Issuu on Google+

A digital portfolio of select design work by Steven Prior


Steven Prior Objectives

I am seeking an Intern Architect position where I can continue to develop my design and problem solving skills, while completing the NCARB licensing process.

Education 2013 2011

M.Arch B.A.Arch

University of New Mexico School of Architecture and Planning University of New Mexico School of Architecture and Planning

Experience

2012-2013 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico: Graduate Assistant 2011-Present Rescue Social Change Group, Albuquerque, New Mexico: Data Collection for UCSF 2010-2011 Osuna Nursery, Albuquerque New Mexico: Greenhouse and Native Plants

Awards

2011-2012 2010 2003

NCA Architects Scholarship. Excellence in Design Intelligence, received for the design of “Musicians Pavilion� New Mexico Academic Decathlon, Second place: Science, Third place: Overall

Design & Fabrication Tools Digital Traditional Digital Traditional

Contact

Sketching, Model Building Rhino, Revit, Photoshop, Illustrator, Premier, InDesign, SketchUp, and Others. CNC, Laser Cutter, 3D printing Bandsaw, Tablesaw, Router, Drill Press, Planer, Common Handheld Power Tools, Common Hand Tools

steven-prior@hotmail.com 505-235-4759 608 Princeton Dr, SE / Albuquerque, NM 87106


Intent My intent as a designer is to find elegant solutions to complex problems and conditions. I find direction and meaning, in the design process, through the identification and resolution of problems. Steven Prior

Projects

Sustainable skyscraper Laboratory Musicians Pavilion Parametric design and fabrication Product design and fabrication


Sustainable skyscraper: Sustainability has become an intrinsic element of nearly every contemporary architectural project. In this studio I was asked to re-imagine one of the least sustainable building typologies. The only requirement was that the skyscraper have a minimum of 500,000 square feet of office space.


Approach to sustainability While form and systems can make a building more efficient, I came to the conclusion that the greatest potential for a skyscrapers' sustainability exists beyond the envelope of the building itself. In specific conditions, the skyscraper typology can reduce inefficiencies on a city scale.

Typological advantages of skyscrapers Reduction in infrastructure Reduced land use Considerably less building envelope per square foot of conditioned space Larger, more efficient, shared mechanical systems Greater mass transit and walking potential


Site analysis

Minor land uses

Major land uses

Site Entertainment / Culture Government Open Space Education Healthcare

Site Retail Residential Commercial Manufacturing Mixed and SU

Site: 440 West 1st Street, 90012 Current use: Parking lot on grade / subway terminal Zone: T, Q, C2-4D, and others. Area: 2.02 Acres. APN: 5149010944 and 5149010034 Plan use: Commercial. Nearby: Parking on grade up to 1000’+ towers. Topography: Hillside Classification (slight).

Incentives State enterprise zone. Greater downtown housing incentive MTA Subway addition (2019)

Seismic

Views from site

Public transit Site Subway Expo Line Subway Blue Line Bus Surface Railway Planned Subway

Nearest fault: 1.33 km. / Type: B. Max estimated magnitude: 6.4. Slip rate: 1.3mm/year. Landslide: No. Liquefaction: No. Tsunami inundation zone: No.

Site City views Ocean views Mountain views

UNION STATION

Great

Good

Poor

Nearby Museum of Contemporary Art. Disney Concert Hall. Broad Museum. Japanese American Museum. SCI-ARC Dodger Stadium

Further Information Airport hazard: No. Flood zone: No. Watercourse: No. High wind velocity: No. Hazardous waste / Border zone: No.

Climate Temperature

Wind speed

90

30

40

100

25

80

20

70

15

60

10

50 40 Deg F J

5 F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D Annual

0 Mph J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

Annual


Greater Los Angeles Area 13th largest city in the world by area: 4,850 square miles. 12th largest city in the world by population: 16.37 million. Density: 2,645 people per square mile. Key issues: traffic, infrastructure cost, water scarcity, sprawl, heat island, pollution Key advantages: climate, population, strong and diverse economy

Traffic Rush hour: Typically lasts from 5 a.m. and 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. (some days as long as 5 a.m. to 11am and 2:30pm until as late as 8pm). National average commute time for workers in cities with populations over 1 million: 22 minutes each way Average commute within Los Angeles proper: Approximately 30 minutes each way (excluding commuting to and from the valley) Average commute within the Greater Los Angeles Area: Approximately 45 minutes each way

