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Dear Students and Parents, Adlai E. Stevenson High School has a proud 48-year tradition of offering an outstanding program of academic courses, athletic programs, and co-curricular activities. Our mission of Success for Every Student leads us to seek offerings that will best prepare students for life after high school. This course book provides a brief description of every course and the sequencing of courses designed by each department. We offer a wide array of courses in all subject areas demonstrating our commitment to helping all students establish a broad foundation for future learning in college, in the work force, and beyond. High school course selection can play a significant role in a student’s future options. Designing a four-year goal-oriented plan with a counselor is an important part of the development of a coherent approach to course selection. We want every student to be prepared for the future and that starts by making informed choices regarding the classes to pursue in high school. Our counseling staff is available to help in any way possible. For incoming freshmen, the course selection process begins with one of our Freshman Parent and Student Orientation Evenings (Tuesday, January 22; Thursday, January 24; or Wednesday, January 30, 2013). Together with the information available on our website (www.d125.org) and from our division directors, students can prepare for one of our course selection evenings Thursday, February 7 or Wednesday, February 13, 2012. For current students, it is critical for both students and parents to be involved in the course selection process and work closely with a counselor to make selections. Your counselor is there to assist you along the way. Feel free to ask them questions. You can also ask teachers or division directors about courses. Seeking out the information you need will help you make better decisions about your classes for next year. In closing, the faculty and staff at Adlai E. Stevenson High School are here to support the success of every student. Your involvement in that process is important. The Board of Education is committed to the vision statement included in Appendix A of this course book. As you progress through your four years at Stevenson High School we hope that every student is prepared for future success. Sincerely,

Troy Gobble Principal

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Student Information

Table of Contents

Academic Eligibility....................................................................9 Academic Waiver Policy..............................................................8 Appendix A - Community Relations..........................................87 Appendix B - Legal Notice .......................................................89 Athletic Program..........................................................................8 Athletic Waiver Policies...............................................................8 Audits...........................................................................................5_ Co-Curricular Activities.............................................................10 Correspondence Credits...............................................................6 Course Load.................................................................................3 Course Re-Take Policy.................................................................5 Early Graduation .........................................................................6 External Credits...........................................................................6 Graduation Planner Worksheets.................................................93 Gifted Education........................................................................85 Grading Procedures......................................................................6 Grade System...............................................................................6 Graduation Requirements............................................................3 Honor Roll...................................................................................8 Independent Study.......................................................................5 Level Changes..............................................................................5 Level Placement...........................................................................4 Marching Band PE Waiver Policy...............................................8 National Honor Society................................................................8 Course Selection Worksheet......................................................95_ Schedule Changes – Criteria........................................................5 Student Records.........................................................................89 Summer School............................................................................6 Transcripts....................................................................................7

Division

Applied Arts..............................................................................11 Wendy Custable, Director, Ext. 4151 Business Education Department............................................12 Driver Education Department................................................16 Family and Consumer Studies Department...........................17 Technology Education Department.......................................20 Technology Campus..............................................................24 Communication Arts................................................................25 Joseph Flanagan, Director, Ext. 4326 Fine Arts....................................................................................33 Jonathan Grice, Director, Ext. 4751 Art Department......................................................................34 Dance Department.................................................................39 Music Department.................................................................42 Theatre Department...............................................................47 Mathematics.............................................................................51 Christina Kelly, Manager, Ext. 4601 Mathematics Department.......................................................52_ Computer Science Department..............................................55 Physical Welfare.......................................................................57 Jill Lipman, Director, Ext. 4229 Physical Education Department............................................58 Health Education Department...............................................62 Science.......................................................................................63 Dr. Steve Wood, Director, Ext. 4401 Social Studies............................................................................67 Brad Smith, Manager, Ext. 4651 Special Education.....................................................................86 Jay Miller, Director, Ext. 4801 Student Activities.....................................................................10 Ted Goergen, Director, Ext. 4461 Student Services.........................................................................3 Angela Sisi, Director, Ext. 4501 World Languages.....................................................................73 Rowena Mak, Director, Ext. 4701 World Languages Department...............................................74_ English Language Learning Department...............................81

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EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY The district’s educational program is designed to enable each student to develop to his or her maximum potential. The objectives for the educational program include helping each student to: • become a productive and responsible citizen • develop the fundamental skills essential to self-directed lifelong learning • make appropriate educational and career plans • learn and apply strategies for logical problem solving and decision making • develop self-discipline and a sense of personal responsibility for his or her learning, decisions, and actions • demonstrate consideration and respect for others • make choices consistent with a healthy lifestyle • demonstrate the ability to work well with others • use technology effectively COURSE SELECTION Each year, students meet with counselors to choose courses for the following academic year. Upperclassmen may receive recommendations from classroom teachers for continuation in required courses. Students also choose electives and other academic courses not required for graduation. Freshmen course placements are determined by examinations. Course verification sheets are sent home each spring to ensure accuracy. The master schedule is created based on student selection of courses. After creation of the master schedule, further elective changes will be honored throughout the summer when possible. Graduation Planner We encourage all students to reach well beyond the minimum graduation requirements and to make the most of the educational opportunities which Stevenson provides. Freshmen, along with their counselors, begin the discussion of the Graduation Planner in their Freshman Advisory. Students are encouraged to review their Graduation Planner located in Infinite Campus with their parents each year before course selection begins so that long-term curriculum goals can be planned and achieved as the students progress through their high school years. All students have the opportunity to update their plans at any time by meeting with their counselor. A planning worksheet is located at the back of the course book. School Day Schedule The school day at Stevenson High School extends from 8:05 AM to 3:25 PM. Students are expected to be in attendance during these hours. There are eight 50 minute periods in each school day including a mandatory lunch period. "Early bird" classes are also offered in physical education and certain AP science classes. Alternate schedules are followed periodically throughout the school year to allow for various activities and meetings. Student Course Load Every student must be enrolled in the following each semester:

Student Tutorial Programs Freshmen and sophomore students earning unsatisfactory grades are required to attend tutorial programs in specific content areas in the learning centers until satisfactory progress occurs. Junior and senior students earning unsatisfactory grades are strongly encouraged to work with learning center tutors for additional support in their classes. See content area pages for more specific information. Course Availability All courses listed in this course book require a sufficient number of student requests to run in a given year. If there is not sufficient interest in a particular course, it will not be provided during the upcoming school year. Sectioning decisions are made in early March. Counselors will contact students who may need to select another course. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION FROM STEVENSON HIGH SCHOOL

Course English Mathematics Biology Physical Science U. S. History World History Government Economics or Consumer Ed Health Driver Education Required Electives Additional Credits & P.E. Total Credits

Semester/Credit 8 6 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 17 45

Constitution Test Requirement Students must pass the Illinois and United States Constitution exams which are part of the required Government course. Driver Education Requirement The State of Illinois Driver Education requirement may be satisfied by completing Driver Education at Stevenson, by submitting a Certificate of Successful Completion from a commercial school, or submitting a copy of the student's Illinois driver's license if issued prior to age 18. Students must earn eight credits in their previous two semesters in order to be eligible for Driver Education. Elective Requirements At least two elective credits must come from any of the following divisions: Applied Arts, Fine Arts and/or World Languages. English Requirements Eight semester credits are required for graduation. For these classes, two writing intensive courses are required. These courses will be detailed in the course descriptions.

• at least five credits of course work • a sixth supervised period (either an additional class or a fullperiod study hall) Students must meet the State of Illinois requirement of 300 minutes of supervision each day.

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Science Requirements Students must complete two semesters of a biological science and two semesters of a physical science in order to graduate. Physical Education Requirements and Waivers Students must participate in physical education during each semester they are enrolled in school unless: • the student is enrolled in Health Education (for the first time) • the student is enrolled in Applied Health Education • the student is enrolled in Driver Education (for the first time) • the junior or senior student receives an athletic waiver (see Athletic Waiver Policy) • the student is enrolled in first semester Marching Band or Color Guard • the student is enrolled in Dance • the senior student receives an academic waiver for six non- physical education classes Refer to the section on waiver policies for more specific information. Note: Students may elect to stay in physical education and forfeit any waivers. Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE) Requirement The Prairie State Achievement Exam is required for graduation for any student who attended an Illinois public high school during their junior year. By law, all Stevenson students will sit for this exam during their junior year. "The 46th Credit" While not one of the 45 credits required for graduation from Stevenson High School, the "46th Credit" is as important as the rest. The "46th Credit" fulfills a District 125 commitment to provide students with a coordinated education and awareness program with critical information about alcohol and other drug use, as well as resources for support. During their years at Adlai E. Stevenson High School, students are provided with information about substance abuse and are introduced to a variety of substance abuse prevention activities through Stevenson High School's Student Assistance Program. During the three week Drug Education unit in the Health Education classes, all students are issued a "46th Credit" manual which contains current information on the dangers associated with tobacco, alcohol and other drug use, addiction, recovery, available student prevention programs, school tobacco/drug/alcohol policies, state laws and local ordinances, as well as resources for assistance within the school and community. Students are held accountable for this information and must pass a test during their Health Education class in order to satisfy this requirement. This test, devised by the school's Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator, is based directly on the information contained in "The 46th Credit" manual. The Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator personally works with all students who have not taken or passed "The 46th Credit" exam in the Health Education classes to ensure that this requirement is met. Seniors must have passed "the 46th credit" exam in order to participate in the graduation ceremony.

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ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS TO PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES IN ILLINOIS It is important to emphasize that the graduation requirements listed previously represent the minimum program of studies for Stevenson students. Entrance requirements to particular colleges and universities may be considerably more stringent. The following high school program is either required or strongly encouraged for admission to all public universities in Illinois: Course Requirement English - Emphasis on written and oral communication and literature

Sem/Credit 8

Mathematics - Including algebra, advanced algebra, geometry and/or trigonometry.

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Science - Emphasis on laboratory sciences

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Social Studies - Emphasis on history and government

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Electives - Four semesters in foreign language, art, music, or applied arts

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For details on specific course requirements visit the College Career Center or individual college web sites. LEVEL PLACEMENT Level placement is used in English, mathematics, science, and world languages. The underlying goals and purposes are provided below. Freshman are assigned to the levels based upon a combination of the following criteria: • • • •

Stevenson departmental benchmark examinations past academic performance teacher recommendations student interest

The content area director considers each of these factors prior to determining a student's placement in a particular level or course. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with a director when considering a level change. College Core Courses are designed to provide students with the opportunity to study college preparatory courses with extensive support structures in place. College Prep Courses provide students with the traditional college preparatory program. These courses are designed to prepare the student for entrance into college and for academic success in the college classroom. Students have an opportunity to pursue four years of English, mathematics, science, social studies and world languages. Honors/Accelerated Courses enable students to prepare for and pursue college-level studies while still in high school. Students who complete honor/ accelerated level courses may have the opportunity to earn college credit or placement through the Advanced Placement Examination.


Advanced Placement Courses Students have the opportunity to complete Advanced Placement (AP) courses in most subject areas. The content of these college level courses is determined by the College Board. Students who score well on the exams may be awarded college credit in most of the nation's colleges and universities. In assessing a student's application, many colleges also look favorably upon courses designated as AP since these courses represent more rigorous content than the standard high school curriculum. Students are encouraged to investigate the AP policy of the college of their choice. In preparation for some Advanced Placement courses at Adlai E. Stevenson High School, students must complete summer work. Summer assignments are available in the late spring via the school's website. SCHEDULE CHANGES Each year, a new master schedule is created to accommodate students' course selections. Faculty members are employed, textbooks are purchased, and rooms are assigned on the basis of course requests. Students may modify their course requests at designated times during the spring and summer months. Students receive a copy of their final schedule at orientation. Upon receipt of the final schedule, students may not modify their schedules unless they are adding or dropping a course or changing levels in a course. Once the semester has begun, schedule change requests must adhere to the following guidelines: Adding a Course Students may add a course in place of a free hour, study hall, or another class during the first three days of a semester if space is available in the course. Students must consult with the teacher regarding make-up requirements for any missed content. Dropping a Course Students may withdraw from a course until eight days after the end of the first six-week grading period. Please note that in a full-year course students will only have the first five days of the second semester to drop. Students who drop a class after this time will receive a grade of "WF" and have a failing grade included in their grade point average. Students must maintain a minimum of five courses for credit. Level Changes On occasion, students may need to change the level of the class in which they are enrolled. In order to do so, students must: • • • •

initiate a level change discussion with their teacher demonstrate that they have completed all homework and sought additional help from the teacher or resource area staff member request that their teacher complete the level change form after the teacher contacts the parents, the request will be forwarded to the counselor and content area Director for approval.

Downward level changes will be permitted until eight school days after the end of the first six-week grading period of each semester. The letter grade at the time of withdrawal from the class is the grade that accompanies the student to his/her new class. SPECIAL SCHEDULING PROVISIONS The Independent Study option allows juniors and seniors with a special interest in a subject to pursue that area of interest in more detail or greater depth than the existing curriculum provides. Students who wish to undertake an independent study project must: • develop a proposal which includes clearly stated goals, the learning activities designed to achieve these goals, and a schedule detailing the time line of the project • complete the Independent Study form located on line • obtain parent, teacher, director, and counselor approval of the project • solicit the help of a teacher advisor to supervise the study • be scheduled into a course with the teacher advisor • attend that course everyday • pursue the project with a minimum of direction • complete the project and report its results as agreed upon in the project proposal Successful completion of an independent study project will result in a grade of "P" (Pass). Projects that are not completed will not receive a grade. Credits will be determined by director and teacher. Course Retake Policy Students may retake any course. The original grade will remain on the transcript. The GPA will be determined by using the points from the higher of the two grades. Duplicate credit will not be issued. Students must complete a Course Retake Form available on line before beginning the course. Courses taken at a lower level are not considered course retakes. Students may retake a course at a higher level if it is an equivalent course in terms of content. The course being retaken does not count toward an academic or athletic waiver. It does count towards the 300-minute supervision requirement. Students wishing to retake a course in the summer at a different high school need to consult their counselor prior to registering to begin the approval process. If a grade of "A-" or higher was earned the first time, then a course may not be retaken. Audits Audits do not count toward academic or athletic waivers but they do count toward the 300-minute supervision requirement. Students who wish to audit a class may do so provided: • they obtain an Audit Request Form from their counselor • there are seats available in the classroom • they request the audit within the first ten days of the semester

Students must remain in class until the level change is approved by the Director and made by the counselor.

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• receive approval of the division Director • they attend the class each day, complete all assignments, and take exams and finals and participate in all class activities Students will be assigned the grade of "AU" (Audit), they receive no credit towards graduation nor points for inclusion in their grade point average. If a student fails to fulfill a requirement in a course taken on an audit basis, the student will be withdrawn from the course. No record of enrollment will appear on the student's transcript. EXTERNAL CREDITS Stevenson students may apply for up to four credits of external study toward the completion of elective credits required for graduation. Only elective courses may be taken for external credit. A maximum of two external credits can be earned for a World Language course. Courses offered at Stevenson will not be approved for external credit. External credits are not calculated in the Grade Point Average. No external credits will be given for work done prior to the student entering high school in the fall term. All external credits must come from accredited programs approved by the Assistant Principal for Teaching and Learning (e.g. summer school at another high school, college, university, language school, or study abroad programs). Students must apply for external credit. No credit will be given without an application. To apply for external credit, a student must meet with his or her counselor prior to taking the course to: • complete an External Credit Form; and • provide a complete course description including information about the accredited institution, the program or course content, and the number of contact hours Upon completion of the course, the student will produce an official transcript mailed directly from the program to the registrar's office at Stevenson High School. The approval process should be completed before the course is taken or Stevenson credit may not be given. Correspondence School A maximum of two credits may be earned through correspondence. These two credits count toward the four total external credits. Only seniors who are enrolled in at least six classes at Stevenson during both semesters of the academic year and are in danger of not graduating may earn correspondence school credits. It is the student's responsibility to request an official transcript to be submitted directly to the Stevenson registrar by the school at which the student completed the course. Final transcripts for seniors are due by May 15 if the course is to be included for meeting graduation requirements. Summer School Stevenson's summer academic program offers opportunity for enrichment and remediation. The courses taken from this program become part of the student's transcript. Summer courses may be taken during the student's attendance in high school. Summer School credit obtained at a high school other than Stevenson is

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considered external credit and is not included in the calculation of the student's grade point average. Students must complete an External Credit Form and request course approval prior to enrolling in any summer school class outside of Stevenson. Students attending summer school in another accredited high school district must request that school to forward their grades to the Stevenson registrar. EARLY GRADUATION Students wishing to graduate early should meet with their counselor to determine eligibility. Once it is determined that the student can meet graduation requirements earlier than the scheduled semester of graduation, the student, with parent approval, must complete an Intent to Graduate Early form available on line. GRADING All course grades are qualified in the following manner: A – Excellent B – Above Average C – Average D – Below Average F – Failing Course Description Within the first five days of the semester all teachers will provide students with a course description. This description will explain the general goals of the course, the specific knowledge and skills acquired as a result of the course, the activities that will be included, and the procedures for grading. Grading Periods Each semester is divided into three grading periods of approximately six weeks each. At the end of each grading period, students will be assigned a grade reflecting achievement solely for that grading period. The grade earned for one grading period does not carry over into the next. Calculating Course Grades The final course grade will be determined by assigning twentyfive percent to each grading period and twenty-five percent to the final examination. The steps to calculate a semester grade are listed below: 1.

The following point values are assigned to each letter grade:

Grade Points

A+ 12

A 11

A10

Grade Points

C+ 6

C 5

C4

2.

B+ 9 D+ 3

B 8

B7

D 2

D1

F 0

The points from the three six-week and semester exam grades are totaled: (Example)

Grade Points

1st C+ 6

2nd C+ 6

3rd C+ 6

Final Exam B+ 9

Total B27


3.

The final course grade is determined from the chart below:

Grade A+ A AB+ B BPoints 48-46 45-42 41-38 37-34 33-30 29-26 Grade C+ C CD+ D D- F Points 25-22 21-18 17-14 13-10 9-6 5-3 2-0 Note: Students who fail two of the reported grades must earn at least a "C-" average in the other two reported grades in order to pass the course. Students who fail the third grading period as well as the final exam will receive an "F" grade for the semester. Students who fail three of the reported grades will receive an "F" for the semester. Second semester seniors who have an "A-" average, as well as students in AP courses who took the AP exam for the course and have a "C" average in the course, may be exempt from final exams. If no final exam is taken, total the points from the three grading periods. The final grade can be determined from the chart below. Two (F) grades receive an "F" for the semester. Grade Points Grade Points

A+ 36-35

A 34-32

A31-29

B+ 28-26

B 25-23

C+ 19-17

C 16-14

C13-11

D+ 10-8

D 7-5

B22-20 D- F 4-2 1-0

Grade Point Average Both a weighted and an unweighted grade point average are calculated for each student at the conclusion of the first semester and again after summer school. • weighted grade point average is calculated using the weights assigned to the grades in the following chart • unweighted grade point average is calculated by assigning college prep grade points to all grades that are figured into the grade point average, regardless of their level A B C D F College Prep/Core 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0 Accelerated 4.5 3.5 2.5 1.5 0 0 Honors 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 Exclusions The following courses are not included in the calculation of a student's grade point average: • • • • • •

Driver Education courses completed by home-schooled students correspondence courses audit, independent study, and GPA-waived courses external credit courses any course in which the regular outcomes have been significantly modified for an individual student

Grade Point Waiver Students have the option of applying to exclude certain courses from the calculation of their grade point average (GPA). These courses are those which are not considered part of the academic core and which do not fulfill a SHS graduation requirement. Included in this waiver option are:

all college preparatory-level Fine Arts Courses all college preparatory-level Applied Arts courses Introduction to Radio Broadcasting Physical Education Leaders, Pool Leaders, and Applied Health • all college-prep level summer school courses which are not part of the regular school year course offerings (See summer school brochure for specific courses and deadlines for submission.)

• • • •

To be eligible for a waiver, the student must be enrolled in four or more courses per semester which are included in the GPA. The Request for GPA Waiver form is available on line and must be submitted to your counselor no later than eight school days following the conclusion of the first six week grading period of each semester. All waivers must be requested; no courses will have an “automatic” waiver. Please see the Summer School course book for specific information regarding courses and deadlines offered during the summer. Transfer Students The records of transfer students will be evaluated individually with each course grade being assigned the weight of its closest counterpart in the Stevenson curriculum. The division director will make the final determination in the evaluation of the records of the transfer student. HOMEWORK REQUESTS Students are responsible for requesting and making up homework if they are absent from class. When students are out ill for five days or fewer, please follow these suggestions: • • • • •

review assignment sheet, if available review class website, if available email teacher utilize Infinite Campus arrange a "homework buddy" in each class INCOMPLETES

Students who receive a grade of "Incomplete" must complete the necessary make-up work in a timely fashion according to each teacher's guidelines before a letter grade will be assigned. TRANSCRIPTS Students may request transcripts by logging onto www.parchment. com. Some transcripts might require a fee to be submitted online prior to the request being processed. College admission test scores are not included on the transcripts. Students must request these test scores to be sent directly to colleges and universities. This may be done through the web sites of the testing agencies, www.act.org and/or www.collegeboard.com. By law, Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE) content area results will be on the students' final transcripts issued after graduation.

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ACADEMIC HONORS Honor Roll At the end of each semester Stevenson announces its Honor Rolls. All letter grades are considered for Honor Roll. This includes courses that are not calculated into the grade point average. The standards for this achievement are calculated based on weighted or unweighted grade points and are as follows: Gold Honor Roll • grade point average of 4.0 or higher with no grade lower than a "B" • all "A's" regardless of grade point average Green Honor Roll • grade point average of 3.0 with no more than one grade of "C" • all "A's" and "B's" regardless of grade point average Any incomplete grade, even in a non-GPA class, will keep a student off the Honor Roll. National Honor Society The four pillars of National Honor Society are: leadership, character, service and scholarship. Sophomores and juniors with a cumulative 3.900 weighted grade point average are reviewed for membership in National Honor Society by a faculty council selected by the principal. The faculty council reviews leadership, service and character for the selection process as per the National Association of Secondary School Principals' Constitution. Members are expected to attend all general meetings throughout the year. All members are expected to maintain their grade point average, complete ten community service hours per semester, and participate in the National Honor Society service project. For more information regarding National Honor society, please go to the Stevenson High School web site, www.d125.org. Honor Graduates Students who have earned at least 42 credits at the end of seven semesters and who have a weighted cumulative grade point average listed below are eligible to be declared Honor Graduates:

4.0 and above 3.75 - 3.99 3.50 - 3.74

Highest Honors High Honors Honors

WAIVER POLICIES: ATHLETIC AND ACADEMIC Athletic Waiver Policy: Eligibility The athletic waiver is an option only for juniors and seniors. A student who has earned a Junior Varsity or Varsity letter may be eligible to preregister for an athletic waiver. Student athletes must register for athletics to receive a waiver. They must also complete the Athletic Waiver Form, found on the Stevenson website, and submit this form to the Athletic Office.

• Criteria for a non-credit waiver: A junior or senior athlete in one sport and six academic classes. • Criteria for a credit waiver: A junior or senior athlete in at least two sports and five academic classes.

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Note: If a student athlete reduces the number of academic classes, fails to participate in a sport, or for any reason fails to continue participating in a sport, he/she will be immediately placed in Physical Education by his/her school counselor. Academic Waiver Policy: Eligibility A senior may receive an academic waiver from physical education if the student presents evidence that he/she: • must complete a specific academic course, not included in state or local requirements, in order to be granted admission to a specific college or university • must carry additional courses to complete graduation requirements due to failure or transfer A senior who receives an academic waiver from physical education will not receive credit for physical education. Marching Band and Color Guard PE Waiver Policy Any student, grade 9-12, who is enrolled in Honor Band, Symphonic Band, Advanced Symphonic Band, Freshman Band, Concert Band, or Color Guard and is a member of the Marching Band may waive his/her PE requirement for the first semester. This waiver may be applied each fall semester throughout a student’s years of participation in Marching Band. ATHLETIC PROGRAM Adlai E. Stevenson High School is a member of the Illinois High School Association (IHSA) and competes within the North Suburban Conference (NSC). Boys' Fall Cheerleading Cross Country Football Golf Soccer Student Athletic Tr.

Girls' Fall Cheerleading Cross Country Field Hockey Golf Patriettes Student Athletic Tr. Swimming Tennis Volleyball

Boys' Winter Basketball Bowling Cheerleading Fencing Ice Hockey Student Athletic Tr. Swimming Wrestling

Boys' Spring Baseball Gymnastics Lacrosse Student Athletic Tr. Tennis Track & Field Volleyball Water Polo Girls' Winter Girls' Spring Basketball Badminton Bowling Lacrosse Cheerleading Soccer Fencing Softball. Gymnastics Student Athletic Tr. Patriettes Track & Field Student Athletic Tr. Water Polo


ACADEMIC ELIGIBILITY The primary purpose of Stevenson High School is to promote academic achievement. Therefore, students engaged in those areas of the Extracurricular/Co-Curricular program, which make significant demands on their time must perform satisfactorily in the classroom in order to continue their participation in those Extracurricular/Co-Curricular activities. In order to be eligible to participate in an Extracurricular/Co-Curricular activity, students must meet the weekly scholastic standing requirements of the Illinois High School Association. Students must be passing 25 credit hours each week. See the Student Guidebook for the Extracurricular/CoCurricular Code of Conduct that details the specific rules, expectations, and consequences.

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CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES/CLUBS Stevenson offers a rich array of co-curricular activities, and every student is encouraged to select one or more of these programs in which to participate.

Careers Business Professionals of America F.B.L.A. Future Architects & Engineers Future Doctors of America Future Educators of America Law Club Print Media Youth & Government - Judicial Youth & Government - Legislative Community Service – In Reach 9th Hour B.O.S.S. F.M.P. Operation Snowball Peer Tutors Peer Helpers S.P.I.N.S. Stand For The Silent Student Ambassadors Community Service – Outreach 300 Club Amnesty International Best Buddies C.A.R.E. Edufund Fighting Childhood Obesity G.I.V.E. Green Team Hispanic Tutoring Interact Club Key Club KIVA National Honor Society Relay For Life S.A.V.E. S.P.T. (Stevenson Peer Theater) Students Helping Soldiers SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) Tri-M Music Honor Society Recreation Cultural Cuisine Club Interactive Gamers Table Tennis Table Tennis Advanced Video Game

Competition Bass Fishing Chess Club Debate Team Economics Club FCCLA History Fair / NHD Latino Culture Club Mathematics Team Model United Nations Physics Club Scholastic Bowl Science Club Science Olympiad Speech and Drama Team T.E.A.M.S. Competition Discussion American Red Cross Club Book Ends Breakfast With Books Film Club Gay Straight Alliance Military History Club Poetry Club Sports Talk Club Truth Seekers *Uprising Fine Arts – Art Art Club Mural Club Odyssey Photography Studio Visual Communications Club Fine Arts – Dance Melange Dance Co. Repertory Dance Co. Fine Arts – Music – Instrumental Baroque Ensemble Flute Choir Guitar Club Jazz Band I Jazz Lab Band Marching Band/Color Guard Orchestra Pep Bands

Fine Arts – Music – Vocal Jazz Etc. Just the Guys Ladyjazz Madrigal Singers Fine Arts – Theatre Drama Productions Improv Troupe International Thespian Society StageCrafters TBA: Playwright’s Club Leadership/Student Government Freshman Class Board Sophomore Class Board Junior Class Board Senior Class Board Student Council Student Congress S.L.A. (Student Leadership Academy) S.L.A.C. (Student Leader Advisory Council) Media Ambassador - Yearbook DJ Club SHS TV SNN Video Announcements Statesman - Newspaper Stevenson Styler (Fashion Magazine) WAES-FM Radio Station WIT / HALF WIT WIT CD World Culture Anime Club Chinese Club Chinese Exchange Club Israel Diversity Council French Club French Exchange German Club German Exchange Indian Student Association Latin Club Spanish Club

*Uprising is not school-sponsored organization. The views and opinions expressed by this organization, and those of its participants, are not necessarily the views and opinions of District 125 or Adlai E. Stevenson High School.

