Page 1

CCENTRIC 路


路 RE\10LUTION No. IV.

ECC .E N T RIC

Pl路BLISHED BY THE

I

JUNIOR CLASS )

: ~T~VtN~ IK~TITUn

~f TI\~HN~LOGY,

HOBOKEN, N. J. ,~I.;1 Y,

187'7'.


! I

r1J Oll~ POLUElIU8, PruxTER, 102 ~M'Al: ST., ~. Y.


ECCLI TR.lC. T

E D ITORS. \

BROW:\"

A. YRt:S. HARRY

\\T.

H ,\ZARD. RUDERT ZAllNER.

3


ECCE.,."\7R.IC

4

ABBREV rATION S.

* LEFT

THE CLA~~.

t DECE.-\SED.


5

EDITORIAL. ~\nothL'r cyele eompleted! ~hll>ther rcvolution matIe! ~\1It1 the rolling year hn~ carried the" ECOKNTllH'" to that ph:l!'e of her IllOtion where it 1lecollll's the dnty of '78 to ~tep forward and gi\"e the "kick-off" which sh:lll turn her safely into the arms of gallant '79. X ot only a duty is it, hnt :lIl honor too, to take IIp the pen where it W:lS left by Ollr worthy pre(leces~ors. '77, ye who are ::;0 ~oon to le::w e the shades of • Ulna .J.1Iatej·, we salute yon and bill you God~peed, fully realizing that as your halcyon (lays of college life have 11011' almost pas~et1, ";0 too arc onrs fast rippling away, am1 we shall soon" go ont to meet yon in the wi(lc, wide worill" '78 no longer looks through the Freshmall's colored haze of distance, nor through the !'Iophomore's chromfttic gbs~, but the gloriolls rays of the world's sunshine are opening upon u~, chasing away the cIoud5, and le::wing us to

"Dip into the future far as human eye can sec, See the vision of the world and all the wondcr that shall bc.·'

It is not nve years ~ince the Steyens Institute of Technology has heen openell DllI'ing this short spaee much work ha:'! been solidly aml faithfully done. Our Alma JIatf;!' has heen forcing her way by han1 but successful blows, alll1 to-clay she stand,.; foremost among the schools of seicnce. Blessed with a faculty whose worth and ability ha::; won Elll'opean as well as American reputation, ne~tletl in suhstantittl and capacious huildingl:! filled with every yariety of the 1ll0~t yaluable scien t ific inHtrnmen ts, a pparatns ancl collectiom o.f all kind~, her position is certainly a prout1 one, am1 her futUl'e ought as certainly to be ma(le an emin ently brilliant anel succes~fnl one. "\Vell, in<leed, may we delight to hOllor the name of E<lwin ~\. Stcyens, whose munificence ana broad, unprejlHIicecl common sense have done so much for the (levelopment of those branches of human progre~s which play so important a part in the (lrama of modern life.

I


6

ECCE.iYTRIC.

'Ye tind reprC'sente(1 at STEYEXS allnationalitie~ and all stat1es of character. lIl'I' (;ollege life is the re~ult of a conglomeration of heterogenC'(luf; clements. Here the entl'rpri~ing Americ<1n, the stun1), '1'(,lltoll, the "i"a<:iou~ Frenchman, the ardent Spanian1, the luxurious Oriental, all mingle together. The" ECCEXTlUC" i" the exponent of thi~ life. And as the ;.;pirit she reflects is ~tormy an<1 desiccating, so the "ECCE~TRIl'" can neyel' he other than fearle~~, scorching, and impatient of re~traint, helonging, "hy a large mnjorit)'," to that ebss of organs denominntcu "indel'endent." The 1'1'0l)elling power l,ehind the "ECCE~Tm('" makes it im]lo~sihle for her en1' to 1)(' sub<1ned into a hohby-horse for the College, 01' the functionaries of the College, hut neither will be spare(l when either fails to " toe the mark"

It is unnece~sarr to apologize for the new features introdu(;ed into the "EC(,E~TIUC." Among tlle;;e arc "The /';tevens GI'ull'l," lmd " III .J1IeillOriam." " The Stevells Growl" is to be the vox stadentillm, the waming bcacon to the College authoritics. Here e,"ery one of us f;hall han! the right to make himself heard; hCl'e \\'e can l11eet and attack the cncmy on comlllon ground. And if the IX!;TIT{;'TE is to rctain her Rtudents and their respect, if she is to become the grandest Hlcees~, she will not be deaf to the l'U.?路 st(l(7elltiuli1, hut will aJ\\'ap he as good as her \l'ord, and ever exhibit it lin;Jier illtcrest ill her student;, than ill any of her "o-called "(;ontrihntions to seience." Stc,-ells men of the l'rel'ell t and future, rally! And ill the ueautifnl language of the l'oet, "Take the hull 1,y the hol'1l~." "LI .J.1Iemui'irlin"! Here we bow our hea<h in rc\'crence anc1loye. The Dead of KTEYli;Xt;! Their mcmory i:iball eyer he cherishc<] and rc\'ore<1 hy the "ECCEXTRW ", and "he shall annnally I'ccon1, upon her immortal pages, a life-~kctch of those graduates, who, in the course of the year, dose their eyes in death. Om illu~trious am1 much lamented POIXIEH hegins the long list upon which "'e shall all find a place "oonel' or later. Two new entcrprii'\('s han' heen stmtec1 at STEYEXS in the (,O\ll'~e of the pa;.;t year. "TILE H I")IPORl) SO(,IETY" i" no longer an l'xpC'J'iment, lmt a most deeidetl "ucees:o; ill every regaru. ~Ollll' of the paper~ rea<l hefore the Society sinec its organization, rank high botb in point of originnlity and depth of thought, a]](111a\'e alrea(l;' found their war into the h('.-t ]!l'l'iodical jitel'ntnl'e of the day. It i" the


ECCE~\TTRJC.

7

ambition of the Society to prove it~elf worthy of being the namcsake of one so distinguishell and cosmopolitan as the great Rumford. The Telegraph Oompany organi~ed by the students is in fine working order. Their wires circulate in every part of the eity, and to-day the student of applied science sits in his room up-town and chats with his fellow-student down-town. Thus do we annihilate distancc, and electricity doth make room-mates of' ns all. Our athletic life i~ as VigOI'OllR and brilliant as it is popular. N flyer, indeed, in the history of the College, have there been such wOlHlerful activity and fmch splendid achievements in her out-door RportH as at present. Banting, foot-ball, base-ball, and the gamcs, rival each other, and strive for the" balance of power". Boating Rcems just now to be gaining a slight lead. Every class has its crew, and, on any fine afternoon, or at day-break in early morn, you can see the steady pull of the Stevens' boys on the beantiful Hudson. Even the "Freshies" are out on their muscle, and really make a very respectable spurt. 'Ve cannot say so much for in-door sports. That long-promised gymnasium has not yet come, and, in the meantime, how saelly wc do neeel it! It is just what is necessary to keep up health and muscle during the long winter months. How much more ea~ilr we could stu ely, and we should come out of the winter so much better prepared for all out-eloor sports. The gymnasium is at the bottom of all sound physical training, and we mllst have one soon. Our Musical and Dramatic interests need rcviving. The bUl'l1ing of the Brooklyn Theatre and hard times in general have cooperated to dampen operatic and dramatic enterprises at STE,EXS, as well as in New York. The full Runlight of prosperity shines upon our Fraternities. The Rons of each clasp hands over a common altar, fragrant with fraternal incense, and blazing with FricnclRhip's never-dying flame. There is but one intcrpretation to the earneRt grasp of hand- Unselfish Brothedwod. But an unseen power elJ'iYes us on! There is no stanel-still. And the cditors in behalf of chivalric '78 have now done their work, and wistfully linger as they look hack and Rec the" ECCENTRIC" pas~ing from their bnnds forever! '78 now plnce" upon the shelf the first of that long series of "EccExTHIcs" which will ap]lC'ar eluring the


8

ECCENTR.lC.

second century of Ollr glorious national existence, (mel she is well worthy of the honor. Her editors humbly submit their work, fully conscious of its many imperfections, and confidently hoping that "the editors" of the future will be blessed with infinitely greater ability than has been allottea to them, and s1l1Tountled by circumstances infinitely more favorable than those hampering them. Go on! again cries a voice. And we obey, for it is not the voice of a Cllrse. Yemen of '78! IIark! The voice ye heal' is the trumpet-call of society, which asks for men, for living, practical, men, who, doing their part well in life, not only secure for themselves wealth, honor, and immortality, but spreading their influence far and wide, stimulate by their example those who see them, reminding us that" we can make our lives ~m blime."


ECCENTRIC.

9

TRUSTEES. MRS. RE\". S.

,-

B.

DOD.

E. A.

STEVE:\,S.

W. \V.

SHIPPEN.


ECCEl\7RIC.

10

F aculty and Instructors.

flESRY J\IORTOX,

PII.D ., PI'csideld, (Ul(l Pl'ofesso?' of The01'etical

Physic,<. ALFRED

M. :;)1A YEH, PH.D., Pi'Ofesso1' of Phf/sics.

TurRsTos, .1'1. •.:'11., gineering.

ROBERT II.

e.E.,

D E V OLSOX , ,- OOD, A. :;'II., C. E., Mech({nics.

P"ofesw)' of _1Ieclwnical En-

pl'(~ti:SS01'

of .1.1I athel,wtics ane!

C. W. MAC{)oHD, A.M., P"ofess01' of jll eclwm'cal Dntwing. ALHEHT

n.

LEEDS,

A.:;U., Pi'Ofesso,· of Chemist1'y (lncZ .L1Ietallw·gy.

F . KRoEH, A.M., Scc1'etm'Y of the Faculty, P?·o.fessor of Modem La)(f!twges.

CH.\RLES

ED\\-ARD " -ALL,

,y 11.

A. .:'I1.,

P}'ofe,~8ol'

of Btllcs-Lcttl'es and IIistm·y.

E. GEY1!R, A.B., Registrar of tIl( Faculty.

IIE::Sl1Y

A.

BECK)lEYEl:,

Libi'(wiwl.

C oll ege Functionari es. J A:}IES A . Dox ALD<.;OX, Jmzit01·. SA)IUEL IIAWKRIDGE,

Lons

BECKER,

Engineer.

lIfoulde1·.


ECCENTRIC.

II

,

Class of 77路 " Boutez ell avait."

J. B. E. A.

PIERCE,

J OIlS

R.~rEL.JE)

F.

l~EIILISG,

Y.~X 1\lXli:LE,

:;\A~IE.

A. G.

BmSCKERIlOFF,

MAURICE

1.

CO::;TEn,

J. K. F. E.

InELL,

LOLls

A.

IIORSHLOWER,

NASII,

DASIEL P .\LACIO,;, JAMES

J OI1N E. P.

B.

PIERCE,

RAPEL.m,

ROllERT:>,

EDWARD

A.

j)i'esiclellt. 1'"i(路e路 Pres i rle1/ t, 8ec. d; l'1'eas. Jlisto?'iaJl.

'("EULlS(;,

FRASKLIS YAS 1VISKLE,

ADDRESS,

1072 Fulton St. 220 IIlIdson 8t. 125 IIll(lson 8t. 102 Bloo711fiel(7 St.

J. City Heights. 14 Hudson 8t. 22 II/.l(lsol1 St. "

"

90 TTc{shington St.

J. City IIiif/hts, Paterson.

RESIDESCE.

Brooklyn, N 1-: Bustoll, JJIass. IIoboken. IIolJoken. S. ~Yol'1l'alk, COlin. PuebZa, JJlexico. Shw'pllville, Pu. lIopeu'r:Zl, J.v, Y: Elizabeth, J.v, J. Richmond, TVis. Paterson.


ECCKI7RIC.

,

History of the Class of 77路 Four year~ of eventful college life have come al1,l gone with '77. nnt it ,10cs not seem to any of u~ that half that ti1lle lifts passed oyer onr he:1(18 since we were first arranged in the lecture hall to hear the words of instnwtion and advice. Let each one of us compare that day's Lopes for tllC fnture with to-tlay's thonghts of the past. Eyery one has treasured up bits of hiRtory which, for fear of marring their interest, we will not here attempt to touch upon. It should not, however, be understootl th:1t the history of our chss if< di~eonllected or unattractive to its members; but to collate the factr: and incidence:; of our history ::md pbce them in the most attractive light, would be no ea"y task. This general sketch mu~t only be regarded as a remin(ler of the facts of our hi~tory which each one must arrange according to his indivitll1al taste. So rapidly has the time gone by that it seems as though we hac1 been Rhot to our destination like a cannon-ball, crashing through the electrical targets of examinations. At the same time receiYing a sort of centrifugal whirl, a great many dropped or flew off, some were splashed over to one sille or formed eledion pools, a11l1 the remainder continued ill their course, doing the work with little or no friction, but frequently <1oing a corresponding amount of work. On!" cla~s began its eventful career numbering twenty-nine memher~. By a stroke of policy, we suppose, only twelve of these retnrned as sophomores, anl1 we had ODe addition, sudt1en and unexpected, ,veighing al)out HO ponnds, in the person of a young gentleman said to have come fronY Canada. The next year found llS with bnt ten from our :-;ophol11ore ranks, rmc1 as J nniors we welcomed Idell-ness. Senior year fountl us relieyed of del7li-weight; nevertheles~, on calling the roll ollr Secretary was delighted to count ten. There haye 1)een represente,l six States anc1 two foreign eonntries-J apan and South America. Of the ten remaining are


ECCEJ.VTRIC.

