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“With engineering, science and technology management having a profound and growing impact in every area of modern life, the national leadership role of Stevens Institute of Technology is more important and more challenging than ever.” A Report from President Harold J. Raveché Fall 2006

Stevens Institute of Technology Castle Point on Hudson Hoboken, NJ 07030-5991 www.stevens.edu


Dear Colleague: Per aspera ad astra – ‘Through adversity to the stars’ – is the motto shared by Stevens Institute of Technology and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, an agency whose Manned Spaceflight Center in Houston was once directed by a Stevens graduate, Aaron B. Cohen. The Latin phrase could also serve as a secondary motto for the entire American enterprise, from the nation’s founding (in which the “first family of invention in the US” – the Stevenses – played a pivotal role), through territorial expansion, civil war, world war, nuclear standoff, the race to the moon, global engagement and the vexing struggle with global terrorism. In all phases of the American story, historic outcomes were shaped first by the Stevens family, later by countless direct beneficiaries of their philanthropic legacy, affecting millions of lives for the better. And with each May Commencement, the Institute graduates those knowledgeable and skillful leaders who are capable of reaching the stars signified by our motto. With engineering, science and technology management having a profound and growing impact in every area of modern life – business, medicine, academe, politics, the arts, law and homeland security – the national leadership role of Stevens Institute of Technology is more important and more challenging than ever. America’s global industrial competitiveness now rests on cultivating engineers and scientists who advance the frontiers of their fields with the highest levels of creative inventiveness, and on managers who understand how to reap the full potential of technology for the growth of their business. Stevens is well prepared to help our nation meet these challenges with its rich legacy of broad-based education and the distinctive approach of Technogenesis®, which integrates education, research and the launching of new businesses based on the intellectual property of the Institute, in concert with external partners. In the past year, Stevens sold its second Technogenesis Company, PlasmaSol Corporation; we graduated our largest undergraduate and graduate classes in history; realized major successes in sponsored research; had a banner year in student athletics; and welcomed a stellar group of new teaching and research faculty.

The President’s Report

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Dear Colleague: Per aspera ad astra – ‘Through adversity to the stars’ – is the motto shared by Stevens Institute of Technology and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, an agency whose Manned Spaceflight Center in Houston was once directed by a Stevens graduate, Aaron B. Cohen. The Latin phrase could also serve as a secondary motto for the entire American enterprise, from the nation’s founding (in which the “first family of invention in the US” – the Stevenses – played a pivotal role), through territorial expansion, civil war, world war, nuclear standoff, the race to the moon, global engagement and the vexing struggle with global terrorism. In all phases of the American story, historic outcomes were shaped first by the Stevens family, later by countless direct beneficiaries of their philanthropic legacy, affecting millions of lives for the better. And with each May Commencement, the Institute graduates those knowledgeable and skillful leaders who are capable of reaching the stars signified by our motto. With engineering, science and technology management having a profound and growing impact in every area of modern life – business, medicine, academe, politics, the arts, law and homeland security – the national leadership role of Stevens Institute of Technology is more important and more challenging than ever. America’s global industrial competitiveness now rests on cultivating engineers and scientists who advance the frontiers of their fields with the highest levels of creative inventiveness, and on managers who understand how to reap the full potential of technology for the growth of their business. Stevens is well prepared to help our nation meet these challenges with its rich legacy of broad-based education and the distinctive approach of Technogenesis®, which integrates education, research and the launching of new businesses based on the intellectual property of the Institute, in concert with external partners. In the past year, Stevens sold its second Technogenesis Company, PlasmaSol Corporation; we graduated our largest undergraduate and graduate classes in history; realized major successes in sponsored research; had a banner year in student athletics; and welcomed a stellar group of new teaching and research faculty.

The President’s Report

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The Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) was founded with funding from the Office of Naval Research and will soon establish its facilities in The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center. Dean of Engineering George P. Korfiatis serves as founding director; Center for Maritime Systems Director Michael S. Bruno is the principal investigator for the major research initiatives; and Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Barry Bunin is a chief architect of the MSL infrastructure. As increasing attention is given to security at the local, state and federal levels, maritime security has come into focus as one area where improvement is critical. In a response to this need, Stevens, in partnership with the US Navy, has established a research facility founded with an initial grant from the US Office of Naval Research.

research in estuaries and environments with shallow water, high spatial and temporal variability, high turbidity, fresh water inflow, variable tides, strong currents, strong stratification, vessel traffic and limited shoreline access,” said Hady R. Salloum, Director of Technology Applications at MSL. “The combination of the expertise in various technical domains coupled with the access to and knowledge of the realistic environment of the New York Harbor and the Hudson River makes MSL a uniquely qualified national laboratory for research and technology for maritime security.”

Maritime security poses an immense challenge: The US maritime border consists of 95,000 miles of shoreline and more than Hady R. Salloum 350 official ports of entry. The MSL will address awareness of threats and vulnerabilities, prevention and protection against threats and the response to potential attacks.

The MSL gains additional strength from existing Stevens Centers, including The Center for Maritime Systems, The New York Harbor Observing and Prediction Center; The Design and Manufacturing Institute (DMI); The Wireless Network Security Center (WiNSeC); The Center for Intelligent Networked Systems (iNetS); and The Center for Decision Technology (CDT).

Stevens is strongly positioned to address multiple areas of maritime security. The Institute has developed technical and practical expertise in areas such as ocean engineering, wireless networking, communications, computer science and decision analysis, all of which will be used to support the MSL. “Stevens’ location on the Hudson River is a competitive advantage. It gives us access to a realistic environment that allows to perform practical testing, measurements and

To demonstrate a unique role for the MSL, a multi-disciplinary, intensive six-month project to run an experiment on the detection and classification of moving underwater objects was commissioned. This experiment is running in the maritime environment of the New York Harbor, using threat assessment algorithms, control algorithms, systems-level data management and fusion, and addressing scenarios of concern to the Navy as well as other Departent of Defense and Department of Homeland Security agencies.

In a related area, the historic high-speed testing tank at the Center for Maritime Systems’ Davidson Lab underwent a major $4 Million renovation project that has created at Stevens the finest testing facility of its kind in the world. The kick-off symposium to dedicate the reopened lab will take place in December of this year. Throughout the past 70 years, the Davidson Laboratory has been one of the world’s leading centers for research and education in the areas of Naval Architecture, Ocean Engineering and Marine Environmental Engineering. During the past 18 months, the lab’s famous Towing Tank, also known as Tank #3, has undergone a complete renovation. Everything, from the design of the tank to the installation of the wave maker and beach structures, has been redone. “The new towing tank will be the most advanced facility of its kind in the United States, providing Stevens with exciting new capabilities to perform both fundamental and hydrodynamic research,

The President’s Report

and applied naval architecture and ocean design studies,” said Michael Bruno, Professor and Director of the Center for Maritime Systems. “The significantly increased size of the tank will allow us to study ships, structures and ocean physics at much larger scale than in the past,” said Bruno. A viewing area has been incorporated near the center of the tank. The area’s glass windows, which span the full water column, enable flow visualization studies of the test models and greatly enhance studies of coastal waves and sediment transport.

Professor of Electrical Engineering and member of the National Academy of Engineering Victor Lawrence, who is also an Associate Dean for Special Programs in The Schaefer School, has established the Center for Intelligent Networked Systems, or iNetS, which will promote the next generation of advanced micro-robotics.

Stevens’ newly established research center for Intelligent Networked Systems (iNetS) will harness the strong competence of Stevens and industrial facilities to research, invent, create and develop transformational technologies as well as practical tools that have both industrial and consumer applications. Many different user appliances will be embedded with intelligence and be enhanced and assisted by real-time systems. Intelligent networks will provide media translations, protocol conversion, database integration and caching. The center will pay particular attention to secure and robust information services and the use of embedded intelligent networks to further the objectives of US Homeland Security. “We’re trying to look at ways in which we can make the best use of information and find out how it can aid us. Embedded intelligence is perhaps one of the most important areas of information and communications technology in this decade,” said Victor Lawrence, Associate Dean and Batchelor Chair Professor of Engineering in The Schaefer School of Engineering. “It’s used in everything from consumer electronics to industrial equipment, military systems and networks of all sorts. And embedded intelligence is influencing almost every aspect of our lives and bringing about changes in our businesses, defense, society and the way we live, work and entertain ourselves.”

Under overall leadership from Lawrence, Stuart Tewksbury, Director of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and Frank Fernandez, the Center for iNetS focuses on six areas of research: 1. Network/information interoperability for secure multilevel sharing. 2. Engineered network systems, led by Professor Yu-Dong Yao. 3. Distributed cooperative systems’ increased use of unmanned platforms (robotics), led by Professor Hongbin Li. 4. Information gathering, understanding and reduction/secure surveillance systems, led by Professor Hong Man.