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Applied Arts

Applied Arts Division Wendy Custable, Director

Business Education Department Driver Education Department Family and Consumer Sciences Department Technology Education Department Technology Campus

The Applied Arts Division offers a program of electives that develop individual interests while facilitating authentic learning experiences by linking the curricula to the real world. Each course teaches students to apply content knowledge in a project-oriented environment. The Family and Consumer Sciences, Technology, Business and Driver Education Departments provide learning opportunities which foster academic achievement, career exploration, creativity, and problem-solving skills for all students. The unique characteristics of each of these departments provides students with a wide variety of course selections that integrate the diverse curricula of Stevenson into activities they can use in their daily lives and future careers.

• Business Education: Consumer Education meets a graduation requirement. • The classroom phase of Driver Education is a graduation requirement. • Elective courses in this Division may be eligible for the GPA waiver option.

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BUSINESS EDUCATION SEQUENCE Introduction to Business BUS171/172 9-10

Entrepreneurship BUS231/232 10-11-12

Marketing BUS281/282 10-11-12

Consumer Education BUS301/302 11-12

Business Law BUS371/372 11-12 Entrepreneurial Tactics Accelerated BUS411/412 11-12

Computer Applications BUS131/132 9-10-11-12

Information Processing BUS142 9-10-11-12

Accounting 1 BUS251 10-11-12

Accounting 2 Honors BUS252 10-11-12

Investment Management BUS361/362 11-12

Advanced Accounting Honors BUS351 11-12

Suggested Course Offerings

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Freshman Computer Applications Information Processing Introduction to Business

Sophomore Introduction to Business Marketing Entrepreneurship Accounting 1, 2 Honors

Junior Accounting 1, 2 Honors Advanced Accounting Honors Marketing Business Law Entrepreneurship Investment Management Entrepreneurial Tactics

Senior Accounting 1, 2 Honors Advanced Accounting Honors Marketing Business Law Entrepreneurship Investment Management Entrepreneurial Tactics


Applied Arts

BUSINESS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

In every facet of society, business plays a vital role. Therefore, a thorough business education will provide a solid foundation for a successful, professional life. Here at Stevenson High School we provide the skills necessary for students to become tomorrow's business leaders.

Computer Applications (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS131-Semester 1, BUS132-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course will provide students with the computer skills and knowledge necessary for today's technological society. Students will develop typing, word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation skills through a variety of activities and applications. The course concludes with an extensive project that incorporates all skills learned throughout the semester into a "Create Your Own Sports Franchise" simulation. Information Processing (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS142-Semester 2 Only Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Computer Applications or proficiency test

data through the use of email. Students who complete Computer Applications and Information Processing will have the opportunity for articulated credit at the College of Lake County. Introduction to Business (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS171-Semester 1, BUS172-Semester 2 Open to 9-10 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

How do you start a business? What type of records should you keep? Why do stores charge the prices they do? What is the best way to sell a product? What are the different career opportunities in the business world? These questions and more are answered in this course. The student will also investigate the different types of business organizations from sole proprietorships to large corporations. This course is strongly recommended for business career-oriented students or as a preview to other business courses.

This course will provide the students an opportunity to develop in-depth information processing skills: inputting, manipulating and managing data for hard copy, networking and visual presentation. Advanced applications will integrate activities using word processing, database, spreadsheets, charts, graphs, mail merges, and labels. Students will also communicate information and

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Marketing (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS281-Semester 1, BUS282-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None - suggested: Introduction to Business Are you thinking of declaring a business major in college? Are you working part-time in a business-related occupation? Marketing activities account for one in every three jobs. This course investigates how goods and services are developed and promoted in the marketplace. Specific topics of study include target markets, the marketing mix, sales promotions, public relations, visual merchandising and display, personal selling, advertising, sports marketing, and entertainment marketing. The class includes many interactive projects, guest speakers, and field trips. Entrepreneurship (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS231-Semester 1, BUS232-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None - suggested: Introduction to Business Entrepreneurship will provide students with a working background on the skills and knowledge necessary to own and operate their own small businesses. Students will examine the environment of small business ownership, the procedures and skills necessary to open a small business, and the policies and practices of a successful small business operation. Entrepreneurship will emphasize a hands-on approach to small business ownership. Entrepreneurial Tactics (Accelerated) BUS411-Semester 1, BUS412-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: One course required from: and One course required from: Investment Management Introduction to Business Business Law Accounting 1 Marketing Accounting 2 Entrepreneurship Advanced Accounting Entrepreneurial Tactics is a capstone course that ties together all the curricular fundamentals from the Business Education curriculum. This course models the research and concepts of a capstone course at many university business schools. In this project-based course, students work within teams to create a business plan that guides them in developing a business of their choice. Students will learn to work with and have first-hand collaboration with top business professionals from the community. These CFOs, CEOs, and other top executives will visit, present, and mentor the students in incorporating all the fundamentals of creating a business idea, marketing the product, and preparing the finances of their business plan. Accounting 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS251 - Semester 1 Only One Semester Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None – suggested: Introduction to Business This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in the study of Accounting. It is strongly recommended that both semesters of Accounting be taken in the same year. Accounting is currently the most in-demand college major. Basic principles and practices of double entry accounting are developed with an emphasis on the financial records of sole proprietorships and partnerships. Daily transactions, financial statements, and statement analysis are

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included. Students also have the opportunity to attend regional, state, and national accounting competitions. Accounting 2 (Honors) BUS252 - Semester 2 Only Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Accounting 1

One Semester

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in the study of Accounting. It is strongly recommended that this semester be taken immediately following the first. Specialized journal systems, uncollected accounts, depreciation, payroll, taxes, and financial statement analysis are emphasized with regard to a corporation. Students who complete this course will have the opportunity to receive articulated credit from the College of Lake County. Students also have the opportunity to attend regional, state, and national accounting competitions. Advanced Accounting (Honors) BUS351 - Semester 1 Only Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Accounting 2

One Semester

This is a semester course which serves as a capstone to the advanced study of Accounting. A "managerial approach" emphasizing the internal data used to make decisions and control revenues, costs, and expenses is explored and developed. Departmental accounting, multi-business accounting, and manufacturing (cost) accounting are other areas of study. Students learn to work both independently and as a "management team," and use the computer in solving business accounting problems. Students also have the opportunity to attend regional, state, and national accounting competitions. Business Law (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS371-Semester 1, BUS372-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None – suggested: Introduction to Business This course is designed to satisfy the curiosity of students who are interested in learning about the law as it relates to various aspects of business. Students will gain a greater understanding of their legal rights and responsibilities as an individual, employee, manager, and business owner. General legal topics discussed include contracts, property, employment rules and regulations, business organization, finance, as well as technology, environment, entertainment and sports law. Students will participate in daily discussions about current legal events, review “real world” cases and verdicts, and participate in lively arguments and debate. In addition, guest speakers, collaborative team projects, and small group activities allow for students to work together developing a greater understanding of the law and a more authentic learning experience.


Applied Arts

Investment Management (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option BUS361-Semester 1, BUS362-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: None – Suggested: Accounting 1

One Semester

Investment Management is designed to help students create a wellrounded investment plan to meet their financial goals. Students will learn techniques used in corporate finance and analyze various financial securities like stocks, futures, and options. They will explore the issues faced by today's corporate financial managers and brokers through the use of a sophisticated, hands-on investment simulation. [This course is designed for students who are planning careers in brokerage, investment, and other financial fields.] Consumer Education (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option (if not taken for Graduation Requirement) BUS301-Semester 1, BUS302-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None Consumer Education will guide students to understand the concepts that affect fundamental decisions about their personal financial affairs. This project-based course uses the latest technology to aid students’ awareness of consumer topics, issues, and strategies in planning for their financial future. Topics include the key consumer concerns of budgeting, credit, housing, insurance, investment, and taxes. This course satisfies the state consumer education requirement for graduation.

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DRIVER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

Driver Education D/E231-Semester 1, D/E232-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: An instruction permit issued by the Secretary of State’s office through the Driver Education Department, parental consent, verification of age (enrollment is based on chronological age), and accumulation of at least 8 credits in the previous two semesters. ELL students wishing to enroll should be in a minimum of Intermediate ELL. This course is normally taken during one semester of the sophomore or junior year. Students are enrolled in this course based on chronological age. Students must take and pass both the classroom phase and the behind-the-wheel phase of Driver Education if they wish to receive a license prior to their 18th birthday. Passing the classroom phase of the course is required for graduation. The course is a two-phase program consisting of classroom and behind the wheel instruction. The course prepares students in safe motor vehicle operation in a suburban driving environment. Among the topics taught in this course are the rules of the road, defensive driving, natural law and their effects on vehicle control, driver responsibility, and impaired and distracted driving. Students must also meet all the essential course requirements as mandated by the Illinois State Board of Education and the Secretary of State’s Office. The grades earned in this course are not included in the student’s grade point average.

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For the 2013-2014 school year students may register for first semester if they were born on or before December 15, 1997 and for second semester if they were born on or before April 25, 1998. Dates may still change due to state law changes. *These dates are guidelines. Upon completion of course selection, exact birth dates will be confirmed. Students will be notified of any date changes via Freshman Advisory and your counselor. Driver Education Fees: $300 and an additional $20 check to the Secretary of State.


Applied Arts

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

 

 

Foods   Courses  

Introduction  to     Foods  &  Nutrition   FCS111/112   9-­‐10-­‐11-­‐12  

Food  Preparation   FCS  221/222   10-­‐11-­‐12  

Introduction  to     Clothing  &  Design   FCS121/122   9-­‐10-­‐11-­‐12  

 

Development     Courses   Life  Management   FCS411/412   11-­‐12  

Gourmet  Foods   FCS  321/322   10-­‐11-­‐12   Prerequisite:     Food  Preparation  

  Clothing   FCS251/252   10-­‐11-­‐12  

Child  Development   FCS  211/212   10-­‐11-­‐12  

Design   Courses   Fashion  Merchandising    &  Design   FCS241/242   10-­‐11-­‐12  

 

Suggested  Course  Sequences  

Teaching  Young  Children   FCS  311/312   10-­‐11-­‐12   Prerequisite:   Child  Development  

 

  Interior  Design   FCS231/232   10-­‐11-­‐12  

Foods  Sequence:  Careers  related  to  Nutrition,  Dietetics,  and  Culinary  Arts   • Introduction  to  Foods  and  Nutrition   • Food  Preparation   • Gourmet  Foods     Child  Development  Sequence:  Careers  related  to  Children,  Social  Work,  Psychology,  and  Teaching   • Child  Development   • Teaching  Young  Children  (Can  be  taken  multiple  times)     Fashion  &  Design  Sequence:  Careers  Related  to  Fashion  Design,  Merchandising,  Marketing,  and  Advertising   • Introduction  to  Clothing  &  Design   • Clothing  (can  be  taken  multiple  times  and  as  an  Independent  Study)   • Fashion  Merchandising  &  Design     Interior  Design  Sequence:  Careers  Related  to  Interior  Design  and  Retailing   • Introduction  to  Clothing  &  Design   • Interior  Design  (Can  be  taken  again  as  an  Independent  Study)   • Clothing  (can  be  taken  multiple  times  and  as  an  Independent  Study)     Social  and  Emotional  Awareness:  Counseling,  Social  Work,  and  Personal  Development   • Child  Development   • Life  Management  

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FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES DEPARTMENT

Family and Consumer Sciences offers a broad range of courses designed to develop practical life skills such as decision making, consumer issues, preparation for college, healthy relationship and interpersonal skills. Many of the courses have a lab component. Introduction to Clothing and Design (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS121-Semester 1, FCS122-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None

Child Development (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS211-Semester 1, FCS212-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

In this introductory course students have the opportunity to develop a range of business skills in fashion design, clothing construction and interior design. Through lab use, projects and activities, students will learn to integrate these concepts into the context of individual and family life.

Child Development explores the world of the developing child, concentrating on current theory and research relating to the healthy development of children prenatally through age 6.

Clothing (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS251-Semester 1, FCS252-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Clothing is a lab-oriented course where students learn various construction techniques, fabric and pattern selection. Students apply learning to ready-to-wear apparel and accessories. This course can be taken multiple times for credit and as an Independent Study.

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Teaching Young Children (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS311-Semester 1, FCS312-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Child Development

One Semester

One Semester

Teaching Young Children offers students the opportunity to teach pre-school and kindergarten aged children in the Little Patriots Day School. Students will prepare and teach lessons, observe children, and assess individual children’s developmental progress. This course provides a valuable opportunity for the students to explore their interests in education and other fields related to early childhood. Teaching Young Children can be taken for more than one semester with credit earned for each semester.


Life Management (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS411-Semester 1, FCS412-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None

This course is designed to be an introduction to the basic principles of food preparation, nutrition, and wellness. The course is centered on healthy food and lifestyle choices to enhance student awareness in regards to personal food choices, physical activity, healthy weight management, and the enhancement of athletic and academic performance.

Life Management allows students to explore a variety of topics designed to help them meet the challenges of life. Curriculum topics work to enhance the social and emotional development of teenagers. Students gain an understanding of self, healthy relationships and practical decision making skills that will help them to develop responsibility and independence. They work on setting goals, developing better time management skills, making more informed decisions based on personal values, and enhancing communication while learning to build positive relationships with others.

Food Preparation (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS221-Semester 1, FCS222-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course evaluates the impact of our food choices while studying nutrition, the science behind foods, and basic food purchasing. Students gain basic culinary skills while working in the foods lab. Gourmet Foods (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS321-Semester 1, FCS322-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Food Preparation

One Semester

This course teaches students advanced food preparation skills with hands-on work in the foods lab focusing on regional American and international cuisine. A global perspective is gained through the exploration of international culture and food customs. Students will examine the current food supply and study the major influences and controversies associated with producing and distributing food. Interior Design (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS231-Semester 1, FCS232-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Interior Design is a project-based course where students explore design as it relates to housing and commercial interiors. This course integrates the application of design principles with the living environment, environmentally friendly design, color, and the efficient use of design in the context of individual and family lifestyles. Emphasis is on using available resources effectively to meet individual and housing needs. Fashion Merchandising and Design (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS241-Semester 1, FCS242-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None Fashion Merchandising and Design is a project-based class, which involves the study of the fashion industry, design & merchandising of fashion related products. Topics will include an overview of the fashion industry, the evolution, trends and movement of fashion, career development, merchandising, promotion, fashion and accessory design.

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Applied Arts

Introduction to Foods and Nutrition (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option FCS111-Semester 1, FCS112-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None


TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION MEDIA ARTS Audio Video Design 1 One Semester TEC 111/112 9-10-11-12

Web Development 1 One Semester TEC 171/172 9-10-11-12

Game Development 1 One Semester TEC 501/502 NEW 9-10-11-12

Print Media 1 One Semester TEC 181/182 NEW 9-10-11-12

Audio Video Design 2 One Semester TEC 121/122 9-10-11-12

Web Development 2 One Semester TEC 281/282 NEW 9-10-11-12

Game Development 2 One Semester TEC 511/512 NEW 9-10-11-12

Print Media 2 One Semester TEC 251/252 NEW 9-10-11-12

New Media Arts courses will be introduced for the 2014-2015 school year.

Advanced Print Media 2 (Honors) One Year TEC 711/712 10-11-12

Students who were enrolled in Print Media 1, 2, or 3 prior to the 2013-2014 school year.

Advanced Print Media 3 (Honors)* One Year TEC 721/722 11-12 *Course may be repeated

ARCHITECTURE & ENGINEERING Residential Architecture One Year TEC 141/142 9-10-11-12

Commercial Architecture One Year TEC 241/242 NEW 10-11-12

PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design One Year TEC 151/152 9-10-11-12

PLTW Civil Engineering & Architecture (Honors) One Year TEC 261/262 NEW 10-11-12

PLTW Digital Electronics (Honors) One Year TEC 291/292 NEW 10-11-12

New PLTW Engineering and Architecture courses will be introduced for the 2014-2015 school year.

Students who were enrolled in Adv. Architecture or Adv. Engineering prior to the 2013-2014 school year.

Advanced CAD 1 Accelerated One Year TEC 531/532 11-12

Advanced CAD 2 Accelerated One Year TEC 541/542 12

Date modified: 9/14/12

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Applied Arts

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

The Technology Education Department provides an opportunity for students to explore the latest technological trends in software and hardware of graphic media, audio video media and technical drawing. Students create practical projects that can enhance their personal and future professional lives. Audio Video Design 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC111-Semester 1, TEC112-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Audio Video Design 1 is an introduction to moviemaking with digital video and audio technologies. The fundamental elements and techniques of cinematography are explored from pre-production (planning and storyboarding) to production (shooting, lighting, sound) to post production (editing, compositing, titles, audio, special effects). Students will use industry professional audio and video editing software to produce video shorts from conception to completion. Audio Video Design 2 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC121-Semester 1, TEC122-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Audio Video Design 1

One Semester

Audio Video Design 2 will allow students to continue working with professional digital video and audio editing software and expand their knowledge through advanced use of software and digital video effects. Topics and projects will focus on sound creation, green screen editing, picture in picture effects, multicamera filming/editing and 3D-like effects through complex digital video production software. Students who complete this course will have the opportunity to receive articulated credit from Triton College.

PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC151-Semester 1, TEC152-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: None Introduction to Engineering Design is a full-year course is available to all students. In this course, students use 3D solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems. Students will learn how to document their work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards, and technical documentation. Students may receive college credit and/ or advanced standing for successful completion of this course and a cumulative exam. Residential Architecture (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC141 - Semester 1, TEC142 - Semester 2 Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

Residential Architecture is an entry-level architecture course that provides students with the opportunity to develop architectural planning and drawing skills. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts, theories and practices of the professional architect. Students will use architectural software that is used

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by professional architects to develop skills in residential design including: floor plans, plot plans, foundation plans, electrical plans, elevations, and structural detail drawings. The course culminates with a comprehensive project that has students design a home from the ground up on a designated plot with specific building constraints resulting in a model and portfolio of both 2D and 3D renderings. PLTW Digital Electronics (Honors) TEC291-Semester 1, TEC292-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design or Residential Architecture, Introduction to Technical Drawing, Engineering CAD, Advanced Architecture, Advanced Engineering, Advanced CAD 1, Architecture CAD The Digitial Electronics course is designed to expose students to engineering design and troubleshooting techniques that are used in the electronics field. Computer simulation software is used to design and test digital circuitry prior to actually constructing them in order to see if the circuits work. The projects are traditional, such as those found in watches, digital cameras, and calculators to combinational logic using SSI chips to small subsystem implementation in programmable devices, such as small robots, in which you will learn how machines "think." You will also learn a systematic approach that engineers use to design the electronics that is used every day. Students may receive college credit and/or advanced standing for successful completion of this course and a cumulative exam. PLTW Civil Engineering & Architecture (Honors) TEC261-Semester 1, TEC262-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design or Residential Architecture, Introduction to Technical Drawing, Engineering CAD, Advanced Architecture, Advanced Engineering, Advanced CAD 1, Architecture CAD The major focus of this course is completing long-term projects that involve the design and development of residential and commerical properties and structures. The course provides students the freedom to develop the property as a simulation or to model the experiences that civil engineers and architects face. Students work in teams, exploring hands-on activities and projects to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. In addition, students use 3D design software to help them design solutions to solve major course projects. Students learn about documenting their project, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture. Students may receive college credit and/or advanced standing for successful completion of this course and a cumulative exam. Commercial Architecture (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC241-Semester 1, TEC242-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Civil Engineering & Architecture or Residential Architecture, Advanced CAD 1, Advanced Architecture Commercial Architecture is recommended for students interested in pursuing a career in architecture, construction, project management, interior design, or landscape design. CA provides students with an opportunity to extend their knowledge of planning and drawing procedures used in the development and preparation of construction plans for a commercial building. Students follow the architectural

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design process to find a suitable site for construction, prepare client analysis, sketch concepts ideas, design detail, assembly and installation documents, calculate strengths of materials, construct a mass or mock-up model and create suitable presentations in the form of renderings or multimedia. Advanced CAD 1 (Accelerated) TEC531-Semester 1, TEC532-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced Architecture or Advanced Engineering This course is recommended for students who are interested in a career in the field of architecture, building construction, mechanical design, manufacturing or engineering. Advanced CAD provides students with an opportunity to extend their knowledge of planning and drawing procedures used in the development and preparation of construction plans for a small office building or manufacturing drawings for a variety of mechanical products. Students will prepare a written problem statement, complete a client or product analysis, develop preliminary design sketches, prepare presentation drawings, create architectural or engineering layouts, calculate strengths of materials, select methods of construction or manufacturing procedures, and draw detail, assembly, and installation documents, and produce models or prototypes of their designs. Advanced CAD 2 (Accelerated) TEC541-Semester 1, TEC542-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced CAD 1 – Recommended for students interested in pursuing a career in architecture or engineering. Students are able to choose and study topics of particular interest on an individual basis revolving around the advanced concepts in architecture and/or mechanical engineering. This capstone course allows students to work with their minds, hands and the computer in the design and construction of scale models, computer-generated renderings, and product animation. Web Development 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC171-Semester 1, TEC172-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Web Development 1 is an introductory experience in website design using project based coursework. Students will develop the technical and creative skills needed to plan, create, and publish interactive web pages. Instruction will include the creation and manipulation of text, graphics, animations, and interactive content through the use of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Photoshop, Dreamweaver, and Flash. Web Development 2 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC281-Semester 1, TEC282-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Students will continue their studies from Web Development 1 by applying modern web development techniques to create highly responsive web 2.0 sites that maximize user experience. Students will take advantage of the jQuery framework to manipulate web content and create sophisticated transitions and effects. New Internet technologies will be explored such as app writing and epublishing. Students will design and develop mobile apps that take


Print Media 2 GPA Waiver Option TEC251-Semester 1, TEC252-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Print Media 1

Game Development 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC501-Semester 1, TEC502-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Print Media 2 is an intermediate study of graphic design including spot color separations, trapping, masking, advanced layering, photo corrections, multi-page layout, bleeds, and package design. Students will learn precision registration and advanced bindery and finishing techniques when producing printed products. Each student will design and produce a multicolored t-shirt, a multicolored vinyl decal, two sided business cards, a life size fat head, a frisbee, a deck of playing cards, and a package for the cards.

One Semester

This course introduces students to fundamental principals of game design and 2D computer animation using software that allows for interactivity through web browsers and mobile platforms. Students will learn vector imaging and animation techniques to design and develop characters, props, levels, and user interfact. Object-oriented programming will be introduced through a userfriendly block-snapping interface to develop game logic and build interactive environments. Students will develop a 2D game from conception to completion ready for release on iOS, Android, or the World Wide Web. Game Development 2 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC511-Semester 1, TEC512-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Game Development 1

One Semester

This course will expand upon the principles of animation and gaming learned in Game Development 1 and will introduce students to the principles of three-dimensional modeling and animation for game development. Students will us 3D modeling software to create character animation and 3D environments for video games. Topics will include lowpoly modeling, rigging, animating, lighting, camera angles, and texturing. Through the use of a game engine, students will implement controls, physics, collision detection, sound, animation, and memory management. Students will develop a 3D game from conception to completion ready for release on desktop computers and the World Wide Web. Print Media 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option TEC181-Semester 1, TEC182-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Advanced Print Media 2 (Honors) TEC711-Semester 1, TEC712-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Print Media 1 (Full year course)

One Semester

Full Year

This course is designed to expand on Print Media 1 by introducing the student to multicolored work, precision press operation, spot color trapping, and other advanced software, press, and post-press techniques. Students will continue to create individualized projects for their own use. Students who complete this course will have the opportunity to receive articulated credit from Ferris State University, Illinois State University and Triton College. Advanced Print Media 3 (Honors) TEC721-Semester 1, TEC722-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Print Media 2

Full Year

This course is designed to introduce the student to press-color work, using high-end software, press and post-press techniques. Students will create projects for their own use, as well as being part of a production team that will function as an in-plant production group producing jobs for the school. Students will also be responsible for scheduling and maintaining the equipment in the Graphic Media Lab. This course can be repeated once for credit. .

One Semester

In Print Media 1, students will be introduced to the basics of graphic design including digital image capture, digital illustration, and page layout using Adobe Photoshop, Illustration, and InDesign. Students will learn to design for different printing technologies including, screen printing, digital production printing, inkjet printing, die cutting, and gravure printing. Each students will design and produce a one color t-shirt, one color decal, four full color notepads, a full color collage poster, a one color pad printed item, and a custom calendar.

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Applied Arts

advantage of mobile device technology such as the accelerometer, GPS, SMS, and camera functions. Students will explore the advantages and disadvantages of electronic publishing while authorizing an original document to be packaged as an ebook.


LAKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS The Lake County High Schools' Technology Campus is located adjacent to the College of Lake County in Grayslake, Illinois. The Technology Campus, which encompasses 203,000 square feet, is equipped with the latest equipment and machinery in order to provide students with valuable hands-on experience. Students who choose to attend the Technology Campus earn high school credit and the opportunity to earn college credit in many programs. The traditional vocational concept of "Learn by Doing" is the underlying method of instructional experiences at the Technology Campus. Emphasis is placed on students participating in actual or simulated job and production situations. Each day, busing is provided for sessions 1 and 2 by Stevenson High School to and from Lake County Technology Campus. The first session bus leaves at 7:50 AM with courses beginning at 8:20 AM. These students return to Stevenson around 11:00 AM. Cosmetology students attend the first session and return to Stevenson around 12:30 PM. The second session bus leaves at 10:00 AM with courses beginning at 10:30 AM. These students return to Stevenson around 1:00 PM. Program descriptions are available on the Web at lakecountytech.sharpschool.com. There is an application process to complete and individual course lab fees to pay in order to attend the Technology Campus. Please direct all questions to your counselor or the Applied Arts Director. Following is a listing of courses available at the Technology Campus. Students earn three credits per semester. Cosmetology students earn four credits per semester. Prerequisite: Junior or senior classification. All courses are classified as College Prep. Communications Programs A. Information Technology (VOC171/172) Game/Java/C++ Programming I* (VOC191/192) Game/Java/C++ Programming II* (VOC071/072) Computer Support Services I* (VOC091/092) Computer Support Services II* C. School of Visual Arts (VOC671/672) Graphic/Web Design I* (VOC691/692) Graphic/Web Design II* (VOC271/272) Photographic Design I* (VOC281/282) Photographic Design II* Human Services Programs (VOC291/292) Certified Nurse Assisting (seniors only)* N (VOC591/592) Cosmetology I (VOC611/612) Cosmetology II N (VOC111/112) Criminal Justice I* (VOC121/122) Criminal Justice II* (VOC951/952) Culinary Arts I* (VOC971/972) Culinary Arts II* (VOC911/912) Early Childhood Education I* (VOC931/932) Early Childhood Education II* (VOC311/312) Emergency Medical Services* (seniors only)

(VOC211/212) (VOC221/222) (VOC321/322)

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Fire Fighting I* Fire Fighting II* Medical Assisting I

Transportation Programs (VOC471/472) Automotive Service I* (VOC491/492) Automotive Service II* (VOC431/432) Automotive Collision Repair I* (VOC451/452) Automotive Collision Repair II * Manufacturing/Industrial Programs (VOC511/512) Building Trades I* (VOC531/532) Building Trades II* (VOC871/872) Welding – Fabrication I* (VOC891/892) Welding – Fabrication II* (VOC251/252) Photonics I

(VOC261/262)

Pre-Req: Algebra 1, Geometry & 1 year of Science

Photonics II

*Articluated or dual credit at College of Lake County N Valid Soc. Sec. # required for state certification exam eligibility  for senior standing students


Communication Arts Division Joseph Flanagan, Director

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Communication

Students are required to take four years/eight credits of English classes in order to complete graduation requirements.

Arts

The Communication Arts Department includes the academic areas of English, speech, reading, and journalism. It offers courses on three levels – college preparatory, accelerated, and AP honors. It is the department's goal to assist students in becoming critical and analytical readers, logical and insightful thinkers, and skilled users of written, visual, and oral communication. All courses promote inquiry and a framework for argumentation to prepare students for college. These objectives are taught through written as well as spoken language.


COMMUNICATION ARTS DIVISION SEQUENCE College Prep

Grade 9 Depending on their benchmark assessment results, some students may be required to take a year of Reading Enrichment with College Prep English

Grade 10

College Prep Freshman English ENG111/112

College Prep Sophomore English ENG211/212

Grade 11

College Prep Junior English ENG311/312

Grade 12

College Prep Junior English: Amer. Studies ENG321/322

College Prep Senior Electives *Creative Writing, ENG501/502 *Creative Writing Seminar, ENG522 *Film Genres, ENG722 Literary Analysis, ENG611/612 Literary Genres, ENG621/622 *Media Analysis, ENG691 Political Thought, ENG601/602 Writing for College, ENG541/542

Accl. / AP Accl Freshman English ENG131/132

Accl Sophomore English ENG231/232

Accl Junior English ENG381/382

Accl World Masterpieces ENG431/432

AP Junior English ENG371/372

AP Themes in World Literature ENG451/452

Journalism Program Journalistic Writing ENG901/902 9-10-11-12

Multi-Year Electives Intro. Radio Broadcasting ENG983/982 9-10-11-12

Public Speaking ENG761/762 10-11-12

Adv. Journ. Writing ENG921/922 9-10-11-12

Multi-Year and Journalism Electives Students may register for these courses during the years indicated in the flow chart. If taken prior to senior year, they are to be taken in addition to freshman, sophomore, or junior sequence courses. *Accelerated option: May be taken for accelerated credit. Teacher recommendation during the opening weeks of school required.

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Newspaper Production Accl ENG951/952 10-11-12

Yearbook Production Accl ENG991/992 10-11-12


Student Tutorial Programs

Reading Enrichment (Core) ENG101-Semester 1, ENG102-Semester 2 Open to 9 Full Year Prerequisite: Director recommendation as determined by the freshman benchmark exam The focus of this course provides instruction in the skills needed for success in high school. This course emphasizes fundamental reading skills by examining text structure and story development, word recognition, and author purpose. Literacy skills and study skills are taught and reviewed throughout the course. Depending on their benchmark assessment results, this course may be required of some entering freshmen. Freshman English (College Prep) Freshman English (Accelerated) ENG111-Semester 1, ENG112-Semester 2 ENG131-Semester 1, ENG132-Semester 2 Open to 9 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

In each of these skills based courses, students develop proficiencies in the areas of reading, literary analysis, writing, grammar and usage, oral communication, and research. Students explore the overarching theme of the course—the individual’s understanding of himself or herself and others—through short stories, essays and articles, novels, poetry, drama and other texts. Through their reading and inquiry, students are introduced to various stylistic techniques that help them learn strategies to improve their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students write in multiple formats throughout the year, including narrative and argument, which is a framework for critical thinking. Writing is used to enhance student learning in all areas of literacy development. Authentic class discussion plays a vital role in that students talk in class as a means of enhancing their literacy skills. This holistic approach to literacy learning acclimates students to the benefits of reflecting and learning to think deeply about the ways they interact and communicate with the world around them. Students learn to write through a structured process approach that teaches students to analyze a writing task, develop the means by which to execute a task, and execute the writing through various drafting and revision stages. Students will be assessed regularly in the areas of full-class and small-group discussions, and students are required to deliver one formal speech each semester. Vocabulary study and reading instruction are integrated into the study of literature and other texts. Incoming 9th graders are required to take one of these courses. Course selection is determined through the careful consideration of a number of factors. In January of the 8th grade year, students within the district take a benchmark assessment in Lan-

Sophomore English (College Prep) Sophomore English (Accelerated) ENG211-Semester 1, ENG212-Semester 2 ENG231-Semester 1, ENG232-Semester 2 Open to 10 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

In each of these skills based courses, students continue to develop their proficiencies in reading, writing, literary analysis, grammar and usage, oral communication, and research. Students explore the overarching theme—the individual’s interaction and negotiation with society—through the study of short stories, short essays and articles, novels, poetry, and drama. Through their exposure to a variety of texts, students build upon the various stylistic techniques introduced in Freshman English as a means of enhancing their literacy skills. A focus on persuasion introduces students to the study of rhetorical analysis. This writing intensive course builds upon the argumentation skills introduced in Freshman English while reinforcing a structured process approach to writing. Students will be assessed regularly in the areas of full-class and small-group discussions, and students will deliver one formal speech each semester. Vocabulary study and test preparation continue to be integrated into the study of literature and other texts. Sophomore College Prep English serves students who will benefit from continued reinforcement of the foundational skills noted above, while Sophomore Accelerated English is best suited for students who are prepared for a greater challenge. Junior English (College Prep) ENG311-Semester 1, ENG312-Semester 2 Open to 11 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

This skills based course completes the department’s three-year scope and sequence in the areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening, grammar and usage, and research. Students explore American themes and values through a variety of texts. Through their reading and writing, students deepen their analysis of language, and they are introduced to literary criticism. Building on the Freshman and Sophomore English focus on argumentation, students continue to develop their writing through a structured process approach that is aligned with college writing expectations. This writing intensive course includes sophisticated literary analysis, synthesis and argumentative process essays. Instruction in the formal research process culminates in an extensive paper second semester. Students are assessed regularly in the area of full-class and small-group discussions, and they are required to participate in formal speaking assignments. Additionally, students participate in ACT test preparation in the areas of identifying English language skills and reading.

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Arts

Students' skills in English (writing, revising, and editing) and reading are formally evaluated in their junior year as part of the state assessment program. Juniors not passing these assessments will be required to remediate their deficiencies in tutorials during their senior year.

Communication

Students earning a six-week grade of "D+" or lower in Freshman English or a grade of "F" in Sophomore English and/or Junior English will be required to attend regularly scheduled tutorials in the school's Learning Center.

guage Arts. Students new to the district sit for this assessment in May or August. The data from the benchmark assessment is used, and each student’s 8th grade Language Arts teacher is consulted to determine the best course for each student. Freshman College Prep English serves students who will benefit from continued reinforcement of the foundational skills noted above, while Freshman Accelerated English is best suited for students who are prepared for a greater challenge. Both classes are outstanding preparation for college.


Junior English: American Studies (College Prep) ENG321-Semester 1, ENG322-Semester 2 Open to 11 Full Year Prerequisite: World History, concurrent enrollment in U. S. History: American Studies This skills-based course is taken in conjunction with US History: American Studies (College Prep). Students are scheduled for consecutive periods of history and English, allowing for an integrated study of the two disciplines, as well as activities which center on thematic movements in our country’s history and literature. Through the literature, students review and deepen their analysis of language and rhetorical devices, and they are introduced to literary criticism. Students continue to study the elements of argumentation and persuasion; identifying logical fallacies, refuting the opposition, and employing rhetorical and stylistic strategies. This writing intensive course includes sophisticated literary analysis and argumentative essays, and a minimum of two in-class essays per semester. Instruction in the formal research process culminates with an extensive paper second semester. Students are assessed regularly in the area of full-class and small-group discussions, and they are required to deliver one formal speech. Additionally, intensive work with ACT test preparation is used to sharpen reading, editing, and revising skills. Junior English (Accelerated) ENG381-Semester 1, ENG382-Semester 2 Open to 11 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

This course promotes continued development in the areas of reading, literary analysis, argumentation, grammar and usage, oral communication, and research. The course explores American themes and values through the study of both short works of fiction and nonfiction. In addition, the course emphasizes the analysis of poetry, literature, language and the study of rhetoric. The course introduces students to literary criticism as well as building skills related to persuasion and argumentation. This writing intensive course is rigorous in terms of quantity and depth of work. The course emphasizes literary analysis and argumentative writing in order to explore various modes as well as the development of voice, purpose, and audience. The course includes test preparation skills as well as vocabulary building throughout the year. Junior AP English Language and Composition (Honors) ENG371-Semester 1, ENG372-Semester 2 Open to 11 Prerequisite: Sophomore English

Full Year

This is a college level course, one that adheres to the objectives articulated by the College Board, and students may obtain college credit by taking the Advanced Placement Examination, a natural culmination of the year long study of language. Upon entering this course, students are expected to be proficient in the areas of reading, literary analysis, argumentation, writing, grammar and usage, oral communication and research. The course emphasizes a variety of British and American texts as a means of critical analysis of language and rhetoric. This writing intensive course focuses on literary analysis, rhetorical analysis, synthesis, and

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argumentation, and is more rigorous than the accelerated level in terms of quantity and complexity of the writing assignments. The complexity and regularity of the writing assignments, ranging from process essays to a research paper, requires students to assume an increasing degree of independence as the year progresses. In addition, students write numerous short papers and in-class essays each semester. Students will be assessed regularly in the area of full-class and small-group discussions, as well as formal presentations. ACT, SAT, and AP test preparation are used to sharpen reading, editing, and revising skills. Students also engage in independent and intensive vocabulary study throughout the year. Advanced Placement, Themes in World Literature (Honors) ENG451-Semester 1, ENG452-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Prerequisite: None, but most students take Junior Accelerated English or Advanced Placement English Language This course will provide students with a college-level literary experience that will foster readiness for the Advance Placement English Literature and Composition Exam. In compliance with College Board requirements, students will study works from the sixteenth century to the present, including works by such authors as Yann Martel, William Shakespeare, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Joseph Conrad, and Franz Kafka. During the course of the year, students are expected to continue to develop their knowledge of literary terms related to prose and poetry; demonstrate how the parts and techniques of a literary work contribute to the meaning of the work; actively participate in high level analytical discourse; and create cogent, sustained and sophisticated expressions of analytical interpretation in written form. Students should expect to write weekly, including response papers, in-class essays, and process essays. Near the conclusion of the course, students are expected to take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam. World Masterpieces (Accelerated) ENG431-Semester 1, ENG432-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

This two-semester sequence surveys world literature from ancient times to the present, focusing on both western and nonwestern cultures. Students will read poetry, prose, and drama in excerpted and complete forms. In addition to reading the “classics” early in the course’s sequence, students will read and study contemporary works that draw their inspiration and form from various earlier periods of literature. Students will read works by such authors as Sophocles, Dante, Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, and Camus. During the course of the year, students engage in close readings of prose and poetry; analyze literary style; actively participate in small and large group discussions; write response papers as well as in-class timed writing essays; write at least two major papers each semester; and develop project-based presentations. Please note: Level changes from Advanced Placement Themes in World Literature and/or World Masterpieces into one semester electives are not possible.


Semester-Long Electives Students not taking a full year course (World Masterpieces or Advanced Placement Themes in World Literature) are expected to take two semester electives.

Public Speaking (College Prep) ENG761-Semester 1, ENG762, Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Freshman English

One Semester

This course is designed to provide experience and training in public speaking so that students are equipped with the skills essential for success in the business and academic worlds of today and tomorrow. Students learn to tailor a message to suit a particular audience, enhance the message through technology, understand logic and reasoning, develop listening skills, identify propaganda techniques, and understand the physical producers of voice to control and vary tone, volume, pitch and rate. Students participate in workshop-oriented groups to develop the various skills listed above. Students present approximately one speech per week and are responsible for constructive feedback of their peers’ speeches. Creative Writing (College Prep, *Accelerated Option) ENG501-Semester 1, ENG502-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Students learn to express their thoughts through writing short stories, poems and plays. Class discussions analyze and implement different writing styles including, but not limited to, fiction, poetry, and drama. The course format is a workshop that includes daily writing. Students will give and receive feedback and peer edit in small and full class groups. Students are also required to read and annotate fiction. The reading will be assessed in a manner that engages students in a process through which they become more aware of how their reading improves over time. All students participate in a variety of approaches to literacy development and to apply what they learn to the art of writing creatively.

Students will refine their skills in writing and analyzing stories, plays and poetry. Projects, readings, and assignments will cover various genres that allow students to pursue individual interests. Class discussions focus on the analysis and consideration of different writing styles and genres including, but not limited to, fiction, poetry, and drama. Students explore writing in greater depth than in the pre-requisite course, examining how various genres impact writing style and what it means to create voice in writing. The course format is a workshop that includes daily writing. Students will give and receive feedback and peer edit in small and full class groups. Students are also required to read and annotate fiction. The reading will be assessed in a manner that engages students in a process through which they become more aware of how their reading improves over time. All students participate in a wide variety of approaches to literacy development and apply what they learn to the art of writing creatively. Topics in Composition: Media Analysis (College Prep, *Accelerated Option) ENG691-Semester 1 Only Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This one-semester course is designed to lead students to a critical understanding of the media that surround us. The course focuses on the analysis of three major media industries – advertising, news and entertainment – and the print and non-print messages created by these industries. Students will be required to write weekly response papers, read college-level texts, view a variety of forms of media, participate in class discussions, and complete four analytical projects. Topics in Composition: Film Genres (College Prep, *Accelerated Option) ENG722-Semester 2 only Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This one-semester course is designed to lead students to an understanding of the art of film through the world of film genre, including suspense, comedy, horror, among others. Topics of composition include film techniques, film history, film analysis, and elements of genre conventions. Students will be required to write weekly response papers, view a variety of films, participate in class discussions, and complete four analytical projects.

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Communication

Because each college determines its own definition of an academic unit, it is always important that you speak with your counselor about the number and type of academic units you have accumulated.

One Semester

Arts

(College Prep, *Accelerated Option) indicates that the elective is part of a program in which students who qualify and who agree to predetermined academic expectations may earn accelerated grade weighting instead of the usual college prep grade weighting. Actual determination of level will not take place until the course convenes at the opening of the term. Students will apply and sign an academic agreement within the first two weeks of the term. The agreement will add to existing course expectations in terms of assignments and class participation. This option is available only for the English electives of Creative Writing, Creative Writing Seminar, Media Analysis, Film Genres, and some electives in the Journalism sequence.

Creative Writing Seminar (College Prep, *Accelerated Option) ENG522-Semester 2 Only Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Creative Writing


Literary Genres: The Short Story (College Prep) ENG621-Semester 1, ENG622-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This one-semester course is genre-based, focusing on the short story. Some genres will be explored by the class, reading common materials with the teacher guiding students in an examination of the features of the chosen genre; some genres will be explored independently in reading workshop, allowing students to pursue their own interests. The students will read numerous short stories in a semester. The course involves units on detective fiction, science fiction, Ernest Hemingway, and stories from the current year’s Best American Short Stories anthology. Students refine their annotation skills as a means of deepening comprehension and analysis. Students participate in a combination of independent and group projects in order to continue refining their literacy skills. Political Thought and Its Literature (College Prep) ENG601-Semester 1, ENG602-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: U. S. History and Junior English

One Semester

This one-semester elective course focuses on the development and evolution of government policy affecting social, economic, political, ethical, and generational issues nationally and globally. Topics are explored and informed through reading, viewing, researching, and discussing fiction and non-fiction literature including novels, historical documents, and pertinent electronic and print mass media artifacts. Students will write essays, research and participate in class debates, and speak before the class both individually and collaboratively on such diverse issues as individual rights versus social responsibility, and balancing civil liberties and national security. An important requirement of the class is fulfilling ten hours of service learning with an approved social service agency and/or political, educational, or denominational organization culminating in an experience-response essay and presentation on the challenges and rewards of community service. Students may elect to take this course for EITHER a single credit of English or a single credit of Social Studies. PLEASE NOTE: Some colleges may grant only Social Studies credit; others will grant credit in either English or Social Studies. Literary Analysis (College Prep) ENG611-Semester 1, ENG612-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This reading class is designed to help students build their reading and interpretation skills through growing independence. During the semester, students will be required to read four to six books which are incorporated into major projects. Some of these books are common class texts; others are chosen independently from lists. Students will respond to these texts in writing. Course activities also include vocabulary study and exercises to improve reading comprehension.

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Writing for College (College Prep) ENG541-Semester 1, ENG542-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This class provides students the opportunity to develop their writing through a variety of skills, including but not limited to argumentation, research, and impromptu responses. Using a workshop format, this course focuses on writing as a process, with a strong emphasis on revision. Students will enhance their ability to read and analyze selected models of prose writing, as well as synthesize other authors' ideas. The class will also explore the growing technology available in school libraries. Student progress is evaluated throughout the semester in a manner that authorizes students to take an active role in their learning. A student's overall performance is evaluated at the end of the semester based on a comprehensive portfolio review. Journalistic Writing (College Prep) ENG901-Semester 1, ENG902-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course includes interviewing students and adults, writing stories that could get published in the student newspaper or yearbook, and solving problems that typically face reporters and editors. Designed to offer students background and practice in basic journalism concepts and skills, Journalistic Writing units include news gathering/interviewing, news writing, headline writing, copy editing, press law and page design. Oral and written communication skills, as well as critical thinking and problem solving skills, will be exercised. Advanced Journalistic Writing (College Prep) ENG921-Semester 1, ENG922-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Journalistic Writing Units in opinion writing (editorial, personal column, reviews), feature writing, sports writing, and in-depth reporting, along with hands-on production of pages and sections of the newspaper and yearbook, prepare students for positions on the student newspaper or yearbook. Students will build on the reporting and writing skills learned in Journalistic Writing. As in the prerequisite course, communication and problem-solving will be stressed. Journalism: Newspaper Production (Accelerated ) ENG951-Semester 1, ENG952-Semester 2 Full Year Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Advanced Journalistic Writing Students do all the work necessary to produce the school newspaper, the Statesman. Staff positions include managing editors, copy editor, design editor, advertising manager, photo manager, page editors (news, opinions, sports, in-depth and feature), reporter and photographer. Staff members gather news, research and write copy, and help complete pages. Students who hope to be photographers are encouraged to take a photography course through the Art Department. Because this is a student publication, all responsibilities, from the planning of the content to the design of an issue to the processing of photos and the completion of pages, are handled by students. After school work is necessary for the completion of each issue. This course may be repeated once for credit.


Journalism: Yearbook Production (Accelerated) ENG991-Semester 1, ENG992-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Journalistic Writing

Full Year

Arts

Introduction to Radio Broadcasting (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ENG983-Semester 1, ENG982-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Communication

Members of the Ambassador staff plan, complete and publish Stevenson's yearbook. Beginning with theme development and section design by the editors, followed by reporting, writing, photography and page layout by all staff members, this annual history of the school year is completed between July and April. Staff members are responsible for all content on their pages. The latest in theme development, page design and copy writing is emphasized. Meeting deadlines is essential for the book to deliver on time. Attendance at approximately seven Saturday deadline work sessions is required. This course may be repeated once for credit.

One Semester

This one-semester elective course offers students the opportunity to explore and study the history, technological advances, policies, social impact, and current developments in the electronic broadcast mass media, specifically, radio. Students will develop an awareness of rapidly shifting delivery modes in electronic mass media in a modern society increasingly focused on information and entertainment. Students will experience a working knowledge of the daily operations of an FCC-licensed radio station. Extensive class time is dedicated to collaborative productions in the studio of Stevenson’s WAES 88.1 FM. Students compose scripts, rehearse, and produce on-air programs individually and collaboratively, ranging from public service announcements and commercial advertisements to variety entertainment, news, and sports programming. Radio Broadcasting demands proficiency in meeting rigorous deadlines, the operation of studio equipment, the mastery of production methods and techniques, and the strict adherence to FCC requirements and procedures.

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Fine Arts Division . . . .

Jon Grice, Director Art Department Dance Department Music Department Theatre Department

• Elective courses in the Fine Arts Division may be eligible for the GPA waiver option. • Dance courses satisfy the Physical Education graduation requirements. See Dance Department page 39 for more information.

Photos taken by Stevenson High School Students: Monica Wilner, Esdras Castillo-Ramirez Eleonora Edreva

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Fine Arts

The Fine Arts curriculum focuses on the necessary skills, concepts, and artistic traditions that allow each student to achieve his or her potential within each art discipline, and provides a shared common cultural experience. The curriculum encompasses well-established methods, processes, and outcomes, as well as contemporary approaches, subject matter, and themes. It includes introductory opportunities for the novice learner. It also provides a solid foundation for students to pursue post-secondary programs with confidence, well-developed problem solving skills, and refined higher order thinking abilities. The curriculum presents students with artistic material of high and enduring quality from a variety of historical periods, artistic styles, and cultures.


Art Department Sequences Art & Design ART101/102 9-10-11-12

Drawing ART221/222 9-10-11-12

Painting ART261/262 9-10-11-12

Studio Art ART611/612 9-10-11-12

Ceramics ART201/202 9-10-11-12

1 semester of another 2D Art Class (Drawing, Painting, or Studio Art)

AP Drawing Portfolio ART801/802 11-12

Photography 2 ART411/412 9-10-11-12

AP 2-D Design Portfolio: Media ART881/882 11-12

AP 3-D Design Portfolio ART821/822 11-12

Advanced Photo Accelerated ART421/422 9-10-11-12

AP 2-D Design Portfolio: Photo ART871/872 10-11-12

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Art History Sequence Art History 1 ART701 10-11-12

Computer Art 1 ART501/502 9-10-11-12

Computer Art 2 ART 511/512 9-10-11-12

NEW

Advanced 3D Art ART631/632 10-11-12

Media Arts Sequences Photography 1 ART401/402 9-10-11-12

Metals & Jewelry ART241/242 9-10-11-12

1 semester of another 3D Art Class (Ceramics, Sculpture, or Metals & Jewelry)

NEW

Advanced 2D Art ART621/622 10-11-12

Sculpture ART281/282 9-10-11-12

2D Animation ART531/532 9-10-11-12

NEW

Art History 2 ART702 10-11-12

3D Animation ART541/542 9-10-11-12

NEW

AP Art History ART721/722 10-11-12

Students May Consider Taking Gaming -Applied Arts or Computer Programing - Math Division


ART DEPARTMENT

Fine Arts

Photos taken by Stevenson High School Students: Esdras Castillo-Ramirez Klaudia Grigiel, Cathy Han, Krystal Fickensher

The activities in the art classes are designed to develop skills of perception, problem solving, understanding, and sensitivity through a variety of experiences. The aim of the art curriculum is to give students an understanding and appreciation for the endless and constant results of artistic efforts which surround us in our daily lives. The unique character of the art curriculum provides students an opportunity to express and nurture their creative instincts and to develop a high sense of appreciation for humankind and nature in an atmosphere where individual expression is encouraged. Courses are offered to meet the varied interests and abilities of the students. Students may be required to purchase specialized supplies and tools for some art classes.

Visual Arts Studio Courses

Art and Design (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART101-Semester 1, ART102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

In this course, students will explore a variety of tools, techniques, and media which provides them with the foundation necessary to expand into more specialized areas. The studio activities will focus on developing skills in drawing, painting, and sculpture/ceramics.

Drawing (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART221-Semester 1, ART222-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Art and Design

One Semester

This course provides the art student with the opportunity to learn more advanced realistic drawing and shading techniques. Observational drawing and inventive design are explored. Various color and black and white media are used in this course.

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Painting (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART261-Semester 1, ART262-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Art and Design

One Semester

This course is designed to teach students the concepts, skills, methods, and processes necessary to explore oil painting. Students will explore a broad spectrum of images used in quick studies and a concentration on more extended and complex paintings. There is an emphasis on color theory, design principles, media, tools and a variety of painting techniques. Students will need to supply their own brushes. (Approximate expenditure $11.00.) Studio Art (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART611-Semester 1, ART612-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Art and Design

One Semester

The artistic focus in this course is the development of individual expression through the use of creative visual problem solving. Students will be challenged to brainstorm and to work quickly. Experimentation with different techniques, compositional approaches, and media will be encouraged. Ceramics (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART201-Semester 1, ART202-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Art and Design

One Semester

One Semester

This course provides a hands-on approach for understanding contemporary sculpture. Students will have the opportunity to work with clay, alabaster stone and their own choice of materials to create their sculpture. A clay head, an abstract stone sculpture along with the production of a “pop art” piece are the final results of the creative problem-solving techniques explored through sculpture media. Metals and Jewelry (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART241-Semester 1, ART242-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Art and Design

One Semester

In this course students will be introduced to the principles of design as applied to metalwork and jewelry. Students will learn to cut, file, texture, and polish metal pieces. They will also solder with a torch and set a cabochon stone. Students will be expected to purchase a set of needle files. (Approximate cost $8.00.)