Sprawl While Los Angeles Proper is relatively dense, the incorporated areas of its metropolitan statistical area is not. 12.55 Million people live in areas of the Greater Los Angeles Area with a density of 2,645 people per square mile which is very low for a large city. By comparison Albuquerque has a density of 3,010 people per square mile and Manhattan has a density of 26,939 people per square mile. Many of the city's chronic problems, including areas under-served by various public services, traffic, infrastructure costs, and pollution, are all exacerbated by the city's large footprint. Additionally, as development spreads unique habitats are damaged along with some of the most productive arable land in the country.

site

Pollution The American Lung Association has ranked Los Angeles as the worst air quality in the country 13 out of the last 14 years. 90% of Californians live in areas that fail to meet state and federal air quality standards. Breathing air in Southern California can reduce one’s life expectancy by one to two years. California is the fifth-largest producer of global warming emissions in the world. Air pollution: 14% higher than national average. Ozone: 5% higher than national average. Carbon Monoxide: 47% higher than national average. Particulate Matter: 6% higher than national average. In addition to pollution production, other factors like ultraviolet light, heat, dryness, and stagnation all contribute to air quality problems.


Program

Building scale allows high density. Key views are identified and sky parks serving individual floors or groups of floors are created. At 1540' it is the 2nd tallest tower in the United States and 7th worldwide.

1530’ 102nd floor office residential

Worlds 2nd highest outdoor observation deck.

retail / dining / observation

View above Los Angeles’ tallest towers.

refuge / transfer floor / service / mechanical

View above buildings within 1000‘ radius.

core

View above Disney concert hall.

subway


Office interior


Typical mid-level office floor plan A B C D E F G H I

Open plan work space Break room Video conference room Conference room Reception Collaborative work space Office Mechanical Storage

F

A

D

D

B

F H

I

H H

H

G

0’

5’

25’

north

E

C


Typical residential floor plan A B C D E F G H I

Master bedroom Bathroom Study Bedroom Closet Living room Terrace Kitchen/Dining Entry

B

A

E B

I

D

H

F

G 0’

5’

25’

north

C


Energy production system Bio-reactors are micro-algae farms that can be mounted to or incorporated into facades. Because of Los Angeles' climate it is entirely possible to offset a great deal of the buildings energy use with clean and renewable energy. The units also shade the building reducing cooling demands. Additional energy can be produced by incorporating transparent photo voltaic cells on the surface of the units.

Sun

Facade mounted algae growth vessel

Since the bio-reactors block valuable views it is important to work with tenants to make implementation of the system mutually beneficial. Transparent P.V.

A

A B C D E

B

Clean energy

Biomass

Processing

East

South

West

D E F G H I J

C

Vegetated terrace Green roof drain / water recovery Facade ventilation Titanium Dioxide infused concrete Bio reactor unit with transparent P.V. glazing

North

Biofuel + CO 2 + Nutrients

Sustainable and energy saving features

Bio-reactor placement

K

F G H I J

Variable shading system Rain screen Triple glazing Active chilled beam with integrated L.E.D. lighting Sustainably sourced wooden baffle ceiling

L

K L M N O

M

N

O

Chilled water for cooling Fresh air supply Bio reactor supply and harvest tube Fire suppression Electrical or data conduits


Laboratory: This project was developed in a studio that focused on designing scientific research laboratories. Located in St. Croix's Salt River Bay, this building is geared toward marine research, training new scientists, public outreach, and education about marine environments.


Site information Coral reef Coral habitat Destroyed coral habitat Remaining mangroves Destroyed mangroves Coastline prior to development Pond prior to development Privately owned property Project

0’

100’

250’

500’ north


Underwater level

Third floor

G

I

H

D

I

B

A

D E

C

Surface level

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O

Entry ramp Exhibit space Living aquarium Elevator Freight elevator Outdoor civic space Laboratories Storage Mechanical Conference room Collaborative workspace Offices Teaching laboratories Classroom Auditorium

J

E

K

L

Fourth floor

I

M

I

F

D

D E

E

O

0’

N

124’


Laboratory module

Reflected ceiling

A

H B

G

C A B C D E F G H I J K L

D

E

4’

I K J

H G L

F

0’

Double skin sun control Collaborative workspace Individual workspace Wet lab Fume hood Exterior hallway Air supply Air return Lighting Data Fire suppression Fume hood exhaust

29’


Exploded section

Double skin system

A B C D E F G H I

A

B C

J

E

L K

M

D

F

G

HVAC supply HVAC return Fume hood exhaust Data Fire suppression Lighting Building envelope Sun protection Thin film photovoltaic

H

J K L M

I

Waste water Hot / cold water Electrical Structure


Musicians Pavilion: This small retreat was designed for a hypothetical client that wanted a place of personal refuge for contemplation and meditation.