Professor Yu-Dong Yao

5. Information mining and analysis, led by Professor R. Chandramouli. 6. Network and information security and reliability/cybersecurity, led by Professor Manu Malek. iNetS is an area of information and communications technology that will have a broad and profound effect in the 21st century. Embedded intelligence in devices and communications networks will help us gather information and make decisions that will improve effectiveness and productivity of government, businesses and households. They will make real-time decisions ranging from the identity of possible terrorists in airports to the need to make purchases to re-stock a refrigerator. “We will see intelligent computing simplify and enhance our daily lives in areas as diverse as energy sources, transportation systems, communication and household maintenance,” said Lawrence. “It will create new markets, moving us from the information age to the knowledge age where we are able to obtain useful information. Our world will converge to form a single universe of experience. We will be able to communicate with anyone or anything at anytime and anywhere.”

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The Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) was founded with funding from the Office of Naval Research and will soon establish its facilities in The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center. Dean of Engineering George P. Korfiatis serves as founding director; Center for Maritime Systems Director Michael S. Bruno is the principal investigator for the major research initiatives; and Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Barry Bunin is a chief architect of the MSL infrastructure. As increasing attention is given to security at the local, state and federal levels, maritime security has come into focus as one area where improvement is critical. In a response to this need, Stevens, in partnership with the US Navy, has established a research facility founded with an initial grant from the US Office of Naval Research.

research in estuaries and environments with shallow water, high spatial and temporal variability, high turbidity, fresh water inflow, variable tides, strong currents, strong stratification, vessel traffic and limited shoreline access,” said Hady R. Salloum, Director of Technology Applications at MSL. “The combination of the expertise in various technical domains coupled with the access to and knowledge of the realistic environment of the New York Harbor and the Hudson River makes MSL a uniquely qualified national laboratory for research and technology for maritime security.”

Maritime security poses an immense challenge: The US maritime border consists of 95,000 miles of shoreline and more than Hady R. Salloum 350 official ports of entry. The MSL will address awareness of threats and vulnerabilities, prevention and protection against threats and the response to potential attacks.

The MSL gains additional strength from existing Stevens Centers, including The Center for Maritime Systems, The New York Harbor Observing and Prediction Center; The Design and Manufacturing Institute (DMI); The Wireless Network Security Center (WiNSeC); The Center for Intelligent Networked Systems (iNetS); and The Center for Decision Technology (CDT).

Stevens is strongly positioned to address multiple areas of maritime security. The Institute has developed technical and practical expertise in areas such as ocean engineering, wireless networking, communications, computer science and decision analysis, all of which will be used to support the MSL. “Stevens’ location on the Hudson River is a competitive advantage. It gives us access to a realistic environment that allows to perform practical testing, measurements and

To demonstrate a unique role for the MSL, a multi-disciplinary, intensive six-month project to run an experiment on the detection and classification of moving underwater objects was commissioned. This experiment is running in the maritime environment of the New York Harbor, using threat assessment algorithms, control algorithms, systems-level data management and fusion, and addressing scenarios of concern to the Navy as well as other Departent of Defense and Department of Homeland Security agencies.

In a related area, the historic high-speed testing tank at the Center for Maritime Systems’ Davidson Lab underwent a major $4 Million renovation project that has created at Stevens the finest testing facility of its kind in the world. The kick-off symposium to dedicate the reopened lab will take place in December of this year. Throughout the past 70 years, the Davidson Laboratory has been one of the world’s leading centers for research and education in the areas of Naval Architecture, Ocean Engineering and Marine Environmental Engineering. During the past 18 months, the lab’s famous Towing Tank, also known as Tank #3, has undergone a complete renovation. Everything, from the design of the tank to the installation of the wave maker and beach structures, has been redone. “The new towing tank will be the most advanced facility of its kind in the United States, providing Stevens with exciting new capabilities to perform both fundamental and hydrodynamic research,

The President’s Report

and applied naval architecture and ocean design studies,” said Michael Bruno, Professor and Director of the Center for Maritime Systems. “The significantly increased size of the tank will allow us to study ships, structures and ocean physics at much larger scale than in the past,” said Bruno. A viewing area has been incorporated near the center of the tank. The area’s glass windows, which span the full water column, enable flow visualization studies of the test models and greatly enhance studies of coastal waves and sediment transport.

Professor of Electrical Engineering and member of the National Academy of Engineering Victor Lawrence, who is also an Associate Dean for Special Programs in The Schaefer School, has established the Center for Intelligent Networked Systems, or iNetS, which will promote the next generation of advanced micro-robotics.

Stevens’ newly established research center for Intelligent Networked Systems (iNetS) will harness the strong competence of Stevens and industrial facilities to research, invent, create and develop transformational technologies as well as practical tools that have both industrial and consumer applications. Many different user appliances will be embedded with intelligence and be enhanced and assisted by real-time systems. Intelligent networks will provide media translations, protocol conversion, database integration and caching. The center will pay particular attention to secure and robust information services and the use of embedded intelligent networks to further the objectives of US Homeland Security. “We’re trying to look at ways in which we can make the best use of information and find out how it can aid us. Embedded intelligence is perhaps one of the most important areas of information and communications technology in this decade,” said Victor Lawrence, Associate Dean and Batchelor Chair Professor of Engineering in The Schaefer School of Engineering. “It’s used in everything from consumer electronics to industrial equipment, military systems and networks of all sorts. And embedded intelligence is influencing almost every aspect of our lives and bringing about changes in our businesses, defense, society and the way we live, work and entertain ourselves.”

Under overall leadership from Lawrence, Stuart Tewksbury, Director of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, and Frank Fernandez, the Center for iNetS focuses on six areas of research: 1. Network/information interoperability for secure multilevel sharing. 2. Engineered network systems, led by Professor Yu-Dong Yao. 3. Distributed cooperative systems’ increased use of unmanned platforms (robotics), led by Professor Hongbin Li. 4. Information gathering, understanding and reduction/secure surveillance systems, led by Professor Hong Man.

Professor Yu-Dong Yao

5. Information mining and analysis, led by Professor R. Chandramouli. 6. Network and information security and reliability/cybersecurity, led by Professor Manu Malek. iNetS is an area of information and communications technology that will have a broad and profound effect in the 21st century. Embedded intelligence in devices and communications networks will help us gather information and make decisions that will improve effectiveness and productivity of government, businesses and households. They will make real-time decisions ranging from the identity of possible terrorists in airports to the need to make purchases to re-stock a refrigerator. “We will see intelligent computing simplify and enhance our daily lives in areas as diverse as energy sources, transportation systems, communication and household maintenance,” said Lawrence. “It will create new markets, moving us from the information age to the knowledge age where we are able to obtain useful information. Our world will converge to form a single universe of experience. We will be able to communicate with anyone or anything at anytime and anywhere.”

3


Interdisciplinary research in nanotechnology is going forward in nanomaterials, nanomachines, microchemical systems and nano/microbiology. Nanotechnology stands out as a likely launch pad to a new technological era, because it focuses on perhaps the final engineering scales that people have yet to master. Stevens is aggregating the expertise to meet the challenges of this new frontier.

Professor Frank Fisher, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, received a Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) grant from the National Science Foundation to enhance the research and educational initiatives under way at Stevens in the areas of nanotechnology and multi-scale engineering. Acquired in collaboration with Professors Henry Du, Yong Shi and Zhenqi Zhu, the Nanoscale Manipulation and Experimental Characterization Instrument (NMECI) will provide nanometer-resolution, scanning electron microscope compatible manipulation, enabling critical nanoscale experimental investigations spanning many key emerging nano/microtechnology areas at Stevens. These will include nanomaterials development/characterization, nano/micro sensors and actuators, and micro-chemical/mechanical systems. Professor Matthew Libera, Professor of Materials Engineering, also received a MRI grant from the NSF.

Libera’s team of Professors Henry Du and Svetlana Sukhishvili from Stevens, Patricia Soteropolous (PHRI/UMDNJ) and Treena Arinzeh (NJIT) obtained the Dip Pen Nanolithography System for Surface Nanofunctionalization (DPN) to research how individual cells behave when they stick to a surface. Such work may lead to new sensors that can detect trace quantities of harmful chemicals and new tools for biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. DPN is among the newest and most advanced scientific tools for controlling how the surfaces of materials interact with their surroundings, and can create patterns that are almost 1,000 times smaller than those in state-of-the-art electronic devices like advanced computer chips. Furthermore, DPN can deposit as little as a few molecules at each point in the surface pattern, and this capability gives scientists and engineers impressive new control over chemical reactions that occur at very specific points on a surface.

Our Biomedical Engineering program is equipped with new labs and faculty, and with a growing, highly energized undergraduate constituency that is engaged in entrepreneurial research and activity within the field. After a spirited meeting with Professor Arthur Ritter, Stevens’ Director of Biomedical Engineering, Dr. Thomas Haher ’72 was determined to help create, as he put it, “the finest Biomedical Engineering Laboratory in the country” at Stevens. Together with his associates at Clinical Engineering Services, Inc., Haher set out to program to provide generous donations of in-kind biomed lab equipment and installation services to Stevens. The plan was to facilitate a collaborative partnership based in a comprehensive menu of biomechanical studies, while also offering enhanced training opportunities for Stevens students. “By promoting work on real-time projects and interaction with experts in the field,” said Haher, “this gift can only have a positive impact on accomplishing our shared goal of minimizing the gap between academia and current industry needs.” Haher stands as a shining example of alumni who give back to Stevens by sharing their expertise and professional partnerships to benefit new generations of students.