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Prerequisite '14-'15: Art & Design, Two of the following (Drawing, Painting, Studio Art) The Advanced 2D Art course is designed to give students additional experiences in creative thinking and problem solving using 2D art media. In this class, students will build upon the concepts and skills learned in their Drawing, Studio Art or Painting classes. Students can choose to focus on Drawing or Painting, either in a representational or expressive style, to product works of art that relate to specific design issues and themes. Advanced 3D Art (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART631-Semester 1, ART632-Semester 2 One Semester Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite '13-'14: Art & Design, and two of the following courses: Ceramics 1 and 2, Metals & Jewelry 1 and 2, or Sculpture 1 and 2 Prerequisite '14-'15: Art & Design, Two of the following (Ceramics, Metals & Jewelry, Sculpture)

This course is a hands-on class designed for those art students who like to work in clay. Students will learn basic and advanced handbuilding techniques and how to use a potter’s wheel. They will be introduced to a variety of decorating, glazing and firing techniques, and will produce a number of creative pieces of stoneware. Sculpture (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART281-Semester 1, ART282 -Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Art and Design

Advanced 2D Art (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART621-Semester 1, ART622-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite '13-'14: Art & Design, and two of the following courses: Drawing 1 and 2, Painting 1 and 2, or Studio Art 1 and 2

The Advanced 3D Art class is designed to give students advanced experiences in creative thinking and problem solving with three dimensional art issues and three dimensional art media. In this class, students can focus on Ceramics, Sculpture, or Jewelry and Metals to produce works of art that relate to specific design issues and themes. Advanced Placement Drawing Portfolio (Honors) ART801-Semester 1, ART802-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite '13-'14: A portfolio review, Art and Design, Drawing 1 and 2 or Drawing and Design 1 and 2, Studio Art 1, or Painting 1 Prerequisite '14-'15: Art & Design, Two of the following (Drawing, Painting, Studio Art), and Advanced 2D Art This course offers art students a concentrated program which enables them to apply for college credit in Art. Emphasis is centered on studio work, the preparation of a portfolio, and the submission of a portfolio for an Advanced Placement grade. In the spring each student will exhibit his/her work in a one person show. Advanced Placement 2-D Design Portfolio: Media Concentration (Honors) ART881-Semester 1, ART882-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite '13-'14: A portfolio review, Art and Design or Art Form 1, Computer Art 1 & 2, and either Photo 1, Studio Art 1 or Computer Animation Prerequisite '14-'15: Art & Design, Computer Art 1, Studio Art, and either Computer Art 2, Photography 2, or 2D Animation This course offer 2-D design students a concentrated program, which enables them to apply for college credit in Art. Emphasis is centered on studio work, the preparation of a portfolio, and the submission of the portfolio for an Advanced Placement grade. In the spring each student will exhibit his/her work in a one person show.


Advanced Placement 3-D Design Portfolio (Honors) ART821-Semester 1, ART822-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite '13-'14: A portfolio review, Art and Design, Sculpture 1, Jewelry 1, Ceramics 1 and one of the following: Sculpture 2, Ceramics 2, or Jewelry 2 Prerequisite '13-'14: Art & Design, Two of the following (Ceramics, Metals & Jewelry, Sculpture), and Advanced 3D Art This course offers 3-D design students a concentrated program which enables them to apply for college credit in Art. Emphasis is centered on studio work, the preparation of a portfolio, and the submission of the portfolio for an Advanced Placement grade. In the spring each student will exhibit his/her work in a one person show.

Photography Courses

Photography 1 is designed to give beginning photo students a background in visual literacy and the basic skills of camera operation, film processing, printing, enlarging, and print finishing. All work is black and white using a 35mm SLR film camera. Students must supply their own film and photo paper (approximate expenditure of $100.00) and cameras may be checked out through the school's audiovisual department. Photography 2 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART411-Semester 1, ART412-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Photography 1 and students may use their own 35mm camera with manual operations or check out school owned equipment. Photography 2 is designed to refine students’ photographic skill and aesthetic judgment. Special effects, studio lighting, portraiture, night photography, the pinhole camera, digital photography using Photoshop, and creating a series of photographs are areas studied in this course. Students must supply their own film and photo paper (approximate expenditure of $100.00) and cameras may be checked out through the school's audiovisual department. Advanced Photography (Accelerated) ART421-Semester 1, ART422-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Photography 1 & 2 and Students may use their own 35mm Camera with manual operations or check out school owned equipment. This course offers a concentrated study of photography for the student who wants to pursue image-making in a serious manner. Students are introduced to large format printing, toning, infrared, and digital photography. Students explore a “series,” compile a portfolio, and assemble a one-person show to be exhibited in the spring. (Approximate expenditure of $100.00 per semester.) Advanced Placement 2-D Design Portfolio: Photo Concentration (Honors) ART871-Semester 1, ART872-Semester 2 Open to 11-12

This course offers 2-D design students a concentrated program, which enables them to apply for college credit in Art. Emphasis is centered on studio work, the preparation of a portfolio, and the submission of the portfolio for an Advanced Placement grade. In the spring each student will exhibit his/her work in a one person show.

Computer Courses Computer Art 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART501-Semester 1, ART502-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course is designed to introduce students to using Photoshop as a design tool and a means of producing finished artwork. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills and be creative while digitally drawing and painting, and using photographic manipulation techniques to produce works of art. Projects will have fine arts, photography, media arts, and graphic design components. Computer Art 2 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART511-Semester 1, ART512-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Computer Art 1

One Semester

This course is designed to be an advanced or second level for students interested in furthering their study and exploration of using Photoshop as graphic design tool. Students will be introduced to more complex concepts and techniques of media arts and graphic design including poster layout, collage, toy and game package-design, and animation. The course will have fine arts, photographic, and commercial art components. 2D Animation (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART531-Semester 1, ART532-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Computer Art 1

One Semester

This course provides students the opportunity to study and explore 2D animation. Students will study the history of animation and work with 2D animation software to produce their own animated shorts, from initial concept and story boarding through final rendering. Concepts and techniques in vector-based drawing, timing, key-framing, and music and lip synchronization will be explored. 3D Animation (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART541-Semester 1, ART542-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Computer Art 1 and 2D Animation

One Semester

This course is designed for students with an interest in 3D animation. In addition to the study of the history of 3D animation, students will build upon the concepts, skills and techniques learned from 2D Computer Animation to help them learn to use 3D animation software to create and animate their own 3D models/ characters. Polygon and NURB modeling, texturing, lighting, and basic 3D key-frame/path animation will be explored.

Full Year

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Fine Arts

Photography 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART401-Semester 1, ART402-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Students may use their own 35mm Camera with manual operations or check out school owned equipment.

Prerequisite: A portfolio review, Photo 1 and 2, Advanced Photography


Art History Courses Art History 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART701-Semester 1 Only Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course is designed as an introduction to the histories of art. Students will become familiar with the major forms of artistic expression from antiquity through the early Renaissance. They will become informed observers of their visual culture. Depending on enrollment, this course is offered with AP Art History. Art History 2 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option ART702-Semester 2 Only Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course is designed as an introduction to the histories of art from the last five centuries. Students will become familiar with the major forms of artistic expression from the late Renaissance to the present. They will become informed observers of their visual culture. Depending on enrollment, this course is offered with AP Art History. Advanced Placement Art History (Honors) ART721-Semester 1, ART722-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

This course is designed as an introductory college-level course in the history of art. Students will examine the major forms of artistic expression of the past as well as those of our time and of various cultures. They will study architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms with intelligence and sensitivity. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam.

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Dance Department Sequence Beginning DNC101/102 9-10-11-12

Ballet/Jazz DNC311/312 10-11-12

*Advanced DNC301/302 9-10-11-12

NEW

Concert DNC401/402 10-11-12

Dance Leadership DNC601/602 11-12

Fine Arts

Men’s Rhythm Core DNC501/502 9-10-11-12

*Intermediate DNC201/202 9-10-11-12

There is no placement assessment necessary for students wishing to enroll in Beginning Dance or Men’s Rhythm Core. *Freshman desiring placement in either Intermediate or Advanced Dance should attend a two-day assessment for placement. Current students not enrolled in dance may register for Beginning Dance and may audition for placement in Intermediate or Advanced Dance during a daytime assessment during their Physical Education class or study hall. Such placement requires extensive experience in Ballet, Jazz and Modern Dance. See assessment date information below. Enrollment in Dance satisfies the physical education requirement. It may also be used as Fine Arts credit.

Assessment Dates Incoming Freshmen February 6 and 7, 2013 (Wednesday and Thursday) 4:00 to 7:30 PM Room 2010 Must attend both dates

Current Student Placement February 7 and 8, 2013 (Thursday and Friday) During scheduled P.E. class or study hall Room 2010 All Students should attend February 7. February 8 will be a makeup/call-back date.

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DANCE DEPARTMENT

Photos taken by Stevenson High School Students: Emily Shen, Jessica Silva, Monica Wilner

Stevenson High School provides dance as a creative and rewarding art experience where artistic integrity and appreciation are developed. Dance is a physical and mental discipline. Students are provided opportunities to develop body strength, agility, coordination, creative problem solving skills, organizational skills, and the ability to work effectively in cooperative learning groups. They gain self-confidence, self-discipline, and satisfaction in movement. All dance students are required to purchase and wear appropriate attire as designated by the dance teacher. Beginning Dance (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option DNC101-Semester 1, DNC102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

Students are introduced to contemporary dance techniques, dance vocabulary, choreographic concepts, and dance anatomy. Students will work independently and in groups , engaging in self, peer and teacher assessments. Students are required to attend and critique the Winter and Spring Dance concerts. Students will have the option of participating in a recital during second semester. Intermediate Dance (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option DNC201-Semester 1, DNC202-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Placement by instructor

Full Year

Designed for students with previous dance training. This course concentrates on contemporary dance techniques and composition. The continued development of the student’s dance knowledge, creative expression, and dance vocabulary is achieved through the study of locomotor and axial techniques, dance anatomy, choreographic projects, and movement vocabulary. Students

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are required to attend and critique the Winter and Spring Dance concerts. Students are required to participate in a recital during second semester. Advanced Dance (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option DNC301-Semester 1, DNC302-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Placement by instructor

Full Year

Designed for students who have achieved a high degree of skill in contemporary dance, this course explores different contemporary dance styles and focuses on the detailed aspects of contemporary dance technique at an accelerated pace. This course concentrates on movement qualities, composition, and dance anatomy. Students are required to assess their progress. Students must attend and critique the Winter and Spring Dance concerts. Students are required to participate in a recital during second semester.


Concert Dance (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option DNC401-Semester 1, DNC402-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Student must complete a minimum of one year in Advance Dance and approval of instructors.

Dance Leadership: (College Prep)

This course is designed for students who have had advanced training in contemporary dance, as well as a strong background in ballet, jazz and composition. Concert dancers are responsible for maintaining a high quality of technical skill. The Concert Dance class will work toward developing and enhancing performance and choreographic skills in preparation for college level dance study and/or professional studio experience. Concert dancers will perform in the Winter and Spring Dance concerts. Daily and after school rehearsals will be scheduled a week to two weeks prior to the opening of the Winter and Spring concerts. Rehearsals may also be scheduled after school for the guest choreographer. These rehearsals are required if the student auditions and is cast in a piece. Class fees approximately $150 for costumes and company apparel.

Dance Leadership is a one-year course where students will intern and assist with dance instruction in beginning level dance classes. The student leader will learn and demonstrate, the teacher created combinations including warm-ups, across the floor, and center combinations Dance leaders will model proper technique and assist students. Students will periodically work one- on- one with dance students in a peer mentoring fashion. While taking this course the Dance Leadership student will also meet individually with the teacher outside of class to learn dance pedagogy. The leadership student will create exercises and a lesson that they will instruct at the end of each semester. This course may be repeated once for credit. Dance Leadershp applications are available through the Dance website starting Nov 5 and are due to the Dance office December 3.

DNC601-Semester 1, DNC602- Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisites: Students must complete a minimum of one year in Advanced Dance and approval of instructors

This course will examine different elements of ballet and jazz dance as well as their origins. Students will explore technical skill and theory, history of the genres, and exploratory work. This may be repeated once for credit. Men's Rhythm Core (Men's Dance) (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option DNC501-Semester 1, DNC502-Semester 2* Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: No experience required This course is designed for male students who want to enhance their flexibility, musicality, endurance, and creativity. Students will develop an improved movement capacity in a dance setting. Students are introduced to conditioning systems used by dancers, actors, and athletes. This course also addresses core strengthening and injury prevention. Students will occasionally watch themselves on video and critique their work. Students will have the option of participating in a performance at the end of the semester. This course may be repeated once for credit. *Student may opt to take full year.

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Fine Arts

Ballet/Jazz (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option DNC311 - Semester 1, DNC312 - Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Two semesters of Beginning Dance or higher

GPA Waiver Option


Music Department Sequences Band Sequence

Freshman Band MUS101/102 9

Concert Band MUS111/112 10-11-12

Advanced Symphonic Band MUS131/132 10-11-12

Symphonic Band MUS121/122 10-11-12

Honor Band MUS141/142 10-11-12

Choir Sequence

Stevenson Chorus MUS201/202 9-10-11-12

Advanced Chorus MUS211/212 10-11-12

Patriot Singers MUS221/222 10-11-12

Guitar Sequence NEW

Guitar Technique & Musicianship MUS421/422 9-10-11-12

Patriot Guitar Ensemble MUS441/442 9*-10-11-12

Orchestra Sequence

Symphonic Orchestra MUS331/332 10-11-12

Concert Orchestra MUS311/312 9-10-11-12

Patriot Orchestra MUS321/322 10-11-12

Other Music Courses Discover Music MUS431/432 9-10-11-12

Piano Technique & Musicianship MUS401 9-10-11-12

AP Music Theory (Honors) MUS801/802 11-12

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Any SHS Band, Choir, Orchestra, or Guitar

Composing & Arranging MUS412 9-10-11-12


MUSIC DEPARTMENT

Fine Arts

Photos taken by Stevenson High School Students: Emily Shen, Esdras Castillo-Ramirez, Cathy Han, Jessica Silva

Music study helps students develop skills in comprehending, creative problem solving, working as a team, logical reasoning, using symbols, conceptualizing, making value judgments, and communicating. It promotes cultural awareness and provides unique opportunities for self-expression and creativity. The Stevenson Music Department offers a variety of classes that allow students to continue – or begin – a strong, sequential program of music study. Courses are offered in instrumental music, vocal music, and non-performance classes. Though many objectives for music education can be met in the classroom, it is important that students who are developing music skills are provided opportunities to display their accomplishments through concerts, recitals, parades, festivals, and other performance experiences. These are a direct outgrowth of the nature of the art which is being studied. Therefore, performing ensembles include an emphasis on the importance of participation in occasional after-school rehearsals and performances. NOTE: Seniors who are enrolled in Honor Band, Patriot Orchestra, Patriot Singers or Advanced Chorus, and have been active for 4 semesters in a performing ensemble, earn accelerated level grade points unless requesting a GPA waiver. Students enrolled in any band are offered a PE Waiver for the first semester. Band Classes *Freshman Band (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS101-Semester 1, MUS102-Semester 2 Full Year Open to 9 Prerequisite: Prior Band experience and/or approval of Band Director All entering freshmen with band experience enroll in Freshman Band to continue work on total musicianship, developing performing skills, and building further knowledge of fundamental materials of music theory. For the first 8 to 9 weeks of first semester, the Freshman Band combines with the Symphonic, Advanced Symphonic, Concert and Honor Bands to perform as the highly acclaimed Marching Patriots. During this time, students study contemporary marching performance techniques, culminating in halftime and parade performances. For adequate preparation of

halftime shows, a two week August rehearsal "camp" at Stevenson is provided for all members. Freshman Band members also perform in four formal concerts. (PE Waiver offered for first semester.) *Concert Band (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS111-Semester 1, MUS112-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 (Qualified Students) Prerequisite: Audition with Director

Full Year

Upperclassmen with band experience enroll in Concert Band to continue work on total musicianship, including the development of advanced performing skills, and building further understanding of music theory. For the first 8 to 9 weeks of first semester, the Concert Band combines with the Freshman, Symphonic, Advanced Symphonic, and Honor Bands to perform as the highly acclaimed Marching Patriots. During this time, students study contemporary marching performance techniques, culminating in halftime and

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parade performances. For adequate preparation of halftime shows, a two week August rehearsal "camp" at Stevenson is provided for all members. Concert Band members perform in four formal concerts and also perform at several home basketball games as members of the Pep Band. (PE Waiver offered for first semester.) *Symphonic Band (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS121-Semester 1, MUS122-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 (Qualified Students) Prerequisite: Audition with Director

Full Year

Upperclassmen with band experience enroll in Symphonic Band to continue work on total musicianship, including the development of advanced performing skills, and building further understanding of music theory. For the first 8 to 9 weeks of first semester, the Symphonic Band combines with the Freshman, Concert, Advanced Symphonic and Honor Bands to perform as the highly acclaimed Marching Patriots. During this time, students study contemporary marching performance techniques, culminating in halftime and parade performances. For adequate preparation of halftime shows, a two week August rehearsal "camp" at Stevenson is provided for all members. Symphonic Band members perform in four formal concerts and also perform at several home basketball games as members of the Pep Band. (PE Waiver offered for first semester.) *Advanced Symphonic Band (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS131-Semester 1, MUS132-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 (Qualified Students) Prerequisite: Audition with Director

Full Year

Upperclassmen with band experience enroll in Advanced Symphonic Band to continue work on total musicianship, including the development of advanced performing skills, and building further understanding of music theory. For the first 8 to 9 weeks of first semester, the Advanced Symphonic Band combines with the Freshman, Concert, Symphonic and Honor Bands to perform as the highly acclaimed Marching Patriots. During this time, students study contemporary marching performance techniques, culminating in halftime and parade performances. For adequate preparation of halftime shows, a two week August rehearsal "camp" at Stevenson is provided for all members. Advanced Symphonic Band members perform in four formal concerts and also perform at several home basketball games as members of the Pep Band. (PE Waiver offered for first semester.) *Honor Band (College Prep/Accelerated) GPA Waiver Option for College Prep only MUS141-Semester 1, MUS142-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 (Qualified Students) Prerequisite: Audition with Director

Full Year

The Stevenson Honor Band is open by audition to the most advanced wind and percussion students. The Honor Band performs advanced repertoire at festivals, concerts and community events. For the first 8 to 9 weeks of first semester, the Honor Band combines with the Freshman, Concert, Symphonic, and Advanced Symphonic Bands to perform as the highly acclaimed Marching Patriots. During this time, students study contemporary marching performance techniques, culminating in halftime and parade performances. For adequate preparation of halftime shows, a two week August rehearsal "camp" at Stevenson is provided for all members. Honor Band members also perform at several home basketball games as members of the Pep Band. (PE Waiver offered for first semester.) Seniors may earn accelerated credit in this course.

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*Important Note for All Band Classes: All band classes participate in activities of the Marching Patriots. All band students should be available for two weeks of Band Camp rehearsals beginning Monday, August 5, 2013, for preparation of the upcoming season’s marching show. Band Camp is held after the end of Summer School second session and before the opening day of regular classes. There will be a public performance of the Marching Patriots in the evening on Monday, August 19, 2013.

Choir Classes Stevenson Chorus (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS201-Semester 1, MUS202-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

This course combines the best of personal enjoyment while developing vocal skills and studying the fundamentals of musicianship. Special emphasis is put on the development of sight singing skills necessary for future placement into advanced choral groups. Stevenson Chorus performs at several school concerts throughout the year. Advanced Chorus (College Prep/Accelerated) GPA Waiver Option for College Prep only MUS211-Semester 1, MUS212-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 (Qualified Students) Prerequisite: Audition with Director

Full Year

This advanced treble ensemble is designed for experienced altos and sopranos. The development of vocal skills and musical concepts is achieved through the study and performance of varied literature. The importance of musicianship is stressed, along with continuing work on basic music theory. This ensemble is active at school performances and often participates in music festivals and competitions. Seniors may earn accelerated credit in this course. Patriot Singers (College Prep/Accelerated) GPA Waiver Option for College Prep only MUS221-Semester 1, MUS222-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 (Qualified Students) Full Year Prerequisite: Audition with Director, treble voices need to have completed one year in Advanced Chorus (MUS211/MUS212) This course is designed for advanced students who perform a wide variety of choral literature, from classical to contemporary. Patriot Singers also focuses on music reading, sight-singing, and more advanced music theory concepts. Students who wish to become members of Patriot Singers are urged to participate in Stevenson Chorus to gain experience and training. The Patriot Singers perform for concerts, contests and community events. Seniors may earn accelerated credit in this course.


Guitar Classes

Orchestra Classes

Guitar Technique and Musicianship (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS421-Semester 1, MUS422-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: None

Concert Orchestra (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS311-Semester 1, MUS312-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Players must have previous experience in school orchestra (junior high, high school level, or private lessons) plus permission of Stevenson Orchestra faculty. Auditions are not required for this ensemble.

Patriot Guitar Ensemble (College Prep / Accelerated) GPA Waiver Option for College Prep only MUS441-Semester 1, MUS442-Semester 2 Open to (9)*-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Auditions are required for all students. Students should have taken at least one year of Guitar Technique and Musicianship. Students with two years of Patriot Guitar experience will be exempt from the audition process with the approval of the instructor. *Freshman are admitted to the class with the instructor approval and audition. This course is designed for advanced guitarists who are interested in further developing their guitar technique and musicianship. The repertoire performed in this class includes chamber works for guitar, large ensemble pieces by composers of varied eras, and extensive work on etudes and solo repertoire. Emphasis is placed on development of technique, music-reading skills, composition, sight-reading, chords (first position and barred), and expressive performance as soloists and ensemble members. Students will also receive advanced training in performance practices from the various musical eras, bass line construction and blues improvisation, and flamenco rasgueado technique. Nylon string classical guitars are provided for class use but it is highly recommended that students have their own nylon string classical guitar for home practice. This ensemble performs several concerts each year and are encouraged to perform at solo and ensemble contests. Students will be required to attend periodic rehearsals and performances outside of the school day.

Violin, viola, cello and bass players with previous orchestra experience are encouraged to enroll in this ensemble. This orchestra explores a variety of string orchestra and chamber music repertoire. Building on previous musicianship and performing skills training, students will become better prepared to make the transition to Symphonic Orchestra and Patriot Orchestra as well as college/ adult level orchestras and chamber ensembles. Students in this class typically are mastering two octave scales and learning three octave scales, having reasonably good sight reading skills, and are working on book four to seven solo repertoire. Students who are not yet at this level are welcome in the program but a consultation with an orchestra director is advised. All students enrolled in any orchestra are expected to own or rent an instrument for home use and for performances. Cello and bass students may use school instruments for daily rehearsals. All students will be required to attend periodic rehearsals and performances outside of the school day. Symphonic Orchestra (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS331-Semester 1, MUS332-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Auditions are required for most students. Students with two years of Symphonic Orchestra experience will be exempt from the audition process with the approval of the instructor. The repertoire performed includes chamber works, string orchestra, and full orchestra repertoire from advanced works written for school ensembles to works commonly performed in professional orchestras. Repertoire will focus on music of the Baroque, Classical and early Romantic eras. Strong support is given for development of chamber ensembles. Most students in this class have mastered all three octave major and minor scales, are working on the concerto repertoire, have excellent technique, and have excellent sight-reading capabilities. This ensemble combines with members of Advanced Symphonic Band for several concerts each year for performance of the full orchestra repertoire. Students will be required to attend periodic rehearsals and performances outside of the school day.

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Fine Arts

This course is designed for guitarists who are seriously interested in working hard to become good musicians. Previous experience is helpful but not required. The course will teach the technique and musicianship needed to develop a classical guitar performance repertoire. The skills and knowledge learned will be applied to other musical styles. Emphasis is placed on development of technique, music-reading skills, sight-reading, chords (first position and barred), and expressive performance. Students will also receive basic training in flat picking, bass line construction and blues improvisation. Nylon string classical guitars are provided for class use but it is essential that students have their own nylon string classical guitar for home practice. Students may repeat this class.


Patriot Orchestra (College Prep/Accelerated) GPA Waiver Option for College Prep only MUS321-Semester 1, MUS322-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Only Full Year Prerequisite: All students must have completed one full year of Concert or Symphonic Orchestra in addition to a formal audition and approval from the Orchestra Director. The repertoire performed includes chamber works, string orchestra, and full orchestra repertoire from advanced works written for school ensembles to works commonly performed in professional orchestras. Repertoire will focus on music of the mid 19th century to living composers. Strong support is given for development of chamber ensembles. Most students in this class have mastered all three octave major and minor scales, are working on the concerto repertoire, have excellent technique, and have advanced sightreading capabilities. This ensemble combines with members of Honor Band for several concerts each year for performance of the full orchestra repertoire. Students will be required to attend periodic rehearsals and performances outside of the school day.

Other Music Courses Piano Technique and Musicianship (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS401-Semester 1 Only One Semester Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None This course is designed primarily for students with little or no piano experience. Using the electronic piano lab (MIDI Lab), the class will introduce the student to music notation, basic music theory, keyboard technique and musical terminology through the study of keyboard repertoire. Students repeating the course, or students with some piano experience, will be able to pursue more advanced repertoire and musical topics. Students may repeat this class once for credit. Discover Music (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS431-Semester 1, MUS432-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Explore the exciting world of music and technology in this handson class! Discover Music will explore the latest music apps available for iPad and mobile devices. In addition, software such as Garage Band, Audacity, Finale, and Sibelius will be used to create, edit, notate, and mix music. Through these project-based activities students will learn keyboard/piano skills, music reading, and basic music theory.

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Composing and Arranging (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option MUS412-Semester 2 Only Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Any of the following: Discover Music or semester one of AP Music Theory; Piano Technique and Musicianship or Guitar Technique and Musicianship with instructor approval; minimum of one year experience in a Stevenson Band, Choir, Guitar, or Orchestra with instructor approval. In this course, students with basic knowledge and skills in music theory will build on those abilities and apply them in composing and arranging music. Projects will involve a variety of assigned and chosen forms, orchestrations and styles. Students will learn to use MIDI software to aid in the creative, editing, and publishing processes. AP Music Theory (Honors) MUS801-Semester 1, MUS802-Semester 2 Full Year Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Membership in either high school Instrumental or Vocal Ensemble or approval of instructor This course is designed to prepare students for a possible major or minor in music at the college level. Students learn the basics of tonal harmony, including: chord construction; four-part voice writing; harmonic analysis; and harmonic sequence. Students also study ear training, sight singing, melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation, 20th century techniques and form/structure. Students are expected to take the AP exam.


