae

bra ut

CITY CENTRE

p

<W AT E

RF

Arnarhรณll

Hve

rfis

Lau gav egu r

RO N

T>

La ek jar ga ta

p

gat a


P1 OLD HARBOUR Site Selection

E RG BA

IP

t

C

ED S O

P

O PR

U STR

SH

Y TR US D IN

M

RIS

U TO t

E

R TU

RY ST U IND

0

0 16: WORK YARD

00

14:

ath nP

u

eS

Jun

00

12:

K IOS

K IST et > R U re t

<S

RC

TO

00

10:

PIE

DRY DOCKS

00

08:

RA

PIE

PROTECTED MARINA

gt bu

r du Su RB

PIE

isg ata

SHOPS & RESTAURANTS

AEg

Geirsgata

p

Tour Boat Dock

p

Tour Boat Dock


SITE ANALYSIS Site Selection

DEVELOPMENT PROPOSAL 2030

THE OLD HARBOUR

SITE ACCESS

The proposed site of the project found its way into the old harbour where recent devlopments have made it a hot bed of interconnected economies and lifestyles.

Currently there are two vehicular access points, the main road Geirsgata and a side street, Suburbugt. The main road entrance lacks a public side walk and thus makes it difficult and uncomfortable for pedestrain traffic from that area. Thus any development on the site needs to address multiple access points to allow for the different entrance points to the harbour.

A

The old shipping industry still has a large presence in the area with the dry docks and large winches bringing in massive trawlers and boats in for repairs and maintenaince. The work yard wraps itself all along the edge of the pier.

B

The tourism has taken the area by storm with a strip of temporary kiosk structures laid on the street edge of the harbour. Developments of shops and restaurants have pushed up to the dry docks and workyard making the intersection and interactions of the sectors inevitable.

Presently, pedestrian access to the site isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the major issue but rather spaces for people to dwell and stay, the harbour does not consist of any seating and lacks of walkways for visitors to stay for prolonged periods of time.

FISHING & SHIPPING INDUSTRY PRESENT

TOURISM

+ CREATIVE ARTS INDUSTRY (specifically digital arts)

2004


SITE EXPLORATION Site Selection VIEWPORTS During site visits the tour kiosks that lined the harbour began to pose issues with the way harbour could visually connect to the work being done in the shipyard behind them. This was felt as an unfortunate impression left by tourism and in some ways counter intuitive as visitors couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a good glipse of the workings of the old harbour.


q

TOURIST KIOSKS

PROTECTED MARINA

photo the harbour from the east entrance


CONTEXTUALIZATION Site Selection


VIEWPORTS CONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D In order to gain visuals of the work yard one had to either walk around to the other side of the harbour or trespass behind the kiosk. With the shipyard in a sense being walled off, there is a sense of disconnection in the harbour where those entering the area canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really fit in and attached themselves to the area.

INTENTIONS With multiple visits to the site and conversations with some workers on the site, it seemed that the harbour presently has a delicate balance between the two industries in close proximity. However in a larger scale it could be argued that there is a lack of appreciation of the working harbour, and it is this projects stance that it should not be disconnected and related to the rest of the harbour front but celebrated as a large part of Rekjaviks history and atrraction of the harbour.

tp

photos of the workyard


4 2 3 1


SITE REDEVELOPMENT Site Re-Interpretation DEVELOPMENT In the redevelopment of the site multiple steps were taken to allow for the workyard and dry docks to become a focal point of the Harbour once again.

2

There was a conscious effort to reduce the proposed building height to fit in with the adjacent buildings. Thus it was proposed that the area in which the proposed building would be situated would be lowered to help keep the elevations lower.

3

The main street was re-routed to bring the main access point to become the central to the harbour. By doing so it also allowed the shipyard to be physically seperated from the new proposal while not inhibiting the visual access to the area.

4

A new waterfront walkway was also proposed to provide an area for tourist and residence a like to return to the harbour. This new pier would also provide an alternative pedestrian path to access the site taking away congestion from the street.

SITE ADJUSTMENTS

The tour kiosks were removed and relocated to the end of the barge to allow for an unbroken view into the workyard and create a larger area in which the new building proposal could be placed. By removing the strip of temporary structures it also gave the oppurtunity to include a larger outdoor space to be developed for visitors and residences in the area.

1

p

re-route main street

p

lowering the site ground plane

p

adjusting landscape to natural slope of site

p

addition of new waterfront walkway


BUILDING PROPOSAL Site Re-Interpretation BUILDING DEVELOPMENT With the development of the site re-routed street provided a stretch of area that the new building proposal could exist. It was decided that instead of having a singular building that two structures would tap into the potential of the site a lot better. The two building blocks would be spaced with a public area between that would act as a plaza as well as the main entrance to the waterfront pier walkway.

p

plan of road site lines and adjustments to the site

t

images of the developed site with building footprints


p

site development model


P2 STRATEGIES

Inspiration

WAVE & TIDAL MAPPING With a site adjacent to the water, inspiration was drawn to the fluactuation and temporality of the ocean. Interest was sparked by how the harbour and it’s activity are reflected by the water’s movement.

WAVES CREATED BY A FERRY

RIPPLES ON THE WATER

Drawings showing the peaks and valleys of the tides were used to produce a different way of interpreting the site.


tp

tidal/wave line mapping


SIMULATIONS Landscape

WELCOMING THE TIDE The changes of the tide and the motions of the wave are an intergral part of the ocean and how it hits the land is always a place of contestment espcially when there is a built environment meeting the water. In the development of the open plaza of the project it was proposed to imagine it as a gathering point for not only people coming to the site but also the water. While having the actual plaza flooded was a little extreme the design took this symbolism and developed undulating knolls and hills in for the plaza representing this welcoming of the external environment.

