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Portfolio Steven John Moore University of Johannesburg Fa c u l t y o f a r t, D e s i g n & Architecture 2013 - 2016


Reflection iscovering my design philosophy and architectural language during the last 4 years it has opened my eyes to see that architects are more than mere special practitioners. Architects have become the translators of an extremely complex narrative. The environment we find ourselves in today has become so specific to its complex needs. It is impossible to begin to think about architecture without factors of these narratives forming an input in the design process. The rich nature of my context during my studies had developed my conceptual thought process to be able to read these narrative, draw inspiration from them and understand what they need. Social, political, environmental etc. Architecture for me has become the process of understanding. My unique outlook of what architecture means to me and what my conceptual design process is, was welcomed with open arms in the GSA when I applied to my MTech in 2017. The mutualistic nature of the GSA creates the perfect platform where this unique vision of architecture can become clear. A space where the student and mentors share the passion for an idea creates minds that will be forward thinkers in their fields. These new methods of thinking are crucial when addressing issues within South African context. The rapid growth of South Africa and Johannesburg needs new and explorative methods to challenge the future of South African architecture. Johannesburg being such a young city on a global scale needs the help of a new wave of architects that form and sculpt in the manner of how architecture is perceived. GSA forms around the revolutionary method of thinking and exploration of architecture. This system will push to develop and ridicule my design philosophy to become deeper and richer with every project.


Contents:

Contents page : Project include from first, second, third and BTech years. Practical work experience and work abroad.

01

B - Te c h [ A p p l i e d D e s i g n ]

Fracture [GROUP] Comfort Plus Klipriversburg nature reserve Rigs to research Archigram 41 Cooper Square

9 31 41 53 57 59

03

Second year

The Unknown Working period in New Delhi, India

97 --

05

Professional Office

Propertuity 125 Kothari Associates 131


02

Th i r d y e a r

65 81 85 91

Urban Interchange Urban unknown Interface Braamfontein Cemetery

04

First year

107 113 119

Cubes Elemental The Entrance

06

Personal Interest

145 147

Light 1 Light 2


B - Te c h [ A p p l i e d D e s i g n ] 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Fracture Comfort plus Investigate - Educate - Rehabilitate Underwater or on the Moon Archigram Theory seminar [ Theory ] 41 Cooper Square Precedent study [ Theory ]


Fracture

Complex building & Thesis project Project description : This project is the major project of the BTech Program that is intended to synthesize all the experiences over the entire architectural education into a comprehensive demonstration of the ability to conceive, design and resolve a complex building in an urban context. The project is treated as a mini thesis in preparation for further postgraduate studies or an excellent portfolio for the beginning of ones careers as Technologists. This project synthesizes all the year’s learning from all the courses into a single output assessed across all the different modules at the November end of year portfolio exams. The project has already begun with the urban mapping and urban design frameworks for the identified study area. This part of the brief will deal with other exploitive and analysis aspects of the project, and is an essential and useful process to assist the design of the Tower project. In order to meet all the assessment criteria for the project, the building must conform to the following minimum requirements: 1. At least one basement level 2. Ground Floor Retail and/or public nature at street level with catering 3. Offices component 4. Residential component 5. Large span space of some sort (over 17m) 6. At least 7 storeys high The site of the tower project is located anywhere within the identified urban design study area. This makes a large precinct with Braamfontein’s Cultural hub comprising of Constitutional Hill, Braamfontein Civic Theatre and Joubert Park. Each student was to choose an individual site within the existing street block structure, (this may be one or more even within a street block), to design a multi-storey structure as a mixed-use space within an existing urban context. The design will be informed through ongoing theory and construction projects.

Full thesis document at:

Design

Theory

Construction

8

University of Johannesburg


9

Steven John Moore


PROGRAM FINDING: All the program was then placed within the vertical plaza as per the sections created as reference. Understanding the nature of these sections the program can be allocated in to its optimal positions all of these allocation were made in strict accordance to the excel sheet.

An initial program outline was done when the project was started. These numbers have since been fine tuned to respond better to the brief and the conceptual framework the project has situated itself in. The program requirements are a hybrid between education, corporate and circulation. Most of the programs make use of open spaces that can respond to the concept (Vertical Plaza) and can easily be integrated to a network of spaces. There are some components that serve as an auxiliary program to what was found as part of the concept-program. These paces will integrate in the space but not necessarily the conceptual Vertical-Plaza.

Once the program placement was done colors were assigned in accordance to program that is more public and more private. The more public program will in essence form part of the vertical plaza and thus crate part of the primary concept integration. Connection of the spaces were made to start looking at how these space could be articulated. The program secondary to the public spaces was then interrogated to have better relationship towards the other programs. Programs were then shifted to all for better collaborative and efficient relationships. These programs will have secondary connections that will form more private impromptu meeting spaces for the occupancies of the building.

Since there is a very clear understanding of the nature of the concept in plan and section, a very systematic way was used to program the requirements for all the spaces. A excel sheet was set up to outline all the different requirements for each of the programs and then within all of this requirement a rating per program was made. This started to show trends of what the spaces need in relation the vertical plaza.

DESCRI PTI ON

DAY

NIGHT

SOLAR ACCESS Les s

Green space Health and Fitness Residentual Webinar space Interaction space

OPTI MAL ORI ENTATI ON Nor t h -

Fl ex Sout h

DAYLI GHTI NG Les s

0 - 10 Mor e

VI EWS Les s

0 - 10 Mor e

VENTI LATI ON Nat ur al 0 10 Mec h

WATER Les s

0 - 10 Mor e

ACOUSTI CS Noi s e

0 - 10 Qui et

PRI VACY Les s

0 - 10 Mor e

SECURI TY Les s

0 - 10 Mor e

SERVI CI NG Les s

0 - 10 Mor e

80

20

10

F

8

8

0

5

2

0

0

0

70

30

2

F

5

4

2

6

3

1

5

6

5

95

9

3

10

8

9

10

5

100

0

2

F

2

6

8

2

8

5

3

4

60

40

8

F

9

5

3

5

4

5

0

6

100

Digital libraries Online lecture space Local lecture space Public lecture & Auditorium Open studios Tech application Digital libraries Libraries Hardware Research Retail Food Urban Intergration Refuse access

0 - 10 Mor e

0

8

6

N

N

8

7

5

5

4

6

5

7

100

0

1

S

2

4

7

0

7

3

3

4

50

50

1

S

2

9

3

6

0

8

5

3

3

80

20

1

S

7

3

6

0

7

5

5

3

60

40

2

F

3

0

10

3

8

2

8

5

90

10

7

S

9

8

4

5

6

5

7

8

100

0

2

S

5

3

7

0

4

5

3

8

80

20

1

F

3

4

8

0

5

4

3

4

80

20

1

F

8

4

6

2

8

6

2

3

100

0

1

N

10

4

5

0

6

5

7

8

70

30

6

N

7

6

6

5

2

2

1

3

50

50

5

N

8

8

9

9

3

4

1

8

60

40

10

F

10

10

0

4

0

1

0

1

100

0

0

F

0

0

10

0

0

0

1

3

10

University of Johannesburg


north south section

Residentual Webinar space Health and Fitness Hardware Research

Residentual

Libraries Open studio

Health and Fitness Webinar space

Local lecture space Green space Digital libraries

Green space

Open of ce

Tech application

Open studio

Public lecture & Auditorium Online lecture space

Green space

Interaction space Food - RETAIL Refuse access

Tech application Online lecture space Interaction space

basement access

Food - RETAIL

All the program was then placed within the vertical plaza as per the sections created as reference. Understanding the nature of these sections the program can be allocated in to its optimal positions all of these allocation were made in strict accordance to the excel sheet. Once the program placement was done colors were assigned in accordance to program that is more public and more private. The more public program will in essence form part of the vertical plaza and thus crate part of the primary concept integration. Connection of the spaces were made to start looking at how these space could be articulated. The program secondary to the public spaces was then interrogated to have better relationship towards the other programs. Programs were then shifted to all for better collaborative and efficient relationships. These programs will have secondary connections that will form more private impromptu meeting spaces for the occupancies of the building.

11

Hardware Research Libraries Local lecture space Digital libraries

Public lecture & Auditorium

basement access

At this point the program development has not yet interrogated the size (sqm) of each of the set out programs. Each of the programs was then set out as a percentile of the total floor area required. These percentiles are going to be modified throughout the process to fill into the framework set out in the brief. For the easiest way to visualize how these program sizes are going to differ, a bar graph was made of the percentile. This shows how much relative area each of these spaces are going to require. This was not an indication of the physical amount but rather how much the programs should relatively be change to fit into the original program outline. Up until this point only one sections has been analyzed with program allocation. To enrich the outcome of this process all the above mentioned steps were done for the cross sections and correlated that each program meets up perfectly with both cross sections.

Steven John Moore


12

University of Johannesburg


CO N C EP T UA L F RA M EWO RK : Faced with the growing number of graduate youth unemployment in South Africa and the negative exponential effect it has on the economy a mutualistic space needed to be developed to allow graduated a gateway in to the marketplace. The conceptual approach will attempt to guide the process of the creation of a space where student can integrate in a collaborative way with people from a field that has been already absorbed into the growing economy of Johannesburg. This will foster the relationships of a complex economic nature, and at the same time allow the new youth unemployed to be absorbed into the marketplace. The relationships does not have to be in the same field.

quires. Thus the integration of two opposite fields (economics and art) will form a new perspective of both these fields and create collaborative economic inclusion. This space will attempt to provide young graduates with the most opportune environment to find employment in the context of South Africa and more specifically in Johannesburg. This relationship will be mutualistic. The employers in the space will befit from new fresh minds and the new perspectives on their fields, ability for new businesses to utilize the student to grow and expand in their businesses.

This is one of the biggest problem that we are facing at the moment, is that you graduates are not educated in the exact field that the economy re-

13

Steven John Moore

P R O J E C T C O N T E X T: The integration for commercial and education creates a opportunity for a social dynamic to soften the environment and contribute to the regeneration of Braamfontein. Specific mapping was done to understand the spacial and contextual implications these factors will have on one-another and to the rest of the context of braamfontein. Main mapping topics: - Places of education. - Places of commerce. - Social vibrancy The location and the site was major influenced by two factors that was found in the initial creating of the project brief. These factors include student activity, vibrancy and the possibility for corporate players to have impromptu access to these graduates.