2013 - 2014 Theatre Department Sequence

Acting 2: THR111/112 9-10-11-12

Fine Arts

Theatre Design & Stagecraft NEW THR121 9-10-11-12

Acting 1: THR101/102 9-10-11-12

NEW

Acting 3: Performing Contemporary Drama THR211 10-11-12

Acting 4: Exploration of Performance Styles THR212 10-11-12

Advanced Acting** THR401/402 11-12

Directing the Actor** THR302 11-12

Musical Theatre Workshop* THR202 11-12

* Musical Theatre Workshop - Prerequisite: Acting 1 & 2 or 1 year of Choral Music

** Advanced Acting & Directing the Actor - Prerequisite: Acting 1, 2, 3 & 4 or two workshop courses.

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THEATRE DEPARTMENT

Photos taken by Stevenson High School Students: Esdras Castillo-Ramirez, Klaudia Grigiel, Cathy Han

Theatre is an opportunity for students to express themselves through creating characters in dramatic situations. Whether they have had previous drama experience or not, the theatre classes at SHS offer them the chance to develop their drama skills. The focus in all theatre classes is on developing skills and hands-on experience. Theatre classes at Stevenson feature a sequential and cumulative curriculum which allows students to develop internal and external resources, explore creative potential, investigate the social and historical context in which they live, form aesthetic judgments, and experience the discipline of the artist. The courses are process oriented, primarily concerned with fostering integrity in the student’s work. Some courses include a public performance component. While the theatre courses can provide pre-professional training for students, the ultimate goal is to promote appreciation of the art, as well as deeper self-awareness and more sensitive and reflective understanding of the human condition. Acting 1 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option THR101-Semester 1, THR102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course emphasizes the basic skills and techniques of the actor including: concentration, imagination, observation, and ensemble. Through the means of theatre games, improvisation, creative writing, and written analyses, students learn the fundamentals of creating character, writing monologues, performing monologues, and preparing a scene for performance.

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Acting 2 (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option THR111-Semester 1, THR112-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Acting 1

One Semester

Acting 2 is designed for the student who wishes to expand his/ her acting skills and expertise. The student studies concentration, observation, sensory skills, movement, voice and articulation, and characterization. Emphasis in Acting 2 is on building character relationships through both improvised and scripted/memorized scene work. The student also is expected to perform monologues and scenes, to read and analyze plays, and to perform a final acting scene.


Acting 3: Performing Contemporary Drama GPA Waiver Option THR211-Semester 1 only Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Acting 1 & 2

One Semester

Students will read several contemporary plays, write and perform a personal monologue. They will also engage in improvisation as a creation and rehearsal tool, as well as character, play, and post performance analyses. The course will culminate in a public performance of an ensemble-devised piece. Students are required to rehearse after school the week of the production.

Students will use improvisation as a building block for non-script based performance, studying improvisation theory and technique as related to improvisation as performance. Students will also read, study, and perform multiple plays from two different theatrical periods: the Italian Renaissance and Elizabethan England. This course will also include written assignments and occasional quizzes. Theatre Design and Stagecraft (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option THR121-Semester 1 only Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

One Semester

This course will provide upperclassmen the opportunity to continue their theatre study (specifically actor-training) in a focused learning environment with challenging material that will assure their preparedness for further college, university, conservatory, and/or professional theatre pursuits. Advanced Acting will include the following units for study: characterization through movement, advanced script analysis, and auditioning for professional theatre. After successfully completing this course, students who wish to continue their studies in Advanced Acting may repeat this course once for credit. Directing the Actor (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option THR302-Semester 2 only Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Acting 1- 4

One Semester

This is a one semester course that allows the student to explore and develop his/her directorial ability. The course will emphasize the development of play conceptualization, techniques for working with the actor, and directorial analysis of a play. The culminating project of the course will be a public performance of scenes directed by members of the class. There will be a secondary emphasis placed on techniques an actor may use to adjust to working with different directors. After successfully completing this course, students who wish to continue their studies in Directing may repeat this course once for credit.

This is a one semester course designed to familiarize students with the basic areas of technical theatre. Students will learn about tool and scene shop safety, theatre geography, set design, set construction, scene painting, light design, and production technologies. The course includes theory, hands-on experiences, and will culminate with a design project. After successfully completing this course students may continue their studies in Theatre Design and Stagecraft by electing to apply for an independent study option in the Theatre Design. Musical Theatre Workshop (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option THR202-Semester 2 only Open to 11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Acting 1 & 2 or one year Choral Music Through the workshop process, students will learn all facets of musical theatre as a distinct performance genre. The course will include a historical survey of the evolution of musical theatre and an in-depth study of several different musical theatre performance styles. Students will learn and practice acting, vocal, and movement skills. They will also develop proficiency in analyzing and staging scenes and musical numbers. The course will culminate in a public performance of scenes studied in class. Students will be required to attend after-school rehearsals during the week of this performance. After successfully completing this course, students who wish to continue their studies in Musical Theatre may repeat this course once for credit.

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Fine Arts

Acting 4: Exploration of Performance Styles (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option THR212-Semester 2 only Open: 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisites: Acting 1, Acting 2, and Acting 3 OR Contemporary Drama Workshop

Advanced Acting (Accelerated) THR401-Semester 1, THR402-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Acting 1 - 4


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Mathematics Division Christina Kelly, Manager The Mathematics Division offerings provide options and electives for meeting individual needs, experiences, and goals. Course offerings provide opportunities for the development of problem-solving skills and techniques for theoretical and applied settings. Instructional design promotes student-engaged learning activities. Graphing calculators are used as an integral part of concept development. These skills and techniques will serve the student in future career or educational undertakings.

Students must pass at least six (6) semesters, including Algebra and at least one course with geometry content.

Mathematics 51


1 2

MATHEMATICS DIVISION SEQUENCE

Algebra I Enriched MTH111/112

Advanced Mathematical Decision Making MTH441/442

Advanced Algebra Accelerated MTH171/172

Advanced Algebra Honors MTH191/192

Geometry MTH251/252

Geometry Accelerated MTH271/272

Geometry Honors MTH291/292

Advanced Algebra MTH351/352

Precalculus Accelerated MTH371/372

Precalculus Honors MTH391/392

AP Calculus AB Honors MTH471/472

AP Calculus BC Honors MTH491/492

Algebra I MTH151/152

Precalculus MTH451/452

AP Statistics Honors MTH461/462

1. Freshmen begin the sequence in one of five courses: Algebra I Enriched, Algebra I, Advanced Algebra Accelerated, Advanced Algebra Honors, or Geometry Honors. 2. Freshmen receiving a six-week grade of “D” or “F” and Sophomores receiving a six-week grade of “F” will participate in Mandatory Tutoring in the Learning Center for the following six weeks. 3. The Computer Science electives sequence can be found on page 55.

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Advanced Linear Algebra Honors MTH592

Calculus III Honors MTH591

Calculator Recommendation A TI84-Plus is recommended for all College Core, College Prep, and Accelerated Mathematics courses. A TI89 or TI Inspire with CAS is recommended for all Honors level Mathematics courses.


Algebra I Enriched (Core) MTH111-Semester 1, MTH112-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Placement exam and approval of Director

Advanced Mathematical Decision Making (College Prep) MTH441-Semester 1, MTH442-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra

Students in this course will meet for two consecutive periods so that by the end of this course students will have completed a year of algebra as well as developed readiness skills necessary for success in future mathematics courses. This course is designed to emphasize the development of skills, techniques and applications that deal with algebra, number relations, linear equations, formulas, polynomials, graphing, systems of equations, factoring, quadratic and exponential equations. Completion of this course prepares a student for further work in mathematics, usually in Geometry. Upon successful completion of this course, students will receive two credits, one mathematics credit and one elective credit.

This course is designed for students who are college bound nonmathematics majors. Specific emphasis will be on problem solving using ratio, rate and proportions, probability, combinatorics, graph theory, finance, statistical analysis, mathematical modeling using logistic growth, exponential, periodic functions and finance.

Algebra I (College Prep) MTH151-Semester 1, MTH152-Semester 2 Open to 9-10 Full Year Prerequisite: Placement exam or approval of Director

Geometry (College Prep) MTH251-Semester 1, MTH252-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I or equivalent

Full Year

This course deals with sets of points and related properties. Sets studied include lines, angles, polygons, with emphasis on circles, planes and surfaces of geometric solids such as pyramids, cones, cylinders and spheres. This sequence emphasizes systematic approaches to and processes for proving and applying theorems. Algebra is utilized extensively during the course. Successful completion of this course prepares the students for further work in Advanced Algebra. Advanced Algebra (College Prep) MTH351-Semester 1, MTH352-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Geometry

Full Year

This course extends topics learned in Algebra 1 and introduces new topics that prepare students for Precalculus or Advanced Mathematical Decision Making. Students solve, graph, and write equations for polynomial, quadratic, piece-wise, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and use them to model a variety of situations. In addition, students study complex numbers, radicals, matrices, probability, sequences, and series. Precalculus (College Prep) MTH451-Semester 1, MTH452-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra

Full Year

This course includes the topics of polynomial, rational and algebraic functions, complex numbers, trigonometric equations, identities, inverse trigonometric functions, statistics, logarithms, permutations, combinations, and probability. Students completing this sequence will be prepared for a college-level calculus course.

Advanced Algebra (Accelerated) MTH171-Semester 1, MTH172-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11 Full Year Prerequisite: Approval of Director; Recommended for Freshmen This course is designed to provide the student with a extensive algebra background. Using multiple representations, students will study the real number system; linear, quadratic, higher degree polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational expressions, equations, and functions; matrices; sequences and series; and probability. Successful completion of this sequence prepares the student for Geometry Accelerated. Geometry (Accelerated) MTH271-Semester 1, MTH272-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra Accelerated or approval of Director. Recommended for Sophomores This course requires the students to complete an in-depth study of Euclidean Geometry. Topics include coordinate geometry, proof, congruent triangles, similar triangles, polygons, circles, area and volume. The course teaches and extends problem solving skills and the development of logical reasoning to communicate mathematics. Successful completion of this course prepares a student for Precalculus Accelerated. Precalculus (Accelerated) MTH371-Semester 1, MTH372-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra Accelerated and Geometry Accelerated or approval of Director This course provides an in-depth study of precalculus mathematics. Topics include polynomial, rational, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and relations, conics and their properties, the complex number system, inequalities, probability and statistics. Successful completion of this course provides the student with the necessary prerequisites for Advanced Placement Calculus AB. Advanced Placement Statistics (Honors) MTH461-Semester 1, MTH462-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Precalculus (any level)

Full Year

The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns. 2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study. 3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation.

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Mathematics

This course emphasizes the development of concepts, skills, techniques, and applications that address number relations, linear functions, exponential functions, quadratic functions, systems of linear equations, probability and statistics. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for entry into a geometry sequence.

Accelerated Sequence


4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. Students enrolled in this course are expected to write the Advanced Placement Statistics examination. Advanced Placement Calculus AB (Honors) MTH471-Semester 1, MTH472-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: Precalculus Accelerated

Full Year

AP Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multirepresentational approach to calculus with concepts, results, and problems expressed graphically, numerically, analytical, and verbally. The connections among these representations are also important. Topics covered in this course include limits, differentiation, integration, continuity, indeterminate forms, and improper integrals. Students enrolled in this course are expected to write the Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination. Honors Sequence Advanced Algebra (Honors) MTH191-Semester 1, MTH192-Semester 2 Open to 9 Prerequisite: Approval of Director

Full Year

This course deals with an in-depth study of the topics covered in the Advanced Algebra Accelerated sequence. Additional content includes the study of permutations and combinations, probability, sequences, and series. Successful completion of this sequence prepares the student for entry into the Geometry Honors sequence. Since the student will cover content normally taught in the Advanced Algebra course, students successfully completing Advanced Algebra Honors may not register for credit in Advanced Algebra. Geometry (Honors) MTH291-Semester 1, MTH292-Semester 2 Open to 9-10 Full Year Prerequisite: 10th Graders: Advanced Algebra Honors or approval of Director This course is an in-depth study of Euclidean geometry including extension topics of coordinate geometry, geometric probability and transformations. The course stresses problem solving skills and the development of logical reasoning and communication of mathematics. Advanced Algebra topics are integrated extensively throughout the course. Successful completion will prepare the student for Precalculus Honors. Precalculus (Honors) MTH391-Semester 1, MTH392-Semester 2 Open to 10-11 Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra Honors and Geometry Honors or approval of Director This course is a continuation of the mathematics studied in Advanced Algebra Honors and Geometry Honors. The content includes that of Precalculus as well as topics related to limits, matrix algebra, discrete mathematics, polar coordinates, proof by induction, and conic sections. Successful completion of this sequence prepares the student for entry into Advanced Placement Calculus BC.

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Advanced Placement Calculus BC (Honors) MTH491-Semester 1, MTH492-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Precalculus Honors or approval of Director This course deals with the BC content of the Advanced Placement curriculum beyond that of the Calculus AB sequence. Additional topics include sequences, infinite series, solutions of differential equations, advanced techniques of integration, as well as parametric and polar equations. Students enrolled in this course are expected to write the Advanced Placement Calculus BC examination. Calculus III (Honors) MTH591-Semester 1 Only Open to 12 One Semester Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Calculus BC or approval of Director This course is the last of a three-course sequence in calculus and analytic geometry and includes the essential elements of multi-variable calculus as well as the analytic geometry of space. Students perform operations with vectors, lines and planes, understand and apply curves and surfaces, understand and apply concepts involving differentiation for functions of several variables, and compute double and triple integrals. In addition, students will perform operations of polar coordinates and parametric equations. This course is a dual credit, college-level math course that is offered in collaboration with Oakton Community College. Classes are held at Stevenson High School and are taught by a Stevenson teacher. Students can earn college credit through Oakton Community College, as well as Stevenson High School credit. Advanced Linear Algebra (Honors) MTH592-Semester 2 Only Open to 12 One Semester Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Calculus BC or approval of Director This course provides detailed work in the study of vectors and vector spaces. Topics include solving n by n systems of equations, operating within a vector space, performing linear transformations of vector spaces and locating eigen vectors and eigen values. This course is equivalent to a one semester college linear algebra course. This course is a dual credit, college-level math course that is offered in collaboration with Oakton Community College. Classes are held at Stevenson High School and are taught by a Stevenson teacher. Students can earn college credit through Oakton Community College, as well as Stevenson High School credit. Mathematics Seminar (Honors) MTH571-Semester 1, MTH572-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: Approval of Director

One Semester

This course is designed to explore a series of topics that are of special interest to members enrolled within the class. Students with special interests and talents are called upon to share in the instructional process.


Computer Science Computer Programming Accelerated CSC171/172 (One Semester)

Computer Programming CSC151/152

Mathematics

AP Computer Science A Honors CSC391/392

NOTE: Unless noted otherwise, courses are full year. Electives Computer Programming (College Prep) CSC151-Semester 1, CSC152-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit in Algebra I Students will learn to program computers using both Java and C++. The course will begin with introductory programs in C++. Students learn Java to write graphics-related programs which can run as applets on web pages. Students will also investigate the graphics features of Java applets. Java and C++ are both used to write simple text-based and graphics related computer games. Students cannot earn credit in CSC 151/152 and Computer Programming (Accelerated). Successful completion of this course prepares the student to continue in Advanced Placement Computer Science A. Computer Programming (Accelerated) CSC171-Semester 1, CSC172-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Freshmen enrolled in Algebra 1

One Semester

the computer to automate steps, etc. Successful completion of this one semester course prepares the student for Advanced Placement Computer Science A. Advanced Placement Computer Science A (Honors) CSC391-Semester 1, CSC392-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Computer Programming College Prep or Accelerated and concurrent enrollment or credit in Advanced Algebra or approval of Director In the first semester, students learn about arrays, ArrayLists, sorting/ searching techniques, class (object-oriented) design and stacks, and queues. Several graphics-oriented projects are used to illustrate and practice key concepts. During second semester students learn more advanced data structures such as linked lists, trees, sets, and maps. Students learn and focus on object-oriented programs. This AP course will prepare the student for the AP Computer Science exam. Students may earn one semester of college credit in Data Structures/Algorithms.

This course introduces students to computer programming using both Java and C++. Students use Java to write several simple game applications as well as learn how to include buttons and pop-up menus within Java applets (which can be run as a web-page). Students use Java applets to write programs with both random and student-designed graphics/animations. C++ will be used for the first several weeks to introduce the general programming concepts that are needed in both C++ and Java. Introductory topics include using data files, translating formulas, using loops to get

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Physical Welfare Division Jill Lipman, Director Physical Education Department Health Education Department

Through a variety of fitness based activities, fitness related discussions, and a comprehensive Health Education program, the Division of Physical Welfare will nurture students’ understanding, development, and maintenance of a healthy personal lifestyle. Students gain the knowledge and skill necessary to become healthy, lifelong learners through a fitness based curriculum. The foundation for cognitive and motor development begins with activities and classroom discussions during Freshman Physical Education and continues through Health Education. Students participating in the upper levels of the program will have choices in fitness, group fitness, cardiovascular and team sports, aquatics, outdoor activities and leadership opportunities. We make a commitment to provide each individual student with an equal opportunity for daily physical education regardless of his/her athletic ability or physical capability. The individual needs of the student will determine his/her physical education choices. We provide clear and constant reminders of the consequences of poor health and fitness decisions and encourage positive, healthy decision making.

Physical Welfare courses required for graduation: • All students must be enrolled in P. E. except when waivers apply. • See pages 4 and 8 for a full explanation of P. E. requirements and waivers. • Health Education.

Physical Welfare

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT SEQUENCE Grade 9

Freshman P.E. PED101/102

Grade 10 Introduction to Fitness PED311/312

Advanced Strength and Conditioning PED361/362

Group Fitness PED301/302

Cardiovascular & Team Activities PED401/402

Lifeguard Training PED502 (2nd Sem)

Fitness PED321/322

Leadership

Grade 11 Introduction to Fitness PED311/312

Advanced Strength and Conditioning PED361/362

Group Fitness PED301/302

Fitness PED321/322

Adventure Education PED331/332

Early Bird: Adv. Strength and Conditioning PED061/062

Cardiovascular & Team Activities PED401/402

Early Bird: Fitness PED021/022

Lifeguard Training PED502 (2nd Sem)

Early Bird: Cardio/Team PED041/042

Grade 12 Early Bird: Cardio/Team PED041/042

Early Bird: Fitness PED021/022

Adventure Education PED331/332

Early Bird: Adv. Strength and Conditioning PED061/062

Introduction to Fitness PED311/312

Fitness PED321/322

Group Fitness PED301/302

P.E. Leader Training PED61L/62L

Pool Leadership Training PED51L/52L Alternative P.E. Leadership PED41L/42L

Leadership Cardiovascular & Team Activities PED401/402

Advanced Strength and Conditioning PED361/362

Senior Leadership PED81L/82L Pool Leadership PED71L/72L

Alternative PE Leadership 41L/42L

Please see page 4 for a detailed description of Physical Education requirements and page 8 for Physical Education waiver policies.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT The Physical Education Department offers a health related fitness program. Students will experience a variety of cardiovascular and fitness-related activities as well as develop physical skills while participating in cardiovascular and team-centered activities. Students will also acquire the practical experiences and knowledge required to establish a healthy lifestyle, both as an adolescent and a maturing adult. The cornerstone of the program is the health related fitness assessment administered throughout the school year. This assessment determines the health fitness level of each student registered in Physical Education and his/her level of improvement. Excessive absenteeism or non-participation must be made up. Make-up cards are issued to students. Students can attend another class during their free hour, or use the fitness center or cardio center during their lunch hour or during Early Bird Physical Education for make-up credit. Health education information is linked to the knowledge and understanding each student needs to improve his/her level of emotional and physical health. During the semester a student takes Health Education, he/she is not required to take Physical Education. Medical excuses are accepted from parents for up to three (3) days within each six (6) week grading period. Excuses of longer duration must be written by a physician. Students with physicians’ notes will be accommodated in either an alternative activity or our alternative program (see Alternative Physical Education). If a physical education student is also a student athlete, any medical restrictions in physical education will also affect his/her athletic participation. All classes in Physical Education (except the Leaders Programs) are PASS/FAIL. Students must pass two of the three six weeks to attain a passing grade. Receiving a failing grade in the last six weeks of the semester will result in a failing grade for the semester.

Full Year

Freshman physical education is designed for students to participate in a variety of activities that will focus on developing and maintaining physical fitness and social-emotional concepts through individual and team activities. Students will learn the basic foundations for leading a healthy and active lifestyle. Emphasis will be on improving the health-related components of fitness and the importance of life long exercise. Classes are separated by gender. Students must successfully complete a swimming unit. During participation in this swimming unit, the student will have the opportunity to be certified by the American Red Cross according to his/her swimming proficiency. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester. Introduction to Fitness PED311-Semester 1, PED312-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This program is an introductory course designed to teach students the proper techniques in muscular strength and endurance training, as well as aerobic conditioning. Students will be taught the proper principles of training and how these principles relate to conditioning. Students will develop their own fitness plan. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester.

Fitness PED321-Semester 1, PED322-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Fitness This course is designed for students to continue developing and implementing personal lifetime fitness plans. Students will participate in a variety of fitness activities and will be taught principles of maintaining lifelong fitness. Multiple credits may be earned for this course. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester. Advanced Strength and Conditioning PED361-Semester 1, PED362-Semester 2 One Semester Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Fitness This course is designed to teach highly motivated students advanced techniques in developing muscular strength and endurance, the skill related components of fitness, and aerobic conditioning. Students will participate in a variety of conditioning activities (power and Olympic lifting, speed & agility training, resistance band training, and cardiovascular endurance/interval training) and will be taught principles for creating athletic conditioning programs. Multiple credits may be earned for this course. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester.

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Physical Welfare

Freshman P. E. PED101-Semester 1, PED102-Semester 2 Open to 9 Prerequisite: None


Group Fitness PED301-Semester 1, PED302-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This program is designed to offer students a wide variety of fitness activities in order to enhance physical wellness. Activities include step aerobics, low impact, yoga, aqua aerobics, kickboxing, Zumba, rope jumping, slide, trail and track workouts, circuit training, body sculpting, pilates, and resistance/weight training. Multiple credits may be earned for this course. Fitness testing is conducted twice per semester. Cardiovascular and Team Activities PED401-Semester 1, PED402-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This program is designed to maintain one's physical conditioning through the use of lifetime individual and team activities. Diverse activities will include racket sports, indoor and outdoor games, and days geared toward improving cardiovascular endurance. Activity choices will depend on enrollment, weather and facilities. Multiple credits may be earned for this course. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester. Adventure Education PED 331-Semester 1, PED332 - Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

Students in this course will participate in individual, partner and team activities to work towards becoming better problem solvers, communicators, and learn to trust others while being trusted. Learners will be assessed using standards based grading practices. Some units will require students to be in the pool. Activities may include team building, outdoor games, biking, archery, climbing/ rappelling, kayaking and canoeing. Multiple credits may be earned for this course. Early Bird Physical Education: Cardiovascular and Team Activities PED041-Semester 1, PD042-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: None (See P. E. description for Cardiovascular and Team Activities). Early Bird physical education is scheduled from 7:00 a.m. - 7:50 a.m. Students with excessive absenteeism in this class will be removed from the Early Bird program and placed in a physical education class during the regularly scheduled day. Multiple credits may be earned for this course. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester. Early Bird Physical Education: Fitness PED021-Semester 1, PED022-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

(See P. E. description for Fitness). Early Bird physical education is scheduled from 7:00 a.m. - 7:50 a.m. Students with excessive absenteeism in this class will be removed from the Early Bird program and placed in a physical education class during the regularly scheduled day. Multiple credits may be earned for this course. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester.

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Early Bird Physical Education: Advanced Strength and Conditioning PED061-Semester 1, PED062-Semester 2 One Semester Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Fitness (See P.E. description for Advanced Strength and Conditioning) Early Bird physical education is scheduled from 7:00 am -7:50 am. Students with excessive absenteeism in this class will be removed from the Early Bird program and placed in a physical education class during the regularly scheduled day. Course may be repeated once for credit. Fitness testing will be conducted twice each semester. Physical Education Leadership Training (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option PED61L-Semester 1, PED62L-Semester 2 Open to 11 Full Year Prerequisite: Admission based on written application submitted to and approved by the Physical Education Department during sophomore year. Application available on the Stevenson website, under the Physical Education web page. The PE leadership program is a two year commitment. The first year of the P. E. Leadership Program prepares students to become effective teacher aides and strong leaders. There will be active participation in all activities offered at Stevenson's Physical Education program where students will learn to lead group activities, to develop skill progression, to study the methods and techniques of teaching physical education, to officiate a variety of sports to expand leadership skills and to apply knowledge of those skills in group or individual led discussions or teaching opportunities. Students will have the opportunity to apply the skills they learn by assisting physical education classes throughout second semester and in planning a field day for junior high students. Students will be assessed using standards based grading. All students will participate in an aquatics program and fitness testing. Failure to comply with the Stevenson High School Student Guidebook Code of Conduct and P. E. Leader Code of Conduct can result in immediate dismissal. Senior Leadership (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option PED81L-Semester 1, PED82L-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: P. E. Leadership Training

Full Year

Students will apply what they learned in P. E. Leadership Training by serving as teacher aides with a physical education teacher. Students will be assessed using standards based grading. All students will participate in fitness testing. Failure to comply with the Stevenson High School Student Guide Code of Conduct and P. E. Leader Code of Conduct can result in immediate dismissal.


Lifeguard Training and Certification PED502-Semester 2 Only Open to 10-11 One Semester Prerequisite: Admission based on successful completion of Level Five American Red Cross Personal Water Safety or equivalent. Completion of Health Education and American Red Cross CPR certification is required. Students must be at least 15 years old. This course is designed to provide students with the ability to earn American Red Cross Lifeguarding Certification with First Aid Certification. Students will also learn the skills to be certified in Oxygen Administration, Preventing Disease Transmission and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. Students will be charged a $35 fee if they wish to receive their American Red Cross certification. Students taking this class will be encouraged to participate in our Pool Leadership program. The required textbook and materials for the course are available in the Patriot Super Store.

Pool Leadership Training (College Prep)

GPA Waiver Option PED51L-Semester 1, PED52L-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Admission based on written application available on the Stevenson website, under the Physical Education web page and approval of the Physical Education Department. It is required that a student have his/her American Red Cross Lifeguarding certification.

Pool Leadership (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option PED71L-Semester 1, PED72L-Semester 2 Open to 12 Prerequisite: Pool Leadership training

New students will engage in training which takes place in class during the first semester. Students will perform one-on-one or in small groups working with individuals who have a variety of special needs. Leaders also participate in work with the students outside of the regular school day. Failure to comply with the Stevenson High School Student Guide Code of Conduct and P. E. Leader Code of Conduct can result in immediate dismissal. Alternative Physical Education PED111-Semester 1, PED112-Semester 2 Full Year Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: A physician's verification must be on file. Alternative Physical Education is for students who, for medical reasons, are unable to participate in regular physical education classes. This class is also for students with other disabilities that merit an adapted curriculum. All curriculum will be modified and adapted so that all students can participate and benefit. The instructor will work with the doctor in an effort to design a program to meet the individual needs of each student. Upon clearance from the doctor, a student will be readmitted to his/her regularly scheduled physical education class.

Physical Welfare

The first part of the program consists of the American Red Cross Fundamentals of Instructor Training and Water Safety Instructor Course. Students will learn techniques of teaching swimming and the policies and procedures of the Physical Education Department as they pertain to aquatics and the role of the pool leader in the aquatic program. Students will be charged a $35 fee if they wish to receive their American Red Cross certification. The students will then serve as Water Safety Instructors, Lifeguards, and pool aides. Each student will receive ongoing Lifeguard In-Service Training while in the program that will keep their certifications current and their skills sharp. At the end of each semester, a student must receive a recommendation in his/her evaluation to continue in the leadership program. The required textbook and materials for the course are available in the Patriot Super Store. Failure to comply with the Stevenson High School Student Guide Code of Conduct and P. E. Leader Code of Conduct can result in immediate dismissal.

