Page 1

Stevens Institute of Technology Castle Point on Hudson Hoboken, NJ 07030

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Office of the President Stevens Institute of Technology’s Board of Trustees is moving forward with the adoption of the current best practices for the stewardship of non-profit academic institutions. Some longstanding committees have been replaced, others have been refocused with newly drafted charters and expanded missions. Faculty, staff and trustees have participated in this process in our effort to expand communication and cooperation between the Board and the full spectrum of the Stevens community. In addition, review and revision of Stevens' Bylaws and Conflict of Interest policy has been undertaken, along with an expanded Code of Ethics for the entire Institute, which will now apply to administrators, faculty and staff, in addition to trustees. Among the newly founded Trustee Management Committees are those facilitating Strategy, Human Resources, Nominating and Corporate Governance, and Faculty and Staff Relations. The Human Resources Committee replaces the former Compensation Committee. The Alumni Affairs Committee has adopted a new charter. Among the Financial Committees, the Audit and Institute Development Committees are newly chartered. The Finance and Investment Committee will consist of two co-chairs overseeing the Subcommittee on Finance and the Subcommittee on Investment. The

latter subcommittee will be concerned with endowment management and growth. Newly chartered Operational Committees include the Institute Facilities Committee and the Technology Commercialization Committee; the latter will feature a significant new charter and related investment policy. The Enrollment and Student Life Committee will oversee the activities of three subcommittees: the Subcommittee on Undergraduate Students, the Subcommittee on Master’s and Professional Education Programs, and the Subcommittee on the Institute’s Educational Environment. The Committee on Academe will also be structured to contain three designated subcommittees: the Subcommittee on Strategy: Technogenesis & Stevens as a Research University; the Subcommittee on Faculty Excellence: Teaching, Research, Inventiveness and Post -Tenure Review; and the Subcommittee on Curricula and Academic Disciplines. With these new structures in place, the Board of Trustees will be in an enhanced position to guide Stevens forward in its mission to educate, to create new knowledge, and to contribute to the betterment of society.

continued from front cover replicate, accruing to the benefit of both the Institute and society. Earlier the Center for Environmental Systems, using related technology, was instrumental in helping remediate well water in Bangladesh that was contaminated with arsenic. Our Wireless Network Security Center was the recipient of an impressive fifth major grant from the National Science Foundation, and has contributed to the founding of an exciting new wireless technology venture, Attila Technologies LLC. SINTEL - the Secure Infrastructure Technology Lab - was founded to aggregate the many brilliant faculty efforts now under way at Stevens to protect the integrity of our ports and harbors from potential terrorist attacks or efforts to disrupt our economy and the commercial supply chain. Students and young alumni continued to apply for patents in technology applications that they helped to create through the Senior Design and Technogenesis Scholars programs. Impressively, one biomedical device for detecting sources of pain in the body is expected shortly to undergo clinical trials at a New York City medical center. The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management drew near completion, promising the most up-to-date facility to house the increasingly honored Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management. Accolades for The Howe School included an award as one of the “world’s elite research institutions” by the International Association for Management of Technology, and a placement by Optimize magazine in the Top Five in the US for educating executives in the management of technology. Our graduate Telecommunications Management program awarded Stevens degrees to 21 students in China through a joint agreement with the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT); other graduate pro-

grams are being initiated at BIT and at several other universities in China, with extensive involvement from our award-winning WebCampus.Stevens. The culture of the Scholar-Athlete at Stevens continued to expand and acquire new dimensionalities, as our academically outstanding Division III athletes experienced their most successful season ever, with a first-year student bringing home Stevens' first National Championship, which is in equestrian competition. As a testimony to our alumni, annual giving to Stevens reached new highs, with the Edwin A. Stevens Society breaking the 500-member barrier for the first time in its history. Finally, the Board of Trustees in its efforts to comply with the best practices of governance at not-for-profits developed new Board committees and new charters for Board committees which will enhance the future governance of the Institute. In addition, the Board will continue its outreach to faculty and staff through the new Board Committee on Faculty and Staff Relations as well as other avenues of communication.

September 2005

“In the recent US News & World Report rankings for national universities, Stevens climbed ten positions to #71 – rising farther, faster, than any other university in the National Top 100.” – Hal Raveché Dear Colleague: In the recent US News & World Report rankings for national universities, Stevens climbed ten positions to #71 – rising farther, faster, than any other university in the National Top 100. In 2005, retention and graduation improved significantly, contributing to the higher standing. Stevens is now, in the category of Actual Graduation, ranked 58, up from 83 in 2004. Ranked 39th in SATs, Stevens continues to attract the most talented students in the nation. The important work of our faculty, the impressive achievements of our students, the professional dedication of our staff, and the exemplary commitment of our alumni have all contributed to a most successful 2004-05 academic year. I am honored to serve as president at this exciting time in the ascent of Stevens among the nation’s top research universities. I am especially proud of those extraordinary individuals that contribute to our campus as a dynamically vibrant center for learning and creative activities. Our collective goal is to continue the nurturing of our unique campus environment. Technogenesis® cultivates that high degree of inventiveness which enables faculty and students to connect the pioneering progress they achieve in their fields with products and services that are valued by business, industry and society as a whole. In the year just passed, Technogenesis has shown its value-added impact for our students, faculty, industry partners, the Institute itself, and the world at large. It is no accident that Stevens was ranked in late 2004 by The Princeton Review as standing among the nation’s “most entrepreneurial campuses.”

Sincerely yours,

The major goal of Stevens' vision for growth is to ensure the Institute's continued ascendancy as a leader in research and education where scholars in many fields of endeavor are focused on creating landmark advances and finding innovative solutions to critical needs of our nation and global society. All indications as we begin the new academic year buttress expectations of great things to come through faculty and student achievements.

Harold J. Raveché President

In our sponsored research, the faculty and research centers have made impressive gains. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 2005, more than $30 million from external resources was expended on research, compared to $25 million as of June 30, 2004. This bodes well for our long-term goal of further growth to $50 million by the end of this decade. New research initiatives have been undertaken to build rapid-

This annual letter highlights some of the outstanding contributions made by our faculty, students and staff. As always, I welcome you to consider partnering with us in our growing research and education initiatives.

ly on the wealth of expertise that characterizes our outstanding faculty. Efforts in biomedical engineering, nanoscale technologies, cyber security, mathematical cryptography and network security, as well as computer modeling for more secure ports and harbors, have all added to Stevens’ renown as a wellspring of ideas and applications. Their critically important work has implications well beyond the community of our campus. Our Office of Institute Technology Initiatives negotiated the first sale of a Stevens Technogenesis company, HydroGlobe, making commercially available worldwide a heavy-metals filtration technology to purify drinking water, developed by researchers at the Center for Environmental Systems. The sale also resulted in financial rewards for Stevens; a concurrent licensing agreement will provide patent royalties to Stevens for years to come, allowing the Technogenesis cycle to ...continued on back

Inside Achievements and new arrivals in the three academic schools Institute Technology Initiatives and the Year in Technogenesis Student accomplishments in, and beyond, the classroom and laboratory New Leadership at the Institute The Stevens BoT and its advances in governance


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

T H E H O W E S C H O O L O F T E C H N O LO GY M A N A G E M E N T

Within a decade of its founding, The Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management has become a nationally recognized leader in Technology Management education and research.

This is an exciting time at The Howe School. It was named among the ‘Top Five in the Nation’ for its graduate education by the executive readership of Optimize magazine. Most strikingly, the International Association for the Management of Technology (IAMOT) recognized Howe as one of the top Technology Management Programs in the world at the IAMOT annual meeting in Vienna, Austria. Further recognition came as SAP named the school a Center of Excellence in Business Process Innovation, only one of five such centers worldwide

Acting Dean McCusker In June, an important transition occurred with the departure of Dean Jerry MacArthur Hultin, who was selected to serve as president of Polytechnic University in New York.

The Business and Technology (B&T) program graduated its second class. Nationally, the starting salaries of business majors tend to be less than those of engineering and science graduates. However, Stevens B&T graduates are very much on par with engineering and computer science majors, given an average starting salary of $54,000. B&T welcomes 60 new freshmen this year, now bringing the total program student body to 200 strong.

During his five years at The Howe School, Hultin oversaw the expansion of new graduate programs in technology management in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan region, as well as nationwide and globally; he also presided over a major increase in research funding, and the successful inauguration of the undergraduate program in Business and Technology. At Stevens, Hultin promoted government research interest in Stevens’ technologies for homeland security and military defense. Hultin also led a much-cited September 2004 research study, titled “Securing the Port of New York and New Jersey: Network-centric Operations Applied to the Campaign against Terrorism.”

The B&T program prepares a whole new kind of graduate for the workforce of the 21st century. These young people know exactly where they want to go when they graduate, exactly how to get there, and how to handle major responsibility when it’s entrusted to them. They are among the most savvy and sought-after graduating seniors for mid-level executive positions in telecoms, pharma and the financial industry – as well as by any firm where the understanding and management of both business and technology is crucial, and where the intersection of the two is appreciated as mutually reinforcing.

Upon Hultin’s departure, I was pleased to appoint Associate Dean Lex McCusker as Acting Dean of The Howe School. A long-time executive at AT&T, McCusker brings a history of high-level technology management responsibilities and project oversight, principally in the field of telecommunications. He is an expert in the areas of operations and logistics; general management and change management; strategic planning, analysis and implementation; and organizational development and communications.

On the graduate level, a unique MBA program in Technology Management, directed by Dr. Murrae Bowden, graduated its first class. The school introduced new programs in Management of Information Systems, directed by Dr. Jerry Luftman, in areas of Outsourcing, Legal Compliance (Sarbanes-Oxley) and Cyber Security, and a program focused on Technology Management in the pharmaceutical industry, directed by Dr. Joel Dobbs, was also debuted. The school also added new talent and capability in key research areas for Stevens, including the new Center for Decision Technologies, directed by Dr. Jeffery Nickerson.