13

two representatin:'s from the Excelsior ~tate, one from South Ameriea, three from Jersey, one from the wooden-nutmeg I-'tatc, I onc from the wilLls of Pennsylvania, and one from fnr 'W'isconsin. Of the twcnty-one who have left us, three are HtudentR of engincering, one artist, one assistant minister, a miner, one lawyer, one student of medicine, ten engaged in mercantile pnrsuits, one on the deep lJlue sea, one still looking for a situation, and one, in the I beginning of the Sophomore year, died. I The gentle reader, from the above figll1':1tive facts, may, for the mo~t part, comprehellll the situation: it cannot but be ' remarked, however, that the Cassandra-like prediction of our deeimation eJ1l1ed in a goo(l place. Our friend::; IllUst not suppose though that becau;:<e, in the fir~t part of the course we were redllced, that ,,'e ha,-e been in the same measure (livitlell ; for, in other respects, as an organization, we ha\e been snccessful. From the beginnillg the grc[ttest harmony h[t~ prevailed and wo royiew our history with ple[tsure and f<atisfaction. Probably nothing has contributed 1'0 lUuch to thi" as om little class-room, tIle recolleetionH of which we will never forget-where 1I"e have so often slmred our jOYR and cider. SOJlle hieroglyphic~, carefully desiglled and executed, will conyey to the future alltiquarian of ordinary intelligence, that the avel'age age was 20.7 year~; lLYerage height, 5 feet 91 inches; aYerage weight, three weeks before last Spring examination, 152.3 pounds. But '77 lea,ves another-a nobler and fitter emblem of future greatness-an elm, awfully suggestive to the freshman of future genemtions of the slippery wa.y~ of this life. "Vith one accord we say, """oodman, spare that tree," and lllay it continue to apIJl'o[tch Busch-y dilllenHion~ long a,fter it has burst its iron cage and its planter~ arc forgotten. An<l now COIllt'R the" saddest tale we ha,ve to tell "-for you who IHn-e known us only through the pages of the ECCEXTRIC, we must biel you a long, last farewell, and only with a, feeling of sincerest regret do ,,-e contemplate those separations which mu~t soon follow. II

I-lr"TORIAX.


ECCE.NTRIC.

Class of '78. II. ,Yo

Pl'Cdident. T-i' ct -PI·e.-a"den t. Tl'ea surer.

HAZ.\Rl>,

ROBERT ZAllXEH,

\V. H.

SIlEL])OX,

Ilistol·il/n.

'V. H. Rmw,

XAME OSCAR AXTZ, BRO,"X AYRES, W)[.

RADIOXD BAIRD,

ADDRESS.

HESIDEXCE.

217 E . .Kinney St. 3il Garden St. 23 E Kinmy St.

..L\rWxlrh·, .LY J. ~Yew Orleans, La. ..L,reWarh·, .Lv' J. ..L1Iars/wllt01en, 10. IVeehmL'ken. lIoboken. Baltimore, ..J[d.

Am:nuR DE BOXXEVILLE,

220 Hudson St. W eehwo ken. 28 IEu7son St. 23 First St.

W}I. ]\L\HK D01J lillERTY,

18(3 8i,<:th !::Jt.

T.

PLIXY

BIRCIIAlm,

J. T.

HILLRIC HEXRY

B.

FRAXK

Boxx, BRe-CK,

FOOTE,

RICHARD GERXER,

W.

ALFRED

GmIIS,

OTTO CH.\RLES GSAXTXER, HARRY

\-V.

HAZARD,

FRAXK

P.

JOXES,

J orrx

FORI1EST KEU,Y,

JAMES

'V.

VV)I. P. PAUL

F.

KIRCIIlIOFF,

99 TVi.18hill(Jton St. 4 Eleventh &. 145 IIl.ldson St. East Oran[/c. 14 7 .Hudson St.

1·~5

RrCIUIW II. )IATIIER, Emnx L. JH YETIS, FIUXK B. NICHOLS, H. E. Rrcll,umR, )1. D.,

"

St.

IIudson !::Jt.

"

KIRCIIIIOFF, KUDJ.ICU,

"

1+5

5!J ...lIeraloll'

"

184 IIitdson St. 4 Tenth St.

Orange Valley. IVash'ton St.

2!}7

Bloomfield.

Jersey Oity. Cincinnati, Ohio.

IIoboken. .1Yew Brul1swick. East OI·an(Je. Elizabeth, .Lv' J. Cecil Co., .1Vd. IIoboken. jYew Orleans, La.

"

"

IIoboken. lIro·tford, Conn. Plattsbur(Jh, ..Lv, y. lIoboken. Bloomfield, .Lv' J.

I

I


IS

ECCEI7R.lC.

ADDRESS.

RESIDE:NCE.

252 BloOl1~fiel(l St.

Hobokell . Philadelphia, Pa. IIoboken.

:NAME. \\)J. H. SHELDOX, J OH:N R. DTEPJIEXS,

IIEXRY S-CYD.D[, AnOLF

"V.

EDW,\RD

VO:N SEYFRIED,

P.

Tno\[psOX,

:220 IIlldson St. 371 Om'den St. ~Vewm路k.

.LVewark.

20 I-Ilidsoll St.

Elt:wbeth, .oN. J. U. S. Columbia. 8hanesville, Ohio.

JOSE MARIA VILLA,

14

ROBERT ZAflXER,

-!

"

Tenth St.

"


16

ECCEXTR.1C

History of the Class of '78.

III looking back at the record, which we, of '78, ha\'e made for ourselves during the past year, we ~ee that the clas~, as a clas~, has somewhat changed its character, We have lost that indescribable something which seem~ to cling during the first two yearR of any college course, and to show the school-boy in the stUllent, and we han', it i~ to be hoped, obtained the right appreciation of the end and aim of our work and study. 'Vhile we have left foreyer our Sophomorical pranks and traditional use of Rpeech, and while it ReClUS our newly as~umea dignities should have brought us deech more worthy of a place in our annals than those whic!!. occur in the quiet monotony of student life, yet, snch as they are, it is om duty to record them, During the last term of our Sophomore year, little happened to ruffle the even tenor of our way; but one eYent, at least, stands f0rth with prominence-we had our picture taken! One bright ~pring morning, our Professor of Chemistry decided that we should be made the suhject of a chemical experiment, :llld so ,,'e were, assi ted by the dulcet tones of a hand organ operated hy [L seedylooking brigand, who, it is to be feared, was ~ecretly encouraged in his daylight ~erenacle. Although our picture was most painfully open to eriticif;m, and canl"ed ill-natured remarks to ue ma(le j)y the ullintimidated "seyenty-niners" concerning the ::;ize of the shoes generally worn in our class; allll although one of our most keenf'ighted classmates wa~ doollle<l to appear to posterity as sightless, and one of our most belligerent as holding aloft the oli"e IJranch of peace, yet the picture \\'ill always bring to us the plea~al1t memory of our Profes~or';; kindness, and of that sunny day when '78 was all together. One thing we did worthy of record-we helped to write a book; well, not exactly ~orite it, hut still to "a 'sist," as the critics say. And hereby let it be known that \I'hen on Fome future day awe-


ECCENTRIC.

struck Freshmen shall be told, in defiance of grammar, logic and truth, that" Prof. W-- and me wrote that book," the statement can be stoutly contradicted. We are called upon to mourn the death of Ollr Glee Club, be it natural or otherwiHe. It i~ ~upposed to have become defunet from want of time, but as some one maliciously suggest:.;, "from want of voice." That may be the reason too, so we won't commit ourselves. The Rpirit of music was not dead within us, however, as a most tuneful examination showed, and although now we ~eem destined to remain forever unsung, let UR hope that we will always be "on time ", antlneyer, when necel:isary, voiceleR>i. The year do~ed on a hot Summcr day, and after having seen '76 graduate with all honor to itself al1tl Stevens, aUll having hem路tl a most complimentary Rpeech in a lauguage not now unfamiliar, thanks to two years' practice, we were all glad to go to Olll" home", though there was not one, it is to be warranted, who did not acknowlellge to himself some rcgrct at le:wing Old I-Itevells, dear with many happy memories. The hot centennial Summer haying passed, 110t, however, without bringing honor to ourHelves at Philadelphia, our classmates came back to be welcomed warmly, some changed to Hllch broac1-shoulderell, brown-skinued youths, that we hardly recoguized in them the students of the year before. Then came the choice of our profesl:iion, and it is our duty to record that four only of our number chose to turn to the paths of chemical and physical science as the way in which tht'ir Ii ,路es should lead, while the remainder chose the more practical though not less noble course, that is, to enroll us in the raub of American Engineers, if we are true to ourl:ielves, our class and Stevens. 'Ye are now fairly engaged upon our work, and while there are a few thingl:i that might be improyed, and more still that might be omitted, yet we find our course agreeable, though hard work is on either side of the path we have chosen.

: \

:

Engineering we have found pleasant, with plenty of room for earnest workers. Mathematics has become more practical as we apply it to our other studies, and although we must complain that our study of physical science has been most unduly limited to the meaf\urement of time, ou r chemical inyestigations haye amply made up for it. French anel German :\re no longer unknown tongues, I


18

ECCE.NTRIC.

and the knowledge of 0\11' own sturdy EngliRh lIa;; become hroader aml more liberal, and here, in the language of the last, but by llO meanR the least, of om studies, we complete the cycle while we leaye the record still unfinished. Although, as we remarked in the beginning, the class has cxperiencell a change in it~ character, yet one change we haye not experienced : we haye prcsenc<1 our unity; riyal frienil.ships, society adherence, 01' hard fought battles for scholarly distinctions, could neH~r de;;troy the feelillg that it i" to '7(4, fi1';;t anll foremost, that we owe our allegiance. 路W" e--hut we fear we are ellcroaching on the f;phere of our successor, and RO we lay (lown our pen until another eccentric reyolutioll ha~ heen Illude, and it be taken up again to record for the last time the deeds of '78. III8TORIAN.


ECCEXTR/C.

,

Class of 79· C. S. KrX(;ST..Dm, .T. II. J. . ()~G';TlWET, :-I. C.\~I'\CIIO, .Tn. K P. HOHBI~",

l),·esir/(,lIt.

(~.

f ns(oJ'i(/ It.

:-I.

.TH.,

F. :-I.

ClltHIEH, JOIl~ ~. COO],E,

H. F.

D\.\I'E5,

I\~.\[.TER

11. I r.

G. ] )U.\\·Ol1TII,

1l.\XnFOHTII,

GEO. ('. llom;];:",

'VJL K .T.\(01l~, I . Eol'oLJ)() J ..I.t;I:E(;n, J.UI \0:" KELLY, C. :--. KI\"(;,,["\\"Il,

•T. II. LO,\';"TltEET, J. 13. H..DIlREZ, A. B. HA~l>-\U, AIWIlEU HrclI.l.lws,

E. P. H..oHm:>;", V{ILJ.'mm

c.

:--)J1TII,

PHILIP 'VALLl~, ~IA t· X~EI. 'V IIITE,

l

RE';IDEXCE.

ADDREi5S.

l:n Iflfll"oll St.

" \JKE~,

C,DL\('110

lh(/S/I1'('I'.

C. IIOIl(;}:",

~_\)IE.

A. C.

ril'e- Pl'csiilu.t. 8el'I'tlu J'!J.

BaltillloJ't, JJi7.

28 lYest '221117 St.

.LYell' ) 'u1'1".

~Yw'({I'k,

_Yi"l"w'/':, ~I': J I)utu'so11, .LV ,T, E"II!//r'I"OOl7, ~I~ J

X: .r

PIIIII'WII,

.1.\r. .T.

J~"II!llc/l'(!lId, ~I':

J.

~y:

:102 11"sII'(uli 8t.

I1o/luken,

7th 8tnet. '217 lludlJon St. 303 ,,)u Jllill it A,'. l:lD 111111s011 BI. 50 .11[e((dow N.

1101101.-'11. nic(/, .1.1r. r JtI'S(/i ('ity.

Fi'(fld,/ill,

~Ir.

.r

217 11,117",," St. 103 WUlt 14th St.

1-17 /Il(d.,u,' SI. l07 IVtlsh'ton St, -,-Yo. 4 '1 'ell th St.

147 IIlIillJOJl 131 II/1I18(!1I

"

"

.ot. St,

J,

Me;"",,!).

110bo/,-"II. 1;"t'IIlI k I ill, _I~ .J. Phil((drll'h ill, Pa . Xi,/!, rud.:. AmlUl'uli8, .llJi.l. Ph il((dIZp!tiU, Pa. .F'J'(( /I kja,." 0 It i o. .lYell'",'''. Ohio. .1.Yew Orleans, La,

"

"


20

ECCEJVTRIC.

History of the Class of '79.