In Braamfontein there is a major presence of students. Despite for the heavily populates student areas there are no integration between them and the active establishments that have the possibility to provide work after these students have graduated. This them guided the possibility to areas where these two factors have the strongest presence. Understanding the nature of what is required from the brief and the context of the site a more inform decision could be made of where the site could be. The chosen location is the best suitable site for the interaction between Students and the corporate world. The site allows for corporate access on the northern edge and more student integration on the west.


Fold out Page

14

University of Johannesburg


FA C A D E D E V E L O P M E N T: Because so much attention was payed in the initial program allocation within the building facades can be treated as a single system to optimize the cost and performance of the building. This could only have been done by grouping programs that have similar passive requirements. The internal complexities of the building can be seen as a large light well. The spaces focused in close proximity to the atrium will have excessive

15

lighting that could essentially create discomfort due to glare. Special focus was given to the roof of the atrium to able to control the amount of light that will be allowed in to the space. A light sensitive dynamic louver system will be used to automatically control the light distribution to optimize the internal environment.

Steven John Moore


16

University of Johannesburg


FA C A D E D E V E L O P M E N T: Double skin vented facade: SOUTH FACADE

Triple skin vented: WESTERN FACADE

-- Double glazed unitized system Including opage spandrel panels -- Space frame -- Mentis grating -- Double skin unitized system

-- Double glazed unitized system -- North west facing louvers -- Double glazed unitized system including opage spandrels panel -- Double skin glass and perforated aluminum -- Double glazed stick system -- R.C shear wall {circulation} -- Open edges for greenery to precondition north west wind into the building. -- Horizontal shading louvers

17

Steven John Moore


18

University of Johannesburg


S T R U C T U R E D E V E L O P M E N T: Three main pieces of structure that will have to be considerer. A tension like structure, A gravitational compression structure and a lateral compression structure. The structural solutions will then be a hybrid system with steel beams and columns that will form the basic grid structure. And a concrete ring beam system that will tie the two halves of the crack together. This concrete beam will also tie into the sear walls to create maximum lateral support. The steel framed structure placed on the edges of the building where no cantilevers or transfers

19

structures are required. Allowing these members to be tied back into the structure it will able to support the cantilever within the atrium. The grid system for the basement is a 7500mm x 6500 grid, this works well for the basement but not for the building above. The grid thus changes to the top of the building rather responding to the opening that has been formed. A radial grid runs along the cracked opening allowing the structure to integrate with the crack with minimal cantilevers or transfer structures in habitable space.

Steven John Moore


C O N T E X T C O N S I D E R AT I O N S :

The nature of the urban fabric surrounding the site creates an interesting dynamic when looking the plot edges and how they relate to one another. The following factors will inform the pragmatic responses to the site keeping in mind the nature of the concept on the ground level will have the biggest impact on the building.

The existing western edge has a public buffer space that separates the busy Jan-smuts road to the site. This creating of a public real could serve as the main access edge to the ground floor and possibly the vertical plaza that will connect all the spaces within the vertical programming.

The north edge spills out to a pedestrian friendly street edge. The roads tempo is slow and this could possibly allow for retail spill out without the intruding on the users experience and the comfort of the space.

The Southern edge shares a 7,5m wide service road with the neighboring building. This edge will be dead to the social vibrancy from the north and west. This allows for the perfect

The slow pace of the northern edge and the close proximity to the road will house the entrance to the public basement parking. The entrance will be situated on the eastern most edge of the northern edge to allow the pedestrian to wrap around the north and west edges uninterrupted.

Opportunity to create access to all the servicing and goods delivery. Venting for the basement can also be one along this edge hence no interference to the public or intrusion on the activation of the pedestrian edges. The Eastern edge of the site is shared by neighboring building. This creates a dead edge and possibility of overshadowing.

The western edge creates the biggest opportunity for successful urban and social integration.

20

University of Johannesburg


21

Steven John Moore


GROUND FLOOR CONTEXT When the cracking experiment was done a large amount of space was opened on the ground floor level. This is a direct response the exciting context of the site. The western edge will become the most social interactive zone hence the large opening to draw the public into and up the building. The northern edge will also have a entrance due to the large commercial presence from all the corporate influences along ameshof. The ground floor becomes an extension of the building on the first and second floor.

Fold out Page

Extending the ground floor public space into the building will allow for more impromptu meeting and increase the social vitality in and around the site.

22

University of Johannesburg


23

Steven John Moore


24

University of Johannesburg


25

Steven John Moore


26

University of Johannesburg


27

Steven John Moore


SINGLE SKINN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER PANEL-CLEAR SAFETY GLASS • EXTERIOR PANEL-CLEAR GLASS,LOW E COATING

A4

70

4

A4

70

A145

70

A4

900mm X 230mm RC UPSTAND TO OFF SHUTTER FINISH

A4

70

50mm X 50mm ANGLE IRON FIXED TO RC UPSTAND WITH M6 EXPANSION BOLTS

A4

70

230mm SINGLE SKINN MASONRY WALL WITH INTERNAL TORCH ON, AND PRECAST CAPPING

70

A4

SINGLE SKINN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER PANEL-CLEAR SAFETY GLASS • EXTERIOR PANEL-CLEAR GLASS,LOW E COATING

A4

70

A145

A4

70

5

70

A4

SINGLE SKINN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER PANEL-CLEAR SAFETY GLASS • EXTERIOR PANEL-CLEAR GLASS,LOW E COATING

A4

700mm X 1400mm RC COMPRESSIVE RING BEAM, TO ENG SPEC

B-A

70

7 m²

POLISHED SCREED

STUDY PODS

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

8 m²

POLISHED SCREED

OUTDOOR AREA

SINGLE GLAZED GLASS CURTAIN WALL. 20% WHITE OPAQUE FILM ON INSIDE OF GLASS PANELS.

ISOVER ACOUSTIC BARRIERS,FIXED TO SOFFIT AND TOP OF CURTAIN WALL

95mm X 1500mm GYPSUM DRYWALL. TRACKS TO BE

SINGLE GLAZED GLASS CURTAIN WALL. 20% WHITE OPAQUE FILM ON INSIDE OF GLASS PANELS.

11 m²

GRASS

ROOFTOP GARDEN

B-B

ISOVER ACOUSTIC BARRIERS,FIXED TO SOFFIT AND TOP OF CURTAIN WALL

EXPOSED STRUCTURE / CONCRETE SOFFIT

4 m²

HARDWOOD FLOORING

MEETING ROOMS

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

7 m²

POLISHED SCREED

THINK BOXES

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

FFL 42737

SINGLE GLAZED GLASS CURTAIN WALL. EXTERNAL PANELGLASS - 50% OPAQUE GLASS

300mm X 150mm I-BEAM TRANSFER STRUCTURE , TO ENG SPEC

630

2971

A4

University of Johannesburg

70

3550

A4

28

70

950 HIGH STAINLESS STEEL BALUSTRADE IN STRICT ACCORDANCE TO SANS 10400

950 HIGH STAINLESS STEEL BALUSTRADE IN STRICT ACCORDANCE TO SANS 10400

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

B-C

B-D

STUDIO PRESENTATION BOARDS FIXED TO STEEL COLUMN WITH 1800 SWIVEL HINGE

STUDIO PRESENTATION BOARDS FIXED TO STEEL COLUMN WITH 1800 SWIVEL HINGE

ISOVER ACOUSTIC BARRIERS,FIXED TO SOFFIT AND TOP OF CURTAIN WALL

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

3 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 005

3 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 015

3 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 025

3 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 035

FFL 58645

7 m²

POLISHED SCREED

OPEN STUDIOS

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

7 m²

POLISHED SCREED

OPEN STUDIOS

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

7 m²

POLISHED SCREED

OPEN OFFICES

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

7 m²

POLISHED SCREED

OPEN OFFICES

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

550mm RC UPSTAND WITH TOP FALL TO INTERIOR FACE

B-E

828 2722 828 2722

8 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 001

8 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 010

8 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 020

8 m²

POLISHED SCREED

RES UNIT 030

B-F

50mm POLISHED SCREED,40mmEPS

49268

29493

LVL - 07 CEILING

30500

lvl - 07 FFL

33519

LVL - 08 CEILING

34500

lvl - 08 FFL

37502

LVL - 09 CEILING

38500

lvl - 09 FFL

41485

LVL - 10 CEILING

42500

lvl - 10 FFL

45252

LVL - 11 CEILING

46500

lvl - 11 FFL

DOUBLE SKIN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL, DOUBLE PANE CLEAR SAFETY GLASS. • OUTER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM SINGLE PANE

MENTIS GRATE CATWALK FIXED TO FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

50mm POLISHED SCREED,40mmEPS POLYSTYRENE INSULATION

50500

LVL - 12 CEILING

DOUBLE SKIN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL, DOUBLE PANE CLEAR SAFETY GLASS. • OUTER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM SINGLE PANE

MENTIS GRATE CATWALK FIXED TO FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

50mm POLISHED SCREED,40mmEPS POLYSTYRENE INSULATION

53266

lvl - 12 FFL

DOUBLE SKIN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL, DOUBLE PANE CLEAR SAFETY GLASS. • OUTER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM SINGLE PANE

MENTIS GRATE CATWALK FIXED TO FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

54500

lvl - 13 FFL

57255

LVL - 13 CEILING

MENTIS GRATE CATWALK FIXED TO FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

50mm POLISHED SCREED,40mmEPS POLYSTYRENE INSULATION

58500

lvl - 14 FFL

61559

LVL - 14 CEILING

1500mm X 2300mm VENTILATION OPENING OPENING AND CONNECTIONS TO BE CAST IN.

LVL - 15 T.O. VENTED FECADE

6mm ALUMINIUM FLASHING FIXED TO RC WALL AND CURTAIN WALL SUB FRAME

64500

LVL 16 - T.O STRUCTURE


29

Steven John Moore

DRAINAGE FUNNEL @ MIN FALL 1:60 ,TO CONNECT TO MUNICIPAL STORM WATER CONNECTION

CAVITY TO ALOW WATER TO DRAIN INTO DRAINAGE FUNNEL

• • •

GLAZING TO COMPLY WITH SANS 10137

1070mm HORIZONTAL SUN SHADING,CONNECTION TO BE CASTE INTO SLAB EDGE (SEE DETAIL)

SINGLE SKINN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER PANEL-CLEAR SAFETY GLASS EXTERIOR PANEL-CLEAR GLASS,LOW E COATING

Any errors, discrepancies or omissions to be reported to the Architect immediately. Any queries arising from all the above must be reported to the Architects for clarification before any work is put to hand. This drawing is not to be scaled. Figured dimensions to be used at all times. ALL STRUCTURAL STEEL AND CONCRETE WORK TO STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS DETAILS. Quality of all materials, workmanship and conditions to comply with the relevant S.A.B.S. and N.B.R. specification and shall conform to the minimum standards specified in the Standard Preambles in the Bills of Quantities. Contractor is responsible for correct setting out of the buildings, all external & all internal walls with particular reference to boundaries building lines etc. Contractor to verify all levels, heights and dimensions on site and to check same against the drawings before putting any work to hand. All Contractors to check the details shown on this drawing for compliance with standards of good building practice with particular reference to special requirements necessitated by local and/or site conditions and to report any comment to the Architect. Contractors are to ensure that all details shown on this drawing are in compliance with Local Authority by-laws and regulations. Contractors are to locate and identify existing services on Site and to protect these from damage throughout the duration of the works.