During the search for a new dean, I look forward to working with Acting Dean McCusker in continuing to build the distinctive graduate and undergraduate programs at The Howe School. New Additions to Faculty Joel H. Dobbs joins the Howe School as its Executive in Residence and Program Director, Pharmaceutical Technology Management. Previously, Dobbs was Vice-President, Research Information Services and Global IT Strategy and Compliance, for ScheringPlough Corporation before he retired in 2004. At Schering-Plough, he was responsible for all

On a global scale, in combination with WebCampus.Stevens, Howe graduated Stevens’ first master’s degree students in China, at Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT). Under the direction of Dr. Audrey Curtis, the graduate program in Project Management will soon be offered at BIT as well. In the fall, the Howe School as a whole will move into a state-of- the-art facility, the Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management. Dr. Dobbs

2

NEW LEADERSHIP In the Office of Development and External Affairs, after two successful, back-to-back five-year capital campaigns, long-time Vice President Jim Snyder accepted an appointment as Special Assistant to the President. Stepping in as Acting Vice President for Development and External Affairs is Marjorie Everitt, a familiar presence to our faithful alumni VP Snyder and major donors. She is currently overseeing the historic growth of the Edwin A. Stevens Society, which broke through the 500-member barrier for the first time this year. She and her team are building strategies to develop new levels of support and recognition for Stevens’ programs, faculty and Acting VP Everitt facilities. A sterling financial operations team has come on board to ensure effective management of the gains made during a decade of rapid growth. In March 2005, Stefano Falconi assumed office as Stevens’ Vice President of Finance, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer. He is now in the process of creating the necessary financial mechanisms and controls to guarantee that future growth can proceed apace. Falconi’s experience includes positions of responsibility Harvard University, MIT, and Carnegie Mellon University. Falconi has a J.D.

degree from the University of Padua, was a NATO Fellow at Cambridge University, and received a MBA at the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. His extensive experience includes budgeting, research accounting, information systems and business processes, monitoring expenses and revenues, and managing financial controls. A member of Falconi’s team is Michael D’Onofrio in the position of Controller. D’Onofrio, who had served as interim CFO prior to Falconi’s arrival, is a results-driven executive with a proven record of managing VP Falconi multi-million-dollar budgets, reducing costs and streamlining operations. Previously he oversaw the finances of a $170 million-revenue company; and prior to that, he started up and managed a nationwide financial shared-services center and staff of 60. Douglass Horr just arrived and brings strong credentials for the role of Institute Auditor. He previously served as Senior Auditor, Mr. D’Onofrio Internal Audit Department at Rutgers University, where he also held the positions of Project Team Lead for Rutgers Integrated Administrative System, and Senior Executive Assistant, Office of the VP for Administration.

FA C I L I T I E S Under the guidance of the Vice President for Facilities and Support Services, Henry Dobbelaar, Stevens is looking forward to the debut of several major facilities over the next year. Scheduled to open its doors in the fall of 2005, the Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management, a six-story, 95,000 square-foot structure, will serve as the new VP Dobbelaar signature headquarters for the Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management, along with other Stevens departments and research centers. The construction of this premier facility was made possible by a generous personal gift of $6 million from Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr., the Vice Chairman of Verizon and the Chairman of the Board of Stevens Institute, and an additional $18 million in contributions from strong Stevens supporters, including Verizon, Lucent, AT&T, the State of New Jersey and other esteemed Stevens alumni. As the home of The Wesley J. Howe School, The Babbio Center will further reinforce Stevens’ global presence in the field of technologymanagement education and research. The new Schaefer School Faculty & Dean's Complex, 4th floor, EAS Building, which had been unused for decades.

Now under construction, The River Terrace Apartments complex will open in late spring 2006, ready to accommodate upward of 200 undergraduate residents. The renovation and expansion of the world-renowned high-speed testing tank in the Center for Maritime Systems’ Davidson Laboratory will provide Stevens with the most modern facility in the world for testing naval architectural design and large-scale environmental and ocean engineering projects. Re-opening of the facility is slated for early 2006. Finally, the renovation of the fourth-floor of the Edwin A. Stevens Building has provided a much-needed modern suite of offices and conference facilities for the Dean of Engineering and the Schaefer School’s administrative staff.


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT In the term just concluded the Institute conferred degrees upon the largest undergraduate and graduate classes in its history. Under the leadership of Vice President for University Enrollment and Academic Services Maureen Weatherall, we are looking at the largest incoming class of freshman ever in the VP Weatherall fall – more than 500 students enrolled and headed to campus. At the same time, we are able to be more selective than ever in our approach to admissions. The Stevens tradition of entrepreneurialism and invention, originating with the Institute’s founding family, was fully on display this year as well. Stevens graduating seniors continued to turn out more examples of patentable technologies. Our Division III athletics program is attracting extraordinary young scholars – 160 freshmen alone will participate in a team sport – and our division ranking is rising fast. Indeed, for the first time since the inception of the award, Stevens finished among the top 50 schools in the United States Sports Academy Division III Directors’ Cup. With five teams qualifying for the NCAA Tournament this past year and four advancing past the first round, Stevens earned its highest-ever finish at 46th, marking the most successful year in the history of athletics at the institution.

Stevens also had its first national champion in the form of Equestrian Team member Kerri Rettig, who as a freshman finished first in the Intermediate on the Flat at the 2005 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association National Championship Show held in May. This combination of intellect and talent in athletics, as evidenced by Stevens students, is a hallmark of the talentbase needed for the US to compete in the global economy – tech-creative students who excel in the fields of academics, technical achievement and in leadership and team-building through athletics.

Kerri Rettig

As a sign of young alumni dedication emerging from this constituency, within a year of their graduation, scholarathletes Allison Donnelly, Lindy Gibbons, Giuseppe Incitti, and Brian Lalli, all Class of 2004, took the time to establish a new and exciting alumni organization – the Stevens Varsity “S” Alumni Club. The four founders will assume positions on the Executive Board along with other volunteers. With their advisor, Athletics Director Russ Rogers, they will help with organization and setup of specific self-sponsored events that promote Stevens athletics and alumni activities. The club as a whole, say the organizers, “will aid, when needed, with recruiting, fund-raising, forums for prospective students, and other events.” The club will also “promote the overall culture of Stevens athletics, as well as model the success rate of students moving into the professional world,” said the founders. Dr. Norman Marcus, a well-known pain management physician at NYU Medical School, worked in collaboration with Team MECCo, one of our 2005 Biomedical Engineering Teams in Senior Design. Together, they designed and built a device to facilitate a new high-tech method for diagnosing and treating pain. (See SPOC, “Institute Technology Initiatives.”)

Lindy Gibbons

Giuseppe Incitti

Brian Lalli

Team MECCo’s achievement represents just one of the patentable technologies to emerge from the Stevens 2005 Senior Design program.

Allison Donnelly

information technology for the Schering Plough Research Institute as well as for strategy and IT regulatory compliance globally. Dobbs’ professional experience prior to joining Schering-Plough includes 12 years with Glaxo, Inc., in various management and executive positions in regulatory affairs, medical services and information services. He also served a professor of pharmacy at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama. Dobbs is the author of numerous scientific and technical publications and frequently speaks at industry-related seminars and conferences. He has served on many boards and committees, including the Compaq Computer Corporation Pharmaceutical Advisory Board, the Digital Equipment Corporation Pharmaceutical Advisory Board, the PhRMA/FDA Information Management Working Group and the PMA Safety Surveillance Committee. Dr. Dobbs represented the pharmaceutical industry on the steering committee for the Industry Coalition on Part 11, which worked with the FDA to successfully revise the guidance for compliance with this regulation.

Jan Klein joins the Howe School as an Instructor. Professionally, he has been involved in many areas of capital development, controllership, investments and investor relations, business development and marketing and sales. Among his accomplishments, Klein has supported the $13.5 million in series B and C round for a fables semi-conductor firm (2002-2003), raised approximately $1 million in seed financing for a WiFi software company (2002), created an entrepreneurial finance teaching program at Fairleigh Dickinson University (2001 and 2002), developed budgets/accounting records and financial reports for private companies as an interim/part-time CFO and managed national revenue quotas, branch budgets and the compensation program for a $14-billion division of a large telecom. He also lead the financial team in all phases of the AT&T $12.6-billion acquisition of McCaw Cellular, built business and financial plans that supported partnership initiatives between early-stage firms and large cap domestic and foreign companies and managed a $60-million annual advertising budget for new product introductions, usage stimulation and competitive win backs. He has held multiple marketing positions in sales planning, promotions and advertising in telecom and high-tech segments and was the lead equity analyst at a major Wall Street institution selling high-tech and service provider stock recommendations. Klein founded, co-founded or advised on a number of early-stage corporate formations and is a frequent presenter at industry forums and analysts meetings. He holds an EMBA from Cornell University (1987), a MBA in Finance & Investment from George Washington University (1972) and a BS in Aerospace Engineering from Pennsylvania State University (1972).

Dobbs received a doctorate in pharmacy from the University of Tennessee (1976), a Master of Public Health from the University of Alabama in Birmingham (1982), and a Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy from Samford University (1975). He has also completed executive programs at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Elliot Fishman joins the Howe School as an Industry Associate Professor. Before coming to Stevens, Fishman was an Adjunct Professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business in the Executive MBA Program. He was the Founder and President of Astrina Capital, LLC, a consulting firm involved in advising on technology commercialization, and he also founded and managed the New York office of Advantage Capital Partners, LP, a $440-million Dr. Fishman national venture capital fund. In addition, Fishman directed the product group leading to a successful IPO at Doubleclick, Inc., and served as Vice President of Technology Management & Funding, LP, a technology consulting firm.

Peerasit Patanakul joins the Howe School as an Associate Professor and Postdoctural Fellow. Patanakul earned a doctorate in Systems Science/Engineering Management from Portland State University in 2004. His research centered on the development of a decision-support model for assigning multiple concurrent projects to project managers. Dr. Patanakul Patanakul’s work has been widely published. His research interests focus on project management, new product development, and strategic management.He is a member of the Project Management Institute, IEEE and Professional Engineer, Engineering Institute of Thailand, and serves as the Conference Coordinator for the Project Management Track for the International Conference on Management of Technology. In addition to his doctorate Patanakul holds a Master of Science degree in Engineering Management from Portland State University (2000), and a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Chemical Engineering from Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (1995).