The history of a clas~, like that of a natioll, is yaluable only so far as it relates plain facts. In some preceding cl:-u;ses the historian has been obliged to economize the truth in order to give a creditable account of bis <:last'; but, thanks to tho intrinsic merit of the Class of '79, individually and collectively, no snch subterfuge is necessary to place it in a favorable light. Its works are its witnesses. Its historian does not ask that this statement be taken upon faith; but will give a short account of wbat the clas~ has accomplished, and how it has been done, and then await the verdict. The last terms of our Freshman year passetl along without occurrences of unusual interest; 1mblic " retirings " and "rushes" were unknown, and our time amI our energies were tlevoted to study with such sucees;; that at the final examination at the end of the year, there were but four men" conditioned" in a class of 22, and the deficiency in at least two of these cases WflS the consequence of ill health. 'iVe candidly believe tbat we stand in no danger of Co])tradiction when wc boldly assert that the record of the Class of '79, as a whole, during its Freshman year, has neyer been excelled. The knowledge of this fact caused a feeling of laudable pride among us, as with many well wishes we f;hook hands and parted for the long vacation. Like all yacations the time 路wore quickly away, and almost before we were aware of it October waR at hand, and we were flgain met to resume our studies. Seldom it is that a cbss of twenty meet after a separation of three months without a diminution in numbel', and our pleasure can be imagined when we at that meeting found but few of the familial' faces gone. 'iV" e also welcomed with pleasnre our two members from '78, who then cast their lots with '79. With this accession we entered our second year with twenty men. While we had already, in our Freshman year, establi hed a high standard for ourselves as a cIa s, and for the emulation of classes


ECCENTRIC.

2I

to follow, it was eyident from the expressions freely uttercd by all that we were not yet content. 'rhere was a resolve to accomplish still more in the coming year than had been done in the past. The record of the achievements of the class shows that this resolution was earnestly made and faithfully carried out. A.nalytical Geometry first engaged our attention, and after a manful struggle its hidden mysteries were open to us, and the grim tyrant became our obedient slave. Differential and Integral Calculus, with all their infinitessimalities, next bo路wed to the sturdy application of '79. In French and German, '79's progreRs has been so rapid that it has the voluntary statement of its professor, that it is at least two terms ahead of any previous class. This flattering result is attributable, not only to earnest endeavor, hut abo to a system in ,,-hich printers' ink and electricity are import:mt factors. 'rhe electric pen has, since its introduction, Raved a large amount of time and labor; and there is a universal feeling of gratitude among the class for it~ in troduction. In the English Language we hayc nude good pl'ogre><s, h:wing finished ::md reyiewec1 " Fowler." The declamations han' been of an u11u~ually high order, and would have clone credit to any institution. In Descriptive Gcometry and Drawing, much has been done, although rendered less lauoriol1s, from the change of rec:itatiolls to the construction of problem,; in the drawing room. Here, too, the fruitful" imagination" of '79 has rcaped its just .rewanl. It has been especially assidnou>< in cultiyatillg that important attribute siuee the enunciation of the law, by a membcr of a higher class, "that your progress is directly as your imagination." This law has been but recently enunciated, and we giYe it here for the benefit of succeeding classes. If, in futlll'e years, we are to look back >I'ith more than ordinary feelings of pleasure to any 011e of the many rooms in which we have passed our time at the Institute, it will certainly be to the drawing room; for there rigid discipline is forgotten, stiff rules unknown, and a "feast of reason and a flo,,' of soul" is a constant thing. There, polities and small talk and large talk are freely indulged in, and thcre sometimes may be heard the touching notes of" that whistle."


22

ECCEXT.RiC.

Physic>, has retained all of it:'; old, time-honored attractions, anel new ones, too, have lent to that delightfnl stll(1y new beanties. In onr lecture room many Tare alld IH'alltifnl experiments have been presented for onr inspection and in~truction. The results of these together with our attentive regard to om duties, was to call forth from onr instruc~or marked evidences of his ~atisfaction at onr proficiency. And now we come to the last, though by no means the least of our year':> studies-Ohemistry. ,Ye look hu('k with feelings of Ratisfaction mingled with regret; well s:1ti"fied with om achievements and what we have learned in itself, hnt regretting that we ha\'e not gone deeper :1Ud roamed willer oyer the broad fiellIs of that interesting anc1noble science. To be ;;ul'e wc have receiycl1 "copions" notes upon the preparatioll of the Yl.lrioul!' salts, alld h:we been told how, in delicate reactions, we should allow the drop" of the several re-agents to come into contact at their peripheries along the line of contact; still with all tlliH valuahle store we feel that we wOlll1111fl"ye maue greater progre~s if we eoultl have hall the COll!lRels and practical aSRistanee of the hearl of this department d1ll'ing the three homs of laboratory pruetice, rather th:1ll an averago attendanee of scarce an JlOur. But, not,\-ith"tancling, ,,"e ha n' ~((('ccedea in preparing. ome \'ery fine chemical Rpecimen8. These haye l)(~en deemed worthy of ::t place in the liorary, wher~ they may !lOW he seen, daily surrouJ1(lec1 by an admiring and envious orowd of "Fre,hmen." With this im})erfect aeconnt enels the recon1 of our studies anll our laborR. Father Time has dealt kindly with us c1nring the past year. ,Ve have lost Done of our number by death; anel but one has been o~liged to leave from ~icknesR. One, however, has partell with us to go to ,Yost Point as a cadet, having won his appointment in a competitivc cxamination, ovor many opponents-the fir~t of enelles>, "signal triumphs" to be achieved hy the members of '70 in the comillg future. The class of '79 can boa. t of none of those juvenile exploits which delight in. It bas lIot gained the popularity that is given by "ru._heR," and like manifeHtations of juvenility. X either h'as it shown thnt wilful c1isregard of authority which has at times manifested itself in other elasses. Upon olle memorable occa~ion in the past year, '70 alone, showed its regartI for College Laws, and the duties owell to diseipJine and order. som~


23

.As regard~ athletil'~, although not actin', '70 haR always heen ready to come to the front. This was ~hown to adv:mtage in its action in reganl to the unfortunate "gymna:-iulll schel11e." BaRe ball had to make a requi~ition on ns for a leader, and ~o also dia foot hall, when gooa playing was deRired. ,Ye haye had four claR~ meetings during the year. The fir;;t waH called to take action upon an oft<-'r kindly made liS, of additional time in the laboratory; the ~ecolld to dect the prc~ellt ottic-ers; the third to clect the "Eccentric Editors;" and the fOllrth to take action in reganl to our attendance the day following "~a"hillgtoll'S uirth-day. TIH'sC meetings haye all heen characterized hy their quietnel"'s and unanimity. The ]!olitical standing of the class, ai; RhoWIl hy a straw takell the day before the late PrcsitlenLial cOllte~t, is 9: 9.

Our intercourse with all claRses has been marked hy a gentlemanly conrtesy upon both sides. The Faculty has treatetl ns with markea esteem and faYor, and we earnestly helieye have labored together for our good. We conlially thank them for their kindness and cOI1Ritleration toward us. ~\ncl now Ollr ,,:ork is done. "~e by down onr pen, and, as 'we think of the" Htrnggles and tri urnphs " of the past year, we can hut hope that the "Class of '79" may acquit itself as nobly in the future as it has in the past.

IllS


ECCENTRIC.

24

Class of '80. FRANK WILCOX,

C. WHITE, W. W. DASIIIELL,

H.

J.

M.

E,YI:'<,

G.

lYI.

ALLEX,

NAME.

GEORGE M. ALLEN, GEORGE M. BOND, J ORN BORCIIARDT, WILBUR Y. BRO,YN, GEORGE BRYAN, W~r. W. DASHIELL, L. Rn,SELL DEGEN, THEODORE A. ELLIOTT, J OH:'< ~I. EWEX, HENRY J. FREYGANG, PAUL A. GUERBER, L. lYI. HEHNZ, W~I. E. JOBBINS, ROLAND S. KumUIEEDT,

J. W. LEIB, JR, l\L~TIIEY, GEORGE M. MORTON, HENRY F. OGDEN, WILLARD P. PARSOXS,

L. A.

E. H.

PECK, G"C"ILLEmro S. TORO, II. C. \\IlITE, FRANK WILCOX, DURA:'<D W OODJIAN,

P?·esident. Vice-P1'esident. SeC1'etCl1'Y· 'fll'eas1We?·. IIisto1·ian.

ADDRESS.

RESIDENCE.

'J'e1'ryville, Conn. 36 Senenth St. Gmncl Rapids, 14 Hudson St. IIobolcen. lJ1ich. 54 Gcwden St. Pate1'son, N. J. Paterson, N. J. IIoboJ.:en. 56 Ninth St. P1"in . .Anne, J.1Id. 154 Hudson St. Smith Orange. South Omnge. East Orange. East Omnge. G1'eat Neck, L. L 131 Hudson St. IIoboken. 88 Gcwden St. )J[onsey, N. Y. Monsey, J.Y. 1": J.Vew Y01'h: City, 11 E 29th St. N B1'i,qhton, .l'l. J. New Bd.yhton. New Y01'lc City. 207 West 14th St. J.Vetocl1'h:, N. J. 22 Ohestmit St. 274 Bloomfield St. IIoboken, Hoboken. Paradise Row. IIobokeil. 281 Was/I'ton St. IIoos'kFalls,N Y 4 Tenth St. NewCl1'k, N. J. Newa1"7.:. Santiago, Chili. 212 Hudson St. Pm't Chester, N. Y. ]45 " Pittsbw'gh, Pa. " " South Or·ange. Smtth Orange.

r


ECCENTR.lC.

25

History of the Class of ' 80.

We are called the class of '80, but it is a mi"nomer. ,Ve are only a class of 25 ; and unless our number increases.at an unprecedentea rate, we shall never become a class of 80. '70 cannot boast of a duller hiHtory than 'we haye had. We have, as a claRs, attended so well to our studies, and are indiyidually so well brought up, that our conduct ha" hecn pcaceable toward the other classes anel we have had none of thosc <liRturbances which are about the only thing to be mentioned ill a class history. To be sure, there have been a few rushe~ with the Sop11s, as they camc out from mathematics, but they were confined to a ,.;mall portion of the class, most of us bping' too "en sible to engage in ~uch an affair.

As we now present oursehe" fo], the first time before the readers of the ECCENTRIC, it may be well to describe ourselyes bril'fly, so that they may form some idea as to what kind of a class we are. The average age of the claSH i;; about eighteen years and fiye months. Thc average weight, about one hundred and thirty-eight pounds, and the ayerage height about nye feet nine iuche,.; . .As to color, it is !'afe to say that one man, at least, is vVhite, ana we can affirm ,,,ith equal certainty that another is Brown. lYe will not venture to say that anyone is hlack, but it is a fact that one is a Bond-man. lYe haye made good progres~ in all our studies, aml bid fair to becolUe yery erudite. But for thi~ we must thank the Faculty, who have been yery patient with U~, and haye in all respects done their duty. Last K ovember we had our first clas!';-meeting, at which we voted for the pre~ellt otticers; and as there were no returning boards or other contrivan<.:es for delaying the cOllnt, the returns were soon in and the count completed, giving each of the several officers a fair majority on the first ballot. "Ye will not attempt to deny that there was intimidation and stuffing of the ballot boxes; hut there was no


26

ECCENTRIC.

al'lthority to go behind the returns, and no decided objection was made to the decision of the presiding officer, who did the counting. The next meeting took place on the 22d of February, and was called for the purpose of deciding whether we should petition the Faculty for a holiday on the 23d . It was decided in the afti.rmative by a large majority, but for sufficient reasons the petition was not sent in. We can state on the authority of Prof. Kroeh that we have had the honor of originating a new kind of disturbance. Onc day as we were passing up to French, we struck up "lIold the Fort," keeping time with our footRteps on the stairs and in the. corridor, almost to the door. After we had taken our seats, we were mformed that it was the first time such a thing had been (lone since the Institute was founded. It may be taken as a mark of our docility and deference to the wishes of the Faculty, that it was also the last time. In athletic sports, we have not been very forward, nor yet very backward, considering that it is our first year at the Institute. While the ground was bare, foot ball was the favorite pastime, and when one was tired of using the ball in the customary manner, he would use it as a cURhion to preserve his latter end from too violent contact with 'Mother Earth. When the snow alllI ice came, this had to stop. But we did not lack for healthy exercise, for the muscles were called into active use in order to keep the line of direction within the base, a feat which N atUl'e had rendered difficult by diminishing friction upon the sidewalks. Since the snow and ice have passed away we have not done much of anything in this line. We have still another term before our Freshman year is ended, hut the EccmnRIc must make another revolution before the history of this portion will appear. We hope that when it shall appear, it will be more interesting and instructive than that of the portion here treated of. HISTORIAN.


~

ECCENTRIC

1--Students Pursuing the Scientific Course.

Bnows W)f.

.Tons KELLY, R. II. MA'.rItEI:.

AvnEs,

)1. [)OU(';'I1EHTY,

Special Students. FHAX1\:.

L.

DAImEE:'>,

W)[. E. GEVEJl, .A.B. ,V. R. HOWE, H. E. RICHARDS, :H.D.

1\"': 1~ Unive?路sity. College City N Y. Y(lle College. Princeto?l.

Sun1n1ary. SEXIOHS,

11

JUXIORS,

29

SOPITO)WRES,

20 24 4

FRESID[EX, SPECIALS,

88

TOTAL,

CO::-''XECTICUT, LOUISIAXA, IowA, NEW YORK, NEW JERSi;;y, ::\IARVLAXD,

J\L~SSACITUSETTS,

3 5 1 13

. -n 5 2

)IEXICO, )IrCIIJGAX, OHIO, PEXXSYLVAXIA, SOUTU AMERICA,

W ISCOXSIX,

2 2 -t 6 3 1


ECCENTRIC.