COPYRIGHT AND RIGHT OF REPRODUCTION OF THIS DRAWING OR ANY PORTION THEREOF, IS RESERVED BY THE ARCHITECTS.

900mm X 230mm RC UPSTAND TO OFF SHUTTER FINISH

70

A4

50mm X 50mm ANGLE IRON FIXED TO RC UPSTAND WITH M6 EXPANSION BOLTS

70

A4

11 m²

42 m²

216 m²

TILED

MAIN HALL POLISHED SCREED

950 HIGH STAINLESS STEEL BALUSTRADE IN STRICT ACCORDANCE TO SANS 10400

BUILDING RECEPTION

RC RAFT FOOTING ON ALL STRUCTURAL GRID LINES

POLISHED SCREED

PUBLIC CIRCULATION

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

11 m²

POLISHED SCREED

FOOD COURT SEATING AREA

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

11 m²

POLISHED SCREED

OPEN PLAN TECH APPLICATION

EXPOSED STRUCTURE / CONCRETE SOFFIT

LT ROOM

REV

9 m²

TILED

SHOP 005

DATE

INIT

HT ROOM

49 m²

TILED

SHOP 002

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

7 m²

TILED

SHOP 011

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

9 m²

CARPET

AUDITORIUM 2

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

7 m²

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

POLISHED SCREED

9 m²

950 HIGH STAINLESS STEEL BALUSTRADE IN STRICT ACCORDANCE TO SANS 10400

POLISHED SCREED

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

9 m²

POLISHED SCREED

PRIVATE LIBRARY

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

PUBLIC LIBERARY

EXPOSED STRUCTURE / CONCRETE SOFFIT

95mm X 1500mm GYPSUM DRYWALL. TRACKS TO BE FIXED TO RC SLAB BEFOR SCREED IS POUR

FIXED TO RC SLAB BEFOR SCREED IS POUR

OUTDOOR AREA

562

EXPOSED STRUCTURE / CONCRETE SOFFIT

7 m²

POLISHED SCREED

STUDY PODS

T-GRID SUSPENDED CEILING

3532

230mm SINGLE SKINN MASONRY WALL WITH INTERNAL TORCH ON, AND PRECAST CAPPING

70

A4

SINGLE SKINN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER PANEL-CLEAR SAFETY GLASS • EXTERIOR PANEL-CLEAR GLASS,LOW E COATING

A4

SINGLE SKINN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER PANEL-CLEAR SAFETY GLASS • EXTERIOR PANEL-CLEAR GLASS ,50% WHITE OPAQUE FILM

A4

70

2971

A4

70

6050

A4

70

6750

A4

70

700

A4

70

70

REVISIONS DETAILS

TOWNSHIP

STAND No

CLIENT

JOB

21487

lvl - 05 CEILING

22500

lvl - 05 FFL

25505

LVL - 06 CEILING

26500

lvl - 06 FFL

2 AMESHOFF STR BRAAMFONTEIN JOHANNESBURG

PVT

FRAC[TURE]

004-G

A143

REV.

DRAWING NUMBER

PROJECT

23/11/2016 02:38:49

STEVEN JOHN MOORE

D:\Architecture\BTech\001- Design\004 - Tower\001 - Revit models\[ Fracture ](Recovery)(Recovery).rvt

ISSUED STATUS

REF No

SCALE

DATE

Author 11/20/16 1 : 50

@

Construction - Section

DRAWN

PROJECT ARCHITECT

DRAWING TITLE

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lvl B - U.S BEAM

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18500

lvl - 04 FFL

SINGLE SKINN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER PANEL-CLEAR SAFETY GLASS • EXTERIOR PANEL-CLEAR GLASS,LOW E COATING

MENTIS GRATE CATWALK FIXED TO FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

50mm POLISHED SCREED,40mmEPS POLYSTYRENE INSULATION

MENTIS GRATE CATWALK FIXED TO FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

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DOUBLE SKIN -DOUBLE GLAZED CURTAIN WALL • INNER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL, DOUBLE PANE CLEAR SAFETY GLASS. • OUTER SKIN - UNITIZED CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM SINGLE PANE

MENTIS GRATE CATWALK FIXED TO FACADE SUPPORT STRUCTURE

POLYSTYRENE INSULATION


Comfort Plus

ISOVER Multi-Comfort House Students Contest Project description: The required brief was to develop a vision for a community development located in the perimeter of the Krasny Dvor Belarus Russia district. The territory is conceptually proposed to be developed on the principle of quarters modules. Area of interest can be seen below. It is formed from 2 modules. The module is a structural and planning element with the area of 15-20 ha, the territory of which is confined over the perimeter by main district arteries and broken down inside by district streets. The module is a relative autonomous element of the urban structure, within which the apartment blocks, institutions and social amenities, educational and upbringing institutions as well as production facilities. The blocks of apartments are provided with parking places (at the underground level); the guest parking lots are located outside the yards of residential houses within the module boundaries. The first story (ground floor) is used predominantly for public functions. The main characteristics of a module are: 1. Reduction of the number of building levels. 2. Increase of the density and intensity. 3. Using the first stories for social and cultural-domestic services as well as performing the educational functions. 4. Using the underground space or first floor (ground floor) for parking places. 5. Organizing the environment-friendly manufactures and workplaces within walking distance. 6. Multi-functionality and diversity (availability of residential, production, cultural, entertainment, public, administrative, business, landscape, recreational, sports, educational, medical,shopping and cultic functions). 7. Green space: at least 30% One module consists of approximately 14 quarters, mostly identical constructions and surfaces of approx. 125*75 m (1 hectare) for 1 quarter. For the analyzed residential area there are two types of quarters: Plot 1: Townhouses (row houses) with a low density -- Between 1 to 3 floors, 20-40 houses in the quarter -- 1 parking place per family -- First floor can be used for retail and office space -- 70-150 persons\ha (for one quarter) -- Green space: at least 30%

Design

Plot 2: Multifamily houses with a medium density -- 3-5 floors, “high-rise accents� allowed – till 8 floors -- 1 parking place per family -- First floor facing the street - shopping facilities, offices, parking. -- Rest of the floor: residential -- 150-200 persons\ha (for one quarter) -- Green space: at least 30% Project group consisted of 3 members = Paul Tatham, Kyle Hollis, Steven Moore

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COMFORT [PLUS]

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Solar Orientation

Street edge activation

Residential acoustic setback

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Greens space setback

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COMFORT P LUS DESIGN AP P ROACH Comfort in a building is about: Natural light, Temperature, Natural ventilation, Acoustics, Social interaction, Views, Natural environments, Access. These are the first steps taken toward creating a comfortable building, but essentially all this does is prevent discomfort. Comfort is truly feeling at home, it’s being with the ones you love. Comfort is intangible. Harmonising the tangible and intangible aspects of an experience creates a truly comfortable space. This is a space that engages the occupant through all of their senses. This is COMFORT PLUS. To understand COMFORT PLUS as the Mulit-Comfort House, I will explain each of the different scales of our proposal:

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Urban The original master plan is modified as the high speed road that split the site in two, is moved to the north. The placement of other roads is maintained. The site is then sliced up at 15° intervals, creating nodes and giving functions to certain axes. A BOULEVARD is the central artery, ROADS run within and around modules, STREETS make up the interior networks, and GATEWAYS act as entry points into each plot. Program can then be assigned more accurately for the following modules: Retail, Commercial, Housing, Educational, Community, Green space. This street organization is easy and comfortable to navigate and distributed green spaces soften the landscape. Site Plot 1 has a BOULEVARD to the South, ROAD to the East and STREETS to the North and West. Southern orientation and shallow building depth allows for optimal natural light into the building. Edge types inform ground floor form and function. Streets and boulevards encourage social zones from retail function. Noise levels from edges set back the residential functions above. Attention is paid to ‘unwanted

noise’ like vehicles. The interior green space shifts form and enhances views from residential units. The retail space from the boulevard can also expand into this space. Gateways remove ground floor built form and provides access into site and buildings. Lobbies, stairwells and entrances are placed at the gateways, enhancing the community aspect of the site. This also connects private and public space. Solar access manipulates the roof types and pitches. This enables more sunlight into green space. Building The basic building form separates functions from one another. A concrete frame holds the structure of the building. The total building envelope then wraps itself around the structure. The individual envelopes separate functions as circulation on the North acts as a tempered space for retail on ground floor and residential on the South. These spaces can each be controlled individually creating incremental levels of thermal comfort. They are also made with Saint-Gobain Isover products in a lightweight timber framed structure. A typical building section shows that thermal insulation completely covers the building envelop, focusing on homes and retail spaces. Each connection detail deals with thermal bridges, acoustics, ait tightness and moisture to ensure the internal space is as comfortable as possible.

Frame Structure

Retail wraps ground floor structure

Tempered circulation space

Separated heated environment

WHAT SHOULD BE THE SUSTAINABLE HOUSING APPROACH BASED ON AN ENERGY EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL MODULE IN BREST, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE SOCIAL AND CLIMATIC FACTORS? WE PROPOSE A SCHEME THAT NOT ONLY CREATES A PHYSICALLY COMFORTABLE ENVIRONMENT, BUT ALSO APPEALS TO YOUR SENSES. WE CREATE INTRIGUING GREEN LANDSCAPES, VIBRANT SOCIAL SPACES AND, MOST IMPORTANTLY, WE CREATE NOT HOMES, NOT HOUSES.

Accessories clip on to exterior.