Fishman’s main areas of research interest are technology management and innovation, commercialization of new ventures, technology assessment and valuation of intellectual property and venture capital and governance of new enterprises. His numerous publications include “Securitization of Intellectual Property” and “Equity Valuations in Technology Transfer,” which both appeared in Technology Access Report. Fishman holds a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania (1996) and a MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School (1994). He received his BSE in Electrical Engineering from Duke University (1986).

Prof. Yan Meng with student and intelligent light-sensitive robot.

3


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

THE SCHAEFER SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING unnecessary surgeries or treatments. Clinical trials will begin this fall. Physicians, sports teams, physical therapists have already been inquiring when the product will be available.

A bold new world of engineering has opened up, and at The Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering, under the leadership of Dean George Korfiatis, a burgeoning network of research on the nanoscale has only begun to hint at the future benefits that will yield over time. Well prior to the US Nanotechnology Initiative of 2001, engineers and scientists at Stevens were performing distinguished and highly recognized funded research in the fields of nanotechnology and microtechnology. Since 2001, with growing federal support and new faculty added to strengthen work in interdisciplinary focus areas, greater strides are being made each year.

Dean Korfiatis

Dr. Henry Du and his broad-spectrum research team have pioneered work on the integration of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with nanoscale technologies that will potentially lead to robust chemical and biological sensing devices. The National Science Foundation has funded Du’s team to pursue their multidisciplinary project. Using molecular and nanoscale surface modification, state-of-the-art laser techniques, and computer simulation, their research seeks to enhance the prospects of PCF sensors, sensor arrays, and sensor networks for diverse applications such as remote and dynamic environmental monitoring, manufacturing process safety, medical diagnosis, early warning of biological and chemical warfare, and homeland defense. The other Stevens researchers include Professors Kurt Becker, Christos A discussion with the microchemical team at Stevens. Christodoulatos, Hong-Liang Cui, Rainer Martini, is director of the Electron-Optics Laboratory. Libera’s group has been Xiaoguang Meng and Svetlana Sukhishvili. The project is conductusing electron microscopes not only as materials-characterization tools ed in collaboration with OFS Laboratories, a world leader in fiber but also as materials-processing tools. High-energy electrons can modoptic research. ify the structure and properties of polymers, and because electrons can At the New Jersey Center for MicroChemical Systems, Dr. Adeniyi be focused by a microscope into fine probes with nanoscale dimenLawal's team is currently demonstrating two novel microreactor-based sions, electron microscopes can be used to pattern polymers into process intensification concepts for on-demand, on-site, energy effinanostructures. Libera’s work on nanohydrogels holds implications for cient, and cost-effective chemical production. Both projects are fundthe eventual production of the next generation of protein micro ed by the US Department of Energy to develop and deliver advanced arrays, which can be used to establish the function of various genes technologies that increase energy efficiency, improve environmental that become active during cancer, disease, and aging processes. performance, and boost productivity. The Lawal team's ingenious proThese are just a few of the exciting nano- and microtechnology totypes for microchannel reactors stand to revolutionize the producresearch projects now under way at The Schaefer School. tion and delivery process for highly volatile, widely used industrial chemical compounds, such a hydrogen peroxide. Among Technogenesis projects, Dr. R. Chandramouli used a Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant from the US Air Force Dr. Matthew R. Libera leads the Microstructure Research Group and Research Lab to develop a commercial software product, based on his research in steganalysis, or the detection of hidden digital information, to automatically scan e-mails and web downloads for hidden messages. Chandramouli received the STTR The Stevens Nanosensor Group: Professors Martini, Du, Sukhishvili, Cui, Becker, Christodoulatos & Meng

Dr. Wisniewski with the SPOC Team at the Technogenesis Awards Ceremony. Left to right: Ryan Stellar, Daniel Silva and Jeckin Shah.

Stevens Multi-Media was created by students in the music technology and technology management programs at Stevens, with the encouragement of Mr. David Musial. A part of Stevens Multi-Media is Castle Point Records, and the students have already produced a CD, with sounds of exciting new bands, that will be sold this fall. The purpose of the company is to provide a learning experience for students desiring to enter the music media field, and current students are elected its officers. SPOC also illustrates the entrepreneurial spirit that has inspired Stevens’ students. SPOC is based on a patent pending medical device that was developed as the senior project of Ryan Stellar, Daniel Silva and Jeckin Shah, under the guidance of Professor Vikki Hazelwood. These students are the founders of the company together with Dr. Marcus, a pain management physician at NYU Medical Center, whose methodology motivated the creation of Prof. Hazelwood the device. This device can locate the precise point of muscle pain and can help prevent

Castle Point Scientific, the most recently formed start up, will provide ultra sensitive optical sensors and the associated customized system for ultimate protection in border and perimeter security. The patent pending sensors, developed by Professor Hong Cui the company founder, are based on nanotechnology-enabled photonic crystal fibers, which provide orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity over mechanical approaches. This sensitivity enables the sensors to easily distinguish between different types of vehicles and also reduces false alarms. The same sensor technology can be used for additional applications such as intelligent wells – oil exploration and well-monitoring – as well as for monitoring structural integrity of structures such as bridges. The Office of Sponsored Research, the function of ITI that provides support services to faculty and staff for contract and grants as well as the financial services for billing and invoicing has experienced a significant reorganization during FY ‘05. Dr. Wisniewski promoted Ron Abraham and Lisa Farese to Deputy Directors, and hired a new Director, Glenn Davis. In addition, Dr. Wisniewski installed new institute wide software to streamline both Mr. Davis pre and post award phases and ensure compliance with government filings. This restructuring has been a factor in the research growth and will play an important role in its continued growth. The new Institute five-year growth plan, and our proven track record, position Stevens well for achieving its goal of $35 milllion in research revenues in FY ‘06.

Dr. Cui recently demonstrated his patent-pending technology that forms the basis of Castle Point Scientific.


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

I N S T I T U T E T E C H N O LO GY I N I T I AT I V E S grant to pursue the development project jointly with a commercial partner. The grant led to the production of an initial prototype and demonstration of the software’s capabilities.

Under the leadership of our new Vice President, Dr. Helena S. Wisniewski, the Office of Institute Technology Initiatives (ITI) has entered a new era of achievement and growth.

Leading the list of achievements is that of surpassing the FY ‘05 $30 million goal in research revenue. The $30.6 million figure achieved is phenomenal, since it has tripled since 2000. This major growth was possible because of the outstanding quality of our innovative faculty and research staff, coupled with the interdisciplinary clusters that have formed both within institute-wide centers and among groups of faculty, as well as the excellent support services provided by the Office of Sponsored Research, (OSR). The major research growth was also a factor in Stevens’ increased rank in the recent US News & World Report annual rankings of the “Best Colleges and Universities in America.” All of these factors form the Stevens competitive advantage.

research interests focus on biomaterials design, cellular and tissue engineering, and cell signaling in tissue engineering. Before joining in Stevens, he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He then worked at a Dutch biomedical company, IsoTis NV. Wang has received a broad and systemic training in chemistry and polymer chemistry, as well as biomaterials design and tissue engineering. He has performed research in diverse fields and is the author of 15 scientific papers in the fields of polymer chemistry, biomaterials, tissue engineering and cell signaling. Wang received his doctorate in Polymer Chemistry and Physics (Biomaterials Discipline, 1998) from the Institute of Polymer Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin, China, with honors. He received his second doctorate in Biomedical Engineering (tissue engineering) from the Institute for Biomedical Technology, University of Twente, The Netherlands, in 2003.

In undergraduate education, Dean Korfiatis and Associate Dean Keith Sheppard continue to implement modernizations to the total body of the curriculum, and the newest programs are growing rapidly. The Biomedical Engineering program, directed by Dr. Arthur Ritter, is adding new faculty, expanded features, and upgraded facilities through the generosity of alumni donors with an expressed determination to create the finest undergrad biomedical engineering labs in the US.

Dr. Wisniewski

In graduate education, Professor John Nastasi’s program in ProductArchitecture Engineering, conducted in collaboration with the Design and Manufacturing Institute, directed by Dr. Kishore Pochiraju, continues to grow in scope and distinction.

Alice Squires brings more than twenty years of experience in engineering project management and technical management to the System Design and Operational Effectiveness (SDOE) Program, for which she will serve as Associate Director of the Online Program. Her educational specialization includes online courses in the areas of systems engineering, program management and managing innovation, as well as ground courses in business administration for a variety of universities. Early in her career she focused on engineering hardware design and related software development, followed by technical management and operations management, with a more recent focus on systems engineering, business, and online and classroom education and training. She is also a technical and organizational change consultant for multiple large defense companies. Previously she managed the requirements, integration and testing group for the Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) built for the United States Marines. Prior to this she managed the production system and cost center for Lockheed Martin’s (now BAE Systems’) radiation-hardened manufacturing line. She received the General Dynamics Technical Achievement in Safety in 2002, the Lockheed Martin Outstanding Team Award in 1998, a MBA Fellowship from 1994-1995 and multiple technical and suggestion awards from IBM from 1986 to 1993. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) at Virginia Tech (1984) and a MBA at George Mason University (1996).