Alternative Physical Education Leadership (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option PED41L-Semester 1, PED42L-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Admission based on written application submitted to and approved by the Alternative Physical Education Coordinator during Sophomore year. Applications are available on the Physical Welfare web page. The Alternative Physical Education program is a 2 year commitment.

Full Year

Students will continue to serve as Water Safety Instructors, Lifeguards and pool aides to the aquatic program. Each student will receive ongoing Lifeguard In-Service Training that will keep their certifications current and their skills sharp. At the end of each semester a student must receive a recommendation in his/ her evaluation to continue in the leadership program. The required textbook and materials for the course are available in the Patriot Super Store. Failure to comply with the Stevenson High School Student Guide Code of Conduct and P. E. Leader Code of Conduct can result in immediate dismissal.

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HEALTH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

The emphasis in Health Education is on choices to empower personal wellness through experiential activities. Health Education (College Prep) PED201-Semester 1, PED202-Semester 2 Open to 10 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

The following Health Education units are taught: Wellness and Mental Health Adult CPR & AED Fitness and Personal Health Reality of Drugs Disease Life Cycles Within the Adult CPR Unit students have the opportunity to receive Adult CPR & AED certification (summer school excluded) through the American Red Cross.* Student participation in the Adult CPR unit is required to earn course credit. All health units & learning outcomes are described on the health web page course syllabus. The Health Education web page is a comprehensive, interactive site which offers students and parents access to complete curricular units, homework, test preparation materials, course expectations, study/review materials and class PowerPoint presentations. Health Education should be completed by the end of the sophomore year. During the semester that a student takes Health Education, the student is excused from Physical Education. During the reality of drugs unit, students will be prepared for the graduation required 46th credit test. *It is strongly encouraged that students purchase the American Red Cross Community First Aid & Safety text.

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Applied Health (College Prep) GPA Waiver Option PED231-Semester 1, PED232-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Student must have taken Health Education and completed all requirements. Student must have also earned the basic adult CPR and AED certification in Health Education. The following Applied Health units are taught: Health Careers Exploration Personal Trainer Certification Preparation First Aid and Safety/AED/CPR for the Professional Rescuer Social Development and Life Skills The Stevenson Applied Health Education program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to explore various health medical career options available to them. Students will investigate various demands and qualifications required of vocations within health and medicine students will learn professional level rescue skills. A $35 lab fee is required for any student who wishes to earn the American Red Cross certification. During the semester that a student takes Applied Health, the student is excused from Physical Education.


Science Division Steve Wood, Director Science is as much a way of knowing as it is a body of knowledge. The Science Division at Stevenson is dedicated to a laboratory approach to science education that will involve each student in the process of discovery. This approach enables students to have practice in the kinds of analytic problem solving that will help them throughout life. At the same time, students build an integrated information base for post-secondary studies. Courses are presently offered at three levels as indicated by the sequential groupings below. The graduation requirement for all students is two years of science. One year must be in the biological sciences which are indicated with a B after the course titles. One year must be in the physical sciences which are indicated with a P after the course titles. It is strongly recommended that all college bound students consider four years of a laboratory science.

Science Courses Required for Graduation: Two semesters biological, two semesters physical.

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SCIENCE DIVISION SEQUENCE Biology SCI201/202

Biology Accelerated SCI111/112

Chemistry Accelerated SCI211/212

Earth Science SCI271/272

Chemistry SCI301/302

Chemistry Accelerated SCI211/212

AP Physics B SCI621/622

Environmental Science SCI501/502

Physics SCI401/402

Freshmen receiving a six week grade below a “C-” and sophomores receiving a six-week grade of “F” will participate in Mandatory Tutoring in the Learning Center for the following six weeks.

Physics Accelerated SCI311/312

AP Biology SCI631/632

AP Environmental Science SCI641/642

Earth Science HN SCI671/672

AP Physics B SCI621/622

AP Biology SCI631/632

AP Physics C SCI661/662

Human Anatomy & Physiology Accelerated SCI521/522

AP Chemistry SCI651/652

1. Freshmen begin the sequence in one of three courses: Biology College Prep, Biology Accelerated or Chemistry Accelerated. 2. Freshman placement in Chemistry Accelerated requires Geometry Honors and proficiency in the Communication Arts Benchmark Assessment. 3. Biology Accelerated placement requires Mathematics Accelerated/Honors placement and proficiency in the Communication Arts Benchmark Assessment.

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College Preparatory Sequence Biology (College Prep B) SCI201-Semester 1, SCI202-Semester 2 Open to 9-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Approval of director for freshman placement, otherwise completion of Natural Science. This sequence takes a hands-on, thematic approach to the study of life. Major biological themes include homeostasis, evolution, genetics, energy, and organization. Students investigate biology through inquiry and real-life applications of the concepts. Earth Science (College Prep P) SCI271-Semester 1, SCI272-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Completion of Biology or approval of Director. This lab-based course explores mapping, geology, atmospheric science and astronomy. First semester topics focus on the physical world and will include mapping, minerals, rocks, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and mountain building. Second semester topics will include geologic time, weathering and erosion, running water, glaciers, wind, atmospheric science, and Earth’s place in the Universe. Chemistry (College Prep P) SCI301-Semester 1, SCI302-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Two years of science including one year of Natural Science or recommendation of Director and the equivalent of one year of algebra This course emphasizes basic chemistry concepts and the impact of those concepts on real-life applications. Problem solving, critical thinking and laboratory skills are emphasized. This course incudes the study of measurements, classification of matter, nomenclature, stoichiometry, gas laws, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, nuclear chemistry, bonding, acids/bases and introduction to organic chemistry.

This sequence includes the study of the mechanics of motion and the relationship of light, sound, heat, and electromagnetic waves. The techniques of class discussion and debate, problem analysis, laboratory experiments, and individual student projects are used as physics is approached from a “conceptual” point of view with an emphasis on real world applications. Environmental Science (College Prep B, P) SCI501-Semester 1, SCI502-Semester 2 Full Year Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: An equivalent of one year of a physical science and one year of a biological science or approval of Director

Biology Accelerated (Accelerated B) SCI111-Semester 1, SCI112-Semester 2 Open to 9-10 Full Year Prerequisite: Approval of Director The content of this sequence includes cellular structure and function, biochemistry, theories of evolution, structure and function of one-celled organisms through complex plants and animals (including man), and genetic theory. The pace of this course is accelerated and material is presented in greater depth than in Biology. Students are required to work with abstract and conceptual topics. This course also emphasizes experimental design and research. These students may also be interested in taking a one semester Accelerated GeoScience course offered in summer school only. Students may take this summer school course prior to or immediately after their freshman year. Chemistry Accelerated (Accelerated P) SCI211-Semester 1, SCI212-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Mathematics through Advanced Algebra. Freshman placement requires approval of Director. This sequence explores the fundamental topics of chemistry in depth. Chemistry Accelerated is a lab-oriented, in-depth study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry. This course includes the study of measurement, classification of matter, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, gas laws, kinetic theory, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, bonding, reaction rate/equilibrium, acid/bases/salts, solutions, and an introduction to nuclear chemistry. Physics Accelerated (Accelerated P) SCI311-Semester 1, SCI312-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Mathematics through Advanced Algebra or Geometry (Accelerated or Honors) This course includes the study of mechanics, wave motion, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. Laboratory experiments and problem solving are emphasized in all units studied. The pace of this course is accelerated and the material is in greater depth, with more mathematical computation than in Physics. Human Anatomy and Physiology Accelerated (Accelerated B) SCI521-Semester 1, SCI522-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry and Health Education required This course focuses on the anatomy and physiology of the human body as seen through a systems approach. A direct connection between coursework and authentic lab work is made possible through the use of collaborative projects and forensic investigations. Careers in medical and healthcare fields will be examined.

Students successfully completing Environmental Science will receive one semester credit of biological science and one semester credit of a physical science. The first semester introduces the concepts of the environment including: ecology, population dynamics, biodiversity, biomes, and aquatic ecosystems. Second semester examines environmental problems including: resource depletion pollution, and loss of biodiversity.

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Science

Physics (College Prep P) SCI401-Semester 1, SCI402-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Mathematics through Geometry or beyond and recommendation of previous science teacher

Accelerated Sequence


Honors Courses Advanced Placement Physics B (Honors P) SCI621-Semester 1, SCI622-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Mathematics through Advanced Algebra or Geometry (Accelerated or Honors) This course covers introductory physics at a college level in preparation for the Advanced Placement B, algebra based physics exam. It will be beneficial to students wishing to satisfy a college “physical science” requirement and will deal with mechanics, wave motion, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, modern and nuclear physics. Students are expected to write the Advanced Placement exam. This class meets 1 1/2 periods and receives 1 1/2 credits for each semester. Advanced Placement Biology (Honors B) SCI631-Semester 1, SCI632-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: One year of Chemistry, and Physics [at the college prep or accelerated level] or approval of Director. In this sequence, students study advanced topics in biology as recommended by the College Board. In-depth study of topics is reinforced by laboratory work and individual projects. This sequence is beneficial for students considering science, medicine, or related careers. Students are expected to write the Advanced Placement exam. This class meets 1 1/2 periods and receives 1 1/2 credits for each semester. Advanced Placement Environmental Science (Honors B, P) SCI641-Semester 1, SCI642-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Prerequisite: One year of Biology, Chemistry, and Algebra or approval of Director This two-semester course will be the equivalent of a one semester introductory college lab course in environmental science. Students will investigate the interrelationships of the natural world, analyze environmental problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving/preventing these problems. This class meets 1 period and receives 1 credit for each semester. Students successfully completing this course will receive one semester credit of physical science and one semester credit of biological science. Students are expected to write the Advanced Placement exam and attend three field trips during the school year. A summer assignment must be completed prior to beginning this course. Advanced Placement Chemistry (Honors P) SCI651-Semester 1, SCI652-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Completion of one year of high school Chemistry and Physics with mathematics through Advanced Algebra or approval of Director. This sequence covers the following areas: chemical bonding, structure of matter, kinetic theory, solutions, acid base reactions, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, equilibrium, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Experiments reinforce these units; problem solving is emphasized. Students enrolled in this course are expected to write the Advanced Placement exam during the spring. This class meets 1 1/2 periods and receives 1 1/2 credits for each semester. Students enrolled in AP Chemistry may also be interested in taking a twoweek Prep for AP Chemistry course offered in summer school only.

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Advanced Placement Physics C (Honors P) SCI661-Semester 1, SCI662-Semester 2 Open to 10-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Completion of Physics Accelerated or AP Physics B, and completion of AB or BC Calculus, concurrent enrollment in BC Calculus course, or approval of Director This course will incorporate the Physics C (calculus-based) curriculum into a series of engineering problem-solving situations. Students will be prepared for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam, and the AP Physics C Electricity and Magnetism exam. Topics in 1st semester include kinematics, linear and rotational dynamics, and gravitation. Second semester topics include electricity and magnetism leading to the development of Maxwell’s equations. Students are expected to write the Advanced Placement exam. This class meets 1 1/2 periods and receives 1 1/2 credits for each semester. Earth Science (Honors P) SCI671-Semester 1, SCI672-Semester 2 Dual Credit with College of Lake County Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Completion of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics or approval of Director This course is a dual credit, college-level science course that is offered in collaboration with the College of Lake County. Classes are held at Stevenson High School and are taught by a Stevenson teacher. Students can earn college credit through College of Lake County, as well as Stevenson High School credit. The coursework is lab-based and covers three key areas: geology, atmospheric science, and astronomy. First semester topics focus on the structure of the Earth. Second semester will include concepts related to weather, astronomy, and planetary science.


Social Studies Division BRAD SMITH, DIRECTOR Social Studies is the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to promote civic competence. Within the school program, social studies provides a coordinated, systematic study drawing upon such disciplines as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology, as well as appropriate content from the humanities, mathematics and natural sciences. The primary purpose of social studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent 21st century world. A minimum of three years of study in Social Studies is recommended for college bound students.

Social Studies Courses Required for Graduation: • One year of World History • One year of United States History (or Advanced Placement United States History); and a passing grade grade on both the Illinois and Federal Constitution test • Also one semester of Government (or Advanced Placement Government); and a passing grade grade on both the Illinois and Federal Constitution test • One semester of Economics, AP Macroeconomics, or AP Microeconomics fulfills the Consumer Education graduation requirement

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SOCIAL STUDIES DIVISION SEQUENCE College Preparation Grade 9 & 10 World History SOC101/102

Honors Grade 10 Native World* Cultures

Global Relations* SOC531/532

SOC521/522

Grade 10

World Religions* SOC501/502

Constitutional Law* SOC511/512

AP European History SOC601/602

AP Human Geography SOC611/612

Grade 11

United States History SOC321/322

Grade 11

United States History American Studies* SOC331/332

Native World Cultures

Sociology

World Religions

Constitutional Law SOC511/512

SOC541/542

Global Relations

SOC521/522

SOC531/532

AP United States History SOC621/622

AP Human Geography SOC611/612

Economics

SOC411/412

SOC501/502

AP Macroeconomics SOC641/642

AP Microeconomics SOC651/652

AP European History SOC601/602

Grade 12 Government SOC401/402

World Religions SOC501/502

Economics

SOC411/412

Constitutional Law SOC511/512

Grade 12

Global Relations SOC531/532

Sociology

SOC541/542

AP Government United States SOC681/682

AP Government United States & Comparative SOC631/632

AP Psychology SOC661/662

Political Thought*

SOC561/562

Psychology

SOC551/552

Non-Western Native World Civilizations Cultures SOC521/522 SOC521/522

AP Human Geography SOC611/612

AP Macroeconomics SOC641/642

AP Microeconomics SOC651/652

*Team taught with English.

Bolded courses fulfill a graduation requirement. *Can be taken Grade 9 with completion of World History and ÂŤDirector Approval.

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Philosophy-Honors SOC671/672

AP European History SOC601/602


World History (College Prep) SOC101-Semester 1, SOC102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10 Prerequisite: None

Full Year Course

One year of World History is required for graduation. This survey course in World History is a foundation course for the social studies. A framework is established in which historical patterns, themes and concepts are explored. Although this course touches on some of the greatest ancient and classical civilizations of the old world, it also covers the development of western traditions, especially in the last 500 years. There is an emphasis on the geographical context of civilizations. Students will find ample reason to appreciate both the diversity of the human past and the commonalities in each stage of history. Basic skills in reading, writing, note and test taking will be practiced. Social skills, cooperative group work, debate and class discussion will be taught. Students with six week grades of "D" or "F� will be required to attend tutoring in the learning center during the next six week grading period.

One Semester

Native World Cultures is a one semester course that examines the history, geography, and culture of peoples outside of Western Civilization. It focuses on native, or indigenous communities such as Native Americans, Amazonian tribes, Polynesians, SubSaharan Africans, Arabs, and Tibetans (to name a few). The course emphasizes the critical role traditional peoples play in the globalized world through an analysis of their challenges and a celebration of their contributions. Students will gain perspective on their own life experience in the context of human diversity.

One Semester

This one semester course will focus on significant contemporary topics in world politics. The emphasis in the course will be on international events after the Cold War. A major goal of the course is to encourage an understanding and evaluation of the international system through major current events. Students will be expected to read current news publications in addition to assigned text materials and will be engaged several issue-based simulations throughout the course. World Religions (College Prep) SOC501-Semester 1, SOC502-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: World History

One Semester

This course is designed to introduce students to the major religions of the world. Students will analyze each religion's foundations, historical development, principle themes and beliefs, and cultural impact. Its primary purpose is to equip students with an understanding of the major ideas and practices of the world’s religions so that they may better understand the world in which they live. Constitutional Law (College Prep) SOC511-Semester 1, SOC512-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: World History

One Semester

Constitutional Law provides students with an understanding of how the U. S. Constitution came into existence, why it took the form it did, and how it functions in contemporary American society.

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Social Studies

Native World Cultures (College Prep) SOC521-Semester 1, SOC522-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: World History

Global Relations (College Prep) SOC531-Semester 1, SOC532-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: World History


Students will develop analytic and evaluative skills by applying constitutional principles to a variety of legal issues and political controversies. Students will assume the roles of trial attorney, judge and juror in a mock trial exercise, and legislator in mock legislative debates. These experiences are highly recommended for students considering a legal career. Philosophy: The History of Ideas (Honors) SOC671-Semester 1, SOC672-Semester 2 Dual Credit available with Trinity College Open to 12 Prerequisite: World History, U. S. History

One Semester

The History of Ideas is an introduction to the philosophies by which humans have attempted to understand their world. It is a collegelevel elective which will consider the major world philosophies, their influence on each other, and their influence on the present. Students will be asked to learn the theories of major philosophers, utilize those ideas in discussion, debates and written assignments. Students will be asked to synthesize those ideas into a personal philosophy of their own. Advanced Placement Human Geography (Honors) SOC611-Semester 1, SOC612-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Full Year Course Prerequisite: World History The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Human Geography is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of our world. Students employ geographical and spatial concepts and tools to analyze topics such as human population movement and organization, cultural patterns and processes, political organization, agricultural and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, and city and urban land use. Students will be expected to integrate college-level reading with maps, graphs and other spatial data sets to conduct analyses, apply models, and draw conclusions. A summer reading assignment must be completed prior to beginning this course. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit. Advanced Placement European History (Honors) SOC601-Semester 1, SOC602-Semester 2 Full Year Course Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: World History This college-level course gives students the basic chronology of major events from approximately 1450 through the present. An understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history and the development of the ability to analyze historical evidence are the major objectives. This course requires excellent reading and writing skills, and its structure is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Test in European History. Students should expect a nightly minimum reading assignment of 10-20 pages and one short paper every 2-3 weeks. A summer reading assignment must be completed prior to beginning the course. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit.

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U. S. History: American Studies (College Prep) SOC331-Semester 1, SOC332-Semester 2 Open to 11 Full Year Course Prerequisite: World History, concurrent enrollment in Junior English: American Studies This two semester sequence integrates the study of American history and literature with the development of composition, reading, and research skills. Students are scheduled for consecutive periods of history and English, allowing separate study of the two disciplines, as well as activities which integrate the study of our country’s history and its literature. This course fulfills the graduation requirement of one year of U. S. History. U. S. History (College Prep) SOC321-Semester 1, SOC322-Semester 2 Open to 11 Prerequisite: World History

Full Year Course

This sequence fulfills the graduation requirement of one year of U.S. History as established by the State of Illinois. With an emphasis on the 20th century, the overriding goal of this course is to give students the opportunity to understand how the current domestic and international status of the U. S. developed. It is designed to help students to identify causes and effects, events and philosophies, which led to the contemporary situation, and provide them with an historical basis for decision making. This course builds on the skills associated with historical inquiry introduced in World History. Geographic themes such as location, mobility, and interaction with the environment are stressed within this historical treatment. Advanced Placement U. S. History (Honors) SOC621-Semester 1, SOC622-Semester 2 Open to 11 Full Year Course Prerequisite: World History This sequence fulfills the graduation requirement of one year of U. S. History as set by the State of Illinois. This interpretive collegelevel course considers the American experience from colonial times to the present. The course requires excellent reading and writing skills, and its structure is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Test in U. S. History. Course activities include writing positions papers each semester, 2-4 in class essays per month, and 3-4 document based questions per year. A heavy emphasis is placed on analyzing and synthesizing information obtained from primary sources. A summer reading assignment must be completed before the class begins. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit. Government (College Prep) SOC401-Semester 1, SOC402-Semester 2 Open to 12 One Semester Prerequisite: World History, United States History This course is required for graduation. Topics considered in the course include the fundamental concepts and structure of federal, state, and local government; methods of selecting candidates for office; methods by which individuals and groups may influence government officials; and mechanics of voting. The Federal and Illinois Constitution Tests required for graduation by the State of Illinois are taken during this course.


Advanced Placement Government – United States (Honors) SOC681-Semester 1, SOC682-Semester 2 Open to 12 One Semester Prerequisite: World History, United States History

Economics (College Prep) SOC411-Semester 1, SOC412-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: World History

This course gives students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U. S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States political reality. This course fulfills the graduation requirement of one semester of Government. The Federal and Illinois Constitution Tests required for graduation by the State of Illinois are taken during this course. Course activities include reading periodicals and daily newspapers, as well as a college textbook and supplementary readings. Students will be required to integrate information obtained from readings, discussions, and lectures to answer detailed multiple-choice questions as well as writing analytical and argumentative essays. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Examination in American Government and Politics in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the economic knowledge and decision-making skills they will need to make rational decisions as informed citizens, responsible consumers, and productive workers. Students will develop an understanding of basic micro and macro economic concepts. They will understand the potential fluctuations in an economy and the influence fiscal and monetary policies have on an economy. Students will be able to articulate the role of government in the US economy and our role in the increasingly significant world economy. Students will be able to incorporate consumer economics into their daily decisions. They will use math skills to express and understand economic concepts. Students will develop critical thinking skills that will help them understand world events and participate as a global citizens.

Advanced Placement Government – United States and Comparative (Honors) SOC631-Semester 1, SOC632-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Course Prerequisite: World History, United States History

The purpose of an advanced placement course in macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. It places emphasis on the different philosophies and theories associated with Macroeconomic analysis and policy. Students will analyze both basic and extensive economic concepts in order to become informed economic consumers, producers, and suppliers. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the AP Macroeconomics portion of the AP Economics exam in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit.

The first semester of this college level course will focus primarily on U. S. Government and Politics and will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. The second semester will focus primarily on Comparative Government and Politics, and will give students a basic understanding of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. This full year course fulfills the Government graduation requirement. The Federal and Illinois Constitution Tests required for graduation by the State of Illinois are taken during the second semester of this course. Course activities include reading periodicals and daily newspapers, as well as a college textbook and supplementary readings. Students will be required to integrate information obtained from readings, discussions, and lectures to answer detailed multiple-choice questions as well as write analytical and argumentative essays. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take both the Advanced Placement Examination in American Government and Politics, and the test in Comparative Government and Politics given in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit.

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics (Honors) SOC641-Semester 1, SOC642-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: World History

Advanced Placement Microeconomics (Honors) SOC651-Semester 1, SOC652-Semester 2 One Semester Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: World History This is an Advanced Placement level course preparing students for the Advanced Placement Test in Microeconomics. Course work in AP Microeconomics includes: The basic economic problem, the nature of markets, the firm, the factor markets and the role of government. Successful completion of this course fulfills the Consumer Education requirement for graduation. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Microeconomics in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit.

This one semester elective course will focus on the reading and discussion of literature and other material which explore basic issues of politics, ethics, and social problems. Students will read novels and plays. Much of the material read will be nonfiction, including articles and historical documents. Students will write essays, participate in class debates, and present reports about such issues as individualism vs. the collectivism in a democracy. An important requirement of the course is student participation in ten hours of community service. Students may elect to take this course for either one credit of English or one credit of Social Studies.

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Social Studies

Political Thought and Its Literature (College Prep) SOC561-Semester 1, SOC562-Semester 2 Open to 12 One Semester Prerequisite: United States History and Junior English

One Semester


Sociology (College Prep) SOC541-Semester 1, SOC542-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: World History

One Semester

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a chance to examine human social interaction and social organization. Sociology focuses on special topics such as groups, culture, socialization, deviance and inequalities (gender, social class, race, ethnicity). This class will explore these areas through sociological readings and engaging in discussing and simulation. Students will learn how to become more reflective of themselves, their community, and their society. Students will be required to complete ten community service hours as an alternative to a traditional final exam. Upon completion of this course and required service hours, students should gain a better understanding of themselves and their place in the social world. Psychology (College Prep) SOC551-Semester 1, SOC552-Semester 2 Open to 12 One Semester Prerequisite: World History, United States History Psychology is a scientific study that deals with emotional, behavioral and mental processes of people in society. Special emphasis includes: abnormal psychology (psychological disorders and treatments) and social psychology (people's perceptions of themselves and others, group behavior and interpersonal attraction). In addition, other topics covered include personality, learning, memory, and the brain. This course will provide an introduction to topics typically covered in an introductory level college psychology course. Students will learn how psychology applies to their lives by partaking in class discussions and group projects. Upon completion of this course students should have a better understanding of themselves and the wide variety of people around them. Advanced Placement Psychology (Honors) SOC661-Semester 1, SOC662-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Course Prerequisite: World History, United States History The purpose of the year long Advanced Placement course in Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of humans and animals. Students are exposed to the psychological theories, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major sub fields within psychology. They also learn about the methods psychologists use in science and practice. Specific topic areas include: biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, cognition, personality, research, history/theory, careers, motivation, emotion, development, abnormal psychology, social psychology, and treatment of psychological disorders. This course will provide the student with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in an introductory college psychology course. Students should possess strong reading skills. Students who enroll in this course are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. Success on the AP test may result in college credit.

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World Languages Division Rowena Mak, Director

World Languages Department English Language Learning Department To meet the aims and purposes of world language instruction, it is recommended that students take two to five years of a language. Many colleges and universities require a two-year sequence in one language. A placement test must be taken by all incoming freshmen who have had two years of Spanish, French, German, Chinese, Latin or Hebrew in junior high school. By passing the placement test, the student will be placed in the appropriate second year course and will receive two units of high school credit for the first year of Spanish, French, German, Chinese, Latin or Hebrew upon successful completion of the second year. Some of the courses listed may require summer work to be completed. Please check with the World Languages Department. Students who have developed a proficiency in a language through life experience, rather than through formal study, may be placed by examination into the most appropriate language course for their skill level. However, no transcript credit for earlier courses in that language will be awarded. Prior credit approval from the World Languages director is needed before enrolling in courses for external credit. Please refer to the course book, section titled "External Credits."

World Languages courses satisfy the graduation requirement for elective credits.

World Languages

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WORLD LANGUAGES DIVISION SEQUENCE

French 1

*French 2 Acc FRE211/212

French 3 Acc FRE311/312

German 1

*German 2 Acc GRE211/212

German 3 Acc GRE311/312

Hebrew 1

*Hebrew 2 Acc HBR211/212

Hebrew 3 Acc HBR311/312

Hebrew 4 Acc HBR411/412

Latin 1

LAT101/102

*Latin 2 Acc LAT211/212

Latin 3 Acc LAT311/312

AP Latin Vergil – Honors LAT621/622

Mandarin Chinese 1 CHI101/102

*Mandarin Chinese 2 Acc CHI211/212

*Mandarin Chinese 3 Acc CHI311/312

AP Chinese Lang & Culture – Honors CHI601/602

*Spanish 2 SPA201/202

Spanish 3 SPA301/302

FRE101/102

GRE101/102

HBR101/102

AP French Language – Honors FRE601/602

AP German Language – Honors GRE601/602

Spanish 4 SPA401/402

Adv. Spanish Conversation & Culture

SPA511/512

SPA511/512

Spanish 1 SPA101/102

*Spanish 2-3 Acc SPA211/212

Spanish 3-4 Acc SPA311/312

Spanish 5 Honors: AP Language SPA601/602

Spanish 6 Honors: AP Literature & Culture SPA611/612

*Determined by Benchmark exam for freshmen and previous coursework for Grades 10 – 12

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WORLD LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT

Spanish 1 (College Prep) SPA101-Semester 1, SPA102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

Spanish 3 (College Prep) SPA301-Semester 1, SPA302-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Spanish 2

Full Year

Students are introduced to the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. There is regular homework. Spanish is spoken in the classroom to introduce and practice oral patterns. There are regular vocabulary and grammar quizzes. Writing includes sentence/question formation, short conversational dialogues, and narrative paragraphs. Reading comprehension progresses from recognition to inference. Chapter tests require listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Cultural information about the Spanish-speaking world is presented.