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Detail 1

Detail 3 Detail 2

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Full detailed envelope

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B

Detail 1

Monopitch roof structure (I-beam) Eaves Build-up A in mm From Interior 25 60 15 120 15 140 12

Rigips Rigidur H double layer, each layer 12.5 mm ISOVER Integra UKF 1-032 (wood 6/6 e=40cm, 13% wp) ISOVER VARIO KM Duplex UV OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Integra ZKF 1-032 (wood 6/12 e=62.5cm, 9% wp) OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Sillatherm WVP 1-035 Thick plaster

Build-up B in mm From Top Roof covering Separating layer 24 Solid timber panelling 50 Counter battens 5/8 ISOVER Integra ZUB underlay sheeting 24 Solid timber panelling 260 ISOVER Integra ZKF 1-032 (FJI beam 38x58/260, e=80cm, 3% wp) ISOVER VARIO KM Duplex UV 60 ISOVER Integra UKF 1-032 (wood 6/6 e=50cm, 11% wp) 25 Rigips Rigidur H double layer, each layer 12.5 mm

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Wood beam with CIS External wall, window Build-up A in mm From Interior 25 60

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Rigips Rigidur H double layer, each layer 125 mm ISOVER Integra UKF 1-032 (wood 6/6 e=40cm, 13% wp) ISOVER VARIO KM Duplex UV OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Integra ZKF 1-032 (wood 6/12 e=62.5cm, 9% wp) OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Sillatherm WVP 1-035 Thick plaster

Build-up B in mm From Top 50 30 40 19 160 15 80

Floor covering Screed ISOVER Akustic EP 3 040 ISOVER Exporit EPS 100/035 as compensation for height of tube OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Integra ZKF 1-032 (solid wood beams 10/16, e=80cm, 11% wp) OSB board or chipboard Installation level with ISOVER Akustik TP 1 (glass wool, WLG 040)

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Rigips Rigidur H double layer, each layer 12.5 mm

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Wood beam with RVF External wall, intermediate ceiling

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Rigips Rigidur H double layer, each layer 12.5mm ISOVER Integra UKF 1-032 (wood 6/6 e=40cm, 13% wp) ISOVER VARIO KM Duplex UV OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Integra ZKF 1-032 (wood 6/16 e=62.5cm, 14%wp) OSB board or chipboard Kontur FSP 1-032 Easy Fix 120 (wood 6/12 e=60cm, 12%wp) Rear ventilation Exterior cladding (e.g. wood, metal, plastic, stone)

Build-up B in mm From Top 50 30 40 19 160 15 80

Floor covering Screed ISOVER Akustic EP 3 040 ISOVER Exporit EPS 100/035 as compensation for height of tube OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Integra ZKF 1-032 (solid wood beams 10/16, e=80cm, 11% wp) OSB board or chipboard Installation level with ISOVER Akustik TP 1 (glass wool, WLG 040)

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Rigips Rigidur H double layer, each layer 12.5 mm

Detail 4

Wood beam with CIS Basement ceiling (unheated basement) Build-up A in mm From Interior 25 60

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15 120 15 140 12

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Rigips Rigidur H double layer, each layer 12.5 mm ISOVER Integra UKF 1-032 (wood 6/6 e=40cm, 13% wp) ISOVER VARIO KM Duplex UV OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Integra ZKF 1-032 (wood 6/12 e=62.5cm, 9% wp) OSB board or chipboard ISOVER Sillatherm WVP 1-035 Thick plaster

Build-up B in mm From Top 50 40 30 160 120

Floor covering Screed Vapour retarder and separating layer ISOVER Exporit EPS 100/035 ISOVER Akustic EP 1 Reinforced concrete ceiling ISOVER Topdec DP 1 032 ULTIMATE

Build-up C in mm (Plinth insulation) From Interior

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Steven John Moore

Interior plaster Wall HLZ 245mm (upper layer of porous concrete blocks) Bitumen preliminary coating Sealing against moisture ISOVER Exporit EPS (up to 6m)


Investigate Educate Rehabilitat e Context and Landscape

The context of the Klipriviersberg Nature Reserve (KNR) forms the setting for the landscape project. You are required to design an architecturally sensitive space for a world-class multipurpose community center, in an environmentally and socially sensitive context. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The brief is to design a world-class multipurpose community centre which is being promoted by KlipSA as one of the flagship projects known as Klipriviersberg Sustainable Education Centre (KlipSEC). Design and develop a world class multi-purpose education, tourism, community services and sports and recreation facility which will include: -- An environmental educational center to provide educational resources, services and facilities for local communities, school children and university students; -- A tourism hub as an important component of the N12 Treasure Route providing tourism information and related services; -- A multi-cultural and multi-generational community resource center and hub for various sustainable community and social upliftment projects and initiatives; -- A multipurpose sports and recreational center. -- All supporting spaces and facilities to enable the above activities, (to be workshopped on site). -- The recycling and upgrading of the existing Klipriviersberg Recreation Centre and surrounding areas have been identified as a possible location for the establishment and development of this facility. CONSTRUCTION PROJECT OUTCOMES: The student is required to: -- Follow the design thinking through from all scales; site, building and detail. -- Design a building with a rational and efficient structural system; innovation and “creativity� are encouraged, along with appropriateness and efficiency -- Have an understanding of the services required and how to provide them in a sensitive landscape, this includes road access for trucks, busses, cars bicycles and pedestrian access as well. -- Be able to construct working details that are sound, buildable and long-lasting, based on materials, performance criteria and construction techniques. Creativity is expected; the process of sketch drawing is critical, and many permutations are encouraged before resolution and drafting

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Investigate Educate Rehabilitate

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ocation. ation.

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Information Information center will center be the will welcoming be the welcoming area forarea all users, for all education, users, education, research research ,recreational ,recreational hiking and hiking horseback and horseback riding. This riding. This area willarea facilitate will facilitate personal personal that willthat staywill onstay site on (Security site (Security ,Maintenance). ,Maintenance).

0,3 0,3 0,4 0,4 0,5 0,5 0,6 0,6 0,7 0,7 Entrance Entrance precinct. precinct.

The excising The excising precinctprecinct will remain will remain the main thegate main forgate hikers. for hikers. Because Because there isthere a bigisdemand a big demand on hiking onrouted hiking this routed areathis willarea be will be purely for purely the hikers for theand hikers form and theform base thecamp basefor camp them. for them.

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K L I P R I V I E R S B E R G N AT U R E R E S E R V E PROJECT AIMS:

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-- To apply natural landscape research and relate it to the relationship between nature & man -- To measure & grasp the value of existing landscape with sensitively integrated alternative energy and water sources. -- To understand and document the factors influencing structure & form as a reaction to the natural landscape (Typology) and understand the reaction and adaptation to climate, natural resources, technology and the socio-cultural influences. -- To initiate an engagement with a design that relates directly and indirectly with its context (s), and therefore becomes uniquely place bound (genus loci) -- To assimilate architectural theoretical research and typological precedent studies in an integrated design strategy -- To engage with an existing real life initiative and the communities involved in a constructive and sensitive manner. -- To effectively communicate ideas, research and final resolutions, particularly developed with 3-d models.

Winter sun

Site Plan

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To a obtain internal comfort for this location the following strategies will be implemented. These strategies will create 96.2% comfort during the year

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1 Comfort [1683 hrs] 2 Sun Shading over windows [819 hrs] 3 Internal heat gain [4244 hrs] 4 Passive solar gain high mass [2362 hrs] Winter sun

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Greenhouse Biomimicry Considerations

Bees - Flower petal nest [Systems] Acacia tree [Form generation]

Natural neighbor interpolation [For generation]

are durable and humid because of their multi-layer design, with a hard layer sandwiched between organic layers. this system is ideal for a greenhouse where for new

The acacia tree is know for the remarkable wide spread canopies witch is almost gravity defying. This was the mimic-ed suggestion of witch could form the structure. The positivity of a small footprint but yet spanning a grate area. Architecturally this concept will be done with deep foundations keeping up the vertical cantilever. Thus the for was combined with a mathematical system to form neighboring support from the base points established by the placement of the acacia tree

Box gutter with leave blocker. This will allow the organic material to move over the gutter and be stored in the core of the structure

Natural neighbor interpolation is a method of spatial interpolation, developed by Robin Sibson. The method is based on Voronoi tessellation of a discrete set of spatial points. This has advantages over simpler methods of interpolation, such as nearest-neighbor interpolation, in that it provides a smoother approximation to the underlying "true" function.

Perforated inner core, This will be a perforated tube that will house the downpipes for the water collection system and the organic matter cough on the roof

North Elevation single point origin [footing of structure]

Organic collection area. Small operable hatch to remove collected compounds. Hatch will open into vegetation to serve as compost for the planted areas.

Base outline of structure with points input.

East Elevation

West Elevation

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Substrate to form structure with internal space [Covering structure]

Creation of formal structure


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Rigs -to - [Re]search Underwater or on the moon How do we imagine our cities of tomorrow? We have reached an era where the exponential growth of population, along with the shortage of natural resources and the destruction of the natural environment, is beginning to jeopardize the balance of the planet. Now is the time to start investigating the future of our existing cities and possibly the conceptions of new ones? DESIGN PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Design an intelligent habitable space somewhere out in the ocean or on the Moon for humans to live, play and work. Take into consideration the structural form of how this space is created. Consider how this structural form is influenced by the forces (water pressure, buoyancy, gravity) that it is subjected to.

PROJECT AIMS: The aim of this project is to provoke thinking conceptually about the environment in which they are design. To understand and document the factors which influence the form giving reaction to the landscape/environment. To initiate an engagement with a design that is unmistakably contemporary but relates to its context and there by becomes uniquely place bound (Genus Loci) and to effectively communicate your ideas, research and final resolutions.

CONSTRUCTION PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The internal environment of this structure is very important to SUSTAIN LIFE, and needs to deal with issues such as light, water, air, energy and waste disposal. Develop a systemic approach for cycling oxygen and nutrients using the natural resources of the external environment and the internal inhabitants.

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Design

Construction

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R -T - R P R O J E C T O U T L I N E Due to the vastness of our oceans, deep sea research is limited to short time periods at sea. The introduction of this vessel will allow researchers to be at sea for extended periods of time to allow them to study in dept how these Eco systems work. Forming the base structure for the vessel will be decommissioned Fixed platform oil rig. These Riggs forms The host for many ecosystems to strive. Rigs-to-Reefs (RTR) is the practice of con-

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verting decommissioned offshore oil and petroleum rigs into artificial reefs. Such biotic reefs have been created from oil rigs. RTR Recognizes that during a rig’s productive years, significant marine life comes to live on and around its structure. RTR preserves much of that marine life and encourages further growth. The operator benefits by avoiding the substantial cost of removal. Cumulative costs of removal had reached an estimated $1 billion by the year 2000.