New Additions to Faculty

The VP of ITI is responsible for implementing and managing the Technogenesis process, which has reached new heights in the past year. A perfect example occurred in early 2005 – that of the first sale of a Stevens Technogenesis Company – Hydroglobe. This company was sold to Graver Technologies Inc. for several million dollars plus patent licensing fees and a share in future sales. Hydroglobe was based on a set of Stevens’ environmental technology patents and offered unique technologies and products for filtering heavy metals – such as lead and arsenic – from drinkDr. White, Dr. Wisniewski and Nicolas Girard examine the Attila prototype at WiNSeC. ing water. The technology inventors were Dr. George Also during FY ‘05 Dr. Wisniewski, together with faculty and stuKorfiatis, Dean of the School of Engineering; Dr. Christos dents, launched four new Technogenesis start up companies: Attila Christododoulatos, Director of Center for Environmental Systems; Technologies, Stevens Multi-Media, Stevens Proof of Concept and Dr. Xiaoguang Meng, Director of Technical and Academic (SPOC), and Castle Point Scientific. Development at the James E. Nicoll Environmental Lab. The fiscal year ended with the potential sale of another Technogenesis company. Attila Technologies LLC is a wireless communications company that provides continuous broadband on-demand communication devices New to the structure of ITI are institute wide-centers – the Wireless that function despite saturated airways. Attila’s approach solves the Network Security Center (WiNSeC) and the Secure Infrastructure two most important problems faced by first responders in a disaster, Technology Laboratory (SINTEL). During FY ‘05 Dr. Wisniewski as stated by the Department of Homeland Security – continuous appointed Dr. Patrick E. White as the new WiNSeC director, and in communications and interoperability. Attila’s products are based on FY ‘05 the center won four out of four competitive grants from NSF. patent-pending technology developed at WiNSeC, by its Director Dr. In partnership with the US Navy, Dr. Wisniewski announced the Patrick E. White, and researcher Nicholas Girard, with funding from debut of SINTEL in July 2005. This unique research facility was the National Science Foundation. Dr. White and Mr. Girard are also established with an initial grant of $6.8 million from the US Office of co-founders of Attila Technologies. Dr. Wisniewski, Chairman of the Naval Research (ONR). An additional $6 million will be awarded in Board, recently appointed Mr. John E. Bischoff, the former Vice FY 2006. SINTEL is an interdisciplinary laboratory for real time sysPresident of Operations and Finance AOL, as the CEO. Additional tems development for the protection of maritime infrastructure. It applications of Attila include delivery of high resolution mug shots to tests and analyzes threat scenarios in the realistic environment of the patrol cars operating in the field, and the future enabling everywhere NY Harbor. Defending against the asymmetric threats to our Navy to be a virtual hot spot. forces at home and abroad constitutes the primary research, modeling and development business of SINTEL.

8

Xiaojun Yu joins the School of Engineering as an Assistant Professor in the Chemical, Biomedical and Materials Engineering Department. Prior to coming to Stevens, Yu was a research associate at the University of Virginia’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, where he studied tissue engineering and biomaterials. He also served as a research post-doctorate associate in advanced biomateri- Dr. Xiaojun Yu als and tissue engineering in the Chemical Engineering Department of Drexel University. He has been widely published and frequently presents papers at industry conferences and meetings. Yu is also a member of the Society for Biomaterials as well as the Materials Research Society. He holds a doctorate in Biomedical from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (2002) and a Master of Science degree in Biomedical Engineering from Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China (1992). Yu earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Polymeric Materials and Chemical Engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China (1989). Yi Guo joins the School of Engineering as an Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. Previously, Guo was a visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Central Florida. She also was a Research Fellow in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. She has served as a reviewer for many professional journals and conferences and has been widely published. Guo is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a member of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. She earned a Ph.D. from the School of Electrical and Information Engineering, at the University of Sydney, Australia (1999), an MSEE Department of Electrical Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, China (April 1995). She also holds a BSEE from Xi’an University of Technology (1992).

After a distinguished period of service as a Research Assistant and Graduate Professor, Thomas Herrington has been appointed Associate Professor of Ocean Engineering in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Ocean Engineering. He is the acting NOAA New Jersey Sea Grant Coastal Processes Specialist and the Assistant Director of New Jersey Coastal Protection Technical Assistance Service. His teaching and research interests include inlet hydrodynamics, wave dynamics, sediment transport, wave-structure interaction, air-sea interaction, coastal meteorology and coastal hazard mitigation. Herrington serves on the ASCE Flood Loads Task Committee, and he is the secretary of the Northeast Shore and Beach Preservation Association. He has authored or coauthored more than 40 technical publications in the field of coastal and ocean engineering. He has a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Civil Engineering and a Master of Engineering and a doctorate in Ocean Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology.

Hongjun Wang joins the Department of Chemical, Biomedical and Materials Engineering (CBME) as an assistant professor. Wang’s

5


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

T H E I M P E R AT O R E S C H O O L O F S C I E N C E S & A R T S Under the direction of noted science journalist John Horgan, a Science Writings program and a program of Communications across the Curriculum will be inaugurated this fall. The objective is to establish a multi-dimensional Stevens Center for Science Writings, contributing to Stevens’ growing reputation as a leading cultural hub in the New York Metro area.

With a new all-encompassing approach to Security, an emphasis on Physics for next-generation quantum devices, and the further expansion of Chemical Biology, plus an innovative restructuring of the Humanities Division, The Imperatore School of Sciences and Arts is moving in bold new directions in interdisciplinary education and research. Based in the interaction of Computer Science and Mathematical Science expertise, the all-encompassing approach to security at the School of Sciences and Arts takes advantage of the expertise and depth in both departments when it comes to the question of cyber security.

Dean Kunhardt

In the area of language-based security in Computer Science, the work of Professors Adriana Compagnoni, Dominic Duggan and David Naumann centers in language-based security, while Professors Susanne Wetzel and Rebecca Wright’s work extends over the fields of cryptography and network security, as well as analyzing the foundations of cryptography. In the realm of Mathematics, Professors Robert Gilman and Alexei Miasnikov, a scholar of international stature formerly at the City College of New York, examine the question of generic complexity, while their department colleagues in the area of Stochastic Systems, Professors Darinka Dentcheva, Ionut Florescu and Michael Zabarankin, are exploring the theory of risk assessment. The expertise of these diverse groups intersect in an exciting new area known as Mathematical Cryptography with the objective of developing new approaches to insuring the security of cryptographic systems. Dr. Dentcheva

The Humanities Division is undergoing its first major expansion in more than a decade. The Humanities programs offer students bold new perspectives and opportunities to develop creative thinking and all-important communication skills. The Department of Art, Music and Technology is a newly formed area dedicated to the study and practice of art and music and its particular relationship to science and technology. The programs in the department, Art and Technology and Music and Technology, directed by Professors Julie Harrison and David Musial, offer a Bachelor of Arts degree as an individualized program. Both programs draw upon traditional as well as new art forms, offering the student a broad foundation in technical skills while encouraging experimentation with new ideas, genres, and models. Interdisciplinary investigation with one another and learning across the spectrum of humanities, as well as interdependence and collaboration between artist and scientist, artist and engineer, make the program a uniquely transcultural and transpedegogical experience.

Horgan has written three widely reviewed books: The End of Science (1996), a best-seller translated in 13 languages; The Undiscovered Mind (1999); and Rational Mysticism (2003). He taught science journalism at Polytechnic University and has two Science Journalism Awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Horgan also garnered the National Association of Science Writers Science-in-Society Award. He has Mr. Horgan served as an editor and writer for the IEEE Spectrum and senior writer at Scientific American, with many freelance publications to his credit.

Dr. Martini demonstrates the properties of the hi-rez “3-D Camera.”

Master of Science degree in Mathematics with a specialization in Stochastic Processes from the University of Bucharest.

New Additions to Faculty

Jiahua Xu joins the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology as an Associate Professor. She comes to Stevens from the Department of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y. Prior to that she served as a Research Assistant Professor in the Dermatology Department at State University of New York at Stony Brook. She also held positions earlier at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and the East China Institute of Chemical Technology, Shanghai, China. Among her professional activities, Xu serves as Managing Editor of Frontiers in Bioscience. She earned a doctorate (1992) in Biomedical Sciences from Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn., and a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry from East China Institute of Chemical Technology, Shanghai.

Alexei Myasnikov joins the Department of Mathematical Sciences as associated faculty, holding the title of Research Professor. He is also the Canada Research Chair at McGill University, Montreal, and has held a position as Doctoral Faculty at the City University of New York, among other academic positions. Among his professional honors, Myasnikov has been the recipient of the Gambrinus Award (Germany, 2004), the Canada Research Chair Award (2002) and the Performance Excellence Award from the City University of New York (1999-2000). He is the author or co-author of numerous books and academic papers in his field, and serves as a referee for several learned journals. He has also received numerous grants for his research. Myasnikov holds a D.Sc. degree in Mathematics in the area of Habilitation from the Novosibirsk State University (1992), and a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the Leningrad University (1984). He received his M.Sc. in Mathematics from Novosibirsk State University.

Professors Wetzel and Wright have also proposed a new Interdisciplinary Degree in CyberSecurity, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, which is now being considered by the curriculum committee. Developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, this is a trail-blazing effort to translate the vast body of research knowledge in cyber security into a distinct, academically robust degree program. In the realm of Technogenesis, Castle Point Scientific is a new commercial start-up based on patent-pending sensors developed by a professor of Physics, Dr. Hong-Liang Cui, who is also the company founder. (See “Institute Technology Initiatives.”) Also in the Physics Department, Professor Rainer Martini has collaborated with Professor John Keating of The Howe School to develop a method of image-capture, enhancement and analysis that has given rise to the “3-D Camera” which uses optical pulses and non-linear optics to display and record, respectively, a three dimensional image. Dr. Wright & Dr. Wetzel

6

Ionut Florescu joins the Department of Mathematical Sciences as an Assistant Professor. Florescu comes to Stevens from the Department of Statistics at Purdue University, where he received his doctorate in Statistics (2004). He had also previously served on the faculty in the Department of Physics at the University of Bucharest, Romania. His primary research area is the Mathematics of Finance, with a focus on the modeling, analyProf. Florescu sis and approximation of Option prices in the stochastic volatility world. He has authored or co-authored a number of papers for refereed journals, and was the recipient of the Purdue Research Foundation Grant, and the Puskas Memorial Fellowship. Florescu also holds a Master of Science degree in Statistics with a specialization in Computational Finance from Purdue University, and a

The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management.