Speaking, listening, reading and writing activities incorporate previously learned material as well as new grammar and vocabulary. Spanish is the primary language of the classroom. There is emphasis on the oral and written expression of ideas. Aspects of the culture of Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America will be explored.

Spanish 2 (College Prep) SPA201-Semester 1, SPA202-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test for Spanish 2 and approval of Director

Reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills will be further developed through readings that discuss the culture and history of Spanish-speaking countries. The use of technology will be used to develop these skills. Spanish is the primary language spoken in the class. A review of all major tenses and grammar points will be covered to prepare those students who are entering college. Students are held accountable for note-taking, oral discussions (in Spanish), written examinations, and oral presentations. Students who complete Spanish 4 successfully may enroll in Spanish 5 Honors: AP Language or Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture.

Full Year

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Students continue to develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The content of Spanish I is practiced in new contexts while the student learns new structures. Homework is assigned regularly. Spanish is spoken by the teacher to introduce vocabulary and to review grammar points. The teacher and students use Spanish to accomplish the daily routine and to practice oral patterns. There are regular grammar and vocabulary quizzes. Writing includes sentence/question formation, dialogues, and paragraphs. Short passages continue the development of reading skills. Chapter tests require students to perform in all four skill areas. The culture of Spanish-speaking countries is studied throughout the year.

Spanish 4 (College Prep) SPA401-Semester 1, SPA402-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Spanish 3


Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture (College Prep) SPA511-Semester 1, SPA512-Semester 2 Open to 12 Full Year Prerequisite: Spanish 5 Honors or Spanish 4

Spanish 5 Honors: AP Spanish Language SPA601-Semester 1, SPA602-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Spanish 3 Accelerated or Spanish 4

This course is designed to enhance and strengthen conversational skills for advanced students in the target language. These skills will be developed and vocabulary will be enriched within the boundaries of various themes; including, but not limited to: youth, pop culture, health, politics, social customs, university life, study abroad, careers, interviewing, travel and the future. Spanish 5x will also serve as a comprehensive grammatical review. Cultural information and comparisons are drawn from cultural readers, class discussion and current publications. Students will participate in authentic experiences and field trips, and will contribute to discussions outside of class via the class blog. Students will use technology as a tool to communicate and gain knowledge through their investigations on the Internet. Students will participate in classroom debates and oral presentations and are held accountable for contributing meaningfully to class discussions. Students are expected to speak solely in Spanish in the classroom.

This course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Spanish language examination and provides a transition to the AP Spanish Literature course. AP Spanish Language is comparable to an advanced level (5th- and 6th-semester or the equivalent) college Spanish language course. Special emphasis is placed on the use of authentic source materials related to culture and current events and the integration of language skills. Specific work includes: analysis of articles and literature, formal and informal oral presentations, research projects, and formal and informal writings. The expectation is that all communication in the classroom (teacher-student/student-student) takes place in the target language.

Spanish 2-3 (Accelerated) SPA211-Semester 1, SPA212-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test for Spanish 2 Accelerated and approval of Director This is the first course of the sequence which prepares students for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language exam. The course is conducted exclusively in Spanish. Students are expected to take an active role in class discussions and to use Spanish as their primary means of communication. The course is more intense and faster-paced than Spanish 2. Students are expected to demonstrate: 1) expressive interaction in the language; 2) well-organized, creative, and accurate writing; 3) factual and interpretative reading comprehension; and 4) cultural knowledge of Spanish-speaking countries. Spanish 3 -4 (Accelerated) SPA311-Semester 1, SPA312-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Spanish 2 Accelerated

Full Year

This is the second course of the sequence which prepares students for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language exam. This course is conducted exclusively in Spanish and all interaction will take place in the target language, both student-student and studentteacher. Students will build upon what they have learned in Spanish 2 Accelerated and are expected to take an active role in class discussions. Students will strengthen their skills in the following areas: 1) interacting in an expressive manner as they engage in longer conversations; 2) writing well-organized, creative, and more developed compositions; 3) reading and comprehending more sophisticated selections; and 4) listening to longer passages and extracting the most pertinent information. Students enrolled in this course will begin to participate in activities that are modeled from the AP Spanish Language Exam.

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Full Year

Spanish 6 Honors: AP Spanish Literature and Culture SPA611-Semester 1, SPA612-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Spanish Language The AP Spanish Literature course is designed to introduce students to the basic techniques of literary analysis in preparation for the AP Spanish Literature Exam. Students will become familiar with and explore the major themes of the 56 works listed on the new AP Spanish Literature list. A sample of various literary works (poetry, drama, short stories, essays, and novels) for each author will be introduced in order to further the students’ understanding of each of these genres. To achieve this endeavor, both the cultural component (history, politics, religion, social structure, art, and music), and the linguistic aspect (grammar, vocabulary, and structure) of the analysis will be emphasized. This course is intended to be the equivalent of a third year college Introduction to Spanish Literature. By the end of the course, the students’ language ability will be equated to that of college students who have completed their sixth semester of language instruction. Students are expected to take AP Spanish Literature exam in May. Students proceeding to Advanced Placement Spanish Literature will be provided with summer readings by the classroom instructor. French 1 (College Prep) FRE101-Semester 1, FRE102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None French 1 is an introduction to the French language and culture. The four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are developed. Grammar concepts and vocabulary are introduced and practiced in the classroom and the language laboratory and reinforced through frequent homework assignments. Students will be expected to participate actively and cooperatively in all classroom activities, e.g., engaging in guided conversations, making individual and group presentations, and writing paragraphs utilizing familiar vocabulary structures. Cultural information about daily life and social customs is integrated into the curriculum throughout the year, and students will also begin to learn about the geography of Francophone regions. Students will be evaluated primarily on their knowledge of the French language and culture and on their ability to understand and communicate in French.


French 2 (Accelerated) FRE211-Semester 1, FRE212-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: French 1 or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test for French 2 Accelerated and approval of Director French 2 Accelerated begins the sequence that prepares students for the Advanced Placement French Language exam. This course is conducted primarily in French and continues the development of the four major language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students are expected to take an active role in class discussions and to use French as their primary means of communication. Students are expected to demonstrate 1) expressive interaction with the language; 2) well-organized, creative, and accurate writing; 3) factual and interpretative reading comprehension; and 4) cultural knowledge of French-speaking countries. French 3 (Accelerated) FRE311-Semester 1, FRE312-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: French 2 Accelerated

Full Year

French 3 Accelerated continues the development of the four major language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The students and the teacher communicate exclusively in French. Students develop conversational skills by participating in discussions and role-playing. Students will apply reading skills by reading authentic French short stories. The course will culminate with students reading an authentic French novel. By the end of the course, students will be ready to enter the Advanced Placement French Language course. Advanced Placement French Language (Honors) FRE601-Semester 1, FRE602-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: French 3 Accelerated

Full Year

In this course, students will prepare for the Advanced Placement French Language exam. Students and the teacher communicate exclusively in French. In addition to an extensive grammar review, vocabulary development is emphasized. Training in listening comprehension of sophisticated topics and development of writing style will be stressed. The students will become comfortable listening to native speakers and presenting short extemporaneous speeches in the target language. Students refine their writing skills via weekly essays. Students read and discuss literary works of major authors. Students are expected to take the AP French exam in May. Students proceeding to Advanced Placement French Language will be provided with a summer assignment by the classroom instructor. German 1 (College Prep) GRE101-Semester 1, GRE102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

This is the first course of the sequence that actively prepares students for the Advanced Placement German Language exam. German 2 Accelerated continues and expands the communication skills of listening, speaking, structure, reading, writing, and culture. German is spoken in class for everyday functions and to discuss new material. The content of German 1 is practiced in new situations while learning and using new vocabulary and structures. Written communication is developed in weekly reports and a blog about topics mutually agreed on by this class. Emphasis is on topics such as geography, cultural comparisons, vacations, foods, health, life in the city and country, and current events. German 3 (Accelerated) GRE311-Semester 1, GRE312-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: German 2 Accelerated

Full Year

German 3 Accelerated continues the development of all communication skills and prepares students for the Advanced Placement German Language exam. Specific emphasis is on extended conversation, short speeches, and communicating ideas in writing. Written communication is reinforced in weekly reports. Reading skills are developed in short stories, narratives, and current news articles. Skill practice relates to themes, such as money, alternative vacations, appearance, advertising, prejudices, and reading short stories. All skill development culminates in narration of video, the reading of a short novel, and in publishing a class newspaper. Advanced Placement German Language (Honors) GRE601-Semester 1, GRE602-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: German 3 Accelerated

Full Year

This course reviews and continues the development of communication skills and completes the preparation for the Advanced Placement German Language exam. Emphasis is on practical and theoretical communication with group problem solving and discussion, contemporary prose, discussion of current events, and listening comprehension with contemporary German. Communication skills are reviewed with emphasis on idioms and expressions, understanding native speakers, developing a personal style of expression in speaking and writing, and reading a variety of sophisticated materials. Skills are reinforced with historical essays, current events, cultural trends, songs, lectures, and a group blog. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement German Language exam in May. Students proceeding to Advanced Placement German will be provided with summer readings the classroom instructor.

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German 1 is an introduction to the German language and culture and the opportunity to learn the language spoken by millions of people in several European countries and around the world. Listening, speaking and structure skills, reading, and writing are introduced through class activities. German is spoken to introduce and practice oral patterns which are reinforced in language lab, computer lab, and on videos. Emphasis is on language and cultural survival skills, communicating about one’s life and how people live.

German 2 (Accelerated) GRE211-Semester 1, GRE212-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: German 1 or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test for German 2 Accelerated and approval of Director


Hebrew 1 (College Prep) HBR101-Semester 1, HBR102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

Latin 1 (College Prep) LAT101-Semester 1, LAT102-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

The first year of Hebrew, which begins with the study of the alphabet, develops the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The comprehension of simple spoken Hebrew and the development of the ability to express oneself simply in conversation are course goals. Grammar and vocabulary are studied to develop the students’ facility to read simple material and to write original paragraphs employing the vocabulary and structures learned. Israeli culture is studied to give meaning to the study of the language.

Latin 1 focuses on learning the basics of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. This course is designed to enable students to read materials in Latin with ease and understanding and to write original Latin sentences employing the vocabulary and grammatical structures learned. Additionally, basic prefixes, suffixes, and roots of vocabulary words and word families will be studied. This class will also cover topics in Roman history, mythology, and culture.

Hebrew 2 (Accelerated) HBR211-Semester 1, HBR212-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test for Hebrew 2 Accelerated and approval of Director

Full Year

This course is designed for the student who wishes to study the Hebrew language within an immersion environment. The course is conducted almost exclusively in Hebrew. Students will be expected to participate actively and cooperatively in all activities, utilizing Hebrew as their primary means of communication. The emphasis is placed upon the development of students’ reading and writing skills. Students will begin the study of Hebrew literature through reading short stories. Hebrew 3 (Accelerated) HBR311-Semester 1, HBR312-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Hebrew 2 Accelerated

Full Year

This course is designed to solidify students’ knowledge of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary through reading, writing, and oral work. Students’ vocabulary will be enriched through reading selections and listening activities focusing on Israeli history and contemporary life. The study of Israeli literature will also be an important component of the curriculum. Students are expected to take an active role in class discussions and to use Hebrew as their primary means of communication. Hebrew 4 (Accelerated) HBR411-Semester 1, HBR412-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Hebrew 3 Accelerated

Full Year

Hebrew 4 Accelerated refines students’ conversational and writing skills. Students continue to work in cooperative teams and are required to communicate exclusively in Hebrew. Skills are further reinforced with current events and cultural trends from Hebrew sources. Students will demonstrate their Hebrew mastery through research projects, essays, and oral presentations. A review of all verb patterns and major grammar points will be covered to prepare those students who are entering college.

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Latin 2 (Accelerated) LAT211-Semester 1, LAT212-Semester 2 Open to 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Latin 1 or approval of Director

Latin 2 (Accelerated) will develop and refine students' knowledge of grammar and syntax in translation and composition. The class will move at a faster pace and more emphasis will be placed on developing students' reading and writing skills than in Latin 1. Readings will include adaptations from Livy, Cicero and Pliny and introductions to Ovid and Vergil. Through the readings students will focus on topics such as mythology, culture, and the history of the Republic. Latin 3 (Accelerated) LAT311-Semester 1, LAT312-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Latin 2 Accelerated

Full Year

In this course students will explore various selections of Latin Literature. Students will continue to refine their skills in literal translation, sight translation, scansion and literary analysis both in the target language and in English in order to facilitate greater fluency in the reading of Latin literature. Advanced Placement Latin Vergil (Honors) LAT621-Semester 1, LAT622-Semester 2 Open to: 11-12 Prerequisite: Latin 3 Accelerated

Full Year

In this course students will complete preparation for the Advanced Placement Latin Vergil. Students will continue to refine reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Training in translation, meter and poetic devices involved in the study of major Latin works of literature will be stressed. The students will become more comfortable in the reading and interpretation of Vergil's Aeneid. To achieve this endeavor both the cultural component (history, politics, social structure, and art), and the linguistic aspect (grammar, vocabulary, and structure) will be emphasized. Students are expected to take the AP Latin Exam in May. Students advancing to Advanced Placement Latin will be provided with summer readings by the class instructor.


Mandarin Chinese 1 (College Prep) CHI101-Semester 1, CHI102-Semester 2 Open to: 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

Mandarin Chinese 1 is an introduction to the Mandarin Chinese language and culture. The four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are developed. Students will participate actively and cooperatively in classroom activities, engage in guided conversations, and write utilizing familiar vocabulary and structures. Cultural information about daily life and social customs is integrated into the curriculum throughout the year, and students will also begin to learn about the geography of China. Students will be evaluated primarily on their knowledge of the Mandarin Chinese language and culture and on their ability to understand and communicate in Mandarin Chinese. Mandarin Chinese 2 (Accelerated) CHI211-Semester 1, CHI212-Semester 2 Open to: 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese 1 or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test for Chinese 2 Accelerated and approval of Director. Mandarin Chinese 2 Accelerated continues the development of the four major language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The students and the teacher continue to speak in the target language, developing conversational skills by participating in discussions and role-playing activities. Writing skills progress to level in which student writing will include descriptions, story telling, and the integration of extended vocabulary and sentence structure. Students will be evaluated on their knowledge of the Mandarin Chinese language and culture. Mandarin Chinese Accelerated students are expected to demonstrate; 1) expressive interaction in the language; 2) well organized, creative and accurate writing; 3) factual and interpretive reading comprehension; and 4) cultural knowledge of Chinese-speaking countries.

AP Chinese Language and Culture (Honors) CHI601-Semester 1, CHI602-Semester 2 Full Year Open to: 11-12 Prerequisite: Chinese 3 Accelerated or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test and approval of the Director This Chinese AP course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Chinese language and Culture examination, i.e. a level comparable to fourth semester (or equivalent) college/ university courses in Mandarin Chinese. The course focuses on language proficiency while dealing with level- and age-appropriate cultural content throughout the course. Students engage in readings, conversation and composition and research projects. The expectation is that all communication in the classroom takes place in the target language. By the end of the year, students will be able to understand the spoken language formally (lectures, news, etc.) and in conversation (dialogues‌); to acquire vocabulary and structures that enable students to understand, analyze contextualized materials (advertisement, posters, newspaper, magazine articles, letters etc.); to describe an event or activity in a cohesive and coherent manner with linguistic accuracy; to write appropriately employing the organization, vocabulary, and structure appropriate to the purpose of their writing and to demonstrate cultural appropriateness through spoken and written discourse.

Mandarin Chinese 3 (Accelerated) CHI311 -Semester 1, CHI312-Semester 2 Full Year Open to: 10-11-12 Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese 2 (Accelerated), or demonstrated proficiency on the placement test for Chinese 3 Accelerated and approval of Director. Mandarin Chinese 3 Accelerated is designed to enhance a student's ability to listen, speak, read, and write in Chinese. Sophisticated topics relating to language structures and Chinese culture will be introduced. Important components of this course include a variety of oral activities to produce improved pronunciation, intonation, and tones in communicative situations. The expectation is that communication (teacher-student/student-teacher) in the classroom takes place in the target language. In addition, writing skills are developed to include focus, support, sequence and conclusion. By the end of the course, students will be ready to enter the Advanced Placement Mandarin Chinese level.

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1 2

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING

Beginning ELL Language Arts ELL161/162

Intermediate ELL Language Arts ELL261/262

Advanced ELL Language Arts ELL361/362

World History ELL761/762 (Sheltered)

U. S. History ELL861/862 (Sheltered)

Biology (Sheltered) SCI21Z/22Z

Computer Applications (Sheltered) BUS11Z

American Literature ELL461/462

Accelerated Chemistry SCI211/SCI212

College Prep Chemistry SCI301/SCI302

Information Processing (Sheltered) BUS14Z

ELL Health (Sheltered) PED21Z/22Z

All ELL classes receive full credit toward graduation requirements. Levels are based on assessment scores, class performance, and Director approval.

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING (ELL) DEPARTMENT

The Stevenson High School English Language Learning (ELL) Program is part of the World Languages Division. Students at Stevenson who are non-English or limited-English speakers are provided with a transitional language program. While in this program, students have the opportunity to learn English and to strengthen their reading and writing skills. The goal of the ELL program is to increase the English fluency of limited-English speakers so that they can be successful in mainstream high school classes. The ELL staff guides and gives tutorial support to its students. Appropriate placement of students in the ELL program is done through state and national testing scores, home language surveys, teacher recommendations, and the cooperative efforts of the Student Services Department and the ELL faculty in the World Languages Division.

Writing intensive courses required for graduation for the classes of 2012, 2013 2014 and 2015.

Beginning ELL Language Arts (College Prep) ELL161-Semester 1, ELL162-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: WAPT-screener and director approval

Full Year

This is a two-credit course for beginning ELL students. This course will meet two periods each day. Students will read classic and modern literature adapted for ELL students, using modified texts from a variety of sources. This course also introduces necessary vocabulary pertaining to core mainstream courses. Reading strategies and writing skills are taught and reviewed throughout the course. Students will apply their writing skills - sentence writing and paragraph writing - as they respond to reading. Grammar and spelling will be taught both in context of the text and exclusively. Students will also develop their listening and speaking skills throughout the course. Upon completion of this course, students will receive two credits in English.

Intermediate ELL Language Arts (College Prep) ELL261-Semester 1, ELL262-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Proficiency as demonstrated on WAPT-screener or ACCESS exam, successful completion of Beginning ELL Language Arts, teacher recommendation or director approval.

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This is a two-credit course for intermediate ELL students. This course will meet two periods each day. Students will continue reading progressively higher texts in preparation for mainstream English courses. Students will continue to develop their reading and writing skills by reacting and responding to the readings examined in Intermediate ELL Language Arts. Students will learn how to compose, revise, and edit narrative, descriptive, expository, persuasive, functional and poetry assignments. Through Scholastic's READ 180 program, students will use software to practice their grammar, spelling, phonics, word fluency, vocabulary and reading comprehension skills. Special emphasis is placed on the acquisition of high-incidence academic vocabulary, modeled, and independent reading. Upon completion of this course, students will receive two credits in English.


Advanced ELL Language Arts (College Prep) ELL361-Semester 1, ELL362-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Proficiency as demonstrated on WAPT-screener or access exam, successful completion of Beginning ELL Language Arts, teacher recommendation or director approval. This is a two-credit course for advanced ELL students. This course will meet two periods each day. Students will read a variety of texts, from a variety of genres. Reading strategies will continue to be developed. Students will also continue to refine their writing skills by responding to texts analytically. In addition to reading, writing and grammar skills, students will advance their listening and speaking skills by partaking in Socratic discussions, debates, and oral presentations. Upon completion of this course, students will receive two credits in English. American Literature (College Prep) ELL461-Semester 1, ELL462-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Proficiency as demonstrated on WAPT-screener or access exam, successful completion of Beginning ELL Language Arts, teacher recommendation or director approval. This is an American Literature class for transitional ELL students. It prepares them for the English skills, curriculum, and assessments they will find in a mainstream English classroom. This skills-based course develops students' proficiencies in the areas of reading, literary analysis, writing, grammar/usage, oral communications, and research. ELL World History (College Prep) ELL761-Semester 1, ELL762-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

Full Year

This course covers ancient and classical civilizations to current events of the present time. It also covers the development of Western civilization. History and English are both emphasized by note taking, oral reports, and a research presentation. Social skills in cooperative group work and class discussion will be emphasized. This is a two-semester course that fulfills the World History requirement for graduation. ELL U. S. History (College Prep) ELL861-Semester 1, ELL862-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: World History

Full Year

This course covers the contributions made by various American cultures from the Native Americans to the present. This class helps students to gain a greater understanding of the events, philosophies, and individuals that have shaped contemporary situations. History and English are emphasized by note taking, oral reports, and a research presentation. This is a two-semester course that fulfills the American History requirement for graduation. ELL Tutorial ELL961-Semester 1, ELL962-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None These are tutorial study halls in which ELL students can receive one-on-one help with their English and content area courses. ELL students are allowed to take or complete their tests with the ELL staff. In ELL tutorials, reading, writing, test preparation, and study skills are reinforced.

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Computer Applications (Sheltered) (College Prep) BUS11Z-Semester 1 Only Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

This course will provide students with computer skills and knowledge necessary for our technological society. Students will develop word processing and spreadsheet skills through a variety of activities (i.e. text formatting of letters, reports, research papers) related to personal, business, and educational situations. This class will be taught by a mainstream computer teacher and assisted by an ELL staff member. Information Processing (Sheltered) BUS14Z-Semester 2 Only Open to 9-10-11-12 One Semester Prerequisite: Computer Applications or proficiency test This course will provide students an opportunity to develop information processing skills: inputting, manipulating and managing data for hard copy, networking and visual presentation. Advanced applications will integrate activities using word processing, spreadsheets, charts, graphs, mail merges, labels, outlines and styles. This class will be taught by a mainstream computer teacher and assisted by an ELL staff member. Biology (Sheltered) (College Prep) SCI21Z-Semester 1, SCI22Z-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Approval of Director

Full Year

This sequence focuses on the scientific study of life. Major biological principles include: homeostasis, evolution, ecology, continuity, energy, matter, and organization. The course is laboriented. Students investigate biology through inquiry and reallife applications of the concepts. This class will be taught by a mainstream biology teacher and assisted by an ELL staff member. More personal attention will be given to each student because of smaller class enrollment. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary development. Chemistry Accelerated (Accelerated P) SCI211-Semester 1, SCI212-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Mathematics through Advanced Algebra. Freshman placement requires approval of Director. This sequence explores the fundamental topics of chemistry in depth. Chemistry Accelerated is a lab-oriented, in-depth study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry. This course includes the study of measurement, classification of matter, chemical nomenclature, stoichiometry, gas laws, kinetic theory, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, bonding, reaction rate/equilibrium, acid/bases/salts, solutions, and an introduction to nuclear chemistry.


Chemistry (College Prep P) SCI301-Semester 1, SCI302-Semester 2 Open to 11-12 Full Year Prerequisite: Two years of science including one year of Natural Science or recommendation of Director and the equivalent of one year of algebra This course emphasizes basic chemistry concepts and the impact of those concepts on real-life applications. Problem solving, critical thinking and laboratory skills are emphasized. This course incudes the study of measurements, classification of matter, nomenclature, stoichiometry, gas laws, atomic structure, the Periodic Table, nuclear chemistry, bonding, acids/bases and introduction to organic chemistry. Health (Sheltered) (College Prep) PED21Z-Semester 1, PED22Z-Semester 2 Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: None

One Semester

The Stevenson High School health education program is a statemandated, required course for graduation. It does apply toward the student's GPA. It is a one-semester course with a cumulative final exam that determines 25 percent of the overall grade. Course work covers emotional/mental health, personal health, first aid and safety, diseases, life cycles, and drugs. This class will be taught by a mainstream teacher and assisted by an ELL staff member.

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Gifted Education Stevenson serves the needs of talented young people in many ways. Thirty-two Advanced Placement courses are available to students and prepare them to write the College Board's examinations for possible college credit. The programs listed below represent additional opportunities for students in Science and Mathematics. They are generally non-credit, ungraded opportunities for specially selected students. Science Professionals as Resource Knowledge Open to 11-12 Prerequisite: Enrollment in AP Science courses, recommendation of Science teachers, commitment to project development, and summer research The purpose of SPARK is twofold in that it is an attempt to stimulate independent scientific research by students and to link them with professional mentors involved in the field. Each student is paired with a volunteer practicing scientist and works with the mentor to complete research during the summer. Topics may be in any area of science and completed research may be submitted to state and national competitions. Talented Young Mathematician's Program (TYMP) Open to 9-10-11-12 Prerequisite: Honors Math Placement. This program provides gifted mathematics students the opportunity to explore topics beyond the regular mathematics curriculum. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors enrolled in a honors-level math class meet during lunch and occasionally before school to increase their knowledge of mathematical problem solving. These students are eligible to become members of Stevenson’s competitive mathematics team. Freshman TYMP is an advisory offering students an opportunity to work on non-traditional mathematics. Students in this advisory benefit from the freshman mentor program (FMP), have an opportunity to work collaboratively and individually on challenging mathematics (TYMP), and work towards qualifying for competitive events (the Math Team). All freshmen enrolled in TYMP are concurrently enrolled in another honors-level math class. Active engagement in TYMP is a first step towards being invited to join the freshman-level competitive Math Team. Upper-class student mentors (FMPs) who have experience with TYMP content and have demonstrated a genuine desire to mentor freshmen throughout the year will help freshmen transition to high school and become familiar with policies, procedures, and traditions at Stevenson.