Steven John Moore


HYDRO KINETIC WAVE ENERGY

SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS

RECREATION AND LIVING

PRIVATE ACCOMMODATION

UNDER WATER GREEN HOUSE

DEEP SEA R/D

ENERGY PRODUCTION AND STORAGE

ENERGY PRODUCTION AND STORAGE

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University of Johannesburg


Method of rig-to-reef decommissioning by "toppling in place."

Method of rig-to-reef decommissioning by "partial removal"

Method of rig-to-reef conversion by "tow and place.

Vertical retractable wind turbines. Turbines will be out until a Big storm arrives. Where they will retract back into the housing sleeves under water.

Opening in the top hull will allow the most light into the Livable areas during the day thus ensuring max usage Of the sun light and can thus heat up thermal mass on the inner building later to be used for heating.

All human waste , to be converter into bio-gass and bio- diesel for kooking ,Heating and running moters when needed.

Access oxygen that will be produces in green houses will be stored for Laboratory use where experiments are oxygen critical.

Bio gass plant located at the Bottom of the structure to minimize The amount of air lower in the vessel to allow for more boy ency

Bio gass plant located at the Bottom of the structure to minimize The abount of air lower in the vessel to allow for more boyency

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Archigram Theory Seminars

The aim of these theory seminars is to study the link between theory and the built environment from early modernism to contemporary architecture as well as expose students to urbanism and related topics to urbanism while broadening their understanding around issues pertaining to cities, planning and sustainabilities. The gaining of theory knowledge should contribute towards the written theory documentation for each design project. Guiding questions or reading extracts will be provided where possible but your own discoveries of the topics are part of the goal.

GREAT SPECULATIONS | Living Pod by David Green

PROJECT OUTCOMES: -- Grasping functionalism in the light of environmental, spatial design and social humanitarian context -- The social and physical nature of housing, workplace, trade and commerce will be explored in terms of contemporary issues such as cultural context, sustainabilities, health and research. -- Studying the link between theory & the built environment, from early modernism to contemporary. -- Starting with the everyday experience to wider context, building up to complex hybrid situations; -- Reading and studies of architects as designers, currently enjoying a revived status elsewhere in the world, will be explored in terms of local context. This is the time for architecture to regain its lost momentum (in commercial development), in view of the rest of the design world. -- Study of time-bound precedents illustrating process, e.g. contemporary environmental landscapes.

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The “Zoom” issue propped Archigram into an international context, helping create the public perception of Archigram not only as a magazine, but also as an architectural team with a certain conceptual and aesthetic agenda. Committed to a ‘high tech’, light weight, infra-strucArchigram, the innovative impulse of the 1960’s. tural approach that was focused towards survival With the advance in technology and space travel, technology, the group experimented with moduScience fiction and comics, pop-cultures and hal- lar technology, mobility through the environment, lucinatory drugs and other avant-garde sub-cul- space capsules and mass-consumer imagery. tures and fused them into a vision to boycott the Their works offered a seductive vision of a glamorous future machine age. image of classic modernism. Archigram was a progressive architectural group formed in the 1960s, based at the Architectural Association in London. They drew inspiration from technology in order to create a new reality that was solely expressed through hypothetical projects. The spectacular innovations in technology during the 1960s were for Archigram not just a means to realize projects, but one of their most potent sources of inspiration. Their anticipation of the future was both serious and wondrous. While the architects of the modern movement tried to discover a new dimension to time and space they were limited to static solutions. Archigram view the process itself as a motor capable of giving developments their own accelerating dynamic.

The result of this approach was the highly suggestive imagery of projects such as Walking City, living Pod and plug in city. They sent out a signal witch spoke of a revolutionary vision, a Utopian atmosphere and uncompromising pleasure seeking approach to life. WALKING CITY: Ron Herron proposed building massive, artificially intelligent mobile robotic structures that could freely roam a post-apocalyptic world, moving to wherever the structures’ resources or manufacturing abilities were needed.

PLUG IN CITY: The Plug-in City as a total project was the combination of a series of ideas that were worked upon between 1962 and 1964. The Metal CabThe main members of the group were Peter Cook, in Housing was a prototype in the sense that it Warren Chalk, Ron Herron, Dennis Crompton, placed removable house elements into a ‘megaMichael Webb and David Greene. Archigram is structure’ of concrete. a series of magazines/ comics that depict the futuristic interpretation of the projects of the group. LIVING POD: Archigram 1 was published in 1961. The follow- Speculative proposal for a sculpted and meching editions were published yearly up until 1970 anised “trailer home” which can exist independently or be plugged into larger structures. where the final full Archigram 9 was released. The ‘house’ is regarded here as consisting of two In 1972 Peter cook did another addition, Archi- major components: a living-pod and attached gram 9.5. This was just the current projects that machines. they were working on, some real and some abstract projects. By the time the fourth archigram came out, it was the mouthpiece of the larger combined group. This was mainly the work of warren chalk, this still upset a lot of people who still felt that architecture was a sacred discipline and should not be placed on the same level as comics. 57

Archigram produced buildings that could change like a change of mind, like the development of an idea. Their architecture was a direct output of what you could think. They laid claim to the true spirit of modernism. As opposed to the imitation of it that provided at the time.

Steven John Moore


41 Cooper Square Precedent Study

The aim of this project is to investigate a precedent study of a good building that can inform the design of ones own project. This project introduces one, through ones own study, to large and complex buildings, which is the focus of this course. It is intended as an opportunity for one to explore and express ones enjoyment and understanding of complex multi-storey architecture. Choose a building that one likes, dislike, admires, hate, or interests you in some way. This building can be anywhere in the world and designed by any architect you choose. It must however be a project of enough significance to have been published, and you must have access to enough information to complete this project’s requirements. PROJECT OUTCOMES: This project will lay the foundation for the precedent chapter of your mini Thesis document. At the end of the project you should be able to: -- Analise, understand & critique a contemporary mixed use project in considerable detail. -- Synthesize & apply this information to your own complex mixed-use Thesis project. -- Engage in critical seminar critique about contemporary design & urban design in context.

Image by | [re] Defining a Journey | V. H. Rivera | Aug 5, 2014

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41 Cooper Square, the new academic building for The Cooper Union, aspires to manifest the character, culture and vibrancy of both the 150 year-old institution and of the city in which it was founded. The institution remains committed to Peter Cooper’s radically optimistic intention to provide an education “as free as water and air” and has subsequently grown to become a renowned intellectual and cultural center for the City of New York. 41 Cooper Square aspires to reflect the institution’s stated goal to create an iconic building – one that reflects its values and aspirations as a center for advanced and innovative education in Art, Architecture and Engineering URBAN CONTEXT: 41 Cooper Square aspires to reflect the institution’s stated goal to create an iconic building – one that reflects its values and aspirations as a center for advanced and innovative education in Art, Architecture and Engineering. The two buildings are similar in scale since both are built out to their limits and encompass the entire block. Also, the ground levels are visibly accessible to the public. Retail space lines the eastern frontage of the Academic Building similar to the original arcades of the Foundation Building PUBLIC INTERGENERATION: A pedestrian improvement plan, initiated by the NYC Department of Transportation, will transform underutilized roadway to create new opportunities for public space. The design will develop a multi-purpose urban precinct through the creation of Four new linked plazas. -- Subway plaza to connect larger urban network -- Open plaza -- Increase of pedestrian movement and to create community experience -- Open plaza with seating and planting

also revert to as the vertical plaza. This internal atrium forms the social heart of the building and allows for impromptu and planned meetings , student gatherings, lectures, and the intellectual debate that defines the Academic environment. Carefully attention is payed to the ground floor interaction with the public and the surrounding context. This is also a big influencer when the program placement of the ground floor was made. The double volume entry lobby invites the public to take part in the public function located on the lover levels these include an exhibition gallery, board rooms and a 200 seat auditorium. From the ground floor the grand staircase terminates on the fourth floor in a student lounge overlooking the city. The fifth to the ninth house the more formalized program. The formalized functions located around the vertical plaza Include Art studios, Classrooms, Laboratories, Offices, Public spaces, Social spaces and student social spaces. The program placement was also highly Dependant on the solar study of the surrounding buildings. Overshadowing will dramatically decrease the conceptual outcome if collaborative spaces were to be overshadowed. CIRCULATION: Per floor open passages situated around the central atrium allows for circulation between spaces. For vertical circulation the primary grand staircase that only allows for circulation up to the fourth floor. Sky bridges span the atrium to create connections between these informal spaces and connect the fourth to sixth and seventh to ninth floors.

A Skip-Stop elevator system allows for the stops only to be on the first, fifth and eighth floors. Thus it encourages the users to use the grand staircase and the sky bridges. This allows for both physical BUILDING PLANNING: activity and the creation of more impromptu meetThe Morphosis Team design the building from the ing areas. inside out. The designs main objective was to foster new and interesting collaboration between the Secondary elevators and fire escape stairs at each three different schools that was previously housed floor, both for fire safety and for the practical tasks in deferent buildings. This collaborative space is of moving materials, artworks, and equipment. 59

Steven John Moore


SERVICING AND FIRE SAFETY: Because of the large atrium that rises the entire height of the building it would essentially split the building in half and acts as a chimney that would bring fire and smoke throughout the building.

The secondary structure allows for the integration between the structure and the outer skin. The steel connection make it possible for the facade to be flexible in depth and flair out towards the ground floor to allow people into the space.

Mormhosis implemented egress pathways and fire isolation strategies to deal with the fire safety. In the case of a fire the atrium would be sealed off and routing egress pathways around the atrium to the fire stairs.