7


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

T H E I M P E R AT O R E S C H O O L O F S C I E N C E S & A R T S Under the direction of noted science journalist John Horgan, a Science Writings program and a program of Communications across the Curriculum will be inaugurated this fall. The objective is to establish a multi-dimensional Stevens Center for Science Writings, contributing to Stevens’ growing reputation as a leading cultural hub in the New York Metro area.

With a new all-encompassing approach to Security, an emphasis on Physics for next-generation quantum devices, and the further expansion of Chemical Biology, plus an innovative restructuring of the Humanities Division, The Imperatore School of Sciences and Arts is moving in bold new directions in interdisciplinary education and research. Based in the interaction of Computer Science and Mathematical Science expertise, the all-encompassing approach to security at the School of Sciences and Arts takes advantage of the expertise and depth in both departments when it comes to the question of cyber security.

Dean Kunhardt

In the area of language-based security in Computer Science, the work of Professors Adriana Compagnoni, Dominic Duggan and David Naumann centers in language-based security, while Professors Susanne Wetzel and Rebecca Wright’s work extends over the fields of cryptography and network security, as well as analyzing the foundations of cryptography. In the realm of Mathematics, Professors Robert Gilman and Alexei Miasnikov, a scholar of international stature formerly at the City College of New York, examine the question of generic complexity, while their department colleagues in the area of Stochastic Systems, Professors Darinka Dentcheva, Ionut Florescu and Michael Zabarankin, are exploring the theory of risk assessment. The expertise of these diverse groups intersect in an exciting new area known as Mathematical Cryptography with the objective of developing new approaches to insuring the security of cryptographic systems. Dr. Dentcheva

The Humanities Division is undergoing its first major expansion in more than a decade. The Humanities programs offer students bold new perspectives and opportunities to develop creative thinking and all-important communication skills. The Department of Art, Music and Technology is a newly formed area dedicated to the study and practice of art and music and its particular relationship to science and technology. The programs in the department, Art and Technology and Music and Technology, directed by Professors Julie Harrison and David Musial, offer a Bachelor of Arts degree as an individualized program. Both programs draw upon traditional as well as new art forms, offering the student a broad foundation in technical skills while encouraging experimentation with new ideas, genres, and models. Interdisciplinary investigation with one another and learning across the spectrum of humanities, as well as interdependence and collaboration between artist and scientist, artist and engineer, make the program a uniquely transcultural and transpedegogical experience.

Horgan has written three widely reviewed books: The End of Science (1996), a best-seller translated in 13 languages; The Undiscovered Mind (1999); and Rational Mysticism (2003). He taught science journalism at Polytechnic University and has two Science Journalism Awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Horgan also garnered the National Association of Science Writers Science-in-Society Award. He has Mr. Horgan served as an editor and writer for the IEEE Spectrum and senior writer at Scientific American, with many freelance publications to his credit.

Dr. Martini demonstrates the properties of the hi-rez “3-D Camera.”

Master of Science degree in Mathematics with a specialization in Stochastic Processes from the University of Bucharest.

New Additions to Faculty

Jiahua Xu joins the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology as an Associate Professor. She comes to Stevens from the Department of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y. Prior to that she served as a Research Assistant Professor in the Dermatology Department at State University of New York at Stony Brook. She also held positions earlier at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and the East China Institute of Chemical Technology, Shanghai, China. Among her professional activities, Xu serves as Managing Editor of Frontiers in Bioscience. She earned a doctorate (1992) in Biomedical Sciences from Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tenn., and a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry from East China Institute of Chemical Technology, Shanghai.

Alexei Myasnikov joins the Department of Mathematical Sciences as associated faculty, holding the title of Research Professor. He is also the Canada Research Chair at McGill University, Montreal, and has held a position as Doctoral Faculty at the City University of New York, among other academic positions. Among his professional honors, Myasnikov has been the recipient of the Gambrinus Award (Germany, 2004), the Canada Research Chair Award (2002) and the Performance Excellence Award from the City University of New York (1999-2000). He is the author or co-author of numerous books and academic papers in his field, and serves as a referee for several learned journals. He has also received numerous grants for his research. Myasnikov holds a D.Sc. degree in Mathematics in the area of Habilitation from the Novosibirsk State University (1992), and a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the Leningrad University (1984). He received his M.Sc. in Mathematics from Novosibirsk State University.

Professors Wetzel and Wright have also proposed a new Interdisciplinary Degree in CyberSecurity, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, which is now being considered by the curriculum committee. Developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, this is a trail-blazing effort to translate the vast body of research knowledge in cyber security into a distinct, academically robust degree program. In the realm of Technogenesis, Castle Point Scientific is a new commercial start-up based on patent-pending sensors developed by a professor of Physics, Dr. Hong-Liang Cui, who is also the company founder. (See “Institute Technology Initiatives.”) Also in the Physics Department, Professor Rainer Martini has collaborated with Professor John Keating of The Howe School to develop a method of image-capture, enhancement and analysis that has given rise to the “3-D Camera” which uses optical pulses and non-linear optics to display and record, respectively, a three dimensional image. Dr. Wright & Dr. Wetzel

6

Ionut Florescu joins the Department of Mathematical Sciences as an Assistant Professor. Florescu comes to Stevens from the Department of Statistics at Purdue University, where he received his doctorate in Statistics (2004). He had also previously served on the faculty in the Department of Physics at the University of Bucharest, Romania. His primary research area is the Mathematics of Finance, with a focus on the modeling, analyProf. Florescu sis and approximation of Option prices in the stochastic volatility world. He has authored or co-authored a number of papers for refereed journals, and was the recipient of the Purdue Research Foundation Grant, and the Puskas Memorial Fellowship. Florescu also holds a Master of Science degree in Statistics with a specialization in Computational Finance from Purdue University, and a

The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management.

7


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

I N S T I T U T E T E C H N O LO GY I N I T I AT I V E S grant to pursue the development project jointly with a commercial partner. The grant led to the production of an initial prototype and demonstration of the software’s capabilities.

Under the leadership of our new Vice President, Dr. Helena S. Wisniewski, the Office of Institute Technology Initiatives (ITI) has entered a new era of achievement and growth.

Leading the list of achievements is that of surpassing the FY ‘05 $30 million goal in research revenue. The $30.6 million figure achieved is phenomenal, since it has tripled since 2000. This major growth was possible because of the outstanding quality of our innovative faculty and research staff, coupled with the interdisciplinary clusters that have formed both within institute-wide centers and among groups of faculty, as well as the excellent support services provided by the Office of Sponsored Research, (OSR). The major research growth was also a factor in Stevens’ increased rank in the recent US News & World Report annual rankings of the “Best Colleges and Universities in America.” All of these factors form the Stevens competitive advantage.

research interests focus on biomaterials design, cellular and tissue engineering, and cell signaling in tissue engineering. Before joining in Stevens, he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. He then worked at a Dutch biomedical company, IsoTis NV. Wang has received a broad and systemic training in chemistry and polymer chemistry, as well as biomaterials design and tissue engineering. He has performed research in diverse fields and is the author of 15 scientific papers in the fields of polymer chemistry, biomaterials, tissue engineering and cell signaling. Wang received his doctorate in Polymer Chemistry and Physics (Biomaterials Discipline, 1998) from the Institute of Polymer Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin, China, with honors. He received his second doctorate in Biomedical Engineering (tissue engineering) from the Institute for Biomedical Technology, University of Twente, The Netherlands, in 2003.

In undergraduate education, Dean Korfiatis and Associate Dean Keith Sheppard continue to implement modernizations to the total body of the curriculum, and the newest programs are growing rapidly. The Biomedical Engineering program, directed by Dr. Arthur Ritter, is adding new faculty, expanded features, and upgraded facilities through the generosity of alumni donors with an expressed determination to create the finest undergrad biomedical engineering labs in the US.

Dr. Wisniewski

In graduate education, Professor John Nastasi’s program in ProductArchitecture Engineering, conducted in collaboration with the Design and Manufacturing Institute, directed by Dr. Kishore Pochiraju, continues to grow in scope and distinction.

Alice Squires brings more than twenty years of experience in engineering project management and technical management to the System Design and Operational Effectiveness (SDOE) Program, for which she will serve as Associate Director of the Online Program. Her educational specialization includes online courses in the areas of systems engineering, program management and managing innovation, as well as ground courses in business administration for a variety of universities. Early in her career she focused on engineering hardware design and related software development, followed by technical management and operations management, with a more recent focus on systems engineering, business, and online and classroom education and training. She is also a technical and organizational change consultant for multiple large defense companies. Previously she managed the requirements, integration and testing group for the Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) built for the United States Marines. Prior to this she managed the production system and cost center for Lockheed Martin’s (now BAE Systems’) radiation-hardened manufacturing line. She received the General Dynamics Technical Achievement in Safety in 2002, the Lockheed Martin Outstanding Team Award in 1998, a MBA Fellowship from 1994-1995 and multiple technical and suggestion awards from IBM from 1986 to 1993. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) at Virginia Tech (1984) and a MBA at George Mason University (1996).