A Voice

frOll1

the Ph.D.'s.

" Well, 1\11'. - - , how are you getting on ?" " Very well, sir.)) " Any questions to ask ?" "No, sir." [E,7:it. ] "Good day."

And are ~oe not to ha\路e a say ?-we, the Doctors of Philosophy in potentia. The four classes have their historians, whose place it i" to tell the >:torr of the class for that session, but we Ph.D. 'i', though coming, it is true, umler the general head of the Class of '78, and acknowledgillg allegiance to that class in a general sort of 'way, desire the position and prominence to which as "students of scicnce for science's sake" we are justly entitled, and we desire to chronicle, in a way which no "mere practical man" can do, the beauty and sublimity of many points in our life and course. It is true that, during a part of the time "dcyoted to work in the chemical and physical laboratorie~," we diHCllSS the political situation, or the conflict between science and theology, Ii ke the re~t of mankind; but where find you such stores of information in regard to the Dissipation of Energy (Potential, yet Kinetic),* the relative yalnes of silk and rubber as insulators for the energy so dissipated, as are daily opened to us by our J erse)" City politician allll D.Ph.? This knowledge can not be founel elsewhere, for it is "all my own." We feel that in him we have ;, true student of science-one who actually "touches his work" lIe is a comfort to ns in the 'I'eary hours when" evaporating to dryness," or "washing the filtrate," and the great excess of joy is too much for us, and we have to relegate him to the "gas-room" in self-defence. We can stand him on Energy, but start him on the Catholic Chmch, and verily we feel that hr. is " wounel up for twenty-fonr hours." lIe is withal .* Our J. C. p. says the dissipation is due to diil'erence of potential, said dif路 ference arising from contact simply. Be is prepared to demonstrate his " Contact Theory" experimentally at any time.

I


ECCENTRIC.

of a powerful miud, and fearful to behold, but he haH greater qualities still. lIis manipulation-ah! tlH're's where his true genius comes out. After smashing Prof. :Mayer's elegant prism, "which he bought in Paris," and other marvelous feats of manipul:ttion, he can feel that he waH not horn in \'ain-that he yet may riKe: may rise by virtue of his gift even to the dignity of a J enley City politician, alias a pickpocket. Of our solid man-he whose name comes third on our list-,Ye can say nothing but in praise, though we donbt not our J. C. p. would think he shoul<1 be hramlecl a:-; a bore, for truly he trieth the .T. C. P.'ll patience. Our X o. -! ill so seldom with us that we eallllot chronicle much of hiH "eloingH," though we heal' he will yet astoniHh the worlel with his great inventions. He iH a man of partl:4, but thinks ";:)a1lerol1 was nothing but a el--d Frenchman." For No.1, modesty forbids we should say much, though it may be sai(l, en p(lssant, that, whateyer he may be as a physicist, he will neye]' make an analytical chemist. lIe is all enthui'iia8tic admirer of the Patellt l{etreating BUl'Ilel'-" warranted to retreat under Cirtlllllstances that would callse other hUl'llers to be extinguished." lIe thillb it illten;<ely intereHting work I'e-lighting it when it retreats, :tK his (lid Home time ago, seven time:-; in fifteen minutes. OUI' frieJld the Doctor, whom we hoped would continue with ns as of yore, has decided to restrict himself to l>hysics, [111(1 now paRses his whole time in the" Minute :;}Jeasurements of :UodeJ'H ;:)cience." Of our other fellow-laborers in the" Bal:lement Lai).," we would fain speak, but we have ere now said ellough, and must close. A.


ECCENTRIC.

30

SOCIETIES HAVING NO CHAPTERS AT THE

s.

I. T.

DELTA PSI. WaHh. and I,ee University.

BHOWN AYI{ES,

PHI KAPPA PSI. Penn'a Eta.

ROBEUT ZAHNER,

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. FRANK

P.

JONES,

-

-

University of Virginia.


-~============================~ I ECCENTRIC.

31

. FRATERNITIES.

IN

THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT.


1_ 32

_ _

ECCENTR_IC. _ _ __

I

GAMMA OF

THETA XI. 6294.


ECCENTRIC.

33

Theta XI.

RESIDENT MEMBERS. W :u. F.

ZUfMERlIfAN,

1\1. E., '70.

,V. R.

IIowE,

13., '75 .

.AfDCCCLXX v.u. JOSTAII

N.

ED\\, ARD

IIORNBLOWER.

P.

ROBERTS.

MDCCCLL\' VIII. Fl~ANK

B.

IL\ltRY

"V.

FOOTE,

.LumH

JIAZAIW, EDW} N

J~.

KII{( ' llllOF~"

W.

\VJJ ,LIAM

P.

KmCIIIJOFF,

i\I YERS.

M DCCCLXXIX.

S. B.

ILu{RY F.

CAlI[ACIIO,

DAWES,

CHARLES ~. KIXnSLANll.

\VIl,LIAlIl

W.

DASlIIET,L, Wn,LIAlIl

GEORGE

H.

TORO.

M.

MORTON,


34

ECCENTRIC.

RHO CHAPTER , Established 1874.


ECCENTRIC.

35

Delta Tau Delta.

RESIDENT MEMBERS, JAlI1ES E. DENTON, M.E.,

'75.

THEO. F. KOEZLY, M.E.,

HENRY A. Bm:KlI1EYER,

'76.

SENIORS, FRANK E. IDELL,

ALEX. G. BRINCKERHOFF,

L. H.

J AlI1ES

NASH,

EDW.

JOHN RAPELJE, FRANKLIN

V AN

B. PIERCE, A. U EIILING,

WINKLE.

JUNIOR, HENRY SUYDAM.

SOPHOMORE, JOlIN

S.

COOKE.

FRESHMEN, GEO. M. BOND,

LOUIS MATHEY.

(14 Members.)

'75.


ECCENTRIC.

GAMMA CHAPTER, Established February, 7875.


37 If

Alpha 路Sign1a Chi.

GAMMA

CHAPTER. I

OI'[Janb3d F eb. 15th, I~75.

I .I

CLASS OF '7S . \Y lLI.IA)l H. IhLI.m c

J.

HI CIL\RJl GE){)!EH,

BAIJU>,

FltA)!K

Bo)!)!, ,VILLTA.\1

II.

B.

NIC HOLS,

l::)IIELVON.

CLASS OF '79 . S. CnmIEH, W AW' ER G. DIL"' OKJ'lI, GEOIWE C. IIul)(ms, FRAXK

.J OJlX II.

LOXGSTREET,

EnWARJ)

P.

'V II . Flmv C.

ROBBINS, S ,IIlTll.

CLASS 0 F 'SO. LOUIS M. IlImNz,

W II. LLDI E. J 0 BBI )!S,

llI~xl:y lJAltIly

F. OGDl'; X, C. \VIIITE, I

(15

~Iclllucrs.)

I

-

--


ECCENTRIC.

Stevens I nstitute Athletic Association.

OFFICERS. ::>E(,ONJ) TEH,'\[,

l!'lmlT TEIU[,

.Lu;, E, DENTOX, '75, W, G, DILWOHTlI, '70, THEO.

F.

KOEZLY,

P9'e8. Viee- Pres. C01', See'y. Rec. Se,c'y. T'reasU1路er.

'75,

II. T. BRUCK, '78, JOIlX BAPEL,IE,

'77,

JAo-l.

E. Dm';ToN, '75. S. IrIXGSLAND, '70.

CHM;.

FRANK -VVILCOX, '80. HWJJAI{]) GERXER,

\Y.

II. SrlEL])OX,

'78.

'TR.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. l<'IHST

JAMES EmYARD

P.

ROBERT";,

E. 'i7.

TER~[.

DENTON,

'75, Chai1路lIurn. FHA.NK

B.

JOHN

FOOTE,

W. IlAZAlU), '78, C({pt. oj the Twenty: R. STEl'IlEXS, '78, CI/pt. of tlw Nil//:..

IIXIlRY

SE('OXD TEHM.

P.

HOREHTI', '77, Ghai9路rnan. G. DILWOHTfI, '70, Sec'y. 1 L\ RHY ",\\r. II.<\uHD, '78, Copt. of the 111lel1t y. JO[]NH. DTJ;;PTJl;;XR, '78, ('({j)t. (!!'the l{il/e. Fn.\:\l' B. FOOTE, '7~, CI/jd. of BO(ttill!/. EDWARD

WALTEJ{

'7S.


ECCE, -TRIC.

39

FOOT BALL.

SEASOS

OF

1876.

COLLEGR TTrE.L'-TJ'.

HARlW " -. HAZAR]), '78, Captain. J A)fES E. DENTON, 'i5, J. R. STEl'IIENS, '78, J OSEPll KINGSLAND, '76, W. G. Dn;woRTII, '79, J. T . HORNBLOWER, '77, A. ,C. AmTs, 'i9, E. P. ROBERTS, '77, J. BORC'IIARDT, '80, F. E. IDEI,L, '77, C. KINGSLAND, '79, F. B. FOOTE, '78, A. RICHARDS, '79, F. P. JONES, '78, MAUNSEL WlIITE, '79, F. B. NlC'IlOL';, '78, G. MonToN, '80, W. II. SHELDOX, '78. H. OGDEN, '80. HENIW SUYJ:)A)I, '78,

On the next page we give the foot ball record of STEVENS since the college first opened.


ECCENTRIC.

FOOT BALL RECORD.

OPPOXENTS. STEVEN S

Sept. Oct. Oct. Nov. Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. Noy. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.

14, 26, 31, 2, 10, 18, 9, 12, 80, 2, 6, 13, 20, 24, 1,

11, 28, 29,

1873, 1873, 1873, 1873, 1874, 1874, 1874, 1874, 1875, 1875, 1875, 1875, 1875, 1875, 1875, 1875, 1876, 1876, 1876, 1876,

N. Y. UNIVERSITY COLU)lBIA. C. C. N. Y. N. J. ATHLETIC Assoc. RUTGERS COLU:l1BIA. N. Y. UXIVERSITY YALE N. Y. UNIVERSITY C. C.N. Y. RUTGERS C.C.N. Y. COL"C:l1BIA C. C. N. Y.

V.

PRINCETO~

V.

RGTGERS RUTGERS COLU)[BIA N. Y. U~IVERSITY

V.

COLl; ~lBIA

Number of games played, Number won by STEVENS, Total goals won by opponents, Total goals won by "STEVENS,"

1).

V. V.

v. v. v. v. V.

v. v. V.

V.

v.

V.

V. V.

v.

STEVENS __ STEVRNS __ STEVENS __ STEVENS __ STEVENS __ STEVE~S_ . STEVENS __ STEVENS __ STEVENS __ STEVENS. _ STEVEXS __ STEVENS __ STEYENS __ STEVENS __ STEVENS __ STEYENS __ STEVEXS __ STEYENS __ STEVENS_. STEVEXS __

6 1 3 2 0 4 6 0 5 6 0 6 1 6 0 3 2

I 2 0 0 6 '2 0 6 0 0 6 0

0 6 1 ;3

5

3 0 4

7 0

20 12 41 63


ECCENTRIC.

41

Base-Ball.

STEVENS BASE BALL NINE. 1876.

SEASON OF

J. E. J. O.

A. C. '75,

'79, Oaptain.

AIKIN,

J. R. STEPlIEXti, '7 8, . II. SUYDA",f, '7 8,

DENTOX, BUERK,

'76, •

M.

A. RIESEXlmI{GER, '76, VV. F. Zn.nlER~IAX, '76,

VVIIITE,

'79,

II. O GDEN,

'so.

)Iay 6, 1876.

HOBOKEN B. B. C. vs. STEVENS. SCOJ'el', P. T. BIRCIfARD, '78,

Umpi1'e, HENRY

SUYDA~f, '7 8.

Inninge:, Hoboken, Stevens,

1 U

0

2 5 0

3 :3 0

4 i

0

5 2 0

6 0 0

7 0 4

8 6 0

9 4-27 2- 6

May 10, 1876.

STEVENS CLASS '78 Umpire, A. C.

AIKIX,

VS.

STEVENS HIGH SCHOOL. Scorer,

2 1 0

3

'79.

Innings, Class of '78,

High School,

1 0 1

4

4,

4,

4

1

5 2 2

6 ;3

2

II. T. BRUCK, '7 8. 8 9 U 4, 3-21 3 0 3-16

7


ECCENTRIC.

May 13, 1876.

STEVENS CLASS ' 77

VS.

STEVENS CLASS '78.

[Iinpire,

J . E.

P. G. Innings, Class of '77, Class of '7S,

Scol'e/', H. T. BRCCK, '7S.

DENTON,

1

2

4

0

3 1

2

:3

S

4

1 4

5 1 5

6 5

2

7 S 9 -----12 ----24

:May 20, 1876.

STEVENS CLASS ' 76

VS .

STEVENS CLA SS '78.

U1npil'e,

J. B. PIERCE, '77. Innings, Class '76, Class '7S,

Scm'el', II. T. BREcK, '7S. 1 2 2 11 4 3

3

0 1

4 1 0

5

6

7

8

9

- - -- 1 5 2 3-3:3 3 3 1 2 2-19 t)

May 20, IS7G.