The President’s Report

International outreach through partnerships with other academic institutions and multi-national companies and industries is expanding Stevens’ global footprint and establishing our presence in higher education and research worldwide.

In an article published in the flagship newsletter of the Sloan Consortium, Stevens’ WebCampus received high praise for its China Program, a unique initiative that offers graduate degrees to dozens of Chinese students in Beijing. According to John R. Bourne, Sloan-C executive director, Stevens is “a vigorous entrepreneurial institution, engaged in many new forms of education, including online education and the offshore education trade.” The Sloan Consortium is the nation’s premier online learning association. Stevens’ courses in China are “delivered one-third online by Stevens’ faculty, another third on-ground by Stevens’ faculty visiting China, and another third by US-trained Chinese faculty at the host institution,” said Robert Ubell, Dean of Online Learning at Stevens, who manages Stevens’ education and training programs in China. Since the program was launched three years ago, about a dozen Stevens’ faculty have taught at Stevens partner institutions, Beijing Institute of Technology, one of China’s top engineering schools, and Central University of Finance Economics, the nation’s leading banking and finance school. Faculty who travel to China provide intense education for a period of several weeks and then return to the US. While Stevens provides instruction not only in Beijing but online from Hoboken, the host provides infrastructure—classrooms, computers, and marketing—as well as local faculty for a third of the curriculum. Thirty students have already received their masters degrees from Stevens at ceremonies conducted in Beijing. All courses are taught in English, whether by Stevens or partner faculty. “Stevens has carved out a niche market in a country with a huge potential demand for technology education and US degrees,” concluded Bourne in his article in Sloan-C Views. Also, in December, two of the nation’s prominent corporate learning executives, Luther Tai of Consolidated Edison Company and Kee Meng Yeo of Johnson & Johnson, joined the Board of Directors of WebCampus.Stevens. The two industry leaders complement a notable group of current

board members, drawn from Fortune 500 companies as well as from some of the country’s top universities. Dr. Maureen Weatherall, Vice President for University Enrollment and Academic Services, delivered a talk to a gathering of global university presidents at an international education conference in Beijing in late 2005. Weatherall’s lecture was given at the International Forum of University Presidents (IFUP-ICT 05), held in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the founding of Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT). She reported on the acaMaureen Weatherall demic aims of Technogenesis, the Stevens’ entrepreneurial approach to higher education. Experts from Stevens and Tallaght Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland, in April delivered a joint international presentation at the Interphex 2006 Conference held at the Javits Center in New York City. The presentation unveiled a new and innovative initiative to create an International Center for Pharmaceutical Education (ICPE), which will provide a full range of technical education and training, granting degrees and qualifications to the pharmaceutical/healthcare industry worldwide. The presentation, “How a US and European Educational Partnership Can Provide a Complete Range of Educational and Training Qualifications to the Pharmaceutical/Healthcare Industry Worldwide,” was delivered by Professor Richard Berkof, Distinguished Industry Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Engineering Program, and Dr. Edwin Carey, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at the Tallaght Institute of Technology.

5


Interdisciplinary research in nanotechnology is going forward in nanomaterials, nanomachines, microchemical systems and nano/microbiology. Nanotechnology stands out as a likely launch pad to a new technological era, because it focuses on perhaps the final engineering scales that people have yet to master. Stevens is aggregating the expertise to meet the challenges of this new frontier.

Professor Frank Fisher, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, received a Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) grant from the National Science Foundation to enhance the research and educational initiatives under way at Stevens in the areas of nanotechnology and multi-scale engineering. Acquired in collaboration with Professors Henry Du, Yong Shi and Zhenqi Zhu, the Nanoscale Manipulation and Experimental Characterization Instrument (NMECI) will provide nanometer-resolution, scanning electron microscope compatible manipulation, enabling critical nanoscale experimental investigations spanning many key emerging nano/microtechnology areas at Stevens. These will include nanomaterials development/characterization, nano/micro sensors and actuators, and micro-chemical/mechanical systems. Professor Matthew Libera, Professor of Materials Engineering, also received a MRI grant from the NSF.

Libera’s team of Professors Henry Du and Svetlana Sukhishvili from Stevens, Patricia Soteropolous (PHRI/UMDNJ) and Treena Arinzeh (NJIT) obtained the Dip Pen Nanolithography System for Surface Nanofunctionalization (DPN) to research how individual cells behave when they stick to a surface. Such work may lead to new sensors that can detect trace quantities of harmful chemicals and new tools for biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. DPN is among the newest and most advanced scientific tools for controlling how the surfaces of materials interact with their surroundings, and can create patterns that are almost 1,000 times smaller than those in state-of-the-art electronic devices like advanced computer chips. Furthermore, DPN can deposit as little as a few molecules at each point in the surface pattern, and this capability gives scientists and engineers impressive new control over chemical reactions that occur at very specific points on a surface.

Our Biomedical Engineering program is equipped with new labs and faculty, and with a growing, highly energized undergraduate constituency that is engaged in entrepreneurial research and activity within the field. After a spirited meeting with Professor Arthur Ritter, Stevens’ Director of Biomedical Engineering, Dr. Thomas Haher ’72 was determined to help create, as he put it, “the finest Biomedical Engineering Laboratory in the country” at Stevens. Together with his associates at Clinical Engineering Services, Inc., Haher set out to program to provide generous donations of in-kind biomed lab equipment and installation services to Stevens. The plan was to facilitate a collaborative partnership based in a comprehensive menu of biomechanical studies, while also offering enhanced training opportunities for Stevens students. “By promoting work on real-time projects and interaction with experts in the field,” said Haher, “this gift can only have a positive impact on accomplishing our shared goal of minimizing the gap between academia and current industry needs.” Haher stands as a shining example of alumni who give back to Stevens by sharing their expertise and professional partnerships to benefit new generations of students.

The President’s Report

International outreach through partnerships with other academic institutions and multi-national companies and industries is expanding Stevens’ global footprint and establishing our presence in higher education and research worldwide.

In an article published in the flagship newsletter of the Sloan Consortium, Stevens’ WebCampus received high praise for its China Program, a unique initiative that offers graduate degrees to dozens of Chinese students in Beijing. According to John R. Bourne, Sloan-C executive director, Stevens is “a vigorous entrepreneurial institution, engaged in many new forms of education, including online education and the offshore education trade.” The Sloan Consortium is the nation’s premier online learning association. Stevens’ courses in China are “delivered one-third online by Stevens’ faculty, another third on-ground by Stevens’ faculty visiting China, and another third by US-trained Chinese faculty at the host institution,” said Robert Ubell, Dean of Online Learning at Stevens, who manages Stevens’ education and training programs in China. Since the program was launched three years ago, about a dozen Stevens’ faculty have taught at Stevens partner institutions, Beijing Institute of Technology, one of China’s top engineering schools, and Central University of Finance Economics, the nation’s leading banking and finance school. Faculty who travel to China provide intense education for a period of several weeks and then return to the US. While Stevens provides instruction not only in Beijing but online from Hoboken, the host provides infrastructure—classrooms, computers, and marketing—as well as local faculty for a third of the curriculum. Thirty students have already received their masters degrees from Stevens at ceremonies conducted in Beijing. All courses are taught in English, whether by Stevens or partner faculty. “Stevens has carved out a niche market in a country with a huge potential demand for technology education and US degrees,” concluded Bourne in his article in Sloan-C Views. Also, in December, two of the nation’s prominent corporate learning executives, Luther Tai of Consolidated Edison Company and Kee Meng Yeo of Johnson & Johnson, joined the Board of Directors of WebCampus.Stevens. The two industry leaders complement a notable group of current

board members, drawn from Fortune 500 companies as well as from some of the country’s top universities. Dr. Maureen Weatherall, Vice President for University Enrollment and Academic Services, delivered a talk to a gathering of global university presidents at an international education conference in Beijing in late 2005. Weatherall’s lecture was given at the International Forum of University Presidents (IFUP-ICT 05), held in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the founding of Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT). She reported on the acaMaureen Weatherall demic aims of Technogenesis, the Stevens’ entrepreneurial approach to higher education. Experts from Stevens and Tallaght Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland, in April delivered a joint international presentation at the Interphex 2006 Conference held at the Javits Center in New York City. The presentation unveiled a new and innovative initiative to create an International Center for Pharmaceutical Education (ICPE), which will provide a full range of technical education and training, granting degrees and qualifications to the pharmaceutical/healthcare industry worldwide. The presentation, “How a US and European Educational Partnership Can Provide a Complete Range of Educational and Training Qualifications to the Pharmaceutical/Healthcare Industry Worldwide,” was delivered by Professor Richard Berkof, Distinguished Industry Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Engineering Program, and Dr. Edwin Carey, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry at the Tallaght Institute of Technology.