New Additions to Faculty

The VP of ITI is responsible for implementing and managing the Technogenesis process, which has reached new heights in the past year. A perfect example occurred in early 2005 – that of the first sale of a Stevens Technogenesis Company – Hydroglobe. This company was sold to Graver Technologies Inc. for several million dollars plus patent licensing fees and a share in future sales. Hydroglobe was based on a set of Stevens’ environmental technology patents and offered unique technologies and products for filtering heavy metals – such as lead and arsenic – from drinkDr. White, Dr. Wisniewski and Nicolas Girard examine the Attila prototype at WiNSeC. ing water. The technology inventors were Dr. George Also during FY ‘05 Dr. Wisniewski, together with faculty and stuKorfiatis, Dean of the School of Engineering; Dr. Christos dents, launched four new Technogenesis start up companies: Attila Christododoulatos, Director of Center for Environmental Systems; Technologies, Stevens Multi-Media, Stevens Proof of Concept and Dr. Xiaoguang Meng, Director of Technical and Academic (SPOC), and Castle Point Scientific. Development at the James E. Nicoll Environmental Lab. The fiscal year ended with the potential sale of another Technogenesis company. Attila Technologies LLC is a wireless communications company that provides continuous broadband on-demand communication devices New to the structure of ITI are institute wide-centers – the Wireless that function despite saturated airways. Attila’s approach solves the Network Security Center (WiNSeC) and the Secure Infrastructure two most important problems faced by first responders in a disaster, Technology Laboratory (SINTEL). During FY ‘05 Dr. Wisniewski as stated by the Department of Homeland Security – continuous appointed Dr. Patrick E. White as the new WiNSeC director, and in communications and interoperability. Attila’s products are based on FY ‘05 the center won four out of four competitive grants from NSF. patent-pending technology developed at WiNSeC, by its Director Dr. In partnership with the US Navy, Dr. Wisniewski announced the Patrick E. White, and researcher Nicholas Girard, with funding from debut of SINTEL in July 2005. This unique research facility was the National Science Foundation. Dr. White and Mr. Girard are also established with an initial grant of $6.8 million from the US Office of co-founders of Attila Technologies. Dr. Wisniewski, Chairman of the Naval Research (ONR). An additional $6 million will be awarded in Board, recently appointed Mr. John E. Bischoff, the former Vice FY 2006. SINTEL is an interdisciplinary laboratory for real time sysPresident of Operations and Finance AOL, as the CEO. Additional tems development for the protection of maritime infrastructure. It applications of Attila include delivery of high resolution mug shots to tests and analyzes threat scenarios in the realistic environment of the patrol cars operating in the field, and the future enabling everywhere NY Harbor. Defending against the asymmetric threats to our Navy to be a virtual hot spot. forces at home and abroad constitutes the primary research, modeling and development business of SINTEL.

8

Xiaojun Yu joins the School of Engineering as an Assistant Professor in the Chemical, Biomedical and Materials Engineering Department. Prior to coming to Stevens, Yu was a research associate at the University of Virginia’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, where he studied tissue engineering and biomaterials. He also served as a research post-doctorate associate in advanced biomateri- Dr. Xiaojun Yu als and tissue engineering in the Chemical Engineering Department of Drexel University. He has been widely published and frequently presents papers at industry conferences and meetings. Yu is also a member of the Society for Biomaterials as well as the Materials Research Society. He holds a doctorate in Biomedical from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (2002) and a Master of Science degree in Biomedical Engineering from Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China (1992). Yu earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Polymeric Materials and Chemical Engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China (1989). Yi Guo joins the School of Engineering as an Assistant Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. Previously, Guo was a visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Central Florida. She also was a Research Fellow in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. She has served as a reviewer for many professional journals and conferences and has been widely published. Guo is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a member of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. She earned a Ph.D. from the School of Electrical and Information Engineering, at the University of Sydney, Australia (1999), an MSEE Department of Electrical Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, China (April 1995). She also holds a BSEE from Xi’an University of Technology (1992).

After a distinguished period of service as a Research Assistant and Graduate Professor, Thomas Herrington has been appointed Associate Professor of Ocean Engineering in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Ocean Engineering. He is the acting NOAA New Jersey Sea Grant Coastal Processes Specialist and the Assistant Director of New Jersey Coastal Protection Technical Assistance Service. His teaching and research interests include inlet hydrodynamics, wave dynamics, sediment transport, wave-structure interaction, air-sea interaction, coastal meteorology and coastal hazard mitigation. Herrington serves on the ASCE Flood Loads Task Committee, and he is the secretary of the Northeast Shore and Beach Preservation Association. He has authored or coauthored more than 40 technical publications in the field of coastal and ocean engineering. He has a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Civil Engineering and a Master of Engineering and a doctorate in Ocean Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology.

Hongjun Wang joins the Department of Chemical, Biomedical and Materials Engineering (CBME) as an assistant professor. Wang’s

5


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

THE SCHAEFER SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING unnecessary surgeries or treatments. Clinical trials will begin this fall. Physicians, sports teams, physical therapists have already been inquiring when the product will be available.

A bold new world of engineering has opened up, and at The Charles V. Schaefer, Jr. School of Engineering, under the leadership of Dean George Korfiatis, a burgeoning network of research on the nanoscale has only begun to hint at the future benefits that will yield over time. Well prior to the US Nanotechnology Initiative of 2001, engineers and scientists at Stevens were performing distinguished and highly recognized funded research in the fields of nanotechnology and microtechnology. Since 2001, with growing federal support and new faculty added to strengthen work in interdisciplinary focus areas, greater strides are being made each year.

Dean Korfiatis

Dr. Henry Du and his broad-spectrum research team have pioneered work on the integration of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with nanoscale technologies that will potentially lead to robust chemical and biological sensing devices. The National Science Foundation has funded Du’s team to pursue their multidisciplinary project. Using molecular and nanoscale surface modification, state-of-the-art laser techniques, and computer simulation, their research seeks to enhance the prospects of PCF sensors, sensor arrays, and sensor networks for diverse applications such as remote and dynamic environmental monitoring, manufacturing process safety, medical diagnosis, early warning of biological and chemical warfare, and homeland defense. The other Stevens researchers include Professors Kurt Becker, Christos A discussion with the microchemical team at Stevens. Christodoulatos, Hong-Liang Cui, Rainer Martini, is director of the Electron-Optics Laboratory. Libera’s group has been Xiaoguang Meng and Svetlana Sukhishvili. The project is conductusing electron microscopes not only as materials-characterization tools ed in collaboration with OFS Laboratories, a world leader in fiber but also as materials-processing tools. High-energy electrons can modoptic research. ify the structure and properties of polymers, and because electrons can At the New Jersey Center for MicroChemical Systems, Dr. Adeniyi be focused by a microscope into fine probes with nanoscale dimenLawal's team is currently demonstrating two novel microreactor-based sions, electron microscopes can be used to pattern polymers into process intensification concepts for on-demand, on-site, energy effinanostructures. Libera’s work on nanohydrogels holds implications for cient, and cost-effective chemical production. Both projects are fundthe eventual production of the next generation of protein micro ed by the US Department of Energy to develop and deliver advanced arrays, which can be used to establish the function of various genes technologies that increase energy efficiency, improve environmental that become active during cancer, disease, and aging processes. performance, and boost productivity. The Lawal team's ingenious proThese are just a few of the exciting nano- and microtechnology totypes for microchannel reactors stand to revolutionize the producresearch projects now under way at The Schaefer School. tion and delivery process for highly volatile, widely used industrial chemical compounds, such a hydrogen peroxide. Among Technogenesis projects, Dr. R. Chandramouli used a Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant from the US Air Force Dr. Matthew R. Libera leads the Microstructure Research Group and Research Lab to develop a commercial software product, based on his research in steganalysis, or the detection of hidden digital information, to automatically scan e-mails and web downloads for hidden messages. Chandramouli received the STTR The Stevens Nanosensor Group: Professors Martini, Du, Sukhishvili, Cui, Becker, Christodoulatos & Meng

Dr. Wisniewski with the SPOC Team at the Technogenesis Awards Ceremony. Left to right: Ryan Stellar, Daniel Silva and Jeckin Shah.

Stevens Multi-Media was created by students in the music technology and technology management programs at Stevens, with the encouragement of Mr. David Musial. A part of Stevens Multi-Media is Castle Point Records, and the students have already produced a CD, with sounds of exciting new bands, that will be sold this fall. The purpose of the company is to provide a learning experience for students desiring to enter the music media field, and current students are elected its officers. SPOC also illustrates the entrepreneurial spirit that has inspired Stevens’ students. SPOC is based on a patent pending medical device that was developed as the senior project of Ryan Stellar, Daniel Silva and Jeckin Shah, under the guidance of Professor Vikki Hazelwood. These students are the founders of the company together with Dr. Marcus, a pain management physician at NYU Medical Center, whose methodology motivated the creation of Prof. Hazelwood the device. This device can locate the precise point of muscle pain and can help prevent

Castle Point Scientific, the most recently formed start up, will provide ultra sensitive optical sensors and the associated customized system for ultimate protection in border and perimeter security. The patent pending sensors, developed by Professor Hong Cui the company founder, are based on nanotechnology-enabled photonic crystal fibers, which provide orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity over mechanical approaches. This sensitivity enables the sensors to easily distinguish between different types of vehicles and also reduces false alarms. The same sensor technology can be used for additional applications such as intelligent wells – oil exploration and well-monitoring – as well as for monitoring structural integrity of structures such as bridges. The Office of Sponsored Research, the function of ITI that provides support services to faculty and staff for contract and grants as well as the financial services for billing and invoicing has experienced a significant reorganization during FY ‘05. Dr. Wisniewski promoted Ron Abraham and Lisa Farese to Deputy Directors, and hired a new Director, Glenn Davis. In addition, Dr. Wisniewski installed new institute wide software to streamline both Mr. Davis pre and post award phases and ensure compliance with government filings. This restructuring has been a factor in the research growth and will play an important role in its continued growth. The new Institute five-year growth plan, and our proven track record, position Stevens well for achieving its goal of $35 milllion in research revenues in FY ‘06.

Dr. Cui recently demonstrated his patent-pending technology that forms the basis of Castle Point Scientific.


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT In the term just concluded the Institute conferred degrees upon the largest undergraduate and graduate classes in its history. Under the leadership of Vice President for University Enrollment and Academic Services Maureen Weatherall, we are looking at the largest incoming class of freshman ever in the VP Weatherall fall – more than 500 students enrolled and headed to campus. At the same time, we are able to be more selective than ever in our approach to admissions. The Stevens tradition of entrepreneurialism and invention, originating with the Institute’s founding family, was fully on display this year as well. Stevens graduating seniors continued to turn out more examples of patentable technologies. Our Division III athletics program is attracting extraordinary young scholars – 160 freshmen alone will participate in a team sport – and our division ranking is rising fast. Indeed, for the first time since the inception of the award, Stevens finished among the top 50 schools in the United States Sports Academy Division III Directors’ Cup. With five teams qualifying for the NCAA Tournament this past year and four advancing past the first round, Stevens earned its highest-ever finish at 46th, marking the most successful year in the history of athletics at the institution.