Site plan A B C D E F

Replanted native vegetation Garden Desert grass Parking NM 314 Isleta Indian Rd SW

A

B

E

C A D F 0’

50’

150’

450’ north


Upper floor (level with ground) A B C

Entry Meditation space Bedroom

D E

Zen garden Dining space

B

Lower floor

E

A

A

C

D 0’

5’

20’

40’ north


Section A B

Skylight Water collection

A

View to Sandias / Bosque

B

0’

5’

20’

40’


Meditation space


Parametric practice: Parametric design tools have become more sophisticated and user friendly. They have allowed firms with modest computational power to develop complex designs that respond to a number of factors. In parametric practice I learned to use one of these tools. The next two small projects were developed while I was learning the software.


Train station One of the greatest criticisms of parametric design is that parametric design tools are often used to create complex forms that do not enhance the performance of a building. I sought to find a way to apply the definition I was learning in a way that took advantage of the forms produced. For this quick exercise I designed a commuter train station that's lattice structure cleans the air while its surface is exposed to sunlight.

Smog Sunlight reacts with nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and other pollutants in the atmosphere causing smog.

Similarly, titanium dioxide is a photo-catalytic material. It can be added to concrete, resulting in a surface that reacts with ultraviolet light from the sun to reduce smog to harmless constituent elements like oxygen, hydrogen, nitrates, and sulfates.


Site

Ground floor

A B C D E

A B C D E

Paseo Del Norte Blvd Pedestrian path Rail line Parking El Pueblo Rd

Restrooms Mechanical Ticketing Waiting area behind sound barriers Open waiting area

A A

B

B A

C

D

D E

C

0’

E

50’

150’

350’ north


Sections A B C D E F G H

Structure Elevator Platform Waiting area Pedestrian pathway Ticketing Mechanical Paseo Del Norte Blvd

A

B

C

The lattice structure is designed to create a large amount of surface area. Its orientation on the site allows for sunlight to bathe its surface. These attributes are useful because, when combined with titanium dioxide infused concrete, its surface will destroy many airborne contaminants.

G

D

E

F

H


Building parametrically designed forms: Parametric design tools allow architects to design complex forms with relative ease. In many situations creating these forms on a architectural scale requires specially trained workers or custom built pieces that can be assembled by the average construction worker. As it stands, these conditions make many of these forms too expensive for the vast majority of projects. Beyond simply building a prototype of something I designed using parametrics, I wanted to investigate construction methods that could make parametric forms more accessible for the average project.


Form creation

Physical form building A

An appropriate textile is selected for the desired final shape. The textile is adhered to the top plate of the form.

B

The textile is adhered to the lower plate of the form and to the middle plates (if any).

C

The upper plate is suspended with scaffolding. The bottom plate is pulled down to achieve the desired amount of deflection. The textile is finally sprayed with epoxy and reinforced with additional layers of textile and epoxy if needed.

A

Textile

B

Form

C

Resulting form

Epoxy spray


Pouring and finishing

Textile Top Plate Middle plates Scaffolding

A

Depending on the height of the shape being poured and the strength of the mold that has been made, the pour may need to be split into flights.

B

Once the concrete has become work hardened the form can be removed.

C

After the form is removed the surface can be polished to minimize the appearance of flight lines and textile texture.

A

B

C


Invention & Fabrication: This project was developed for a class exploring design and business. In the class we worked as a team to take an idea and turn it into a viable product. The class covered: product conceptualization, market studies, design development, prototyping, beginning the patent process, researching manufacturing, writing a business plan, legal aspects of starting a business, capital acquisition via finding and presenting to investors, working with business partners and defining roles and expected outcomes, and marketing.


Market study This market study reveals diverse options with differing levels of protection and aesthetic intentions. We feel there is a untapped market that our product addresses.

Fire Tec Smoke Alarm 755FM

Kidde Silhouette Smoke Alarm

Robust, photo/ion detector with carbon monoxide detection $99.95

Low profile for outlet boxes $53.32

Kidde 21007915 AC/DC Low cost photo/ion smoke alarm $24.95

Chick-a-dee Smoke Detector Proves market for unique designs $75

System Sensor Standard non-hardwired photoelectric smoke detector $30


Design & Features Aesthetic goal: A detector that blends into, or artfully punctuates, interior design. Other designs have ventured into this territory. However, we feel our low profile design, ease of installation, interchangeable and modifiable cover plates make our design desirable and distinct.

Performance Goal: The simple idea that, if detectors are located throughout a home for detection of smoke and carbon monoxide, detectors could be fitted with

A

sensors packages to improve energy performance. The array of detectors send information about temperature, room occupancy, and light levels to a smart thermostat. This information allows for real time adjustments to HVAC and lighting systems to achieve minimal energy use while meeting users comfort levels. Additionally, the occupancy detection feature could be integrated into a home security system.