5


Our undergraduate program in CyberSecurity got off to a great start, thanks to Computer Science Professors Susanne Wetzel and Rebecca Wright, who have won grants from Cisco, SUN Microsystems, and the National Science Foundation to establish the Stevens CyberSecurity Lab, which will be located in The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center.

Exemplifying the atmosphere of creative collaboration at Stevens, Professors Susanne Wetzel and Rebecca Wright have developed a new interdisciplinary degree program in CyberSecurity with funding from the National Science Foundation. The incoming class of 2010 has six freshmen joining this program; one sophomore has switched to the program as well. A number of incoming freshmen reported that they applied to Stevens specifically because of their interest in the new CyberSecurity degree. Professor Wright

This program will build Stevens’ capacity in information assurance and computer security education. The program is structured to pro-

vide students with security expertise within the context of a broad education, preparing them thoroughly for careers as information assurance and computer security professionals. Stevens is one of the few universities worldwide to offer such a CyberSecurity degree program at the undergraduate level. A cornerstone of the program is a hands-on CyberSecurity lab course that students take in their senior year. The cybersecurity lab is currently being designed and built in the new Babbio Center, with equipment grants from Cisco and SUN, as well as additional funding from the National Science Foundation.

Advanced work in secured systems, mathematical cryptography, decision-making systems and optimization, controlled quantum systems, and computer vision and visualization, distinguishes Stevens as an emerging leader in these areas. Stevens has been re-designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the National Information Assurance Education and Training Program, part of the National Security Agency (NSA), for academic years 2006-2009. Stevens was first recognized for this honor in 2003, and now shares this distinction with only about 50 other US universities. Professor Manu Malek, Director of the Graduate Certificate in CyberSecurity Program and Industry Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stevens, was again the coordinator of the application to NSA for this recognition. In the area of Mathematical Cryptography, a multidisciplinary effort allied with global e-security firm GLESEC, brings together members of the Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences Departments, as well as experts in Electrical and Computer Engineering, led by Professor Robert Gilman. The consortium seeks to mitigate security risks that organizations face as they move strongly into e-business and the use of the Internet for communications, information sharing and particularly securing their assets. The group’s approach is based on

The national search for a new Dean of The Howe School of Technology Management, assisted by an external search firm and an interview committee of faculty and academic and administrative leadership, selected Dr. Lex McCusker, who had served as Acting Dean during the search process. Senior Howe School Professor, Dr. C. Timothy Koeller succeeds Dr. Ted Stohr, who served admirably as The Howe School’s Dean of Academics and Research.

risk-management methodology to quantify risk, dealing with its dynamic nature and the justification for reducing it through technologies and services. Stevens alumnus Sergio Heker, founder and CEO of GLESEC, was part of the original team that managed the National Science Foundation Network (NSFnet). The collaboration of cutting-edge industrial entrepreneurs with pioneering academic researchers is a model that will guarantee American technology leadership in the new century.

Lex McCusker

As Dean of The Howe School, Dr. Lex McCusker brings a long history of high-level technology management responsibilities and project oversight, principally in the field of telecommunications. He is an expert in the fields of operations and logistics; general management and change management; strategic planning, analysis and implementation; and organizational development and communications. Prior to joining Stevens in 2004, McCusker served as Professional Services Vice President/General Manager at AT&T Laboratories. In this capacity, he oversaw dayto-day operations of the internal consulting practice of 450 high-power technical professionals, providing a wide range of consulting services to the organization, spanning data mining, database marketing and analysis, process monitoring/alerting, web development, multi-media services, information research services, software methods, prototyping, configuration management and market intelligence.

At AT&T Labs, McCusker also led a major new product realization initiative transitioning technology and inventions from R&D labs into potential profit-generating business units. As the new Associate Dean for Research and Academics at The Howe School, Dr. Tim Koeller will be responsible for the overall academic culture of the school and for leading its efforts to create communities of research and creative enterprise. He will also handle all dayto-day faculty issues, including faculty recruitment, evaluation and development, and will provide guidance and direction to the overall Howe School research program. Finally, Koeller will also take on the responsibility for directing The Howe School’s doctoral program, including the improvement plan for the program that began this past academic year.

After its official dedication, October 7, 2005, The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center hosted its first class of students, from the Business & Technology undergraduate degree program, in May 2006. The Babbio Center has rapidly become a popular facility for events and presentations. In February, The New Jersey Technology Council (NJTC) presented “Wireless Evolution: Applications, Services and Content,” the first post-dedication expo at The Babbio Center. The expo included more than 20 companies from New Jersey and New York exhibiting new wireless applications, services and content that constitute the drivers of telecom innovation in the Garden State region. New Jersey is in a hot spot of rapidly converging wireless, telecommunications and media industries. The expo covered topics such as mobile multimedia and marketing, place shifting, social networks, location-based services, mobile video streaming and other technology and network developments.

igniting spark of the process of innovation and the insights that move an idea along the innovation path from conception to commercialization.

The Howe School Alliance for Technology Management (HSATM) also held its annual conference at The Babbio Center on June 7, examining the topic of The Creativity–Innovation Connection. The Conference focused on creativity as both the

The President’s Report

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Our undergraduate program in CyberSecurity got off to a great start, thanks to Computer Science Professors Susanne Wetzel and Rebecca Wright, who have won grants from Cisco, SUN Microsystems, and the National Science Foundation to establish the Stevens CyberSecurity Lab, which will be located in The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center.

Exemplifying the atmosphere of creative collaboration at Stevens, Professors Susanne Wetzel and Rebecca Wright have developed a new interdisciplinary degree program in CyberSecurity with funding from the National Science Foundation. The incoming class of 2010 has six freshmen joining this program; one sophomore has switched to the program as well. A number of incoming freshmen reported that they applied to Stevens specifically because of their interest in the new CyberSecurity degree. Professor Wright

This program will build Stevens’ capacity in information assurance and computer security education. The program is structured to pro-

vide students with security expertise within the context of a broad education, preparing them thoroughly for careers as information assurance and computer security professionals. Stevens is one of the few universities worldwide to offer such a CyberSecurity degree program at the undergraduate level. A cornerstone of the program is a hands-on CyberSecurity lab course that students take in their senior year. The cybersecurity lab is currently being designed and built in the new Babbio Center, with equipment grants from Cisco and SUN, as well as additional funding from the National Science Foundation.

Advanced work in secured systems, mathematical cryptography, decision-making systems and optimization, controlled quantum systems, and computer vision and visualization, distinguishes Stevens as an emerging leader in these areas. Stevens has been re-designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education by the National Information Assurance Education and Training Program, part of the National Security Agency (NSA), for academic years 2006-2009. Stevens was first recognized for this honor in 2003, and now shares this distinction with only about 50 other US universities. Professor Manu Malek, Director of the Graduate Certificate in CyberSecurity Program and Industry Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stevens, was again the coordinator of the application to NSA for this recognition. In the area of Mathematical Cryptography, a multidisciplinary effort allied with global e-security firm GLESEC, brings together members of the Computer Science and Mathematical Sciences Departments, as well as experts in Electrical and Computer Engineering, led by Professor Robert Gilman. The consortium seeks to mitigate security risks that organizations face as they move strongly into e-business and the use of the Internet for communications, information sharing and particularly securing their assets. The group’s approach is based on

The national search for a new Dean of The Howe School of Technology Management, assisted by an external search firm and an interview committee of faculty and academic and administrative leadership, selected Dr. Lex McCusker, who had served as Acting Dean during the search process. Senior Howe School Professor, Dr. C. Timothy Koeller succeeds Dr. Ted Stohr, who served admirably as The Howe School’s Dean of Academics and Research.

risk-management methodology to quantify risk, dealing with its dynamic nature and the justification for reducing it through technologies and services. Stevens alumnus Sergio Heker, founder and CEO of GLESEC, was part of the original team that managed the National Science Foundation Network (NSFnet). The collaboration of cutting-edge industrial entrepreneurs with pioneering academic researchers is a model that will guarantee American technology leadership in the new century.

Lex McCusker

As Dean of The Howe School, Dr. Lex McCusker brings a long history of high-level technology management responsibilities and project oversight, principally in the field of telecommunications. He is an expert in the fields of operations and logistics; general management and change management; strategic planning, analysis and implementation; and organizational development and communications. Prior to joining Stevens in 2004, McCusker served as Professional Services Vice President/General Manager at AT&T Laboratories. In this capacity, he oversaw dayto-day operations of the internal consulting practice of 450 high-power technical professionals, providing a wide range of consulting services to the organization, spanning data mining, database marketing and analysis, process monitoring/alerting, web development, multi-media services, information research services, software methods, prototyping, configuration management and market intelligence.