ST. CLOUD B. B. C. vs. STEVENS. Umpire, II. S. HA]~SEY, Inning!', St. Cloud, Stevens,

Scorer, II. T . Bnt'CK,' is. 1 2 3 4 .5 -----0 0 3 0 1 1 1 0 2

6

7 S

9

.j.

2

0

5

4-22 0-13

S 3

May 23, IS76.

HOBOKEN B. B. C. vs. STEVENS. [Imp ire, A. C. AIKIN, '79 . Innings, Hoboken, Stevens,

Scorer,

II. T. BRUCK, '78. 1

2

3

4

6

7

0 3

0 2

0

3 15 0

7

4

1

4

.5 0

1

8 9 --25 ---15


ECCENTRIC.

43

May 27, 1876.

ST. CLOUD B. B. C.

VS.

STEVENS. Sco1'e1',

Umpi1'e, MR,

H.

HASKELL,

Innings, St. Cloud, Stevens,

1

2

2

3 0

2

3 3 0

4 5 0

SEASON OF

5 0

1

6 7 8 1 0 0 1 1 0

T.

BR-C-CK,

9

7-21 5-10

1877.

The nine of this year is as follows: J OIIN JAMES

E.

W. F.

ZDIMERMAX,

DENTON,

A. RICIIARDS, F, B. N IClIOL:>,

R.

STEPHENS,

'78, Capt. I-IENRY SUYDAM, - - - MERRITr,

F. P. JONES, H. W. HAZARD.

'78.


ECCENTRIC.

44

Boating.

FRAYK B. FOOTE,

'77

'78

CREW.

ROBERTS,

Oapt. of Boating.

Bow.

CREW.

Bow. Oapt.

GSANT:YER,

NASII.

FOOTE,

RAPELJE.

SUELDO:Y.

HOR:YBLOWER.

DILWORTH.

COSTER.

NICHOLS.

Stroke. Oox.

NEHLING.

HAZARD,

IDELL.

STEPHE:YS,

BRINKERHOFF, VXN WINKLE,

'79

Stroke. Cox.

CREW.

CAlIfACHO,

Oapt.

'80

CREW.

WILCOX.

WALLIS.

PARSONi.

WHITE.

BORCIIARDT.

KINGSLAND.

TORO.

S)fITII.

JOBBINS.

HODGES.

OGDEN.

AliuN.

DASIlIEI,L,

Stroke. Oox.

DILWORTH,

MORTO:Y,

COOKE,

WIII'rE,

Oapt. St1路oke. Oox.


ECCENTRIC.

45

SECOND SPRING MEETING OF THE

Stevens A thletic Association, Timekeepers.-Messrs. SATTERTHWAITE and DENTON. Judyes.-Mr. SATTEnTHwAITE, of the Runs and Walk". Mr. COOK, of the Jumps and Th,'ows Reception Oommittee.-G. BAnny WALL, '75;,EuOENE L. VAIL, '76; F. C. SHEPPARD, '78; J. M.

WALLIS,

'76 i FRANJ{ VAN

ROBERTS, '77; EDWIN

Ground Oom11l,itiee.-ALBEJl.T W. STAHL, '76; P. TRA.UTWEIN, '76.

",VIN1'::LE,

'77

~

E. P.

L. MYEUS, '78.

GUSTAVUS

C.

HENNING,

'76; ALFRED

Winner, F B. Foote, '78. Time, 8 min. 45t sec. 2. 100 Yards Dash. " John O. Buedc, '76. Time, 121 min. (?) 3. Putting the Stone. " John O. B~terk, '76. Distance, 29 ft. 11 in. H. Tv. Hazard, '78. 4. Throwing the Base Ball. " Distance, 326 ft. lOt in. 5. One-Haif-Mile Run. J. R. Stephens, '78. " Time, 2 min. 231 sec. 6. Standing IIigh Jump. " J. Kingsland, '76. Height, 4 feet. 7. Running High Jump. " II. W. Hazanl, '78. Height, 4 ft. 10 in. 8. .EIurdle Race. "Letts, Prep. lJep. rrime, 231- sec. 9. 'Running Long Jump. " IL W. Hazard. Distance, 16 ft. 10. Three-Legged Race. "Buerk and IIazard. Time, 14 sec. 11. 100 Yard8 Oonsolation Race. 'Yillner, II. Suydam, '78. Time, nt sec. 1. OZle- Mile Walk.


ECCENTRIC.

The Run1ford Society. OFF I CERS. Presidents. 3d Term, 1875-6. BROWN AYRES,

2d Term 1 18j(.i-I. H. A. BECKMEYER,

Term. 1876-7. 'IV. H. BAnw, l~t

3d Term, 1876-7. BROWN AYRES.

r tCe-P)'eS idents. 3d Term, 18;'5-6. ROBERT ZAlINER,

2d Term, IH76-7.

1st Term, 18;'6-7. BROWN AYRES,

GEO.

C.

IIODOES,

3d Term, 1876-7. JOHN KELLY.

Sec?路etm'ies. 3d Term, 1875-6. W. RADlOND B.URD,

1st Term. 187'6-7', H. T. BRi)"CK,

2d Term, 1876-7. Frr.u,.;: WILCOX,

3d Term, 1876-7. HICrrARD GERNER.

Treasu?路ers. 3d Term, 1875-6. JOIIN KELLY,

1st Tenn, 1876-7. GEO. C. HODGE!',

2d Term, 1876-,'. JOIL."f KELLY,

3d Term. 1876-7. OSCAR ANTZ.

Olwatm's. 1st Term, 1870-7.

3d Term! IM75-6. GEO. C. HODGES,

JOHN KELLY,

3d Term, 1876-7. GEO. C. HODGES.

2<1 Term, 1876-7. BnUCK,

H. T.

HONORARY MEMBERS, HE!'fRY 1IOR'l'ON, Ph.D.,

ALFRED}I. MAYER, Ph.D.,

WM. E. GEYER, A.B.

ACTIVE MEMBERS. OSCAR AXTZ,

RIC'lIARD GER!'fER, GEO. HODGES,

WILFRED O. SMITH, HENRY SUYD.Uf,

WM. E.

JOIIN KELLY,

E. P . TrrmtPSON, E. A. UEHLING, FRANK WILCOX.

c.

BROWN AYRES, W. RAIMOXD BAIRD, H.

A.

H. H.

BONN,

J.

T . BRUCK,

L. H.

BECK)[EYER,

A.

F. S. CURRIER,

JACOBS,

W. KmCIIlIOFF, NASlI,

ROBERT ZAIINER.

VON SEYFRIED,

ASSOCIA TE MEMBERS. G. 11.

BOlm,

W. G. DILWORTH, W.

P.

RmCIIHOFF,

'r. J.

F. KOEZLY, M . E.,

II.

.J. B.

LONGSTREET, RAMIREZ,

F. VAN WINKLE,

H. O.

WroTE


ECCENTRIC.

47

LIST OF PAPERS READ BEFORE THE SOCIETY. May Juue

June

Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.

Nov. Noy. Dec. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb.

March March April

"V. R. BAIRD. On Duplex Telegraphy ____ __ _ BROWN AYRES. 5, 1876.-The Origin and HiAtory of Chess ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ H. T. BRlICK. On Certain Experiments in Spectrum Analysis ________ _ BROW:N AYRES. 12, 1876.-0n Polarized Light ______ - - __ ROBT. ZAll:NER. On Chemical Formulation ___ _ W. R. BAIRD. Hydrogen as the Unit of Atomic Weights _______________ _ BRO,y:,\, AYRES. IS, IS76.-0n the Bergen Hill Minerals __ W. R. BAIRD. 25, IS76.-0n Batteries-Their ,-!-'heory and Use _________________ _ BIWWN AYRES. 1, IS76.-0n Hoboken Minerals. ______ _ 'Y. R. BAIRD. 8, 1876.-Authors ___________________ _ R. GERSER. On the Blue Uolor of the Sky_ O:-;CAR A:,\,Tz. Duplex Telegraphy (continued) BROWN AYRES. 15, 1876.-The Reduction of Zinc in New Jersey Furn:wes __________ _ W. R. BAIRD. 22, 1876.-0n Qlladruplcx Telegraphy. __ BROW:,\, AYlms. 6,1876.-011 Celluloid _______________ _ OSCAR A:NTZ. 10, 1877.-The Bessemer ProcesH ______ _ E. P. Tno:)[pso:,\,. Fiction's Sway _____________ _ R. GER:NER. 24, 1877.-0n Telephones (illustraLed by experiments) _____________ _ BROWN AYRES. 7, 1877.-Thc l\lanufacture of Lead Peucils __ __ ____ ____ __ __ _____ _ II. SUYDA)I. 14,lS77.-0n Thermometers __________ _ L. II. NASH. 28, 1877.-0n Alum __________________ _ JOHN KELLY. On Compressed Air _________ _ ROBT. ZAHNER. Uount Rumford ____________ _ GEO. C. HODGES. 7, 1877.-0n the metal Gallium _______ _ H. 'T. BRUCK. 21, 1877.-0n Quaternions ____________ _ H. BONN. 11, 1877.-0n Simpson's Rule ___ .. _____ _ L. II. NASH. 29, 1876.-The New Jersey Zinc Ores_ ___


ECCENTRIC.

The Rumford Society.

A want ha been more or less felt in the Institute since its foundation, for a Bociety which should, in a certain measure, supply the place of the literary societies in the classical colleges, while it should be in keeping in its object and workings with the general nature of the COUl'se here pursued. About a year ago the question was freshly agitated, and ~after consiuerable preliminary labor a sufficient number of the students were gotten together to form an organization, and a committee was appointed to frame a constitution in accordance with the unspoken but well understood needs of the Institute. Such a constitution was roughly sketched, and in it the object of the Society to be formed was stated to be the communication and discussion of facts and principles relating to science and literature, and the provision of means to enable the students to meet together socially, in a more formal way than in the Athletic A~sociation, and in a less exclusive one than in the Greek letter societies. A name, of course, was the first thing to be cho~en, and the wishes of those interested seeming to point to the adoption of the name of some American cientist, after much discus~ion and a consideration of the similar societies already existing, it 'was decided that we should be known by the name which heads this article, " The Rumford Society." In choosing the name of Count Rumford, we were influenced both by the fact that being an American, tardy justice had but recently established the truth of his patriotism, and that being a cosmopolite, his lIame was, in a degree, indicative both of the nature of our membership, and of the fact that scientific advancement is confined to no country or people. It was agreed upon that we should limit our proceedings to the communication of facts acquired originally or otherwise, upon the questions constantly met with in our stud ies, and that we should by questioning and discussion endeavor to obtain broader views and a more general


ECCENTR.lC.

49

knowledge than the mere college course conld give us. The first regular meeting of tbe Society under the eOllstitution, and with the official name of The Rumford Society, was held ~Iay 2::?d, 1876. With our newly elected President in the chair, Mr. Baird had tbe bonor of presenting the first paper on "The Zinc OreR of our State," which was followed by "Duplex Telegraphy," by Mr. Ayres. Other communications were then made, ana 11]>on our adjournment we felt that our Society was no longer a doubtful experiment but a confirmed fa(路t. After our initial meeting our member"hip litlt received Ilew additions, and ;L greatl'l" and more general interest was manifl'sted in our doings. For a long time Wc' were hampered by the want of a meeting room, until by the kinc1nes:; of Pre~ident Mortoll, we were provided with comfortable quarters and felt that we bad :1 " local hahitation " as well as a name; and here we would express our illdebteaness to 1he same gentleman for his many other favors. As a manifestation of the oonfidence repo~('d in us, we have been made the cllsto<1i:ms of the In~titute periodical", alld the URe that has already heen ma<1e of them ~hows that the favor was appreciated. Knowing by experienee the <lifficnlties to be met with in searching for some point of information ollly to be found in current pu1)licatiolJs, \I路e have eomlllcm路etl the work of illllexing the numerous periocliuali:; belonging to the InKtill1te library am1 to our own, and by a judicious diYi~ioJl of labor tbe work is easily aeCOlllplished and afford~ great aid to those consulting the works mcntionell. Our librar), is, as yet, in embryo, hu t, by the nsc of the loan system, we are constantly incrca~illg the number of YOllllllCS which arc on our sheIyeii for cOllslllt:ttion, and whose places we hope will soon he occupied by our exclusiye property. As will be seen ly the list of articles appended, neither stll(ly nor pain!'. haye been !'.pared in order to make thc' ~mbjeds pre:;entell interesting and of general '-:llne. By inviting a discll~8ioll upon them, new facts are bronght out and dwelt upon, thus fixing the information in such a manlier ag to lie readily remembered. As there are mallY factlS about which questions are a"ked, which, while they are not of sufficient importance to warrant a Reparate communication, yet would affonl a certain satisfaction in the an~wering, a , system of interrogation has been . introduced, by means of _ Wh_i_C_h _the questions are communicated an<l are then referred to

j

-

-


50

ECCENTRIC.

a committee, either regular or specially appointed, and in this way the information sought for is most readily obtained. In such ways we endeavor to attain the ends for which the Society was formed, and feel more and more an assurance of future success when we look upon that already attained in the light of the circumstances attending the Society's foundation and progress up to the present time. W. R. B.


ECCENTRIC.

51

Hoboken Domestic Telegraph Co.

DR. J.

M.

FOSTER,

Pres'!'