Stevens also had its first national champion in the form of Equestrian Team member Kerri Rettig, who as a freshman finished first in the Intermediate on the Flat at the 2005 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association National Championship Show held in May. This combination of intellect and talent in athletics, as evidenced by Stevens students, is a hallmark of the talentbase needed for the US to compete in the global economy – tech-creative students who excel in the fields of academics, technical achievement and in leadership and team-building through athletics.

Kerri Rettig

As a sign of young alumni dedication emerging from this constituency, within a year of their graduation, scholarathletes Allison Donnelly, Lindy Gibbons, Giuseppe Incitti, and Brian Lalli, all Class of 2004, took the time to establish a new and exciting alumni organization – the Stevens Varsity “S” Alumni Club. The four founders will assume positions on the Executive Board along with other volunteers. With their advisor, Athletics Director Russ Rogers, they will help with organization and setup of specific self-sponsored events that promote Stevens athletics and alumni activities. The club as a whole, say the organizers, “will aid, when needed, with recruiting, fund-raising, forums for prospective students, and other events.” The club will also “promote the overall culture of Stevens athletics, as well as model the success rate of students moving into the professional world,” said the founders. Dr. Norman Marcus, a well-known pain management physician at NYU Medical School, worked in collaboration with Team MECCo, one of our 2005 Biomedical Engineering Teams in Senior Design. Together, they designed and built a device to facilitate a new high-tech method for diagnosing and treating pain. (See SPOC, “Institute Technology Initiatives.”)

Lindy Gibbons

Giuseppe Incitti

Brian Lalli

Team MECCo’s achievement represents just one of the patentable technologies to emerge from the Stevens 2005 Senior Design program.

Allison Donnelly

information technology for the Schering Plough Research Institute as well as for strategy and IT regulatory compliance globally. Dobbs’ professional experience prior to joining Schering-Plough includes 12 years with Glaxo, Inc., in various management and executive positions in regulatory affairs, medical services and information services. He also served a professor of pharmacy at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama. Dobbs is the author of numerous scientific and technical publications and frequently speaks at industry-related seminars and conferences. He has served on many boards and committees, including the Compaq Computer Corporation Pharmaceutical Advisory Board, the Digital Equipment Corporation Pharmaceutical Advisory Board, the PhRMA/FDA Information Management Working Group and the PMA Safety Surveillance Committee. Dr. Dobbs represented the pharmaceutical industry on the steering committee for the Industry Coalition on Part 11, which worked with the FDA to successfully revise the guidance for compliance with this regulation.

Jan Klein joins the Howe School as an Instructor. Professionally, he has been involved in many areas of capital development, controllership, investments and investor relations, business development and marketing and sales. Among his accomplishments, Klein has supported the $13.5 million in series B and C round for a fables semi-conductor firm (2002-2003), raised approximately $1 million in seed financing for a WiFi software company (2002), created an entrepreneurial finance teaching program at Fairleigh Dickinson University (2001 and 2002), developed budgets/accounting records and financial reports for private companies as an interim/part-time CFO and managed national revenue quotas, branch budgets and the compensation program for a $14-billion division of a large telecom. He also lead the financial team in all phases of the AT&T $12.6-billion acquisition of McCaw Cellular, built business and financial plans that supported partnership initiatives between early-stage firms and large cap domestic and foreign companies and managed a $60-million annual advertising budget for new product introductions, usage stimulation and competitive win backs. He has held multiple marketing positions in sales planning, promotions and advertising in telecom and high-tech segments and was the lead equity analyst at a major Wall Street institution selling high-tech and service provider stock recommendations. Klein founded, co-founded or advised on a number of early-stage corporate formations and is a frequent presenter at industry forums and analysts meetings. He holds an EMBA from Cornell University (1987), a MBA in Finance & Investment from George Washington University (1972) and a BS in Aerospace Engineering from Pennsylvania State University (1972).

Dobbs received a doctorate in pharmacy from the University of Tennessee (1976), a Master of Public Health from the University of Alabama in Birmingham (1982), and a Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy from Samford University (1975). He has also completed executive programs at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Elliot Fishman joins the Howe School as an Industry Associate Professor. Before coming to Stevens, Fishman was an Adjunct Professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business in the Executive MBA Program. He was the Founder and President of Astrina Capital, LLC, a consulting firm involved in advising on technology commercialization, and he also founded and managed the New York office of Advantage Capital Partners, LP, a $440-million Dr. Fishman national venture capital fund. In addition, Fishman directed the product group leading to a successful IPO at Doubleclick, Inc., and served as Vice President of Technology Management & Funding, LP, a technology consulting firm.

Peerasit Patanakul joins the Howe School as an Associate Professor and Postdoctural Fellow. Patanakul earned a doctorate in Systems Science/Engineering Management from Portland State University in 2004. His research centered on the development of a decision-support model for assigning multiple concurrent projects to project managers. Dr. Patanakul Patanakul’s work has been widely published. His research interests focus on project management, new product development, and strategic management.He is a member of the Project Management Institute, IEEE and Professional Engineer, Engineering Institute of Thailand, and serves as the Conference Coordinator for the Project Management Track for the International Conference on Management of Technology. In addition to his doctorate Patanakul holds a Master of Science degree in Engineering Management from Portland State University (2000), and a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Chemical Engineering from Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (1995).

Fishman’s main areas of research interest are technology management and innovation, commercialization of new ventures, technology assessment and valuation of intellectual property and venture capital and governance of new enterprises. His numerous publications include “Securitization of Intellectual Property” and “Equity Valuations in Technology Transfer,” which both appeared in Technology Access Report. Fishman holds a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania (1996) and a MBA from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School (1994). He received his BSE in Electrical Engineering from Duke University (1986).

Prof. Yan Meng with student and intelligent light-sensitive robot.

3


PRESIDENT’S LETTER 2005

T H E H O W E S C H O O L O F T E C H N O LO GY M A N A G E M E N T

Within a decade of its founding, The Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management has become a nationally recognized leader in Technology Management education and research.

This is an exciting time at The Howe School. It was named among the ‘Top Five in the Nation’ for its graduate education by the executive readership of Optimize magazine. Most strikingly, the International Association for the Management of Technology (IAMOT) recognized Howe as one of the top Technology Management Programs in the world at the IAMOT annual meeting in Vienna, Austria. Further recognition came as SAP named the school a Center of Excellence in Business Process Innovation, only one of five such centers worldwide

Acting Dean McCusker In June, an important transition occurred with the departure of Dean Jerry MacArthur Hultin, who was selected to serve as president of Polytechnic University in New York.

The Business and Technology (B&T) program graduated its second class. Nationally, the starting salaries of business majors tend to be less than those of engineering and science graduates. However, Stevens B&T graduates are very much on par with engineering and computer science majors, given an average starting salary of $54,000. B&T welcomes 60 new freshmen this year, now bringing the total program student body to 200 strong.

During his five years at The Howe School, Hultin oversaw the expansion of new graduate programs in technology management in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan region, as well as nationwide and globally; he also presided over a major increase in research funding, and the successful inauguration of the undergraduate program in Business and Technology. At Stevens, Hultin promoted government research interest in Stevens’ technologies for homeland security and military defense. Hultin also led a much-cited September 2004 research study, titled “Securing the Port of New York and New Jersey: Network-centric Operations Applied to the Campaign against Terrorism.”

The B&T program prepares a whole new kind of graduate for the workforce of the 21st century. These young people know exactly where they want to go when they graduate, exactly how to get there, and how to handle major responsibility when it’s entrusted to them. They are among the most savvy and sought-after graduating seniors for mid-level executive positions in telecoms, pharma and the financial industry – as well as by any firm where the understanding and management of both business and technology is crucial, and where the intersection of the two is appreciated as mutually reinforcing.

Upon Hultin’s departure, I was pleased to appoint Associate Dean Lex McCusker as Acting Dean of The Howe School. A long-time executive at AT&T, McCusker brings a history of high-level technology management responsibilities and project oversight, principally in the field of telecommunications. He is an expert in the areas of operations and logistics; general management and change management; strategic planning, analysis and implementation; and organizational development and communications.

On the graduate level, a unique MBA program in Technology Management, directed by Dr. Murrae Bowden, graduated its first class. The school introduced new programs in Management of Information Systems, directed by Dr. Jerry Luftman, in areas of Outsourcing, Legal Compliance (Sarbanes-Oxley) and Cyber Security, and a program focused on Technology Management in the pharmaceutical industry, directed by Dr. Joel Dobbs, was also debuted. The school also added new talent and capability in key research areas for Stevens, including the new Center for Decision Technologies, directed by Dr. Jeffery Nickerson.

During the search for a new dean, I look forward to working with Acting Dean McCusker in continuing to build the distinctive graduate and undergraduate programs at The Howe School. New Additions to Faculty Joel H. Dobbs joins the Howe School as its Executive in Residence and Program Director, Pharmaceutical Technology Management. Previously, Dobbs was Vice-President, Research Information Services and Global IT Strategy and Compliance, for ScheringPlough Corporation before he retired in 2004. At Schering-Plough, he was responsible for all

On a global scale, in combination with WebCampus.Stevens, Howe graduated Stevens’ first master’s degree students in China, at Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT). Under the direction of Dr. Audrey Curtis, the graduate program in Project Management will soon be offered at BIT as well. In the fall, the Howe School as a whole will move into a state-of- the-art facility, the Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management. Dr. Dobbs

2

NEW LEADERSHIP In the Office of Development and External Affairs, after two successful, back-to-back five-year capital campaigns, long-time Vice President Jim Snyder accepted an appointment as Special Assistant to the President. Stepping in as Acting Vice President for Development and External Affairs is Marjorie Everitt, a familiar presence to our faithful alumni VP Snyder and major donors. She is currently overseeing the historic growth of the Edwin A. Stevens Society, which broke through the 500-member barrier for the first time this year. She and her team are building strategies to develop new levels of support and recognition for Stevens’ programs, faculty and Acting VP Everitt facilities. A sterling financial operations team has come on board to ensure effective management of the gains made during a decade of rapid growth. In March 2005, Stefano Falconi assumed office as Stevens’ Vice President of Finance, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer. He is now in the process of creating the necessary financial mechanisms and controls to guarantee that future growth can proceed apace. Falconi’s experience includes positions of responsibility Harvard University, MIT, and Carnegie Mellon University. Falconi has a J.D.

degree from the University of Padua, was a NATO Fellow at Cambridge University, and received a MBA at the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. His extensive experience includes budgeting, research accounting, information systems and business processes, monitoring expenses and revenues, and managing financial controls. A member of Falconi’s team is Michael D’Onofrio in the position of Controller. D’Onofrio, who had served as interim CFO prior to Falconi’s arrival, is a results-driven executive with a proven record of managing VP Falconi multi-million-dollar budgets, reducing costs and streamlining operations. Previously he oversaw the finances of a $170 million-revenue company; and prior to that, he started up and managed a nationwide financial shared-services center and staff of 60. Douglass Horr just arrived and brings strong credentials for the role of Institute Auditor. He previously served as Senior Auditor, Mr. D’Onofrio Internal Audit Department at Rutgers University, where he also held the positions of Project Team Lead for Rutgers Integrated Administrative System, and Senior Executive Assistant, Office of the VP for Administration.