At AT&T Labs, McCusker also led a major new product realization initiative transitioning technology and inventions from R&D labs into potential profit-generating business units. As the new Associate Dean for Research and Academics at The Howe School, Dr. Tim Koeller will be responsible for the overall academic culture of the school and for leading its efforts to create communities of research and creative enterprise. He will also handle all dayto-day faculty issues, including faculty recruitment, evaluation and development, and will provide guidance and direction to the overall Howe School research program. Finally, Koeller will also take on the responsibility for directing The Howe School’s doctoral program, including the improvement plan for the program that began this past academic year.

After its official dedication, October 7, 2005, The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center hosted its first class of students, from the Business & Technology undergraduate degree program, in May 2006. The Babbio Center has rapidly become a popular facility for events and presentations. In February, The New Jersey Technology Council (NJTC) presented “Wireless Evolution: Applications, Services and Content,” the first post-dedication expo at The Babbio Center. The expo included more than 20 companies from New Jersey and New York exhibiting new wireless applications, services and content that constitute the drivers of telecom innovation in the Garden State region. New Jersey is in a hot spot of rapidly converging wireless, telecommunications and media industries. The expo covered topics such as mobile multimedia and marketing, place shifting, social networks, location-based services, mobile video streaming and other technology and network developments.

igniting spark of the process of innovation and the insights that move an idea along the innovation path from conception to commercialization.

The Howe School Alliance for Technology Management (HSATM) also held its annual conference at The Babbio Center on June 7, examining the topic of The Creativity–Innovation Connection. The Conference focused on creativity as both the

The President’s Report

7


The undergraduate Business & Technology program continues to yield a remarkable crop of highly talented and self-motivated young leaders, and major industry has remained impressed with this unique cohort, bringing them into their organizations at higher levels and salaries than the average undergraduate with a background in business or technology studies. In May, a group of seniors from Stevens presented their senior design project findings to officials from New York City’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM) in a meeting held in The Babbio Center. The presentation was the culmination of two semesters of collaboration between the 17 seniors (11 Business and Technology majors; six Electrical Engineering majors) and officials at the OEM. The students worked with the OEM to improve their policies, procedures and internal operations in the areas of organization, processes and technology. The students split into four teams to tackle various areas of the OEM’s structure. Of the Business and Technology majors, Pamela Dorsett, Jessica Pruzinsky and Kathy Wu worked on organizational issues; Karen Donnelly, Mary Claire

Among the impressive technologies presented at this year’s Senior Design Projects Day was the MicroSpy BioChip™. The student team of Ali Saaemi and Manish Modi, from the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department, devised this lab-on-a-chip system created to provide a microbial detector that can sense the presence of bacteria and other microbes, with implications for detection of contaminants in the air and in the food supply, from packaging all the way to the store shelf. Their project sponsors include the Center for Applied Genomics (CAG), the Public Health Research Institute – Tuberculosis Center, and the Stevens Microstructure Research Center. Their faculty advisor was Professor Hong Man. The Emergency Communications System (ECS) project team worked to improve emergency communication between blood banks and local agencies. The ECS project was a collaborative effort from students from the ECE Department and the Business and Technology Program. ECE students Shamim Akhtar, Ravi Amin, Ndiritu Muriuki and Imtiazur Rahman worked with Business and Technology students Joel Perez, Nick Mabunay, Sarah Quinn and Praveen Tanguturi (a doctoral candidate).

The President’s Report

D’Elia, Malanka Misilo and Jennifer Palumbo handled processes; and Ed Bordet, Ian Gorham, Tim Akpinar and Jiby Jacob were responsible for investigating data/information problems. The Electrical Engineering majors, Ali Afzal, Srikant Gupta, Stephanie LeBlanc, Rajarshi Nandy, Alexander Semidey and Carlos Vinasco, worked on a technology plan for the city. At the conclusion of the student presentations, OEM Commissioner Joe Bruno commended all the students and faculty involved. “The work you’ve done analyzing Watch Command is crucial to us,” he said. “You did a great job and exactly what we wanted you to do. You’ve given us a wake-up call and told us where the problems are.” This year, Stevens will once again partner with the OEM to address potential areas for improvement.

Design Day attendees were also able to try out the Women’s Lacrosse Skill Development Training Device, from Mechanical Engineering students Neha Desai, Ryan Donovan, Mike Freeman, Robert Hoar, Thomas Presutti and Oliver Smith. The team’s device was designed to assist women lacrosse players in practicing their draw, a critical element of a lacrosse game. The training device takes the place of the player’s opponent, enabling her to improve her skill at the draw without the aid of another person. Their portable device has adjustable skill levels, which help quicken a player’s reaction time.

In September, Stevens welcomed the incoming class of 2010, one of Stevens’ largest incoming classes in recent years, with approximately 530 students. The class of 2010 includes a large percentage of students from across the US, with 40 percent of the class coming from outside of New Jersey, as well as many international students. This year, Stevens also welcomes its first international students from the Dominican Republic.

In September, Stevens welcomed the incoming class of 2010, one of Stevens’ largest incoming classes in recent years, with approximately 530 students. The class of 2010 includes a large percentage of students from across the US, with 40 percent of the class coming from outside of New Jersey, as well as many international students. This year, Stevens also welcomes its first international students from the Dominican Republic. The entering class includes a large percentage of students in The Schaefer School of Engineering, at 65 percent, with 25 percent from The School of Sciences and Arts and 10 percent in The Howe School of Technology Management. In addition to an already demanding curriculum, approximately 60 members of the incoming class will take part in Stevens’ Scholars program, which requires outstanding achievement on the SATs (this year saw a midrange of scores from 1430 to 1490) and a high grade point average. Overall, of those reporting a class rank, 54 percent of the incoming class graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school classes, up from 49 percent last year. The class of 2010 also averages an overall GPA of 3.7 on a 4.0 scale. Stevens Athletics celebrated many individual and team successes during the 2005-2006 academic year. Six teams advanced to post-season play, including Men’s Soccer (NCAA Sweet 16); Women’s Soccer (NCAA Sweet 16); Men’s Lacrosse (NCAA 2nd Round); Men’s Volleyball (Molten Final 4); Women’s Basketball (ECAC); Women’s Volleyball (NCAA 2nd Round). Five Stevens teams

won conference championships: Men’s Soccer, Women’s Soccer, Men’s Lacrosse, Men’s Tennis and Women’s Volleyball. Individual honors included Patrick Dorywalski (Men's Volleyball) being named Coach of the Year, six Stevens athletes named conference Players of the Year (Siena YorkCarr, women's soccer; Tim Meehan, Baseball; Mark Bielicky, Men's Lacrosse; Dana Bacalla, Women's Tennis; Dawn Herring, Women's Volleyball; Ricky Bawa, Men's Tennis) and four Stevens athletes named conference Rookie of the Year (Salme Cook, Women's Soccer; Melanie Volk, Women's Volleyball; Chris Ford, Men's Lacrosse; Kobe Attias, Men's Tennis). In addition, Women's Tennis coach Steve Gachko was named Coaching Staff of the Year. Michael Schulte and Andrew Cranford were named firstteam All-Americans in Men’s Volleyball; Tim Meehan was named first-team Academic All-American in Baseball; Mark Bielicky was named third-team All-American in Men’s Lacrosse; and Heather Dean was named second-team Academic All-American in Women’s Soccer.

9


The undergraduate Business & Technology program continues to yield a remarkable crop of highly talented and self-motivated young leaders, and major industry has remained impressed with this unique cohort, bringing them into their organizations at higher levels and salaries than the average undergraduate with a background in business or technology studies. In May, a group of seniors from Stevens presented their senior design project findings to officials from New York City’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM) in a meeting held in The Babbio Center. The presentation was the culmination of two semesters of collaboration between the 17 seniors (11 Business and Technology majors; six Electrical Engineering majors) and officials at the OEM. The students worked with the OEM to improve their policies, procedures and internal operations in the areas of organization, processes and technology. The students split into four teams to tackle various areas of the OEM’s structure. Of the Business and Technology majors, Pamela Dorsett, Jessica Pruzinsky and Kathy Wu worked on organizational issues; Karen Donnelly, Mary Claire

Among the impressive technologies presented at this year’s Senior Design Projects Day was the MicroSpy BioChip™. The student team of Ali Saaemi and Manish Modi, from the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department, devised this lab-on-a-chip system created to provide a microbial detector that can sense the presence of bacteria and other microbes, with implications for detection of contaminants in the air and in the food supply, from packaging all the way to the store shelf. Their project sponsors include the Center for Applied Genomics (CAG), the Public Health Research Institute – Tuberculosis Center, and the Stevens Microstructure Research Center. Their faculty advisor was Professor Hong Man. The Emergency Communications System (ECS) project team worked to improve emergency communication between blood banks and local agencies. The ECS project was a collaborative effort from students from the ECE Department and the Business and Technology Program. ECE students Shamim Akhtar, Ravi Amin, Ndiritu Muriuki and Imtiazur Rahman worked with Business and Technology students Joel Perez, Nick Mabunay, Sarah Quinn and Praveen Tanguturi (a doctoral candidate).