C. HODGES, See'y. &: T?路eas. Gen'l Stlp't.

GEO.

BROWN AYRES,

LIST OF MEMBERS. M.

DR. J. GEO. J.

II.

C.

FOSTEH, "F."

HODGES, " G."

LONGSTRl拢ET" JH."

BROWN AYRES,

"J\IA."

W. F. vV. P. .T. W.

II.

SUYDA)I, "WS." KIRCHIIOFF, "K." KIRCHHOFF,

F. OGDEN,

"Q."

"HF."

"SIGS." OCCASIONALLY IIEARD ON TilE LINE THOUGH NOT )IEMBERS.

J, II, N, A, D, RS, &c.

LIST OF OFFICES. 145 Hul1son St., "SY."

Stevens Institute, Hudson & Fifth, "IN." 217 Hudson ~t., " NO." 3 71 Garden St., "X."

Washington St., "HF." Washington St., "F." 304 Garden St., "RD." 426 Garden St., "II."


ECCENTRIC. - - -- - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - --

-

----

The T elegraph Line. Not the least among the interesting events of the year has beel( the formation of the Hoboken Domestic Telegraph Company, which, though not entirely reo:tricted to Stevens students has enough of them interested in it to merit some notice. The line extends now about three-quarters of a mile, has eight offices and about twelve operators, SOUle good, others "plugs" of ,-arious degrees of intensity. The line now runs from Hudson and Fourth streets to Garden and Eleventh. The only trouble met with in constructing the line was in getting permisRiollR to pass over houses. At two or three we were refused, while at others fears were entertained and expressed that we would set the house afire and vitiate tIle insur:1nee! Our wire has beell quite busy all the Winter and some of the operators are becoming quite expert. We have not restricted it to the transmission of messages, however, but have had numerous experiments with the Telephones, both of Reiss and Bell, and have had music and "arLiculate speech" along the line to our hearts content. 'Ve derive great pleasure as well :18 profit from "the line," ana we have great hopes that it may become an institution at Stevens as it hal'! at other colleges. It is an opportunity to learn an art that is well worth knowing and whicb might be of great seryice to a beginner in engineering. The fees are merely nominal, and there is little reason why all should not learn. So eome along and learn Morse, or ?'e-llW?'se may follow. (This is an infringement on the copyright of H. T. B. of '78.) We are glad to have new members at any time, and the fact that most of those now on are somewhat advance<.l in the art need hinder no one from joining. A beginner can feel assured that he is learning the correct thing, for one or two of the members have been Western Union operators and "know the ropes." "\Ve have an office in the Humford Society room at the Institute and it is quite cl.llvenient for a student to communicate with his room-mate or any of the members. Altogether we feel it to be :1 success-a success that has not reached its culminating point, but that will continue in the future to become more and more conspicuous. " .Make no mistake." MA.


ECCENTRIC.

53

Athletics.

Athletics at Stevens still hold a prominent place in the minds of the boys. The Spring Athletic games started by the class of '76 have now become as regnlar an institution with us as football and boating. Last year's games were delayed as far into the Summer as possible, in the hopes of being able to have a made track around the StevenÂť Institute Athletic Grounds, but we were not able to raise the money; so had to be eon tent with a closely cut turf track. Our track was one-Rixth of a mile long, with parallel sides and rounded ends of ÂŁfty feet radius. Owing to the wet weather there was not as much ])!'actieing done before the games as could be desired, and taking all things into consideration, the results were much better than conlrl reasonably have been expected. The competitants were confined almol:lt entirely to the classes of '76 and '78. This was not as it should be, as there were certainly as good if not better athletes in the other cla~st's, as in the two just mentionecl To make our Athletic games a perfect success, it is necessary that numerous representatives from all the classes should enter into them, not for the sake of their own personal honor, but for the honor of their class and college. There is nothing that will make men train as well, and achieve as good results in Athletics, as a hearty spirit of rivalry. Not having any gymnasium, it is of course, rather difficult to train as it should be done, but pluck will do a good deal, and we Rurely have our Hhare of it. Three weeks training and practice before the games will accomplish wonders, especially in such things as require skill and sudden efforts rather than endurance. Finally let everyone that has any class or college pride enter into the Athletic games of this year. Only one can win in each thing, it is true, but you stand as good a chance of being that one as any; and even if you do not win, you help the winner to make a better record than he would otherwise have done, and so increase the college standing.

I I


54

ECCENTRIC.

Our foot-ball season opened ratner later than usual last Fall, owing to the length of our Summer vacation, which lasted into October. But everyone seemed anxious to play football, and the result was th at we 1ad a twenty in the field in a very short time after college opened. We felt the lo~s of '76 very mnch at first, but after awhile we found that we could get out as good, if not a better twenty than we had eYer had before. It was composed of men rather lighter in weight than is generally thought advisable, but they made up in quickness what they lacked in "heft." 'Ve also changed our uniform, which lIOW consists of cardinal shirts and stockings, and creamcolored cap and breeches. Our first appearance in the field was against the New York University, but they were so short in numbers that it is hardly fair to call it a match. The only game we played off of our own grounds waR against the Rutgers twenty at New Brunswick. "l'his was one of the closest matches our twenty bas ever played, and, in spite of the fact of their getting the odd goal, it would be very hard to say which had the better players. We were very sorry that they were unable to play us a return match on our own grounds. 'Vith Columbia we had our yearly row aR usual. The Columbians don't seem to appreciate the fact that we try to treat them as if they were gentlemen, but imagine they can make mOre out of us by an attempt at bullying, in which, of course, they are mistaken. It is a matter of discussion with us whether we shall take up the Ruguy Rules or hold to the old ones. This can hardly be decided at present, but the chances are in favor of clinging to the old game, both in regard to its being the prettiel路 game, and the fact that it doe not require the amount of brute strength that the Rugby game does; and this, in a college the size of ours, is an important item.


ECCENTRIC.

55

BASE BALL.

In regard to base ball we have but little to say. Owing to a lack of interest, or a lack of practice, or a lack of something else, the few matches we did play last year, we lost. Boating interfered with base ball somewhat, as it took away quite a number of the best players. With our fine advantages in regard to grounds it seems too bad that we cannot turn out a good base ball nine, especially as we are so successful in other athletic sports.

BOATING.

Deservedly the most popular among the many athletic sports invariably associated with student life, is rowing. With us, introduced as it was at so early a period in the life of our Alma Mater, and supported as it has been by the most prominent of her sons, together with our remarkably fine location, what wonder t~t it has been popular? Our advantages here are exceptioual; possessed of so fine a water-front, so easy of access at all times, and the close proximity of so many sister clubs, always ready for a contest, render it only extraordinary that a greater interest in the manly sport has not been developed. But it seems to have had its drawbacks, and only two classes have contributed materially to the support of the late Stevens Rowing Club. Founded by seventy-six, since her graduation it has been carried on, almost solely, by seventy-eight. The first organization formed here for the purpose of promoting rowing, was that of the class of seventy-six. To the energy and perseverance of the late Howard Duane was the formation of this club, and through it, of the succeeding organizations, principally


ECCENTRIC.

due. Firmly convinced that Stevens was capable o{ supporting an association of the kind, which should do her infinite credit, he labored with a zeal of which only he was capable. And right nobly he suceeedec1. The class organization was formed, and through the characteristic generosity of the treasurer of our Board of Trustees, placed in possession of the largest and finest eight-oared gig to be procured. A boat-house, amply sufficient for their needs, was donated, and the club entered upon its existence under the most favorable auspices. In time, numbers of other classes, seeing the pleasures of the sport, became desirous of being enrolled as members of the popular association, so, with the liberal spirit for which the members of that class have ever beennotec1, the limited organization was dissolved, to give place to the Stevens Rowing Club, the association which during its whole existence has stood so high in the esteem of our students. The new club attracted many members, and, for a time, was the most flourishing of our college institutions. After the departure of seventy-six, owing to the inexplicable apathy of the other classes, it was carried on solely by seventy-eight. Though her members supported the club nobly, they found it difficult to bear the burden of expense alone, so, at last, a step long talked of, the consolidation of our two great organizations, the Athletic Association and the Boat Club, was taken. Many reasons for this action existed; the majority of our students feeling unwillingly, or unable to connect themselves with more than our Association for athletic culture were attracted by the larger scope of the former. The Boat Club was excellent, they reasoned, but the time for rowing was limited, though its expenses were not, while the advantages offered by the other association covered nearly the whole of the academic year. The result was natural. The Athletic Association, with its many: and varied attractions, waxed f~t and hearty, and numbered on its roll nearly every student in the college; the Boat Club, on the contrary, though supported by the foremost of our athletes, could only offer the one amusement, its nnmber of members, consequently, was comparatively small.


ECCENTRIC.

57

The consolidation that has been effected will be of great advantage to both classes of our student~. A man now entering college will not be called upon to choose between physical culture on the land and on the water, but will, by joining one association, haye the advantage of every mode of muscular de,elopment. The advantage derived by the Athletic Association from this uni,on is incalculable. Rowing, as is well known, is the most fascinating, as well as the most healthful of bodily exercises, and by numbering it among the attractions offered to its members, it has taken a step in the right direction. As our adyantages are, so should Ollr crews be, exceptionally fine. Have we not the right material for oarsmen? Have we not, again and again, carried off the honors at ba e-ball, and foot-ball? Why not then in rowing? Let the be t men in each class be selected, tried, and those who prove them~elves most suitable be placed upon the crews. Let us have five crews-one for each class -picked, of course, exclusively from its own members, and one for the college, consisting of the beRt men from the everal classes. Let these crews, during the season, practice daily ; sev~ral times daily, if possible. Let them train themselves up to the highest attainable standard of museular development and bodily strength, and they will find that besides rowing better they will stnily better. To be stro~g physically, helps one mentally. ,,'Te sadly feel the need of a suitable gymuasium. ~Iuch has alI路eady been said about one, but Ftill it is not forthcoming. Let the monotony of daily work be varied by frequent class races. These will be the greatest possible incentives to hard work. It is nonsense to run down cla"s feeling, and to say that these contests \\'ill only foster enmities. A man who does not wish to Eee hiR CluRS taking the lead in the field or on the water, as well as in the class-room, is not worth having in a class. Competition of this kind need never be anything but friendly, and the more of it we have, the more friendly will be the relations between the classes. Now with the opening season is the time to begin. Select your crews carefully. Let them train in the boats you already own, and when you are able get new and

I


58

ECCENTRIC.

better ones. Be content to work quietly and among yourselves for awhile, and Stevens will yet turn out a crew that any college might well be proud of. All of our higher class men will remember the memorable races between seventy-six and seventy-eight, how the Freshmen in their gig, despite a broken oar, beat the Juniors in their shell. Freshies, take heart, and under the kind and judicious guidance of the present stately Juniors (who, though they now scarcely admit it, were once children like yourselves) even you may yet become oarsmen. Be brave, and if you meet with shipwreck, to which all infants are liable, remember the fate of a college crew, who, wrecking their shell, were obliged to paddle ashore like dissolute rats after a spree. Let us then all, if we are not already members, join the Athletic Association, and take up boating with an energy that will pla:ce young Stevens in the foremost rank among boating colleges.

F. C. S.


ECCENTRIC.

Prof. Leeds' Serenade.

WhE'n Sp.venty-seven and Seventy-eight Have faced the world to meet their fate, Haye started forth, sheepskin in hand And for employment scour the land: Yea, e,-en when they settle down To married bliss and dressing gown, 'Twill never from their memories fade, How Leeds received a serenade. 'Twas Chemistry ExaminationThe room was filled to satur:ltion, Two classes in one room togethel' Was" rather much" for summer weather. But p:ltiently we all awaiteu, Some feeling sanguine, others fated. Prof. Leeds the absent onE'S doeH 111:lrk Before beginning to-but hark'! A sound of mu;;ic greets the earil, Despondent ones forget tbeir fears, And hidden joy pervades the class As far off down the street, ell masse, Four organ-grinders, fiddlers two, And harpist, ~lowly come in view, And from the rapt attention lent 'Twould seem that they from heaven were sent.

59


60

ECCENTRIC.

One org:tn, largo, common time, Grouncl slowly out the Auld Lang Syne ; Another, with a brisk a1l6gro, The IValtzfrom Fille de Madame Angot ; While others the procession close With Wacht am Rhein and Summer's Rose; The strings the whole procession head With" Put Me in My Little Bed." Th' effect we leave to be conceived, Remarking only 'twas believed That in the choice of harmony It rivalled the Ninth Symphony. But letting this be as it may They did not at a distance stay, But feeling they were somewhat late Came quickly up before the gate. Prof. Leeds towards the winelow went, His gaze upon the grinders bent, And taking the whole idea in Immediately began to " grin." Returning slowly to his seat, lIe pondered o'er remarks most meet; Away our apprehensiolls pass \Vhen thus he does address the class; " I feel exceeding gratified, Because I to instruct have tried, That you have given slwh good signs Of truly great and gp.llerOllS minds. I'm glad you truly grateful feelI love with men like you to deal, Feel certain when you hence do pass 'Twill stay-memento of the class."


ECCENTRIC.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

\Yhen other freaks of merriment are long forgot, \Yhen we who now are students find our spot Alla settle down to calm cnjoymt'llt of life, Get us a home and take to us a wifcAye, when our children flock to i'lteyens' hall~, Oueaient to their innate talents' calls, \Yhy even then it often will be said lIow Seventy-eight gaye I_eeds a serenade. ALPIIA.

i I


62

ECCENTRIC.