LANDSCAPE DEVELOPMENT Two node points of oscillation were inserted into a wave simulator and development a scape of peaks and valleys. The building bloks were placed in the system and allowed for the convergance of the two waves creating the potential to develop a new landscape for the open plaza. The placement of the hills were chosen to allow for circulation around the plaza, and provide spaces for seating and rest.

WAVE SIMULATIONS


UNDULATING LANDSCAPE Landscape

CIRCULATION The undulating landscape allows the major circulation path to still be open while allowing users to interact with the landscape and area. The peaks provide the area with seating and areas for people to use as please.

PEAK ASSEMBLY SEQUENCE

CONSTRUCTION Each peak will be made using site cast concrete to create the domed surface .

t

t

p

peak circulation plan

formwork

concrete dome structure


ROOF PROPOSAL Roof

INTENTION While the building was designed to be lowered in to the landscape in order to keep with adjacent building elevations. It was felt that there needed to be sharp shift in building topography. By having a roof that would span across both structures it would provide the city with an landmark that would beacon to tourist and residence alike.

FORM While the building was designed to be lowered in to the landscape in order to keep with adjacent building elevations. It was felt that there needed to be sharp shift in building topography. By having a roof that would span across both structures it would provide the city with an landmark that would beacon to tourist and residence alike.

t

u

roof study model


ROOF PLAN Roof


P3 EMPHASIS

Building Development

SKETCHES In order to infiltrate the site with a building proposal the multiple layers of sketches and drawing were done to help understand the site and context better. Early schematics show what each building would house and create a general layout of how the circulation would move in and around each building.

DIGITAL ARTS CENTRE The buildings are proposed to become a open reasource to young, up and coming digital creators. To provide them with the space and tools that might not be available to those just beginning their career in the field. The building will bring the digital arts community to a singular place and allow networking and workshop events for more support in the industry. While the programming of the building gives the tools neccessary for artist in the digital field, emphasises was placed on how the building could inspire these creators. How could they take inspiration from their surroundings? How could architecture intensify those moments?

p

1st Floor


p

2nd Floor


BUILDING A Building Development

Building A is the largest of the two structures and houses the performance side of the Creative Centre. The first floor consists of a large public area in which both users, visitors and tourist can occupy. A small drop from the entrances lifts the ceiling and brings the marina into the main space.

p

p

1st Floor PROGRAMS:

2nd Floor PROGRAMS:

2 Atriums/Viewing Theatres Public Thoroughway W/C Storage

1500 ft2 Sound Stage Lighting Control Rm Make-Up Rm Reading Rm 2 Post Production Edit Bays W/C

Truck Loading Bay Lounge

1st Floor Isometric

2nd Floor Isometric

t

1st Floor Schematic Plan

t

2nd Floor Schematic Plan


BUILDING B Building Development

Building B holds the production side of the digitial arts centre, catering to those who need software or digital fabrication hardware. The first floor house a fabrication lab that allows user to create using 3D software. The 2nd floor consists of computer labs and a sound production studio.

p

1st Floor Schematic Plan

p

2nd Floor Schematic Plan

1st Floor PROGRAMS:

2nd Floor PROGRAMS:

Digital Fabrication Lab (CNC/3D Printing/Laser Cutters) Truck Loading Bay W/C Storage

Recording Studio Lounge Computer Lab Printer Room Rehearsal Space W/C Storage


p

building site plan


PROPOSAL MODEL Building Development

p

visual connections from interior


PROGRAMMATIC LAYOUT Programming

< 2nd Floor >

< 1st Floor >

BUILDING A

BUILDING B


ICELANDIC DIGITAL ARTS CENTRE Reykjavik, Iceland Old Harbour Front Programming


BUILDING SECTION ICELANDIC DIGITAL ARTS CENTRE Reykjavik, Iceland Old Harbour Front Programming


P3 DETAILS

Undulating Ceiling Slates

CEILING DEVELOPMENT SLATE PATTERN DEVELOPMENT

The dropped ceiling takes ons the imagery of the waves, the development of the slates creates a sense of compression and expansion as one transverses through the main floor public lobby, the drops also provides spacing for mechanical systems and lighting to run through the building.

x-axis slates

1” SPACING

2” SPACING

OSCILLATING SPACING

SINGLE BAY CEILING LAYOUT

y-axis slates


UNDULATING CEILING BUILDING A LAYOUT


REFLECTED CEILING PLAN Undulating Ceiling Slates


SINGLE BAY STUDY MODEL Undulating Ceiling Slates

p

bay plan


GLAZING DETAIL Spider Glazing

GLASS FACADE Spider glazing nodes were used to meet the need of a large expansive glazing unit to wrap around the building and run through 2 levels. Glass vertical beams connected to the nodes provide vertical stability and limit the intrusion to the view of the harbour.

SPIDER GLAZING ELEVATION LAYOUT

SECTION


INTERIOR RENDERING


INTERIOR RENDERING


THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME


LIGHT & SOUND / SPACE & SPAN  

Production and Collaboration Facilities for Iceland's Creative Economy

LIGHT & SOUND / SPACE & SPAN  

Production and Collaboration Facilities for Iceland's Creative Economy

Advertisement