The President’s Report

D’Elia, Malanka Misilo and Jennifer Palumbo handled processes; and Ed Bordet, Ian Gorham, Tim Akpinar and Jiby Jacob were responsible for investigating data/information problems. The Electrical Engineering majors, Ali Afzal, Srikant Gupta, Stephanie LeBlanc, Rajarshi Nandy, Alexander Semidey and Carlos Vinasco, worked on a technology plan for the city. At the conclusion of the student presentations, OEM Commissioner Joe Bruno commended all the students and faculty involved. “The work you’ve done analyzing Watch Command is crucial to us,” he said. “You did a great job and exactly what we wanted you to do. You’ve given us a wake-up call and told us where the problems are.” This year, Stevens will once again partner with the OEM to address potential areas for improvement.

Design Day attendees were also able to try out the Women’s Lacrosse Skill Development Training Device, from Mechanical Engineering students Neha Desai, Ryan Donovan, Mike Freeman, Robert Hoar, Thomas Presutti and Oliver Smith. The team’s device was designed to assist women lacrosse players in practicing their draw, a critical element of a lacrosse game. The training device takes the place of the player’s opponent, enabling her to improve her skill at the draw without the aid of another person. Their portable device has adjustable skill levels, which help quicken a player’s reaction time.

In September, Stevens welcomed the incoming class of 2010, one of Stevens’ largest incoming classes in recent years, with approximately 530 students. The class of 2010 includes a large percentage of students from across the US, with 40 percent of the class coming from outside of New Jersey, as well as many international students. This year, Stevens also welcomes its first international students from the Dominican Republic.

In September, Stevens welcomed the incoming class of 2010, one of Stevens’ largest incoming classes in recent years, with approximately 530 students. The class of 2010 includes a large percentage of students from across the US, with 40 percent of the class coming from outside of New Jersey, as well as many international students. This year, Stevens also welcomes its first international students from the Dominican Republic. The entering class includes a large percentage of students in The Schaefer School of Engineering, at 65 percent, with 25 percent from The School of Sciences and Arts and 10 percent in The Howe School of Technology Management. In addition to an already demanding curriculum, approximately 60 members of the incoming class will take part in Stevens’ Scholars program, which requires outstanding achievement on the SATs (this year saw a midrange of scores from 1430 to 1490) and a high grade point average. Overall, of those reporting a class rank, 54 percent of the incoming class graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school classes, up from 49 percent last year. The class of 2010 also averages an overall GPA of 3.7 on a 4.0 scale. Stevens Athletics celebrated many individual and team successes during the 2005-2006 academic year. Six teams advanced to post-season play, including Men’s Soccer (NCAA Sweet 16); Women’s Soccer (NCAA Sweet 16); Men’s Lacrosse (NCAA 2nd Round); Men’s Volleyball (Molten Final 4); Women’s Basketball (ECAC); Women’s Volleyball (NCAA 2nd Round). Five Stevens teams

won conference championships: Men’s Soccer, Women’s Soccer, Men’s Lacrosse, Men’s Tennis and Women’s Volleyball. Individual honors included Patrick Dorywalski (Men's Volleyball) being named Coach of the Year, six Stevens athletes named conference Players of the Year (Siena YorkCarr, women's soccer; Tim Meehan, Baseball; Mark Bielicky, Men's Lacrosse; Dana Bacalla, Women's Tennis; Dawn Herring, Women's Volleyball; Ricky Bawa, Men's Tennis) and four Stevens athletes named conference Rookie of the Year (Salme Cook, Women's Soccer; Melanie Volk, Women's Volleyball; Chris Ford, Men's Lacrosse; Kobe Attias, Men's Tennis). In addition, Women's Tennis coach Steve Gachko was named Coaching Staff of the Year. Michael Schulte and Andrew Cranford were named firstteam All-Americans in Men’s Volleyball; Tim Meehan was named first-team Academic All-American in Baseball; Mark Bielicky was named third-team All-American in Men’s Lacrosse; and Heather Dean was named second-team Academic All-American in Women’s Soccer.

9


Dr. Helena S. Wisniewski, Vice President for University Research & Enterprise Development, in June organized and hosted the first in a series of monthly “Disruptive Technologies Roundtables” at Stevens. The intention of the by-invitation roundtables is to provide a forum for networking and promoting interaction among Stevens, industry and the investment community, leading to joint innovation and enterprise. Each month will focus on a different Stevens technology that either is ready for commercialization, or is the basis of a Technogenesis start-up company. The inaugural June roundtable featured the topic, “UltraSensitive Sensors for Perimeter Security and More,” specifically technologies that form the basis for the Stevens Technogenesis start-up, Castle Point Scientific, LLC, formed by VP Wisniewski’s office in concert with the technology inventor, Physics Professor Hong-Liang Cui. Castle Point Scientific’s mission is to commercialize technology developed

at Stevens for next-generation, fiber optic-based, ultra-sensitive sensing systems, which have demonstrated superior performance and promise to be a revolutionary approach for a diversity of sensor-based applications, including perimeter and border security. Other Disruptive Technologies Roundtables have considered Stevens Proof of Concept (SPOC), a company co-founded by Stevens students and Dr. Norman Marcus, based on a student-designed biomedical device for the precise detection of pain generation in muscle groups; and Attila Technologies, a company that has produced a multi-spectrum radio that overcomes communications roadblocks among emergency firstresponders. Also, through negotiations conducted by VP Wisniewski’s office, PlasmaSol Corporation, a Technogenesis company founded at Stevens, was acquired by Stryker Corporation in a merger that was concluded in December 2005. The cost of the transaction totaled approximately $17.5 million, including an up-front cash payment, plus the assumption of certain liabilities by Stryker. PlasmaSol developed technology that will allow Stryker to provide sterilization equipment for use in sterilizing certain of its MedSurg Equipment products. This was the second sale of a Technogenesis company in two years, the first being HydroGlobe, an environmental technology company sold to Graver Corporation.

Among Stevens’ new, distinguished and recognized faculty: Murray James Elder joins Stevens’ Department of Mathematical Sciences as an Assistant Professor. Elder will lecture and focus on research, and is also a member of the Algebraic Cryptography Center. His research interests include generic complexity of combinatorial and group theoretic problems, automata theory, geometric group theory, and problems in stack-sorting and pattern-avoiding permutations. Elder holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree, a Master of Science and a Postgraduate Diploma in Mathematical Sciences, all from The University of Melbourne, Australia. He earned his Bachelor of Applied Science from LaTrobe University, Bendigo, Australia. Before coming to Stevens Elder served as a Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics and Applied Statistics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. Paul Rohmeyer joins Stevens as an Industry Professor, teaching graduate-level courses on Information Security Management and Network Management as a faculty member in The Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management. Rohmeyer has completed research in Information Security

The President’s Report

Management and Business Continuity Planning, and was a contributing author in the book Guarding Your Business: A Management Approach to Security. Rohmeyer is also a seniorlevel consultant with expertise in IT Management, Project Management, Information Security and IT Audit. Prior to his consulting career he held positions as Director of Strategic Business Intelligence with AXA Financial Services and as Director of IT Architecture Planning for Bellcore. He also has held information systems audit and IT management positions with Citicorp and American Home Products Corporation. Rohmeyer holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from Rutgers University, a MBA in Finance from St. Joseph’s University and Master of Science and doctoral degrees in Information Management from Stevens. Paul Rohmeyer

Eui-Hyeok (EH) Yang has joined Stevens as an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department. Previously he worked with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where he initiated the development of MEMS actuator-based adaptive optical devices. Yang also served as a senior member of the engineering staff and the task manager for several technology development projects at JPL in the area of Eui-Hyeok (EH) Yang micro- and nanotechnologies. He initiated and led the development of MEMS-based deformable mirrors and actuators for future large aperture telescopes, and also led the development of MEMS-based piezoelectric valves for future micro-spacecraft applications. His current research interests include all aspects of microsensors/actuators, microfluidics, adaptive optics, micro/nano-energy conversion, and nano-manufacturing technologies. Yang has published more than 90 papers in the field of MEMS, and has six patents issued or pending. He is a member of the Technical Program Committee (TPC) of the IEEE Sensors Conference. He has served as a referee for several archival journals, international conferences and proposals and is a Senior Member of IEEE. In recognition of his excellence in advancing the use of MEMS-based actuators for space applications, he received the Lew Allen Award for Excellence for 2003 at JPL. Yang received his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and doctoral degrees in the Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering from Ajou University, Korea. Svetlana Malinovskaia has joined the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics as a Research Associate Professor. Previously, Malinovskaia worked as a Research Associate at the Center for Ultrafast Optics at the University of Michigan, where she was a lecturer and FOCUS Fellow. She was also a visiting Research Scientist at ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University. Svetlana Malinovskaia Malinovskaia is also the recipient of numerous honors, most recently receiving a Lecturer’s Professional Development grant. She is an associate member of the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics and a member of the Optical Society of America, the American Chemical Society and the American Physical Society. Malinovskaia has been widely published and presented more than a dozen invited talks. She received her Doctorate in Theoretical Physics from Novosibirsk State University and Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion of Russian Academy of Science, Russia. She holds a Master of Science in Physics from Novosibirsk State University and a Bachelor of Science from Krasnoyarsk State University, both in Russia.