B

Variants: We Identified three major consumer conditions our product would need to appeal to. We developed a variant of the product targeting each group.

Red $60

Black $65

Green $110 + integration

This introductory variant is exclusively for existing homes. It provides the home safety industries best practice, dual method smoke detection and carbon monoxide detection, in one device. Installation is easy for any DIY enthusiast. Requiring a drill, stud finder, and a 2" circle cutting bit.

This variant is for new construction or major remodels where code and best practice requires smoke detectors to be hardwired.

This variant represents the vision for this product: design, safety, and sustainability. This variant integrates environmental sensors into a device that is perfectly positioned in the home to gather information that can be used to dramatically reduce energy use in the home.

Features

Red

Black

C D E

F

Green

Dual smoke detection ionization and photoelectric (each optimal for distinct fire types)

Carbon Monoxide detector Low profile design Interchangeable / modifiable cover plates DIY installation Battery only Hardwired with battery backup Thermometer Sound detector Light level sensor

Components A B C D E F G H I J

Fixed installed housing Mounting tabs 9V Battery Test / 15 min “silence” switch Microprocessor housing Removable “guts” sled Instruments integrated circuit boards Alarm speaker Sensor package Interchangeable / modifiable cover plate

G H

I J


Placement & Installation 1. You must place the device a minimum of 12 inches from any wall. Dead air collects in these spaces and will cause delayed fire detection and inaccurate temperature readings. The devices can be wall mounted between 12 and 20 inches from the ceiling surface. However, ceiling placement provides optimal performance.

2. Choose your ideal location(s). For new construction a smoke detector is required in almost every occupiable space. We suggest this practice for existing homes being refitted. Remember, Using a stud finder determine that the location you have chosen is clear of rafters, joists, plumbing, and electrical conduit or wires. If the device is being installed in an existing home, it is recommended that the installer use a stud finder sensitive enough to detect PVC plumbing and capable of detecting hot electrical wiring. Power should be turned off prior to step three to avoid the possibility of electrocution regardless of a negative hot wire scan.

3. Using a 2" circle cutting bit, cut a hole in the desired location. Be cognizant most homes have 1/2" gypsum board ceilings. Do not drill too deeply in the event your stud detector failed to detect a object. 12� Minimum

20� Maximum

12� Minimum

Ideal placement

Dead air space

Placement for maximum protection

tabs will expand once they clear the far side of the ceiling material. If you have a non-standard thickness ceiling material simply measure the thickness and break the mounting tabs along the corresponding perforated lines.

5. Install a fresh 9V battery and insert the sled into the fixed housing by lining the bumps on the top of the sled with the groves in the fixed housing. Acceptable placement

Placement for minimum protection

4. While holding down the mounting tabs, insert the fixed housing into the hole. The mounting

6. Test the device by pushing up on the exposed portion of the device and holding it for three seconds. The alarm should sound loudly. If your cooking should ever set off the device accidentally, you can activate a 15 minute silence mode by pushing up on the exposed portion of the device. When the 15 minutes has expired the device will alert that it has rearmed with 3 rapid tones.

Customization Interchangeable and modifiable cover plates is a feature unique to this design. Each unit comes with two covers, one white and one primed for painting with latex based interior paints. Additionally, a variety of specialty cover plates can be purchased. These include colored plastic, metals, and woods. Custom materials and colors can be specially made. With this feature you can allow a utilitarian device blend into its surroundings, not punctuate them... unless you want to.


Prototyping Part of the class was devoted to model building to demonstrate design ideas. Our team decided that the best way to present our product was to have a working prototype for reviewers to touch, see and operate instead of just a model. Two were built. One was for handling, the other was installed in a mock-up ceiling and wall.


Team Jennifer Garrett

Maggie Merrigan

Victor Munoz

Steven Prior

Concept & Design Steven Prior

Product development Jennifer Garrett Maggie Merrigan Victor Munoz Steven Prior

3D modeling

Code & legal analysis Jennifer Garrett Maggie Merrigan Victor Munoz Steven Prior

Physical modeling Victor Munoz Steven Prior

Presentations

Working prototypes Steven Prior

Market analysis

0.25” 0.25”

Manufacturing research Jennifer Garrett Maggie Merrigan Victor Munoz Steven Prior

Steven Prior

0.5”

Jennifer Garrett Maggie Merrigan Victor Munoz Steven Prior

Jennifer Garrett Maggie Merrigan Victor Munoz Steven Prior 4.75”

Business plan Jennifer Garrett Maggie Merrigan Victor Munoz Steven Prior

Graphics, documentation, rendering & print media Jennifer Garrett Maggie Merrigan Victor Munoz Steven Prior

0.625”

0.5”

0.125”

0.25”


Architecture and design by Steven Prior