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Special Education Services Stevenson High School provides all students with special education needs a free and appropriate public education. Students and their parents serve as members of the IEP team and fully participate in the determination of eligibility for and provision of special education services. Once a student has been found eligible for special education and/or related services, an individualized education program is developed to determine the appropriate services. It is the responsibility of this multi-disciplinary team to determine the most appropriate education placement in the least restrictive environment. Stevenson High School offers a full continuum of services and programs, including psychological testing, social work, speech therapy and other related services for eligible students. Stevenson High School is also a member of the Special Education District of Lake County (SEDOL), a special education cooperative that also provides support for eligible Stevenson students. Resource Program The Stevenson High School Special Education Resource program is designed to foster the independence essential to work toward: • Becoming active learners in the areas of academics and social skills; • Taking advantage of the resources that Stevenson High School has to offer; • Developing and achieving realistic transition goals. Daily resource instruction supports a student's IEP and transition plan with special education teachers' support through the teaching and implementation of SEL mandates. The resource class is divided into two primary components including direct instruction and self-management/application. Direct instruction includes daily lessons providing explicit instruction in all five competencies of Adlai E. Stevenson High School's school wide SEL initiative. The primary goal of resource instruction is to promote the self-advocacy and self-determination essential for independence within and beyond the walls of Stevenson High School. Self-Management/Application represents the application of skills sets through the following: • Utilization of automated systems to track progress; • Utilization of automated systems to track assignments and upcoming assessments; • Differentiated academic support to address skill-sets presently challenging the students.

Instructional Courses Instructional courses are designed to meet the needs of students who may require individualized assistance with the courses necessary for graduation. Instructional courses range from those that parallel mainstream curriculum and/or are taught collaboratively with both a special education and mainstream teacher, to courses that address the basic life skills necessary to support select transition goals. Similar to our resource program, the primary goal of the special education instructional classes is to foster the academic proficiency and independence necessary to support the student’s progression toward his/ her next level of proficiency in all domains. Consultative/Collaborative Model Stevenson High School's consultative and collaborative model is designed to meet the needs of special education students within the mainstream educational environment. This model facilitates the exchange of information and supportive services between special and general education. Weekly contact is made with mainstream teachers, who maintain the primary responsibility for curricular and disciplinary issues. The Illinois State and Educational Rights and Responsibilities Guide is posted on the Special Education home page of the Stevenson website. In addition, Procedural Safeguards are available upon request from the Special Education Division. Transition Program Stevenson High School's Transition Service Program provides individualized skill development for special education students ages 18 - 22. The curriculum for the transition program includes learning targets focusing on the development and enhancement of daily living skills, and vacational training in the areas of work behavior and communication. Placement into the transition program is addressed on an annual basis by each student's IEP Team upon completion of all Stevenson High School graduation requirements.

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APPENDIX A

District 125 Board of Education Vision Statement for Stevenson High School (Board Policy 1001, Revised September, 2010) Curriculum In order to ensure “Success for Every Student,” Stevenson High School dedicates itself to a comprehensive and clearly articulated curriculum comprised of what should be learned, how it will be taught, and how learning will be assessed. From the classroom to the athletic field and in all activities, students prepare to thrive in a global community and learn to accept the challenge and responsibility of participating and leading in a democracy. To attain this vision: A.

Students learn important academic content, analyze and think critically, attain physical well-being, and develop social and emotional competencies.

B.

Curriculum, instruction, and assessment are dynamic, intellectually challenging, and attentive to the diverse learning needs of students.

C.

Formative and summative assessment monitor student learning and track progress toward explicit learning targets, inform instruction, and support programmatic decisions.

D.

Curricular teams collaborate to meet educational goals through the use of technology, interdisciplinary learning, and innovative teaching techniques.

E.

Students actively engage in their learning and the assessment of such learning. Feedback provides focus for learning and growth and promotes individual improvement.

F.

Students learn leadership skills in all curricular and co-curricular pursuits.

Equity and Access for All Students In order to ensure “Success for Every Student,” Stevenson High School establishes high expectations for all students and provides the support required to help them meet those expectations. Every student is recognized and valued as an individual, and the creation of support systems allows each student to attain the high standards the community holds for them. Staff members understand the importance of pursuing equity; therefore, they provide each individual student with appropriate levels of support to meet or exceed expectations. To attain this vision:

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A.

Faculty and staff provide students with access to opportunities and resources that allow students to meet high expectations for learning in academic, social, and emotional contexts.

B.

Faculty and staff provide students with necessary support and interventions to ensure achievement of curricular expectations and appropriate social and emotional development.

C.

Faculty and staff provide students with the information and support to develop educational and career goals for transitioning to, through, and beyond high school.

D.

Faculty and staff teach and guide students to accept increasing responsibility for their learning, decisions, and actions.

E.

Faculty and staff provide students access and encouragement that allows students to explore and take advantage of the variety of opportunities for participation in curricular and co-curricular programs.

F.

Faculty and staff encourage students to persevere and excel intellectually and ethically as they actively engage in academic and co-curricular pursuits.


Building a Professional Learning Community In order to ensure “Success for Every Student,” the Board of Education, administration, staff, students, parents, and community commit to collaborative practices that ensure continuous improvement and progress toward the vision. The collective expertise and passionate commitment to learning drives individuals to excellence in their fields . To attain this vision: A.

All members of the school community actively promote and uphold the District’s mission, vision, values, and goals.

B.

The District commits to recruiting, developing, and retaining individuals who embrace the school’s mission, vision, values, and goals.

C.

All adults commit to developing and contributing to high-performing collaborative teams to better serve and support all students.

D.

All members of the learning community understand that personal and professional development depends on goal setting resulting from thoughtful and critical reflection, which leads to continued learning and growth.

E.

Everyone commits to innovation, collective inquiry, evidence-based decision- making, and reflects on the results of teaching and learning.

A Culture for Learning In order to ensure “Success for Every Student,” Stevenson High School establishes a safe, caring environment and fosters a culture that is highly collaborative, enables everyone to engage in ongoing learning. Stevenson dedicates itself to meaningful teaching and learning experiences. Such a culture maximizes learning, builds mutual respect between all members of the Stevenson community, and supports high levels of collaboration. To attain this vision: A.

All members recognize and appreciate the diversity in the greater school community, encourage mutual respect, and promote social awareness among all school stakeholders.

B.

Learning is dynamic and socially constructed, requires student engagement and collaboration, and supports relationships with peers and teachers.

C.

Students learn to balance the curricular and co-curricular aspects of school life to promote personal growth and life-long learning.

D.

All members value social-emotional learning and work diligently to serve as models for all members of the school community.

E.

The community promotes and models healthy life choices and responsible decision-making as we continue to work to eliminate alcohol, drugs, violence, and bullying.

F.

The community promotes, recognizes, and celebrates individual and collective effort and achievement.

G.

The district maintains an environmentally responsible physical facility that meets the needs of all members of the Stevenson community and meets the learning needs of the 21st century.

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Community Engagement In order to ensure “Success for Every Student,” Stevenson High School values the importance of strong collaborative relationships with its extended community — families, residents, businesses, government agencies, and other educational systems. Stevenson recognizes its position as a leading professional learning community and actively participates in state, national and global educational initiatives. To attain this vision:

88

A.

The school provides shared-learning opportunities for the extended community to foster partnerships promoting the District’s vision and values.

B.

The extended community provides the various resources that enable the school to offer exemplary academic and co-curricular programs and, in turn, expects effective stewardship in the use of those resources.

C.

The extended community utilizes school resources and facilities.

D.

Parents play an active role in the education of their children, monitor their children’s academic performance, and work collaboratively and positively with staff to maximize their children’s educational experience.

E.

The school, business community, and other organizations collaborate to provide authentic learning experiences for students and staff, thereby reinforcing the relevance of the academic and co-curricular programs.

F.

The school continually seeks effective partnerships with consortium districts and post¬secondary institutions to maintain articulation and provide seamless transitions.

G.

The school promotes community participation through volunteer efforts, service learning, and leadership opportunities.

I.

The school reaches out to use expertise in the community in order to develop authentic career experiences and opportunities for growth that ignite a passion for learning and exploration beyond the classroom.


APPENDIX B

LEGAL NOTICE TO STUDENTS AND PARENTS CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORD INFORMATION In accordance with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and its regulations, the Illinois School Student Records Act and its regulations, and Board Policy 7:340, Student Records, and its administrative procedures, each parent/guardian and student is advised as follows: 1. Directory information may be released to the general public without written consent from a parent/guardian, unless a parent/guardian requests that such information not be released. Any parents/guardians who do not want such information to be made public should check “I do not wish to release information” under the Request to Release Student Information when completing the Online Registration during the summer. Parents/guardians may also make such request by contacting the District office. Directory information is limited to: a. Student’s Name b. Student’s Address c. Parent’s or Guardian’s Name d. Parent’s or Guardian’s Mailing Address e. Parent’s or Guardian’s Telephone Number f. Parent’s or Guardian’s Electronic Mail (E-mail) Address g. Student’s Birth Date and Place h. Student’s Gender i. Student’s Grade Level j. Student’s Major Field of Study k. Student’s Dates of Attendance in School l. Student’s Academic Degrees, Honors, and Awards m. Information in relation to the Student’s participation in School-Sponsored Activities, Organizations, and Athletics n. Photographs, videos, or digital images used for informational or news-related purposes (whether by a media outlet or by the school) of the student participating in school or school-sponsored activities, organizations, and athletics that have appeared in school publications, including but not limited to yearbooks, newspapers, or sporting or fine arts programs, except that: (i) no photograph highlighting individual faces will be used for commercial purposes, including solicitation, advertising, promotion or fundraising without the prior, specific, dated and written consent of the parent/guardian or student, and (ii) no image on a school security video recording will be designated as directory information. 2. District 125 maintains school records for each student. A school student record is any record that contains personally identifiable information of a student, or information that would link the document to a student, except for records kept in the sole possession of a staff member, which are destroyed no later than the student’s graduation or permanent withdrawal, and are not accessible or revealed to anyone other than a temporary substitute teacher; video or other electronic recordings created and maintained by law enforcement professionals working in the school or for security or safety reasons or purposes, provided the information was created at least in part for law enforcement or security or safety reasons or purposes; and electronic recordings made on school buses. These consist of two types of records: permanent records and temporary records. A student’s permanent record consists of: a. b. c. d. e. f. g.

basic identifying information, including the student’s name and address, birth date and place, gender, academic transcript including grades, class rank, graduation date, grade level achieved, scores on college entrance examinations, and the unique student identifier assigned and used by the SIS, attendance record, health record, record of release of permanent record information, scores received on all State assessment tests administered at the high school level, and if not maintained in the temporary record, honors and awards received, information concerning the student’s participation in school-sponsored activities or athletics, or offices held in school-sponsored organizations.

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NO OTHER INFORMATION WILL BE PLACED IN THE STUDENT PERMANENT RECORD. The permanent record will be kept by District 125 for sixty (60) years after graduation, a transfer, or permanent withdrawal. A student’s temporary record consists of all information by which the student may be individually identified but is not required to be in the student permanent record. A student’s temporary records must include: a. b. c.

a record of release of temporary record information, scores received on the State assessment tests administered in the elementary grade levels (kindergarten through grade 8) information regarding serious disciplinary infractions (those involving drugs, weapons, or bodily harm to another) that resulted in expulsion, suspension, or the imposition of punishment or sanction,

d. information provided under Section 8.6 of the Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act, e. completed home language survey form, f. health-related information, and g. accident reports. The temporary record may include family background information, intelligence test scores (group and individual), aptitude test scores, reports of psychological evaluations (including information on intelligence, personality, and academic information), elementary and secondary achievement level test results, participation in extracurricular activities, including any offices in school-sponsored clubs or organizations, honors and awards received, teacher anecdotal records, other disciplinary information, special education records, records associated with plans developed under Section 504, and any verified reports or information from non-educational persons or organizations of clear relevance to the education of the student. The temporary record will be destroyed five years after graduation, a transfer, or permanent withdrawal. A summary of the types of records maintained by District 125 are listed below along with the officials or custodians of these records:

3.

90

Record

Type of Record

Custodian of Record

a. Directory Information b. Achievement Test Data

Permanent & Temporary Temporary

Registrar Registrar

c. Courses/Grades d. Attendance Data e. Graduation Status f. Enrollment/Transfer Information g. IQ/Psychological Data

Permanent Permanent Permanent Permanent Temporary

Counselor & Registrar Dean & Registrar Counselor & Registrar Registrar & Counselor Special Education/Psychologist

h. Family/Social History i. Discipline j. Counseling Records k. Activities and Awards l. Transcript Request Forms

Temporary Temporary Temporary Temporary Temporary

Special Education Dean Counselor, Social Worker, Psychologist Student Activities Director Registrar

m. Health Records n. Health-Related Information o. Accident Reports p. IEPs and Special Education Records q. Section 504 Plans and Records

Permanent Temporary Temporary Temporary Temporary

School Nurse School Nurse School Nurse Special Education Student Services/Section 504 Coordinator

r. Home-school communications

Temporary

Various

District employees and school officials who have a current, demonstrable educational or administrative interest in the student may have access to student records for the purpose of furthering such interests without parent/guardian consent. A school official is a Board member, attorney, auditor, insurance representative, independent evaluator, contractor, consultant, volunteer, or other person to whom District 125 has outsourced institutional services or functions for which District 125 would otherwise use employees.


4.

5. 6.

7.

8.

9. 10. 11.

12.

13.

Each parent/guardian of a student under 18 years old has a right to inspect and copy information in the student’s records. Such requests must be made in writing to the Principal. Access to the records will be given within 15 school days of District 125’s receipt of the request. Access will not be given with respect to confidential letters/recommendations concerning post-secondary institutions, including but not limited to a college/university. Where parents/guardians are divorced or separated, both shall be permitted to inspect and copy the student’s records unless District 125 receives a copy of a court order indicating otherwise. When a student reaches 18 years old, graduates from high school, marries, or enters military service, all rights and privileges accorded to the parents/guardians become exclusively those of the student and no one other than the student can request records or information in such records. District 125 charges $0.35 per page for copies of student records. No parent/guardian or student will be precluded from receiving copies because of financial hardship. Parents/guardians have the right to request a hearing to challenge the accuracy, relevancy, or propriety of their student’s records, except for academic grades and references to expulsions or out-of-school suspensions if the challenge is made at the time the student’s school records are forwarded to another school to which the student is transferring. Parents also have the right to insert a written rebuttal concerning the contents of such records. Upon request for a hearing concerning the content of the student’s records, the Principal will arrange an informal meeting with the parent/guardian. If thereafter the parent/guardian wishes to proceed with a hearing, the parent/guardian must submit such request in writing to the Superintendent. The parent/guardian has the right to present evidence and call witnesses, cross-examine witnesses, legal counsel, and receive written statement of the decision and the reasons for such decision. The parent/guardian may insert a written statement of reasonable length describing their position on disputed information. The parent/guardian may appeal the decision to an administrative tribunal or official designated by the State Board of Education. Parents/guardians have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by District 125 to comply with the requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-4605. Upon graduation, transfer or permanent withdrawal of the student, District 125 will notify the parents/guardians and the student of the destruction schedule for the student’s permanent and temporary records and of their right to request a copy. Requests for District 125 to release a student’s records to any person other than the parents/guardians (or student age 18 or older) must be in writing. Upon receipt of a court order of protection, the Principal will file it in the records of a student who is the “protected person” under the order of protection. No information or records shall be released to the Respondent named in the order of protection. When a student who is a “protected person” under an order of protection transfers to public or private school, or as soon as possible, the Principal will, at the request of the Petitioner, provide, within 24 hours of the transfer or as soon as possible, written notice of the order of protection, along with a certified copy of the order, to the school to which the student is transferring. District 125 may grant access to, or release information from, student records without parent/guardian consent or notification to any person for the purpose of research, statistical reporting, or planning, provided that no student or parent(s)/guardian(s) can be identified from the information released, and the person to whom the information is released signs an affidavit agreeing to comply with all applicable statutes and rules pertaining to school student records. District 125 will grant access to, or release information from, a student’s records pursuant to a court order, provided that the parent(s)/guardian(s) will be given prompt written notice of such order’s terms, the nature and substance of the information proposed to be released, and an opportunity to inspect and copy such records and to challenge their contents. However, District 125 will comply with an ex parte court order requiring it to permit the U.S. Attorney General or designee to have access to a student’s records without notice to or the consent of the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s).

14. District 125 will grant access to, or release information from, any student record as specifically required by federal or State law. NOTE: IT IS STEVENSON’S POLICY TO SHARE INFORMATION REGARDING THE CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES OF STUDENTS WITH JUVENILE AUTHORITIES, INCLUDING LOCAL POLICE DEPARTMENTS, AS PERMITTED BY LAW. 15. District 125 will grant access to, or release information from, student records to any person possessing a written, dated consent, signed by the parent(s)/guardian(s) (or student age 18 or older) stating to whom the records may be released; the information or record to be released; the reason for the release; the right of the parent(s)/guardian(s) or eligible student to copy the information to be disclosed, challenge its contents, limit the consent to designated record(s) or portion(s) of the information contained in those records, and revoke the consent in writing at any time; the consequences of a refusal to consent, if any; and the date on which the consent expires. One copy of the signed consent form will be kept in the temporary records and one copy is mailed to the parent(s)/guardian(s) (or student age 18 or older) by the Superintendent or designee.

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16. District 125 may release student records, or information contained therein, to the official records custodian of another Illinois school, or an official with similar responsibilities in a school outside of Illinois, in which the student has enrolled or intends to enroll, upon written request from such official. 17. Prior to the release of any records, or information under items 14 and 16 above, District 125 will provide prompt written notice to the parent(s)/guardian(s) (or student age 18 or older) of this intended action. This notification shall include a statement concerning the nature and substance of the records to be released and the right to inspect, copy, and challenge the contents. If the release is under 14 above and relates to more than 25 students, a notice published in the newspaper is sufficient. 18. District 125 may release student records, or information contained therein, in connection with an emergency without parent/guardian consent if the knowledge of such information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons. District 125 employees and school officials shall make this decision taking into consideration the nature of the emergency, the seriousness of the threat to the health or safety of the student or other persons, the need for such records to meet the emergency, and whether the persons to whom such records are released are in a position to deal with the emergency. District 125 will notify the parent(s)/guardian(s) (or student age 18 or older) as soon as possible of the information released, the date of the release, the person, agency or organization to whom the release was made, and the purpose of the release. 19. District 125 will grant access to, or release information from student records to juvenile authorities when necessary for the discharge of their official duties upon their request before the student’s adjudication, provided they certify in writing that the information will not be disclosed to any other party except as provided under law or order of court. “Juvenile authorities” means: (a) a circuit court judge and court staff members designated by the judge; (b) parties to the proceedings under the Juvenile Court Act of 1987 and their attorneys; (c) probation officers and court appointed advocates for the juvenile authorized by the judge hearing the case; (d) any individual, public or private agency having court-ordered custody of the child; (e) any individual, public or private agency providing education, medical or mental health service to the child when the requested information is needed to determine the appropriate service or treatment for the minor; (f) any potential placement provider when such release is authorized by the court to determine the appropriateness of the potential placement; (g) law enforcement officers and prosecutors; (h) adult and juvenile prisoner review boards; (i) authorized military personnel; and (j) individuals authorized by court. 20. District 125 will grant access to, or release information from student records, to a SHOCAP (Serious Habitual Offender Comprehensive Action Program) committee member, provided that: (a) the committee member is a State or local official or authority; (b) the disclosure concerns the juvenile justice system’s ability to effectively serve, prior to adjudication, the student whose records are to be released and the official or authority certifies in writing that the records will not be disclosed to any other party except as provided under State law without the prior written consent of the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s); (c) the disclosure’s purpose is limited to identifying serious habitual juvenile offenders and matching those offenders with community resources pursuant to Section 5-145 of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987; and (d) the release, transfer, disclosure, or dissemination consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. 21. Upon their request, military recruiters and institutions of higher learning will have access to secondary students’ names, addresses, and telephone listings, unless an objection is made by the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s). Any parents/guardians who do not want such information to be released should check “I do not wish to release information” under the Request to Release Student Information when completing the Online Registration during the summer. 22. It is the student’s right that no person may condition the granting or withholding of any right, privilege or benefits, or make as a condition of employment, credit or insurance, the securing by any individual of any information from a student’s temporary record which such individual may obtain through the exercise of any right secured under State or federal law. 23. Copies of the Board Policy 7:340, Student Records, and its administrative procedures are available for inspection in the District’s Administrative Office. Policy 7:340 is also available on the District’s website. If you have any questions, please call 847-415-4000 and ask for the Principal.

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8 6 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 17 45

6-8 6-8 4-8

Social Studies Foreign Language

8 6-8

Mathematics Science

# of semesters

English

Suggested College Admission Sequence Subject

12th Grade Goal: _____________________________________________________________________________________

11th Grade Goal: _____________________________________________________________________________________

10th Grade Goal: _____________________________________________________________________________________

9th Grade Goal: _____________________________________________________________________________________

Outside Activities/Jobs: _______________________________________________________________________________

Co-Curricular Activities: _______________________________________________________________________________

https://web1.ncaa.org/eligibilitycenter/common

refer to the NCAA Eligibility Center online at

*If you intend to participate in college athletics,

No credit is earned for lunch or study hall.)

(One credit is earned for each semester course passed.

__________________________________________________________

school: Credits/sem.:

school:

Credits/sem.:

11/12/12 EM/TM 4yrplan(individ edu) - COURSE BOOK3 01 (3).doc

Total credits/yr.:

Previous summer

Previous summer

Total credits/yr.:

8-

8-

Credits/sem.:

7-

4-Lunch

3-Science

6-

Lunch

4-Lunch

7-

Science

3-Science

2-Math

1-English

6-

Math

2-Math

5-

English

1-English

Credits/sem.:

Lunch

Science

Math

English

SEMESTER 2

SOPHOMORE SEMESTER 1

5-

SEMESTER 2

FRESHMAN

SEMESTER 1

Total credits/yr.:

Credits/sem.:

school:

Previous summer

8-

7-

6-

5-

4-Lunch

3-

2-Math

1-English

SEMESTER 1

Credits/sem.:

Lunch

Math

English

SEMESTER 2

JUNIOR

Credits/sem.: Min. 45 for Grad.

Total credits: Min 42 for Honors Grad.

Lunch

English

SEMESTER 2

SENIOR

Credits/sem.:

school:

Previous summer

8-

7-

6-

5-

4-Lunch

3-

2-

1-English

SEMESTER 1

Freshman enrolled in the second year of a language course should add two additional credits for the World Language proficiencies.

Required courses to add: Physical Education, Driver Education, Health, World History, U.S. History, Economics/Consumer Education, Government.

College-bound students should schedule a minimum of four academic units each semester. Academic units include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and world language courses. Certain colleges may require additional electives for admission. Students are strongly encouraged to contact colleges to determine admission requirements. Students should see their counselor for personalized th assistance. *The completion of the PSAE (Prairie State Achievement Exam) and passing the Illinois and Federal Constitution tests must be achieved to meet graduation requirements. To participate in the graduation ceremony, the “46 Credit Test” must be passed.

English Mathematics Science (2P, 2B) World History U.S. History Government Economics (Consumer Ed.) Health Driver Education Required Electives Addt’l Credits and Phys. Ed Total Credits

Subject

# of semesters

S.H.S. Graduation Requirements

CAREER GOAL(S)/MAJOR: ________________________________________ COLLEGE CHOICE(S):

NAME: ___________________________________________________ GRADUATION YEAR: ____________ DATE: ___________ COUNSELOR:__________________________

INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION /CAREER PLAN


COURSE SELECTION WORKSHEET 2013-2014 STUDENT NAME

______________________________________

CLASS OF :

20 ____

GENDER: M

F

ID# _______________

DATE OF BIRTH: ______________

USE THIS WORKSHEET TO PLAN YOUR COURSES FOR THE 2013-14 SCHOOL YEAR.

(SEE REVERSE SIDE OF THIS PAGE FOR COURSE NUMBERS NOT LISTED IN THE DEPARTMENTS.)

REMEMBER TO INCLUDE TYMP, WAIVERS, AND STUDY HALL.

FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS PROVIDED BY YOUR COUNSELOR TO ENTER YOUR COURSES

INTO THE STUDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. COURSE # SEMESTER 1

COURSE # SEMESTER 2

LUNCH1

LUNCH2

**

COURSE NAME SEMESTER

LUNCH

1

COURSE NAME SEMESTER 2

LUNCH

** PE ATHLETIC WAIVERS ** PE WAIVER FOR BAND AND COLOR GUARD (SEMESTER 1 ONLY) ** AFTER SCHOOL STUDENT COUNCIL (YOU MUST BE ENROLLED IN 7 CLASSES DURING THE SCHOOL DAY) ** ACADEMIC WAIVER FOR SENIORS WITH AT LEAST 6 ACADEMIC CLASSES ON THEIR SCHEDULE

TO ENROLL IN DRIVER EDUCATION YOUR DATE OF BIRTH MUST BE ON OR BEFORE: 12/15/97 FOR - 1ST SEMESTER AND 4/25/98 FOR - 2ND SEMESTER CAREER GOAL________________________________________________________ POST SECONDARY PLANS______________________________________________

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ADDITIONAL COURSE NUMBERS COURSE TITLE

SEMESTER

JANUARY GRADUATE

JANGRD

LUNCH

LUNCH1

LUNCH2

HALF PERIOD LUNCH

L NCH01

LNCH02

ATHLETE- 8TH HOUR FREE

ATH081

ATH082

P.E. WAIVER - ACADEMIC

PEAW01

PEAW02

P.E. WAIVER - BAND

PEBW01

P.E. WAIVER - CREDIT

PEDCW1

PEDCW2

P.E. WAIVER - NO CREDIT

PENC01

PENC02

P.E. WAIVER - COLOR GUARD

PEGW01

STUDENT COUNCIL-FREE HOUR

STUCN1

STUCN2

STUDENT COUNCIL- STUDY HALL

STUSH1

STUSH2

STUDENT COUNCIL – NINTH HOUR

STUC91

STUC92

STUDY HALL

STUDY1

STUDY2

ADDITIONAL STUDY HALL

STUDY11

STUDY22

HALF PERIOD STUDY HALL

STDY01

STDY02

T.Y.M.P. - SOPHOMORE

MTH921

MTH922

T.Y.M.P. - JUNIOR

MTH931

MTH932

T.Y.M.P. - SENIOR

MTH941

MTH942

UNSCHEDULED TIME

FREE01

FREE02

HALF PERIOD FREE TIME

FRE251

FRE252

SENIORS- 8TH HOUR FREE

FREE81

FREE82

1

SEMESTER

2

95


The United States Department of Education named Adlai E. Stevenson High School as one of the nation's 2002 Blue Ribbon Schools, making Stevenson one of only three schools in America – and the only high school in Illinois – to earn the honor four times. Adlai E. Stevenson High School previously received Blue Ribbon honors in 1987, 1991 and 1998.

Adlai E. Stevenson High School 1 Stevenson Drive Lincolnshire, IL 60069 (847) 415-4000

Serving the Communities of:

Half Day, Lincolnshire, Long Grove, Prairie View, and portions of Buffalo Grove, Deerfield, Hawthorn Woods,Kildeer, Lake Forest, Lake Zurich, Mettawa, Mundelein, Palatine, Riverwoods, Vernon Hills, and Wheeling.


2013-14 Course Book