Stefan Strauf has joined the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics as an Assistant Professor. He received his Doctorate from the University of Bremen, Germany, in 2001, with his thesis titled, “Impurity luminescence of wide band gap semiconductors.” After one year of post-doctoral work at the University of Bremen, Strauf served as a Research Associate at UC Santa Barbara, where he worked on photonic crystal quantum dot lasers, cavity-QED with single quantum dots in micropillar and photonic crystal cavities, and coupled quantum dots.His research interests include experimental semiconductor nanophotonics, light-matter interactions in photonic band gap structures and non-classical light sources for quantum information science. Ruth Bolotin Schwartz joins Stevens’ Department of Computer Science as a Senior Teaching Professor. Schwartz holds a Doctorate in Business Administration from Temple University; a Master of Science in Computer Science from University of California; and earned her Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Mathematics from Northwestern University. Previously, Schwartz lectured in the Department of Computer Science at Indiana University South Bend and Virginia State University. She was an Associate Professor at Virginia State University and St. Joseph’s University. She is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and INFORMS. X. Frank Xu, Assistant Professor of Civil Environmental & Ocean Engineering at The Schaefer School, was named an Early Career Principal Investigator, a highly competitive and prestigious award from the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the Office of Science, US Department of Energy (DOE). Stevens alumna Kathryn Abel, Director of the Engineering Management Program at Stevens Institute of Technology, was honored with the Merl Baker Award at the 2006 American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Conference and Exposition. It is the second highest award from the Engineering Management Division of ASEE and annually honors those who have performed exemplary service. Abel recently finished her tenure as president of the Engineering Management Division, and in prior years she was also the program chairman as well as treasurer. Professor Richard Reilly of The Howe School was appointed to a national advisory panel working with the Innovation Center of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME). The panel will advise the NBME on procedures, processes and tools for assessing physician behavior. Professor John V. Farr, Department Director, Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, was nominated to serve on the Air Force Studies Board (AFSB) of the National Academies.

11


Dr. Helena S. Wisniewski, Vice President for University Research & Enterprise Development, in June organized and hosted the first in a series of monthly “Disruptive Technologies Roundtables” at Stevens. The intention of the by-invitation roundtables is to provide a forum for networking and promoting interaction among Stevens, industry and the investment community, leading to joint innovation and enterprise. Each month will focus on a different Stevens technology that either is ready for commercialization, or is the basis of a Technogenesis start-up company. The inaugural June roundtable featured the topic, “UltraSensitive Sensors for Perimeter Security and More,” specifically technologies that form the basis for the Stevens Technogenesis start-up, Castle Point Scientific, LLC, formed by VP Wisniewski’s office in concert with the technology inventor, Physics Professor Hong-Liang Cui. Castle Point Scientific’s mission is to commercialize technology developed

at Stevens for next-generation, fiber optic-based, ultra-sensitive sensing systems, which have demonstrated superior performance and promise to be a revolutionary approach for a diversity of sensor-based applications, including perimeter and border security. Other Disruptive Technologies Roundtables have considered Stevens Proof of Concept (SPOC), a company co-founded by Stevens students and Dr. Norman Marcus, based on a student-designed biomedical device for the precise detection of pain generation in muscle groups; and Attila Technologies, a company that has produced a multi-spectrum radio that overcomes communications roadblocks among emergency firstresponders. Also, through negotiations conducted by VP Wisniewski’s office, PlasmaSol Corporation, a Technogenesis company founded at Stevens, was acquired by Stryker Corporation in a merger that was concluded in December 2005. The cost of the transaction totaled approximately $17.5 million, including an up-front cash payment, plus the assumption of certain liabilities by Stryker. PlasmaSol developed technology that will allow Stryker to provide sterilization equipment for use in sterilizing certain of its MedSurg Equipment products. This was the second sale of a Technogenesis company in two years, the first being HydroGlobe, an environmental technology company sold to Graver Corporation.

Among Stevens’ new, distinguished and recognized faculty: Murray James Elder joins Stevens’ Department of Mathematical Sciences as an Assistant Professor. Elder will lecture and focus on research, and is also a member of the Algebraic Cryptography Center. His research interests include generic complexity of combinatorial and group theoretic problems, automata theory, geometric group theory, and problems in stack-sorting and pattern-avoiding permutations. Elder holds a Doctor of Philosophy degree, a Master of Science and a Postgraduate Diploma in Mathematical Sciences, all from The University of Melbourne, Australia. He earned his Bachelor of Applied Science from LaTrobe University, Bendigo, Australia. Before coming to Stevens Elder served as a Lecturer in the Department of Mathematics and Applied Statistics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. Paul Rohmeyer joins Stevens as an Industry Professor, teaching graduate-level courses on Information Security Management and Network Management as a faculty member in The Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management. Rohmeyer has completed research in Information Security

The President’s Report

Management and Business Continuity Planning, and was a contributing author in the book Guarding Your Business: A Management Approach to Security. Rohmeyer is also a seniorlevel consultant with expertise in IT Management, Project Management, Information Security and IT Audit. Prior to his consulting career he held positions as Director of Strategic Business Intelligence with AXA Financial Services and as Director of IT Architecture Planning for Bellcore. He also has held information systems audit and IT management positions with Citicorp and American Home Products Corporation. Rohmeyer holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from Rutgers University, a MBA in Finance from St. Joseph’s University and Master of Science and doctoral degrees in Information Management from Stevens. Paul Rohmeyer

Eui-Hyeok (EH) Yang has joined Stevens as an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department. Previously he worked with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where he initiated the development of MEMS actuator-based adaptive optical devices. Yang also served as a senior member of the engineering staff and the task manager for several technology development projects at JPL in the area of Eui-Hyeok (EH) Yang micro- and nanotechnologies. He initiated and led the development of MEMS-based deformable mirrors and actuators for future large aperture telescopes, and also led the development of MEMS-based piezoelectric valves for future micro-spacecraft applications. His current research interests include all aspects of microsensors/actuators, microfluidics, adaptive optics, micro/nano-energy conversion, and nano-manufacturing technologies. Yang has published more than 90 papers in the field of MEMS, and has six patents issued or pending. He is a member of the Technical Program Committee (TPC) of the IEEE Sensors Conference. He has served as a referee for several archival journals, international conferences and proposals and is a Senior Member of IEEE. In recognition of his excellence in advancing the use of MEMS-based actuators for space applications, he received the Lew Allen Award for Excellence for 2003 at JPL. Yang received his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and doctoral degrees in the Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering from Ajou University, Korea. Svetlana Malinovskaia has joined the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics as a Research Associate Professor. Previously, Malinovskaia worked as a Research Associate at the Center for Ultrafast Optics at the University of Michigan, where she was a lecturer and FOCUS Fellow. She was also a visiting Research Scientist at ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University. Svetlana Malinovskaia Malinovskaia is also the recipient of numerous honors, most recently receiving a Lecturer’s Professional Development grant. She is an associate member of the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics and a member of the Optical Society of America, the American Chemical Society and the American Physical Society. Malinovskaia has been widely published and presented more than a dozen invited talks. She received her Doctorate in Theoretical Physics from Novosibirsk State University and Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion of Russian Academy of Science, Russia. She holds a Master of Science in Physics from Novosibirsk State University and a Bachelor of Science from Krasnoyarsk State University, both in Russia.

Stefan Strauf has joined the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics as an Assistant Professor. He received his Doctorate from the University of Bremen, Germany, in 2001, with his thesis titled, “Impurity luminescence of wide band gap semiconductors.” After one year of post-doctoral work at the University of Bremen, Strauf served as a Research Associate at UC Santa Barbara, where he worked on photonic crystal quantum dot lasers, cavity-QED with single quantum dots in micropillar and photonic crystal cavities, and coupled quantum dots.His research interests include experimental semiconductor nanophotonics, light-matter interactions in photonic band gap structures and non-classical light sources for quantum information science. Ruth Bolotin Schwartz joins Stevens’ Department of Computer Science as a Senior Teaching Professor. Schwartz holds a Doctorate in Business Administration from Temple University; a Master of Science in Computer Science from University of California; and earned her Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Mathematics from Northwestern University. Previously, Schwartz lectured in the Department of Computer Science at Indiana University South Bend and Virginia State University. She was an Associate Professor at Virginia State University and St. Joseph’s University. She is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and INFORMS. X. Frank Xu, Assistant Professor of Civil Environmental & Ocean Engineering at The Schaefer School, was named an Early Career Principal Investigator, a highly competitive and prestigious award from the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the Office of Science, US Department of Energy (DOE). Stevens alumna Kathryn Abel, Director of the Engineering Management Program at Stevens Institute of Technology, was honored with the Merl Baker Award at the 2006 American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Conference and Exposition. It is the second highest award from the Engineering Management Division of ASEE and annually honors those who have performed exemplary service. Abel recently finished her tenure as president of the Engineering Management Division, and in prior years she was also the program chairman as well as treasurer. Professor Richard Reilly of The Howe School was appointed to a national advisory panel working with the Innovation Center of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME). The panel will advise the NBME on procedures, processes and tools for assessing physician behavior. Professor John V. Farr, Department Director, Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, was nominated to serve on the Air Force Studies Board (AFSB) of the National Academies.