A Plea for Honor.

A student who has been for any length of time at the InBtitute-and it is in this respect no great exception to the mass of colleges-can not have failed to have had his attention repeatedly called to what is known among the students as " skinning." By this is I meant the receipt of assistance durillg examinations from whatever source it may come. Though we do not believe that examinations are generally a Just criterion of a student's knowledge, still as long as we are to have them let us all-professors as well as students- \ 1 strive to make them approach, at least, to what they profess to be. I Inseparably connected with any marking Hystem is the intense desire of students to secure good marks at whatever cost. To such an extent does this desire exist that the majority of the stuuents appear contenteu if they h:\\"e received a goou mark, not seeming to care whethc.:r they have leamed anything in a manner at all correctly represented by the mark received. :Marks, then, being the principal prize to be worked for, the easiest way of gaining them is, of course, the one most popular. \Vith our present Rystem of II examinations, where the student is told to put his hook at a safe distance from him-to leave considerable space between his own I I and his neighbor'S chair, "where it will lIot be convenient to look I over your shoulder," the student feels that he is treated as a suspicious character, :md he, in turn, takes pleasure in eeing too quick I for the professor and doing the vel y thing which the professor thinks he has so effectually preventetI. N nthing is shown on the face of the reports of the open booh, the pageH torn out from text books and stuffed in pocket::; or :;leeve~, the" skin papers "-the" differential calculus in a nut-shell," as well as the oral assistance receivedand yet in many cases these make the mark. .At our last examination there was a striking instance of the absurdity of the present system. A student who, as was generally known, had 110 thorough knowledge of the subject-in fact did not profess to have-copied his examination almost entirely from" skin-papers." Another, who is a good ~tudent, has at least a fair knowledge of the subject, and is withal a conscientiOlls young mall was prompted on some minor point,

I,

I


ECCENTRIC.

if we mistake not without his solicitation. The first received a high mark, and opposite his name on the professor's roll was written "excellent,'" while the second received a low mark and was marked " prompted." Is this j l1stice ? Because the profcssor doe not happen to catch the tricky ones are the innocent to suffer by having such placed ahead of them? It will be asked, "But how is this to be preyented?" To dispense with the marking system and to look more at the average worth and work of the studellt than at his examination, would he a great uleRsing, but if thi;; may not he then let us have an "Ilonor System." Let every student feel when he comes into the examination room that he is to be tre:.tted as a gentleman, and that he is expectefl to be a gentleman. Let him keep his books at his seat-let him leave the room or the builcling if he so choose-only require him to place at the cnd of his papers, "I hereby certify on honor that I have neither received nor given al'si::;tance during this examination," and to sign his name to it, and he would be a wretch indeed who conl<1 cheat in the face of this. There are those who will cheat lIndm' any circumstances-for them we have nothing to say; then there are those honest fellows -a small proportion-who work right along and try eOlll-1cientiously to do their work to the beHt of their ability, and who would scorn ' the very idea of cheating; these neea nothing we can say. But there is a third class-the majority, be it said-whoRe fault is weakneHH, who wonld not deceive if tlwy felt it waH a l11ntter of hOllor, but who, not regarding it as su("h, yield to the temptation, and do that from whieh, we doubt not, their better natures revolt. For these the Ilonor System would he a blessing, and we can hardly eonceivc h01l' its purifying influence could fail to he felt universally. Let us, then, have more honor shown in our college duticH. :-;tudents! strin! to feel that you are men, and that you should be above such mean, petty practices as are, ala~ ! too commol~ among you. Strive to be able to look any man in the face, and feel that what you seem to be, that you are. H,es[Jeetec1 Faculty! learn to treat us, not as schoolboys, but as gentlemen. Place reliance on us as such, and we feel convinced your confidence will not be misplaced.. I_et us feel, as far as po sible, a mutual respect-let us have m~

H~~


ECCENTRIC.

Expressly for the" ECCE1'ITRl c."

The New Faculty Song. TO THE TUNE OF "THE SON OF A

GA~[BOLIER."

B), tIle Autlzor of tlze Old One.

Prof. Morton is a physicist, And milk expert is he; To Freshmen and to Sophomores lIe shows the mystery Of light, both pl~ ll and polarized, And colors manifold; But as for the experiments " The next time," we were told. ClIOlWS.

Oll! I'm a mechanical, 'chanical, 'chanical, 'chanical, 'chanical engineer, A mechanieal, \:haJlieal, 'chanical, 'chanical, 'chanical engineer; Like every good honest fellow, I drink my lager beer, For I'm a rollicking rake and a Stevens' man And a mechanical cngineer. Prof. Mayer iA a scientist And physicist is he, Says, "when I kick the bucket, boys, Science kicks with me ; I am a man of theory And do the things precise; Prof. Joseph Henry and myself, ,Ve show the world's de\'ice."-CnoRUs.


ECCENTRIC.

Prof Leeds he is an analyst By quality and weight, And asks to see the freshies' cards When they matriculate; With organ, harp and violin We while the time away, To sooth the savage bosom on Examination day.-ClIoRUS.

Prof. Wood he is a rock drill man A~ math'matician great, Who teaches all our Sophomores '1'0 differentiate; Both class amI individual Diminish with a groan, And once more are they forced to gaze Upon the Freshman cone.-ClloRUS.

Prof. Kroeh he i8 a pa;'lez-vOtts, And deitcher too, is he ; lIe rattles off the Feejee slang, And talks a good Chinee. He loves a maiden wondrOllR fair, Who lived down in a cellar; Immortalized her in a book: Her name is CinuerelIa.-ClloRUS.

Prof. Mac. he is the ladies' man Of our f:l.culty; lIe alwayR acted on the square Anel marked us to aT; "Tith " French" and whistling he'd dispense, And when, with stealthy wit, At "Hoad to Ruin" you are caught, Pack up your duds, and git !-CllORUS.


66

ECCENTRIC.

Prof. 'Yall is a facetious man; TIe teaches rhetoric To verdant little Freshmen On plans of transit sick; The next best thing to knowing hereA fact, he used to show it With strangely smiling face-is e'er To know that you don't know it.-CHORUS.

Prof. Thurston is an engineer, And bridge expert is he ; lIe keeps the fellows in a steam And feathers on the sea; TIe don't object to good old wine, But" eatt and oil don't mix ;" .And if you tell him" not preparecl," You'll get into a fiX.-CBOIWS.

,


I,

ECCENTR.IC.

I

I The Stevens Growl.

II

B.\ illES ,\'r "STEI路EX';."- \Vhy do t he faculty and trllstee:-; tolerate ~o many hahies at the I~';TnTTE .~ We want I/lell andl/ot bahies ! 'With the COllr~e bid down at :-;TI~YENS it is Himply imp01'l3ible for anyone who is yet a boy either to do jll~tiee to him~elf or to reflect honor on the ill~titutioll. SOllle of our 11:11>ies do, indeed, by haa cramming, ('heating, "faclllty-~llcking," and" pa and ma" iufluence, succeed in getting very resl'eetallle grades (the thing lht路y mo~t care for), But how llluch are they really benefited? How much of what the 1lahy-student (student ?) goes oYer does he 1'e(/!l// 1111de1"~tl( Ild (( /1(7 l'jl})1'( date .~ But even the acyil mll~t htlyt' hi~ dues, alld we must here credit the :-4teyens balii,s with smarll1e~s ellough at leaHt" to pull the wool oyer the profl'sRors' eyes" in many, many ways, as he does for example ill tIlc {[He of his so ea11l,<1 "l1ut-s]leIl" deviec. These are "skil1-paper~ " for his use in n'citatiolls and examinations. lIt'seemH alRo to po. RC"S the intellectual calihre necessary to prompt him to tak(路 achantage of the professor's absenee to play that jolly game "leap-frog" ill the laboratory. These are Home of the J"l'cleeming f(路atures of the babies at STEnms. In some caHe~, indeed, the boy-student Ktudies honestly, learns t'ycrything the book Hnys, and makes fair ana honest recitations. But does he really" catch" it? Perhaps there is sometimes ont' of these who understands most of what he studies. But the number of these precocious hoys, of those boys who study unc1erRtandingly, is extremely small, indeed, much smallcr than is supposed. The :-4tevens bahy, as he bluff,.; the professor, who thinh he cannot be cheatt'(l, by making him believe he "sees it" all when he don't "l"ee it" at all, laughs in his sleeve, and, looking into the

,. 1


68

ECCENTRIC.

credulous face of his unsuspecting dupe, thinks how sadly professors, too, need to remember Burns' lines: " 0 wad some power the giftie gie us To see oursel's as others see us ! "

While the leading educators of the day advocate eighteen as a minimum age at which to begin a scientific course such as is here intended, the INSTITUTE admits boys at sixteen and under. Quite a large number have been admitted under sixteen, and there are some here now who were not even fifteen at the time of their entrance. It is a question, whether or not, to get in so young, a few " white lies" are not necessary. If such a class of students (?) is to continue to be admitted, the sooner the Stevens Instit'lde of Technology is turned into a boardingschool the better. Just think what an inducement to young men to come here to t>tke a degree if such bab'ies are to be graduated! What honor these baby-gradltates will reflect on Alma Mater, when, with the degree of engineer, they start out into the world to seek a situation, not even yet knowing that they don't know enough to know that they know nothing. What a glorious advertisement for STEVENS these baby-graduates will be ! PH.D OR Ph.B.?-Would it not be better in every regar<l if the faculty and trustees would take up the subject now discussed by the so-called Ph.D. men, and resolve to confer Batchelor of Philosophy instead of Docto}路 of Philosophy upon all those who take "Scientific" instead of "Engineering" during the last two years of the course ? We think the change should by all means be made. PkD. is one of the highest degrees that can be given, and should be conferred only upon those who by virtue of a post-graduate course or the equivalent, show the very highest proficiency and a decided originality .

.A CUAPTER OF GRO"'l"s.-Let us see a greater interest taken in the stude?ds and not quite so mnch in outside business or in so-called "contributions to science." Let us by all means have a gymnasium.


ECCENTRIC.

Let the student be taught manipulative shop-processes. Let us have Ph.B. instead of Ph.D . Let us have fewer babies and more men at STEVENS. Let us have more honor and less "faculty-sucking" and cheating among the students. Let us have less "leap-frog" and more earnestness among the students in the laboratory. Let us not use an alJostrophe in writing "Stevens Institute of rrechno]ogy," and thereby lead strangers to take our College for a p1路ivate Institute for boys and girls, or for the deaf and dumb. You might as well say Cornell's University.


ECCENTRIC.

In Men1orian1.

P. POJU'ER POI~lER, died in K ew York City on Sunday afternoon, June 11th, 1876, aged 23 years. He had early consecrated l1imself to the cause of science, alld, after studying for a time at the Polytechnic Institute of Troy, he entered the RtHens Institute of Technology, from which he grat1nated with high honors ill 1874. He developed a very remarkable genius in the department of applied science, and his, tudies led him, with great tmcccss, into original investigations in the domaiu of heat. His thorough, accurate, and iudependent researches oon attracted the favorable notice of the faeulty under whom he Rtudied . lIe attained to such important results as were found worthy of public notice, and he was engaged in the preparation and publication of an original work on Thermodynamics, with the approval of his professors. Ilis enthusiasm drank up his spirits, and utterly exhausted his physical force. Before he WaS aware, he was in the advanced stages of an incurable disease; and, while laboring to put his work through the press at Cambridge, he was pronollneed beyon<1 recovery. All his ardor in study was suddenly quenched by this stealthy wasting of his vitals, and sadly, alas! he fell in the midst of his proud successes, and in the very act and article of high distinction.

As a lecturer in the department of his spl'cial and successful study, he had become familiar with the best French aI1L1 German works in modern science, and his accuracy, pOl路severanee, and thirst for knowledge gave him promise of a very eminent future as a scientist.


ECCENTRIC.

71

Sir William Thomson, in his opening ' address before the British Association, shortly after his return from his visit to America, used the following words: "I ought to speak to you, too, ". * of the Johns Hopkins University of Baltimore, which, three days after my arrival in America, sent for the young Porter Poinier to make him a Fellow. But he was on his death-bed in New York, ' begging his physicians to keep him alive just to finish his book, and then he would be willing to go.' Of his book, 'Thermodynamic~,' we may hope to see at least a part, for lUuch of the manuscript, and good and able friends to edit it, are left; but the appointment to a FelI lowship in the Johns Hopkins University came a day too late to gratify his noble ambition." Such a young man, of unblemished morals, of pure and lofty aims, gifted with faculties of such high order, and laying down his life in the cause of truth-such a young man fills a large space, and dies leaving a large void. We bow reverently to the Divine will, and kiss the rod.

It


ECCENTR.IC.

Eccentricities.

TIlE "Adelphi" has become the "Eagle," and this time G-rn-r can make afeathel'Y debut and take it on the wing. WE have the bull-dog on the bank, the b1lllf1'og in the pool, and leapfrog in the laboratory. TUE report that S-dam some time ago "sucked" Wood for a re-mal'k-(able cause) in Mechanics, is unfounded. BR-CK will be afinished punster when some one does the world the kindness to break his neck. D-GlI-TY

is writing his ought-to-buy-hog-raphy.