FA C I L I T I E S Under the guidance of the Vice President for Facilities and Support Services, Henry Dobbelaar, Stevens is looking forward to the debut of several major facilities over the next year. Scheduled to open its doors in the fall of 2005, the Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management, a six-story, 95,000 square-foot structure, will serve as the new VP Dobbelaar signature headquarters for the Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management, along with other Stevens departments and research centers. The construction of this premier facility was made possible by a generous personal gift of $6 million from Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr., the Vice Chairman of Verizon and the Chairman of the Board of Stevens Institute, and an additional $18 million in contributions from strong Stevens supporters, including Verizon, Lucent, AT&T, the State of New Jersey and other esteemed Stevens alumni. As the home of The Wesley J. Howe School, The Babbio Center will further reinforce Stevens’ global presence in the field of technologymanagement education and research. The new Schaefer School Faculty & Dean's Complex, 4th floor, EAS Building, which had been unused for decades.

Now under construction, The River Terrace Apartments complex will open in late spring 2006, ready to accommodate upward of 200 undergraduate residents. The renovation and expansion of the world-renowned high-speed testing tank in the Center for Maritime Systems’ Davidson Laboratory will provide Stevens with the most modern facility in the world for testing naval architectural design and large-scale environmental and ocean engineering projects. Re-opening of the facility is slated for early 2006. Finally, the renovation of the fourth-floor of the Edwin A. Stevens Building has provided a much-needed modern suite of offices and conference facilities for the Dean of Engineering and the Schaefer School’s administrative staff.


Stevens Institute of Technology Castle Point on Hudson Hoboken, NJ 07030

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Office of the President Stevens Institute of Technology’s Board of Trustees is moving forward with the adoption of the current best practices for the stewardship of non-profit academic institutions. Some longstanding committees have been replaced, others have been refocused with newly drafted charters and expanded missions. Faculty, staff and trustees have participated in this process in our effort to expand communication and cooperation between the Board and the full spectrum of the Stevens community. In addition, review and revision of Stevens' Bylaws and Conflict of Interest policy has been undertaken, along with an expanded Code of Ethics for the entire Institute, which will now apply to administrators, faculty and staff, in addition to trustees. Among the newly founded Trustee Management Committees are those facilitating Strategy, Human Resources, Nominating and Corporate Governance, and Faculty and Staff Relations. The Human Resources Committee replaces the former Compensation Committee. The Alumni Affairs Committee has adopted a new charter. Among the Financial Committees, the Audit and Institute Development Committees are newly chartered. The Finance and Investment Committee will consist of two co-chairs overseeing the Subcommittee on Finance and the Subcommittee on Investment. The

latter subcommittee will be concerned with endowment management and growth. Newly chartered Operational Committees include the Institute Facilities Committee and the Technology Commercialization Committee; the latter will feature a significant new charter and related investment policy. The Enrollment and Student Life Committee will oversee the activities of three subcommittees: the Subcommittee on Undergraduate Students, the Subcommittee on Master’s and Professional Education Programs, and the Subcommittee on the Institute’s Educational Environment. The Committee on Academe will also be structured to contain three designated subcommittees: the Subcommittee on Strategy: Technogenesis & Stevens as a Research University; the Subcommittee on Faculty Excellence: Teaching, Research, Inventiveness and Post -Tenure Review; and the Subcommittee on Curricula and Academic Disciplines. With these new structures in place, the Board of Trustees will be in an enhanced position to guide Stevens forward in its mission to educate, to create new knowledge, and to contribute to the betterment of society.

continued from front cover replicate, accruing to the benefit of both the Institute and society. Earlier the Center for Environmental Systems, using related technology, was instrumental in helping remediate well water in Bangladesh that was contaminated with arsenic. Our Wireless Network Security Center was the recipient of an impressive fifth major grant from the National Science Foundation, and has contributed to the founding of an exciting new wireless technology venture, Attila Technologies LLC. SINTEL - the Secure Infrastructure Technology Lab - was founded to aggregate the many brilliant faculty efforts now under way at Stevens to protect the integrity of our ports and harbors from potential terrorist attacks or efforts to disrupt our economy and the commercial supply chain. Students and young alumni continued to apply for patents in technology applications that they helped to create through the Senior Design and Technogenesis Scholars programs. Impressively, one biomedical device for detecting sources of pain in the body is expected shortly to undergo clinical trials at a New York City medical center. The Lawrence T. Babbio, Jr. Center for Technology Management drew near completion, promising the most up-to-date facility to house the increasingly honored Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management. Accolades for The Howe School included an award as one of the “world’s elite research institutions” by the International Association for Management of Technology, and a placement by Optimize magazine in the Top Five in the US for educating executives in the management of technology. Our graduate Telecommunications Management program awarded Stevens degrees to 21 students in China through a joint agreement with the Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT); other graduate pro-

grams are being initiated at BIT and at several other universities in China, with extensive involvement from our award-winning WebCampus.Stevens. The culture of the Scholar-Athlete at Stevens continued to expand and acquire new dimensionalities, as our academically outstanding Division III athletes experienced their most successful season ever, with a first-year student bringing home Stevens' first National Championship, which is in equestrian competition. As a testimony to our alumni, annual giving to Stevens reached new highs, with the Edwin A. Stevens Society breaking the 500-member barrier for the first time in its history. Finally, the Board of Trustees in its efforts to comply with the best practices of governance at not-for-profits developed new Board committees and new charters for Board committees which will enhance the future governance of the Institute. In addition, the Board will continue its outreach to faculty and staff through the new Board Committee on Faculty and Staff Relations as well as other avenues of communication.

September 2005

“In the recent US News & World Report rankings for national universities, Stevens climbed ten positions to #71 – rising farther, faster, than any other university in the National Top 100.” – Hal Raveché Dear Colleague: In the recent US News & World Report rankings for national universities, Stevens climbed ten positions to #71 – rising farther, faster, than any other university in the National Top 100. In 2005, retention and graduation improved significantly, contributing to the higher standing. Stevens is now, in the category of Actual Graduation, ranked 58, up from 83 in 2004. Ranked 39th in SATs, Stevens continues to attract the most talented students in the nation. The important work of our faculty, the impressive achievements of our students, the professional dedication of our staff, and the exemplary commitment of our alumni have all contributed to a most successful 2004-05 academic year. I am honored to serve as president at this exciting time in the ascent of Stevens among the nation’s top research universities. I am especially proud of those extraordinary individuals that contribute to our campus as a dynamically vibrant center for learning and creative activities. Our collective goal is to continue the nurturing of our unique campus environment. Technogenesis® cultivates that high degree of inventiveness which enables faculty and students to connect the pioneering progress they achieve in their fields with products and services that are valued by business, industry and society as a whole. In the year just passed, Technogenesis has shown its value-added impact for our students, faculty, industry partners, the Institute itself, and the world at large. It is no accident that Stevens was ranked in late 2004 by The Princeton Review as standing among the nation’s “most entrepreneurial campuses.”

Sincerely yours,

The major goal of Stevens' vision for growth is to ensure the Institute's continued ascendancy as a leader in research and education where scholars in many fields of endeavor are focused on creating landmark advances and finding innovative solutions to critical needs of our nation and global society. All indications as we begin the new academic year buttress expectations of great things to come through faculty and student achievements.

Harold J. Raveché President

In our sponsored research, the faculty and research centers have made impressive gains. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 2005, more than $30 million from external resources was expended on research, compared to $25 million as of June 30, 2004. This bodes well for our long-term goal of further growth to $50 million by the end of this decade. New research initiatives have been undertaken to build rapid-

This annual letter highlights some of the outstanding contributions made by our faculty, students and staff. As always, I welcome you to consider partnering with us in our growing research and education initiatives.

ly on the wealth of expertise that characterizes our outstanding faculty. Efforts in biomedical engineering, nanoscale technologies, cyber security, mathematical cryptography and network security, as well as computer modeling for more secure ports and harbors, have all added to Stevens’ renown as a wellspring of ideas and applications. Their critically important work has implications well beyond the community of our campus. Our Office of Institute Technology Initiatives negotiated the first sale of a Stevens Technogenesis company, HydroGlobe, making commercially available worldwide a heavy-metals filtration technology to purify drinking water, developed by researchers at the Center for Environmental Systems. The sale also resulted in financial rewards for Stevens; a concurrent licensing agreement will provide patent royalties to Stevens for years to come, allowing the Technogenesis cycle to ...continued on back

Inside Achievements and new arrivals in the three academic schools Institute Technology Initiatives and the Year in Technogenesis Student accomplishments in, and beyond, the classroom and laboratory New Leadership at the Institute The Stevens BoT and its advances in governance

Stevens President's Letter 2005  

Harold J. Raveche, President of Stevens Institute of Technology presents the 2005 report.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you