11


Professor Adriana Compagnoni, an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science, chaired the International Workshop on Proof-Carrying Code (PCC) in Seattle, August 2006. The workshop aim was to bring together people from academia and industry and promote the collaboration between those adapting (PCC) ideas to new industrial applications, and experts in logic, type theory, programming languages, static analysis and compilers.

Julie Norris

Julie Norris joined the Office of Sponsored Research as a consultant. In this role, Norris will work closely with Stevens faculty on the construction of grant proposals for new and ongoing research projects across the spectrum of the university. Norris comes to Stevens after a long career at the University of Houston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Together, the financial operations team will ensure effective management of the gains made during a decade of rapid growth.

Dean of Engineering George P. Korfiatis announced the appointment of Ralph Giffin III as Director of Operations and Logistics for the prestigious System Design and Operational Effectiveness (SDOE) program, which resides in Stevens’ Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering

Management. Giffin comes to Stevens with more than 25 years of experience in the US defense industry. He has held numerous senior and executive management positions and served most recently as Vice President for Operations at Lockheed Martin’s Simulation, Training and Support Division in Orlando, Fla. The Office of Development and External Affairs welcomed two new members to its Major Gifts team, which is directed by Dawn Da Silva. Kristen Tegenborg comes to Stevens as Assistant Director of Major Gifts, having worked previously with the development team at St. Phillip’s Academy. She will oversee the administration of Stevens’ premier giving organization, the Edwin A. Stevens Society, now some 540 members strong. Michelle Schleibaum joined the Major Gifts team as Assistant Director for the area of scholarship fundraising and management. She had previously Kristen Tegenborg & Michelle Schleibaum served as Assistant Director for Annual Support Programs. Also joining Development was Michael McGarry in the position of Director of Planned Giving. McGarry had most recently worked as a planned giving officer at Seton Hall University.

Stevens Institute of Technology is a center for learning and research that encourages those who pass through its gates to reach for the stars, overcoming all challenges. Stevens graduates leaders in the creation and dissemination of knowledge that engenders new scientific discoveries and successful innovation in products, processes and businesses. Through its unique Technogenesis approach to research, innovation and the commercialization of new technology solutions, Stevens envisions a revival of the entrepreneurial genius that made America the freest society and the greatest industrial power on earth. This compelling vision was shared and acted upon by the founding Stevens family. And now, as the Institute ascends higher among the nation’s leading research universities, we collectively are building the foundation for long-term greatness. I am confident that the entire Stevens Community, from senior alumni to recent graduates, senses the potential and the excitement inherent in the conquest of today’s challenges, on the way to the incalculable promise of tomorrow. I hope the message of the preceding pages has touched you with the spirit that drives our great institution forward. Sincerely,

Recognizing the value of alternative energy systems, Stevens partnered with SunEdison of Baltimore, Md., to implement two showcase roof installations of solar panels on the S.C. Williams Library and the Schaefer Athletic Center, two of the larger facilities on the Stevens campus. SunEdison generously donated the entire cost to install the panels, including the bonding and maintenance costs for the next 25 years, allowing Stevens to use the solar energy produced at a locked-in rate of 9 cents per kilowatt hour for the next quarter-century.

required to produce a percentage of electricity through alternative energy resources. If a utility cannot produce such power itself, it has the option to buy it in the open marketplace for a renewable energy credit, which is where SunEdison expects to see benefits from the Stevens solar panel installation. With demand remaining high for these energy credits and the supply low, Stevens and SunEdison’s partnership offers a forward-looking model for meeting America’s energy needs.

In the current energy marketplace, power utilities can be

The majority of the River Terrace Apartments were completed, following a year-long renovation of six early-20th century apartment buildings located at Sixth Street and River Terrace. The full residential complex will accommodate approximately 150 undergraduate residents, providing much-needed space for this steadily growing population.

Hal Raveché

The administrative offices of The Howe School moved into fourth-floor accommodations at The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center. The fifth floor will soon be ready to accommodate the Department of Systems Engineering & Engineering Management. The sixth floor will shortly serve as the home of Stevens’ Maritime Security Laboratory, as well the CyberSecurity Laboratory and a Howe School center for research.

The President’s Report

13


Professor Adriana Compagnoni, an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science, chaired the International Workshop on Proof-Carrying Code (PCC) in Seattle, August 2006. The workshop aim was to bring together people from academia and industry and promote the collaboration between those adapting (PCC) ideas to new industrial applications, and experts in logic, type theory, programming languages, static analysis and compilers.

Julie Norris

Julie Norris joined the Office of Sponsored Research as a consultant. In this role, Norris will work closely with Stevens faculty on the construction of grant proposals for new and ongoing research projects across the spectrum of the university. Norris comes to Stevens after a long career at the University of Houston and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Together, the financial operations team will ensure effective management of the gains made during a decade of rapid growth.

Dean of Engineering George P. Korfiatis announced the appointment of Ralph Giffin III as Director of Operations and Logistics for the prestigious System Design and Operational Effectiveness (SDOE) program, which resides in Stevens’ Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering

Management. Giffin comes to Stevens with more than 25 years of experience in the US defense industry. He has held numerous senior and executive management positions and served most recently as Vice President for Operations at Lockheed Martin’s Simulation, Training and Support Division in Orlando, Fla. The Office of Development and External Affairs welcomed two new members to its Major Gifts team, which is directed by Dawn Da Silva. Kristen Tegenborg comes to Stevens as Assistant Director of Major Gifts, having worked previously with the development team at St. Phillip’s Academy. She will oversee the administration of Stevens’ premier giving organization, the Edwin A. Stevens Society, now some 540 members strong. Michelle Schleibaum joined the Major Gifts team as Assistant Director for the area of scholarship fundraising and management. She had previously Kristen Tegenborg & Michelle Schleibaum served as Assistant Director for Annual Support Programs. Also joining Development was Michael McGarry in the position of Director of Planned Giving. McGarry had most recently worked as a planned giving officer at Seton Hall University.

Stevens Institute of Technology is a center for learning and research that encourages those who pass through its gates to reach for the stars, overcoming all challenges. Stevens graduates leaders in the creation and dissemination of knowledge that engenders new scientific discoveries and successful innovation in products, processes and businesses. Through its unique Technogenesis approach to research, innovation and the commercialization of new technology solutions, Stevens envisions a revival of the entrepreneurial genius that made America the freest society and the greatest industrial power on earth. This compelling vision was shared and acted upon by the founding Stevens family. And now, as the Institute ascends higher among the nation’s leading research universities, we collectively are building the foundation for long-term greatness. I am confident that the entire Stevens Community, from senior alumni to recent graduates, senses the potential and the excitement inherent in the conquest of today’s challenges, on the way to the incalculable promise of tomorrow. I hope the message of the preceding pages has touched you with the spirit that drives our great institution forward. Sincerely,

Recognizing the value of alternative energy systems, Stevens partnered with SunEdison of Baltimore, Md., to implement two showcase roof installations of solar panels on the S.C. Williams Library and the Schaefer Athletic Center, two of the larger facilities on the Stevens campus. SunEdison generously donated the entire cost to install the panels, including the bonding and maintenance costs for the next 25 years, allowing Stevens to use the solar energy produced at a locked-in rate of 9 cents per kilowatt hour for the next quarter-century.

required to produce a percentage of electricity through alternative energy resources. If a utility cannot produce such power itself, it has the option to buy it in the open marketplace for a renewable energy credit, which is where SunEdison expects to see benefits from the Stevens solar panel installation. With demand remaining high for these energy credits and the supply low, Stevens and SunEdison’s partnership offers a forward-looking model for meeting America’s energy needs.

In the current energy marketplace, power utilities can be

The majority of the River Terrace Apartments were completed, following a year-long renovation of six early-20th century apartment buildings located at Sixth Street and River Terrace. The full residential complex will accommodate approximately 150 undergraduate residents, providing much-needed space for this steadily growing population.

Hal Raveché

The administrative offices of The Howe School moved into fourth-floor accommodations at The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center. The fifth floor will soon be ready to accommodate the Department of Systems Engineering & Engineering Management. The sixth floor will shortly serve as the home of Stevens’ Maritime Security Laboratory, as well the CyberSecurity Laboratory and a Howe School center for research.

The President’s Report

13


“With engineering, science and technology management having a profound and growing impact in every area of modern life, the national leadership role of Stevens Institute of Technology is more important and more challenging than ever.” A Report from President Harold J. Raveché Fall 2006

Stevens Institute of Technology Castle Point on Hudson Hoboken, NJ 07030-5991 www.stevens.edu

Stevens President's Letter 2006  

Harold J. Raveche, President of Stevens Institute of Technology presents the 2006 report.

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