BUILDING PERFORMANCE: It was Built to LEED Gold standards and finally achieved a Platinum rating, 41 Cooper Square was the first LEED-certified academic laboratory building in New York City. And house a verity of Along the eastern hallway the majority of the elec- green and sustainable systems. trical and waste shafts are located. This forms a major interior north south articulation. This also fol- These systems include: lows the simple grid for the structure of the con- -- An operable building skin made of perforated crete columns. Secondary shafts are located near stainless steel panels offset from a glass and circulation cores to minimize the vertical penetraaluminum window wall. The panels reduce the tion needed throughout the floors. impact of heat radiation during the summer and insulate interior spaces during the winter. All bathrooms are unisex. The reasoning behind -- Radiant heating and cooling ceiling panels inthis is that all bathrooms can be used by both troduce innovative HVAC technology that will men and woman. This will minimize the space to boost energy efficiency. This contributes to provide separate bathrooms form men and wommaking the new building 40 percent more an. This also accommodates for people with disenergy efficient than a standard building of its abilities and need assistance from the opposite type. gender. -- A full-height atrium enables unique circulation for building occupants, improves the flow of STRUCTURE, SKIN INTERGENERATION: air and provides increased interior day lighting. The concrete frame structure consistent of a two -- Seventy-five percent of the building’s regularly way slab supported by a column grid system. The occupied spaces are lit by natural daylight. grid structure remains consistent however the size -- A green roof insulates the building, reduces and type of the columns change. city “heat island” effect, storm water runoff and pollutants; harvested water is reused. Morphosis makes use of standard structural frame -- A cogeneration plant provides additional powto allow for time to develop conceptual, aestheter to the building, recovers waste heat and ics and environmental responses. The facade effectively cuts energy costs. system on 41 cooper square consists of two components. The outer layer consists of a digitally The large atrium that stretches the height of the fabricated perforated panels and curtain glazing building creates a stack effect to ventilate all colsystem make use of clear and opaque glazing. laborative spaces. Secondary spaces around the central atrium also supplement the stack effect The framed concrete structure forms the base for with internal heat gains. Temperature differential the skin development on the building. The Curtain on the inside and outside creates cross ventilation glazing system fills from floor to soffit to maximize through major and secondary spaces. light into the building, Opaque panels are used at programs where light access needed to be limited. The secondary facade structure is connected to the main building structure. That will house the perforated skin. The perforated skin attach to the secondary structure to allow for a effective double skin facade. 60

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Image by | 41 Cooper Square | http://www.archilovers.com


Th i r d Ye a r 1. 2. 3. 4.

Urban Interchange Urban Unknown Interface Braamfontein Cemetery


Urban Interchange

Route [move] - Moment [pulse] - Place [belonging] This project seeks to move students’ thought process through-and-beyond accepted and binding definitions in architecture and urbanism. Finite definitions are useful in describing exact conditions, however when terminology becomes canon, and remains unquestioned, there is a chance that one may begin to separate realities. By fixating on classification, division and separation we risk overlooking the dynamic interfaces where these singular strands weave, loop, wind and snap. In this brief you are challenged to unpack constructed definitions, not simply as limited descriptions of understanding, but rather as multiple, varying aspects that shift and change. This project intends to challenge (even undermine) these traditional assumed limitations of urban categorisation and explore overlapping elements of urban fabric; people groups, spaces, places, networks, seen, unseen, defiant. PROJECT BRIEF: The design challenge is to engage the needs for dwelling and livelihood (at varying scales). The design of site and surrounds should be such that it should be easily identified as a well located urban arrangement of multiple programmes whilst maintaining a balanced inclusive consideration of diverse urban dwellers/users. Students’ approaches must incorporate previous design drivers (Shelter. Landscape. Topography. Topology. History. Meaning. Networks. Connections.) as influences to observation, design, and realization - engaging with the complex nature of this precinct in Johannesburg. SUGGESTED BUILDING PROGRAM: -- A museum/gallery & performance space – outdoor, allweather gathering space -- An arrangement of dwellings; students, young families, artists, business people, artisans, etc (min 5 typologies should be considered – can be repeated as ‘typical) -- A central studio/workshop/discussion space (related to the above) in which larger groups of public residents can interact -- A crèche for the children of the building’s residents and employees -- Hospitality spaces, including cafes, restaurants and bars (and any other urban amenities deemed necessary) -- Commercial space for offices (3 floors with shared volumes, access, services) -- Public spaces (smaller and larger spaces may be considered). -- An open air cinema (publically accessible) -- Spaces for trade and adaptive user defined uses -- Parking to support the program -- A defined transport drop-off/pick-up zone (pedestrian link to BRT with added opportunity and amenity). INTENDED USER GROUPS: -- Multiple, random and inclusive user groups Identified through urban analysis

Design

Theory

Construction

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CO N C EP T UA L F RA M EWO RK : This project will be investigating the future development of inner city economic hubs where these areas become increasingly dense due to economic and trade use until cities become obsolete for living and will thus eventually become purely economic. The speculation time frame that will be undertaken in this theoretical unpacking will be placed in the apex of the crisis tipping point within the transformation between current city use and the development towards purely economic habitation. Habitation of the city will then move to surrounding areas but keeping the life quality of urban living

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although introducing the efficiency of commuting to the economic hubs. The research nature will be directed towards the movement from urban sprawl developed areas along the outskirts of Johannesburg and how these users will create on influx movement towards these Economic hubs. The project will just focus on the efficiency of movement in these areas The interchange from an urban point to point network to a localized hub and spoke network. The interchange point will thus be developed in this project.

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C O N C E P T UA L D E V E L O P M E N T: MOVEMENT: The movement model was to explore the how different entities can form a single relationship around a point The complexity of a connection node has a direct relation to the amount of auxiliary influences on the point For this node to function efficiently auxiliary points need to be segregated onto different streams. This segregation should take place in section rather than in pion view This will save space and form into a complex nodal point

CIRCULATION: When considering the circulation of a nodal hub/ interchange point the flow from one platform to another will the most important aspect to be considered. For people to move through o multi-faceted point o very limited amount of constraints can be placed on the space The freedom to move should be limited within a centralized space of circulation although still remaining strict with regards to movement between platforms

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CONNECTION: For the connection model the concept of the point to point and the hub and spoke typologies working as a hybrid system would be explored Looking at how multiple elements con be connected at a point and then the newly formed base point can be connected to multiple others. This was of connection would decrease to connection network in physical space but at the some time keep the efficiency o how people con move through on urban fabric

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INTERCHANGE ZONE TO LOCAL TRANSPORT NETWORK

COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL ZONE

MAIN TRANSPORTATION INTERCANGE ARE

ATRIUM / INNER CORE

OPEN TO FLOOR -1 PUBLIC INTERACTION AND SERVICE

MULTI USE PUBLIC SPACE PUBLIC SPLILL TO EXISTING URBAN GREEN BELT

MULTI USE PUBLIC SPACE

EXISTING URBAN GREEN BELT

HYBRID PLAN OF TRANSPORT CIRCULATION 0 2

10

20

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RESIDENTUAL / PER DAY RENTAL ONLY

HI END RESIDENTUAL 24/7 USE

COMMERCIAL OFFICE 24/7 USE

MIXED USE INSTITUTIUAL 24/7 USE

RE

MUSEUM/GALLERY & OUTDOOR SPACE 24/7 USE

/ ATRIUM

INNER CO

HIGH END MIXED USE RETAIL / HOSPITALITY 24/7 USE

MIXED USE INSTITUTIUAL 24/7 USE

TRANSPORTATION INTERCHANGE CURCULATION SPACE 24/7 USE

URBAN NETWORK INJECTION POINT 24/7 USE EXSISTING SUPER BASEMENT PARKING TO SERVE ALL ERWEN ON URBAN BLOCK 2

CORE SECTION 0 2

10

20

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LVL 22 +119000

01

LVL 21 +103000

LVL 20 +91000

LVL 19 +87000

LVL 18 +83000

LVL 16 +71000

LVL 15 +67000

LVL 14 +63000

LVL 13 +59000

LVL 12 +55000

20

LVL 11 +51000

LVL 10 +47000

10

LVL 9 +43000

LVL 8 +39000

LVL 7 +35000

0 2

EAST ELEVATION

LVL 17 +79000

LVL 6 +31000

LVL 5 +27000

LVL 4 +23000

LVL 3 +19000

LVL 2 +7000

LVL 1 +3000 NGL +00

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PROJECT OU TCOME: All the principals of interchange that was explored, was combined into elements that will need to work together to make the interchange function as a system. Starting to consider witch of the explored elements needs to work together and where and how these will work together as a montage was made to diagrammatically explain the main drivers of these elements. Circulation and movement around a central node Merging the points of interest overlaps the connections started forming spaces and tends that will allow the intended programmatic and concept specific outcome that was stated in development of the project and interchange

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The lifelessness of a city that will eventually have no inhabited entities will force the growth of a new realm for infrastructure to flourish The mass transportation systems will create high efficiency for the city to work in parallel with the inevitable urban sprawl. Where infrastructure, economics and urban living meets will generate a node that will develop into o highly efficient interchange that will marry all the forces deforming the current urban environments.

University of Johannesburg


LVL 22 +119000

LVL 21 +103000

LVL 20 +91000

LVL 19 +87000

LVL 18 +83000

LVL 17 +79000

LVL 16 +71000

LVL 14 +63000

LVL 13 +59000

LVL 12 +55000

LVL 11 +51000

LVL 10 +47000

20

LVL 9 +43000

LVL 8 +39000

10

LVL 7 +35000

LVL 6 +31000

LVL 5 +27000

0 2

SECTION A-A

LVL 15 +67000

LVL 4 +23000

LVL 3 +19000

LVL 2 +7000

LVL 1 +3000 NGL +00

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0 2

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CONTEXT PLAN

Urban Unknown

Abstract – Design - Document – Build/Assess This project will be conducted over the remaining portion of the year. It will be broken into 4 distinct, but inter-related sections, each relating strongly to the main design brief. Whereas in the first half of the year, we focused primarily on construction documentation, for this project we will start with an analysis and abstraction process, before moving into the more ‘practical’ components of design and construction documentation. This documentation will not be an end in itself, but will rather serve as the basis for physical construction of a critical aspect of the chosen design. This construction will happen with actual materials at full scale. Finally, we will conclude with a comprehensive retrospective assessment of the entire project. -- Design (& document) – 3 weeks – individual or pairs – Design an urban integration/amenity based on the brief you generated for the charette. As always, the design process should involve thinking about the construction process. Note that you will potentially be physically constructing your design so it must therefore be practical, buildable and affordable. -- Document (& design) – 2 weeks – individual or pairs – Document the construction process for the design of your urban integration/amenity. Documentation should include drawings, a written specification, a priced bill of quantities, a construction program, and a list of suppliers -- & Subcontractors along with their details. At the end of this stage, the entire class will vote on the projects to be physically constructed. Details of this process will be provided with the brief. -- Build/Assess – 5 weeks – Form groups of various sizes (depending on the complexities of the designs) and physically construct your urban integration/amenity based on the documentation produced in the previous stage. This process will be performed using actual materials at full scale. Once the construction is complete, assess the realization of the project. What worked well and what needs to be improved? How would you do it differently next time around? How did the group function? Did some people carry the group while others coasted by?