It will soon

be penned. A. VON S.'s soliloquy on his whiskers: "To dye or not to dye, that's the question." IN New York they call S-d-m "Blondie." " Blondie, dear, do drop in." HALLOO,

They say,

Flippy, good essay you read for Robert H. to-day.

Flippy. Yes, d-m good, fresh from Appleton's American Encyclopedia, New Edition. !udv=uv- !vdu=Z-n-r.


RCCE"\"TRfC.

73

Ix l\1E<..:ITANlcs.-Prf!t: :-IIave you evrr seen force '/ Intellectual Jimior. Of course, !'ir, a police-forcc. Prof -What would you think necessary to a ,mceessflll study of MechanicH? JUII.

Brains.

Prof Yon mny sit down, sir.

IN EXGLIRII LITERATURE.-Prcif. H': :-Characterize, if you please, sir, G. P. R. James as a writer, and individualize his works.

G-1/-r. :-G. P. R. James wns a yoluminous author; his tails are immense ! Let a " b

weight generator,

"

generatrix,

"v

"elocity of reciprocation,

" III

potential energy of the generatol". potentinl energy of the generatrix, then

mass; and (Ill

+ lT2)

a+b - =totn 1

g

sy~tem,

total potential energy of the

.'.

t(a;~)y2

-"' energy di,.;sipated during eaeh double stroke, and if

f (Ill) IJ2)

energy

(III

+ IJ2)-~1

di~sipated

at the ena of each "inning," tlH'1l

(a;h)v2+f(IIJ> II2)}

=

potential energy "till rc-

maining in the sYRtem = it But

i\.

!Pdp.

Prof. W., having already integrated a similar expression fOllr times, determining four cOJlstnnts, is now engaged in determining other constant:;;, and he inten(18 to integrate as rapic1ly as posllible between the limits GO and 4-.

â&#x20AC;˘

B--, fonowing Prof. MacCorc1, ha~ been devising a plan for an "O-dont-oscope." lIe ~ays his invention is to how when they

-

-


74

ECCENTRIC.

really mean "O-dont!" and when they mean "O-do !" lIe has not yet given us his plan, hut we "houla judge his in路ventiol1 must be more psychological than mechanical. Upon being informed that the Odontoscope was to show the nicety of contact between~teeth, he said that he did not know about the teeth, but in his experiments he found that the nicety of contact between lips could not be expressed in finite terms. \Ve are afraid he is pretty far gone.


ECCENTRIC.

75

,

VAN NOSTRAND S

ENGINEERING

MAGAZINE,

Pub/is/wi kIollt!t{l', at Eiz'e Dollars per Annllll!.

Van Nostrand's Catalogue of American and Foreign Scientific Books, sent to any address on receipt of Ten Cents.

Scientific, Books. The largest assortment of American and Foreign Scientific Books in the country, always on hand.

D. VAN NOSTRAND, Publisher, 23 Murray St, and 27 Warren St., New York.

Cheapest Book Store in the World! 16,787 NEW AND OLD BOOKS ON HAND.

LEGGAT BROTHERS, 3 Beekrnan Stl'eet, .N: Y., Opposite the Post Office.

F. LUTHIN, 197 Washington Street, Hoboken, N. J.,

I I


ECCENTRIC.

.

S_ J _ S:MIT:H:::>S

FASH IONABLE HAT

and ISO

FUR ESTABLISHMENT,

\VASHINGTON STREET, HOBOKEN, N. J.

Wholesale and Retail. TRUNKS, TRAVELING BAGS, VALISES, SHAWL STRAPS, U:~fBRELLAS,

CANES AND GLOVES.

CLASS C A N E S A N D

CAFS.

G. MEINERS & CO., WATCH ES, CLOCKS & JEWELRY, SILVER &SILVER-PLATED WARE, SPECTACLES &EYE-GLASSES, 152 Washington Street) HOBOKEN, N. ].

HAIR JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER.

Repairing of Fine Watches a Specialty. SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO THE MANUFACTU RE OF

Society Pins and Class Badges.

I


ECCENTRIC.

77

T. M. ABELL .

J. R. WIGGINS.

WIGGINS

&

ABELL,

Hardware, IroIl and Steel, 106 WASHINGTON ST., HOBOKEN , N.

J.

-----

SPRI NGS, SPOKES, BARROWS, Carpenters' and Machinists' Tools. --~~~-

JULIUS SCHLATTER,

Hotel and Restaurant, BREAKFAST, DINNER AND SUPPER.

68 WASHINGTON STREET

HOBOKEN, N. J.

Restaurant Ii la carte from 7 A. M. till 9 P. M. -

-------

--

~,

-

HAMANN & SIEBURG,

GERMAN APOTHEOARIE8, 184 WASHINGTON ST., HOBOKEN, N. J.


ECCE.NTRIC.

ESTAELIS:a:ED

~ 857_

HOUSEKEEPERS' EMPORIUM. LARGEST STOCK OF

House Furnishing Goods in the Country. CHIN A, G L ASS

(X:;

TIX VV AI~E .

We always keep ill stock, a fine a,;sortment of Treble Elect?路o-

Plated Goods, ::t1111 Fine Cutlery of the best makes. Agents for the Celebrated

CLEVELAN D STUDY LAM PS. Give the most per/eyt lif/ht known.

An examinrttion

~olicited.

' Ve sell our goods at bottom pricex, and to cash buyers we give .5 pe?' ('ent.

o.tt; on all pUl'ChaSeR of $1.00 and upwards.

EDw .

A.

CONDI T

& BRo.,

136 JVcushing'ton Street} HOBOKEN.


ECCENTRIC.

79

GEORGE WAL E & CO., (Formerly HAWKINS & WALE,)

Philosophical Instrument Makers TO TilE

STEVENS I NST ITU T E OF TEC H N OLOGY, HOBOICEN, N . J . IIave on hand or made to order, the following:

Blowpipe Apparatus, Spectroscopes, Ma[ic Lalltel'llS and Attachments, ..8...N"D OTF.J:ER .A.PP.A.R.A.TD"S.

BLOWPIPE APPARATUS COMPLETE. The Oomhination Spectroscope, $100 ; the Pocket Spectroscope, $15' the Oollege Lanlem, $200; the Experimenter's Lantern, $75; the Megu>cope, to show 80liel objects on the large scale, $50; Verticul Attuchment for Expel'iml'nter's Lantern, $75 ~ Attachments fol' Lanterns as follows :-Glass OIUldni·plate and Olam!" $15: Circular (liass Tank, $:): Elliptical Brass Ring, $1 ; Air Drum, for Waves, $!.5O : Oi !lut! Pipett,·" $2.50: 1ron Filings, Sieve nnd Mag· net, $] ; \-\'atch Glas8, for V\Tater Len~e~, 2;) l'tK.; Vcrticn.l Tunk, for Chemical Experiments), $4 ; Ditto, for Decompo.ition of Water, $6.50; Ditto. for Solar Prominences. Frost Crystal ::>olu· tion. 25 cts.; Eclip~e Slide. (Prof. ]l[orton',,) S7.50; Electric Light ITnnd Regulator, WIth Rotat· ing Table. $43; Adjul'Itnl>le Slot. SR ; \VI1('el of

DiaphrHgm~.

$6

~

Pair of IIollow PriSDls, $15 :

Adapter, $3; Triple 'funk, $6; Sodium Band U;xperirncnt, S8.5O.

!.

THE COLLEGE L AN T E R N.

J


ECCENTRIC.

80

STEVENS

Institute of Technology LABORATORY

MECHANICAL

Proi: R. 1-1. TIIURSTON, Director. Trials made of Steam Engines and Boilers, materials of construction tested, and their strength, elasticity, ductility, and resilience, determined and automatically re-' corded by the

Auto graph ic Testing Machine.

t:::::.

Lubricants tested, the calorific \'alue of fuel determined, and the D ynamometer attached to machinery,

MACHINE SHOP OF THE S. I. T. S. II. HAWKRIDGE, Sup't. MackinesjO'I' Testing Lubricants allcl Special Con"("'!IotionR, made to Orat?',

AntO[raDhic Recorllill[ Testill[ Machines AND

MACHINES FOR TESTING LUBRICANTS, IN StJ.'oeK AND MADlj: '1'0 onnEH .

TERMS, CASH WITH ORDER. DIREC'rOR for CirClllurs,

Address the

D


ECCENTRIC.

THE

Stevens Institute of Technology.

I

SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

I

FOUNDED BY TilE LATE EnWIN

A.

STEVENS, AT

HOBOKEN, N. ]. HENRY MORTON, Ph.D. ALFRED M. MAYER, Ph.D. ROBERT H. THURSTON, A.M., C.E. DE VOLSO:-< WOOD, C.E. C. W. MACCORD, A.M.

ALBERT

R. LEEDS, A .y! . F. KROEH, A.M.

CHARLES

RE\,. EIJWARD \VA1.L,

A. M.

President Prof. Physics Prof. Mech. Engineering Prof. Math. and Mechanics Prof. Mech. Drawing Prof. Chemistry Prof. Languages Prof. Belles-Lettres

The course of the Stevens Institute is of four years' duration, and covers all that appertains to the profession of a Mechanical Engineer. By means of Workshops provided with excellent machinery, Physical Laboratories whose appointments are without an equal, and with the finest Cabinets of Instruments, every opportunity for the acquisition of thorough and practical knowledge is afforded.

ReqUirements for Admission. Candidates for admission to the first year of the course, must be at least 16 years of age, and must be prepared to pass a satisfactory examination in all the Elementary branches of English Studies, also the whole of Algebra, Plane and Spherical Geometry, and Trigonometry. Candidates for admission to the higher classes, must be prepared to pass a satisfactory examination in all the studies previously pursued by the classes which th ey propose to enter. Advanced students and men of science desiring to avail themselves of the appliances of the laboratories of the Stevens Institute, to carryon special investigations, may apply to the President. For further particulars, address the President,

II . .MORTON, Hoboken, liT. J.

!


ECCENTRIC.

STEVENS HIGH SCHOOL, RIVER

STRE~T,

cBetnr ee n .F'lft71 and Sixtll SL1'eeLs,

HOBOKEN, N. ].

The Stevens High School is a Preparatory Scientific School, connected with the Stevens Institute o£ Tech· nology.

Pupils are also fitted for College and

£01'

Business. French, German and Drawing, tt!-ught

III

all the

Classes. Instruction gIven

III

the Elements o£ Natural His·

tory, or Chemistry, and o£ Physics, both by Lectures and by Text·Books. Four free Scholarships

III

the Stevens Institute,

open to the competition of the Graduates o£ the Stevens High School.


ReCENT/UC.

Stevens /nstitute Brass Foundry. & D ONALDSON , Manufacturers of fine BRASS and COMPOSITION CASTINGS. H AW KRID GE

at3irOrders thankfully received, and promptly 3,t tended to.~

R U DOLPH LUTTOSCH, (T obacconist to the College,)

Importer 'and Manufacturer of Fine Cigars. A large and select assortment of Smoking T obacco and Smokers' :Materials always on hand, at the lowest prices.

No. 108 \ Vash ingt on Street, Hoboke n, N.

J.

KEUFFEL & ESSER, 111 FULTON ST., N. Y. MANUF AC'TURER8 AND D1POR'l'ER8 OF

Matl18matical Inst r l1111811ts, DRAWING MATERIALS. H a rd Rubber Tria n gles, Curves, T S qu a r es, S cales, Are only of our cdcbrated make, if stamped with our name and trade路mark.

~lllustTated

Catalogues sent on receipt of 10 cents. ~


ECCENTRIC.

CHARLES UN REIN 'S HOTEL, RESTAURA~T_

No. 125 Washington Street, Near Hamburg and Bremen Docks,

HOBOKEN, N. J. Roorns -with or -without Board.

PHILIP H EXAMER'S

IIoboken Riding Academy AND

LIVERY STABLE. 103, 105 & 107 Hudson St., betw. 2d and 3d Sts.

CHARLES GROSS,

MANUFACTURER OF SHIRTS, DEALER IN

Genis' FIJrnishing Goods. SHIRTS TO ORDER, A SPEOIALTY.

HOBOKEN .


ECCENTRIC.

BUSCH'S HOTEL , NORTH-WEST OOR. THIRD AND HUDSON STREETS. I

I

THE FINEST

BILLI-L~RD

HALL

In HOrBOKEj'T. Contai n i ng the best Collender T abl es.

GLASS SUPPERS A SPECIALTY. Fifty First-Class Rooms for Transient Visitors. ----

-

-

HOBOKEN CIGAR STORE. Cor. 5th and 'YaRbingtoll Streets.

Complete Assortment of every Article in the Tobacco Line. O ne box of 25 Cigars, of elegant quality, a S pecialty. ALL BUSINESS TRANSAOTED ON THE

[ i.

JOHN BIELENBERG, Jo/fanager.


ECCENTRIC.

86

DR. J. M. FOSTER, DENTI H T~

No. 280 Washington St., Hoboken, N. J. Best of College and City R eferences given.

JOHN LOHSEN,

Confectionery and Ice Cream, 244 Washington Street, Hoboke n.

OYSTER

&

ICE CREAM SALOON AND

COLLEGE DINING HALL, 112 Washington Street,

H o boken.


1877 Eccentric  

1877 Eccentric

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