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03

02 Design

Construction

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1

WIELDING OF INNER STEEL FRAME

2

ASSEMBLY OF ROLLERS ON STEEL FRAME

3

WOOD CLADDING ON STEEL FRAME

4

CASTING OF CONCRETE

5

ASSEMBLY OF CNC STEEL LEGS TO WOOD BENCH

6

LAMINATING OF TABLE TOP

7

ASSEMBLES ROLLER TRACK TO GROUND

8

WOOD BENCH ASSEMBLY TO TRACK

9

CORING ONTO CONCRETE BENCH FOR LEG CONNECTIONS

10

TABLE TOP ASSEMBLY TO WOODEN BENCH AND CONCRETE BENCH

6

10

4

9 5

7 2

1 8

3

EXPLODED AXO [CONSTRUCTION]

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URBAN UNKNOWN [1 FOX] THE SHEDS ARE ONE OF THOSE UNKNOWN SECRETS OF JOHANNESBURG. THE DEVELOPMENT AND THE REJUVENATION OF THE OLD TO SOMETHING NEW IS WHAT JOHANNESBURG NEEDS TO MAKE THE CHANGE I DESPERATE NEEDS. THUS THE POETICS OF THIS BENCH IS THAT TO SYMBOLIZE THE TRANSFORMATION AND THE CONTINUOUS DEVELOPMENT OF THE CITY WE LIVE IN.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BENCH SHOWS THAT THE EVERY DAY USABILITY CAN CHANGE AND FORM TO THE NECESSITIES OF THE SURROUNDINGS AND THE INFLUENCES THAT HAS BEEN FORCED UPON IT

LOCATION [site]

DEVELOPMENT [stages]

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WIELDING OF INNER STEEL FRAME

2

ASSEMBLY OF ROLLERS ON STEEL FRAME

3

WOOD CLADDING ON STEEL FRAME

4

CASTING OF CONCRETE

5

ASSEMBLY OF CNC STEEL LEGS TO WOOD BENCH

6

LAMINATING OF TABLE TOP

7

ASSEMBLES ROLLER TRACK TO GROUND

8

WOOD BENCH ASSEMBLY TO TRACK

9

CORING ONTO CONCRETE BENCH FOR LEG CONNECTIONS

10

TABLE TOP ASSEMBLY TO WOODEN BENCH AND CONCRETE BENCH

536

992

1

LVL 0 - GROUND FLOOR 0

6

FRONT ELEVATION [ SCALE 1 : 5 ] 689

449

10

260

344

345

267

435

4

9 1533

5

7 2

1 8

3

EXPLODED AXO [CONSTRUCTION] PLAN [ SCALE 1 : 5 ] R7 X 2MM MILD STEEL SLEVE CORED INTO TABLETOP FLUSH WITH OUTER EDGE.

UEREKA TEK SCREW HEX CRSE - ROUNDED HEAD (5.5X38MM)

R6 X 2MM MILD STEEL SLEVE INSIDE CORED TABLE SLEVE. WEILDED TO STEEL LEGS.

UEREKA STEEL LAG SCREW (5.5X75MM) - 10MM SOCKET HEAD ALL STEEL CONNECTIONS TO BE ARCH WEILDED AT 90 ANGLE EXCENT ELS SPECIFIED

R15 X 5MM MILD STEEL CAP ON OUTER SLEVE.

DETAIL 1

DETAIL 2

1:2

1:2

DETAILS [ SCALE 1 : 2 ] SLIDING DOOR PIN LOCK

2 X SHUTTERPLY IMP (21 X 1220 X 2440) MILD STEEL FLAT-BAR (70 X 10 X 6000) (5.5KG PM)

MILD STEEL SOLID BAR (30 X 6000 MILD STEEL PIN) (35MM STEEL DOUBLE TOUCH BALLBEARING) 6

SA PINE INDUSTRIAL ROUGH-UNTREATED (19 X 76 X 2700)

A103

70MM 180DEGREE STAINLESS STEEL BUTTERFLY HINGE

5 A103

MILD STEEL SOLID BAR (6 X 60) (0.22 KG PM)

OFF SHUTTER FIXED CONCRETE SEATING

SQUARE HOLLOW SECTION EN10025-2-5355 (50 X 50 X 3

73MM CLOSED BRACKET WHEEL ASSEMBLY (DYNAMIC LOAD = 680KG) (STATIC LOAD = 305KG)

LVL 0 - GROUND FLOOR 0

SECTION [ SCALE 1 : 2 ]

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Interface

H i s t o r y. M e a n i n g . S i g n i f i e r. S i g n i f i e d

CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM [bench] Week 39 Week 40

Name

25

28

Week 41 29

30

1

2

345

Week 42 6

7

8

9

12

Week 43 13

14

15

16

19

Week 44 20

21

22

23

26

27

ORDER MATERIALS ORDER FROM SUPPLIERS

The design challenge is to re-imagine an interface between street and site as museum and sign, a symbolic surface and kiosk of collected information. The re-imagining of the ‘edge’ will call for it to transform the divide as an interwoven image of the area, the signifier. Simultaneously you must deal with the ground plane and the invisible volume bound by pavement edge. In this space you are tasked to design a site-specific museum, the signified. This architecture should emerge from the re-reading, analysis, extraction and synthesis of spatial and tectonic concepts evolving in the series of drawings.

MATERIALS COLLECTION WITHOUT LEAD-TIMES LEAD TIME FOR MATERIALS TILL DELIVERY

SITE PREP SITE PREP GROUND CLEARANCE SURFACE COMPACTING

FABRICATION CNC STEEL CUTTING LEAD TIME TO ARRIVAL WOOD BENCH OUTER WOOD CUTTING SHUTTERING CUTTING CUTTING OF TABLE TOPS STEEL WORKS OF INNER FRAME CUTTING

1 WIELDING OF INNER STEEL FRAME 2 ASSEMBLY OF ROLLERS ON STEEL FRAME 3 WOOD CLADDING ON STEEL FRAME ASSEMBLY OF FABRICATIONS ASSEMBLE SHUTTERING FOR CONCRETE FORMING OF REINFORCING

4

CASTING OF CONCRETE CONCRETE CURING

5 ASSEMBLY OF CNC STEEL LEGS TO WOOD BENCH 6 LAMINATING OF TABLE TOP 7 ASSEMBLES ROLLER TRACK TO GROUND 8 WOOD BENCH ASSEMBLY TO TRACK 9 CORING ONTO CONCRETE BENCH FOR LEG CONNECTIONS 10 TABLE TOP ASSEMBLY TO WOODEN BENCH AND CONCRETE BENCH SNAGS AND CORRECTIONS

The interface and surrounding components should respond to various realities in the area. The architecture should communicate the complex and diverse nature of this in some legible way (expressed spatially, tectonically or through information). The interface and site extent should become a place and space that communicates through its experience at varying scales – person, people, neighborhood, spine, city. Likewise the building program can range from diverse to singular - refining the programmatic requirements to a more relevant and contextual response.

VENEER PAINT OF TABLE TOP AND WOODEN BENCH SNAGS AND FIXES

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS: The design scheme must deal with the site and edge as a considered extent – addressing the ideas of edges and separation, connectivity, urban amenity, etc. The architectural program should incorporate: -- A museum and archive (information point) -- A gathering space -- A NEW PUBLIC function/service/opportunity -- A parcel on a route -- The programmatic ‘footprint’ must include the interior and sidewalk as a spatial and surface extension of the chosen interface.

B.O.Q [bench] ESTIMATED COST inc VAT MATERIALS DISCOUNT

VENDOR SUBCONTRACTOR/CONTRACTOR

LABOR

MILD STEEL FLAT-BAR (70 X 10 X 6000)

NJR STEEL

R0,00

R582,06

R200,00

R382,06

SQUARE HOLLOW SECTION EN10025-2-5355 (50 X 50 X 3)

NJR STEEL

R0,00

R1 794,88

R0,00

R1 794,88

6mm STEEL REINFORCING BAR

NJR STEEL

R0,00

R29,92

R0,00

R29,92

MILD STEEL PIN (r32 X 6310)

NJR STEEL

R0,00

R29,92

R29,92

R0,00

(21 X 1220 X 2440)

AIRTON TIMBERS / ONLINE ORDER

R0,00

R784,00

R200,00

R584,00

RESIN FACE PLY 21MM x 1220MM x 2440MM

AIRTON TIMBERS / ONLINE ORDER

R0,00

R1 260,00

R300,00

R960,00

SA PINE INDUSTRIAL ROUGHUNTREATED (19 X 76 X 2700)

AIRTON TIMBERS / ONLINE ORDER

R0,00

R192,00

R50,00

R142,00

AFRI SAM/ BUILDERS WAREHOUSE

R0,00

R180,00

R0,00

R180,00

UEREKA / BUILDERS WAREHOUSE

R0,00

R400,00

R200,00

R200,00

Gate ground track

BUILDERS WAREHOUS

R0,00

R200,00

R0,00

R200,00

Weel assembly

BUILDERS WAREHOUS

R0,00

R245,00

R0,00

R245,00

CNC FABRICATION OF STEEL LEGS X4

R0,00

R809,95

R150,00

R659,95

r40mm STEEL PLATE FOR LEG FIVITS X4

R0,00

R45,95

R0,00

R45,95

R0,00

R120,00

R60,00

R60,00

DESCRIPTION

TOTAL

Steel

Wood 2 x SHUTTERPLY IMP

Concrete AFRI-SAM CONCRETE PREMIX Fastening UEREKA TEK SCREW HEX CRSE (5.5x38mm) 30pc X4 Track essembly

Fabrication

Ruble removal PRIVATE

R 5 483,76

Design

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Theory

Construction

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S I T E L O C AT I O N :

The enock sentonga road site was chosen since when looking at an urban scale at Johannesburg it is evident where all the mine took place and the tangible remnants of the mining era pollutes the skyline of Johannesburg. Thus the evenly embanked northern edge of the side will be a representation of the miners and the southern edge will be the flat open field which creates a platform for possibility and growth such as Johannesburg during the gold rush.

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C O N C E P T R E A L I S AT I O N :

The concept that what was once under the ground was used to create what the tangible of what we know today had been used in the singular manner of positive and negative space. The representation of on the northern embankment would be cut away to expose the earth and the history of the miners. The soil and rock witch has been excavated would then be used to form the positive space of what is known today on the southern edge which represents the possibility and opportunity of Johannesburg.

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Ghosting the past on the present would be an effective way to create a space that will have no tangible remembrance but the past pressed into / onto it. By outlining the positive and the negative of the se spaces it becomes clear to what the past was and what the present is. The relation between the past and the present creates an intangible connection with the present day user. This project shows how the connection between these elements can be very strong without any physical connection.

Steven John Moore


60MM X 100MM CLEVISES SWIVEL PIN CO 10MM CARBON STEEL PIN WELDED TO PL SWIVEL CONNECTION TO BE WIELDED TO

320MM X 444MM X 111MM DUCTILE IRO HULK EARTH ANCHORS – HG320

20MM GALVANIZED WIRE ROPES, ROUND STRAND 6 X 24 FIBER CORE

anchoring detail

CLEVIS MOUNTING SCREW

200mm RC FLOOR SLAB, TO BE TO ENG SPEC AT 28 DAYS OF CURING, FINISHED WITH EXPOSED OFF-SHUTTER CONCRETE.

MILD STEEL I BEAM ON EDGE OF SLAB, CONNECTED WITH M15 CHEMICALLY ANCHORED BOLT LOCK NUT BODY TIGHTEN LOCK NUT WITH OPEN ENDE WRENCH

300mm x 200mm T-SECTION TO ENG SPEC, FINISHED WITH GREY POWDERCOAT FINISH.

GABION ROCK FILL, ALL ROCKS TO BE EXCOVATED FROM SITE EARTHWORKS, MIN 100MM MAX 250MM ROCK SIZE SWAGED FERRULE 100MM OERFORATED PVC PIPE,COVERD IN 120 MICRON GEOFABRIC 500MM RC RAFT FOUNDATION TO ENG SPEC.

250MM X 230MM GROUND TRENSH DRAIN, TO BE CONNECTED TO MAIN MNICIPAL STORMWATER CONNECTION 250MM RC SERFACE BED TO ENG SPEC, WITH 50MM SCREED TO FALL,

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turnbuckle tensioner

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ONNECTION WITH LACE. O STRUCTURAL MEMBER.

construction / cabion retaining wall system

ON

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Steven John Moore


Braamfontein Cemitry Grown from the earth, Hung from the sky

Cemeteries can be read as traces of a city A library of stories, an archive of artifacts, individuals and events that begin to narrate the makings of our city, the origins of our society. Braamfontein cemetery encloses a variety of clues to our history and beginnings with stories of triumph, struggle, diversity., and change woven into an elaborate layered and visual landscape that in some way captures the delightful and fearsome evorufion of Johannesburg. BRIEF: The task is to design a space that reconnects the now and then - a space that allows for remembrance and contemplation - an architecture that articulates ‘duality’; before and beyond, earth and sky, the physical and the intangible. The scheme must emerge through intensive engagement with the site. A response to real concerns and constraints while simultaneously including more poetic spatial and philosophic aspects - a critical inquiry to architectural languages - an architecture that is “grown from the earth” (much like our city) and a tectonic poetry that is “hung from the sky” (a reference to the intangible). The scheme must respond to the internal or external realms of the site and provide a space for contemplation, rest and comfort (this could be a series of spaces with a variety of experiences) additional specific programmatic requirements will be a product of your architectural inquiry, what are the needs, where is the potential. -- Select a ‘site’ within the larger cemetery, informed by research, physical, spatial and experimental mapping -- Investigate and demonstrate the physical relationship or disconnection between interior and exterior -- Document observations of the site from approach (surrounds) to contact (within) and beyond (intangible) -- From a thorough understanding of the site begin conceptual design -- Programme must be a product of spatial and architectural inquiry -- Explore heavy and light architectural languages and tectonics -- The design must respond to the possible user/s in terms of scale, experience and privacy -- Demonstrate an understanding of the physical notion of topography -- Communicate an engagement with the intangible + metaphysical aspects of spatial articulation (topology) -- Communicate a realistic 30 impression of the design

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Theory

Construction

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P R O J E C T P R E FAC E : The unpacking of the design process is a personal extension of yourself. No one person will have the same outlook and findings of a project and will portray many different perspectives, connection and experiences. These different elements will affect the way the process is formed and the inner workings of the result. The design process shouldn’t be a linear process to work from point A to point B. Not working in a linear fashion promotes the outcome of the process to have a comprehensive understanding and engagement of the brief in relation to the site. The continuous adaptation and alteration of previous dissentions make the final product much richer.

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What initiates this process for me is the first encounter with the site that will be conceptualizes in the brief. Experiencing the site with all your senses will give you a true representation of the needs and wants of the undying complexities of the site. For the first site visit the brief and deliverable will not be in mind, thus all the element of the site will be experienced and the findings will not be forced towards something on a final tangible idea/ concept.

Steven John Moore


C O N C E P T M AT E R I A L I Z I N G :

The initial encounter with the site reviled a strong feeling of neglection and disremembered individuals. On a tangible observation of the surroundings findings showed that not all the remembered parties on the site had a positive and constructive role in the development of Johannesburg. Further investigation shows that voluminous amount of the allocated spaces were for the miners that was involved in the gold rush of 1886. All of these areas were cleared open spaces with no remembrance value to the miners or their families. The concept of “The Golden miner” is that the miners of the gold rush played an important role, (if not the most important) to the development of what Johannesburg is today. Some of these people with historical relevance was remembered not for constructive influences in the rising of Johannesburg but rather for negative contributions in the development. People that has significant remembrance vary from contributors to the apartheid era, assassins that tried numerous assassinations on presidents of South Africa, murderers and many more. Most of the miners that have been buried on the site to date have no identification to where the bodies was buried and because of the fact that Johannesburg was built on greed from the gold rush the miners become one of Johannesburg’s most valuable commodities. And for this reason the miners should be memorialised the same as all the political and social figures memorialised on the site.

The concept of the golden miner forms a unity of remembrance throughout the site. This will allow the person that experience the journey of progression throughout the site to have the same perspective anywhere on the site, but at the same time experience the development and growth of the city. Forcing the perspective of the user will form the unity of the remembrance and how no single entity formed the history of Johannesburg. This forced perspective is the same effect that Peter Eiseman strived for with the construction of the holocaust memorial in berlin. The lack of opticality (visual stimulation with is the most significant sense to preserve architecture) the user will only be preserved by the presence of the space not by the significant of the material or the structure of the surroundings. The perspective will be created by a uniform grid on the entire site, where after all the existing tomb stones will be removed and be replaced by 300mm x 300mm steel coulombs. These coulombs will be placed on the grid in such a fashion that no matter where the user finds themselves along the route on the site the perspective will stay the same at any given time. This Project created an intangible connection between the past and the present by creating a journey for the user to experience any different perspectives of the history of Johannesburg’s development from many different viewpoints of the diverse elements Johannesburg is made out of.

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Once the concept was clear and the relevant research has been done to further the concept to be able to form a substantial understanding of the topic and to ensure that the relevance of the concept can be used as an architectural inspiration.

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Steven John Moore


Second year 1. The Unknown


Th e U n k n o w n Sacred Spaces

“it is necessary to return to the point where the interplay of light and dark reveals form, and in this way to bring richness back into architectural space� Tadao Ando (1990). The task: Choose a site on Bunting Road Campus on to which to design a sacred/ a series of sacred space/s for FADA UJ students that cater for a multi spiritual denomination. Your design must critically consider form, light, symbolism, geometry, scale and proportion. The footprint of the structure may not be more than 100m2. Outcomes and assessment criteria By successfully completing this project you will exhibit your ability to: -- Approach design from a very conceptually driven process -- Question structural concepts, materiality and tectonics -- Appreciate the use of light in architecture -- Articulate how different materials and junctions connect -- Respond sensitively to scale -- Deconstruct and reconstruct your understanding of form in architecture.

Design

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First Year 1. Cubes 2. Elemental 3. The Entrance


Cubes

Modular Mixed use student accommodation This brief investigates the idea of modular design – a well considered “unit” that can be arranged in relationships to other similar units, creating in-between and edge spaces that become integral to the architectural and urban approach. The Precinct Once familiar with various site conditions and possibilities you will be able to make informed decisions about “the bigger picture”, being the precinct – by defining constraints and illustrating possibilities at this scale you will generate a set of design rules that will impact the design of the unit. By knowing how a number of these units could occupy the site and connect to each other in different ways you can approach the design of a single unit with a modular growth and arrangement in mind. The Unit Consider this a single part of a possible-many. The design of this unit must enable adjacent positioning and potential connectedness, resulting in an interesting complex whole. Your challenge here is to avoid mundane repetition. With the inclusion of in-between and edge spaces, combined with minor tweaks and adjustments to your unit you should generate an overall micro neighborhood that inspires both individual identity and community. Select a starter site within your development framework. Using this site design a concept for a modular unit made up of 3 basic levels; 00_ground- retail, 01_1st- commercial/studio, 02_2nd- residential.

Design

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Elemental Social housing study

A housing study of the award winning project elemental by Quinta Monroy. The brief was to understand and explore the relationship between the sensitivity of the illegally occupation of land and how to relocate families utilizing the housing policies in place.

Fold out Page

Study considerations: -- Understanding socio economic context. -- Conceptual program development. -- Open building considerations. -- Permanent and infill structure. -- Cheap and affordable building methods and materials.

Theory

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CURRENT COMMUNITY STATUS:

PROJECT BRIEF:

THE PEOPLE THAT INHABITED THE SITE PRE-DEVELOPMENT ARE PEOPLE THAT ARE LIVING A THE SITE ILLEGAL Y, ALL OF THESE PEOPLE LIVE IN POVERTY AND ARE STRUGGLING TD SURVIVE,

TD SETTLE THE SANE 100 FAMILIES OF THE QUINTA MONROY IN THE SANE 500sqmTHAT THEY HAVE ILLEGAL Y OCCUPIED FDR THE LAST 30 YEARS,

DESIGN PRINCIPALS:

----

TD THINK ) DESIGN AND BUILD BETTER NEIGHBORHOODS) HOUSING AND THE NECESSARY URBAN INFRA­STRUCTURE TD PROMOTE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND TD OVERCOME POVERTY, IN ORDER TD TRIGGER A RELEVANT LEAP FORWARD) THE PROJECT MUST BE BUILD UNDER THE SAME MARKET AND POLICY CONDITIONS THAN ENY OTHER ) WORKING TD ACHIEVE “MORE OF THE SAME11 BY QUALITY WE UNDERSTAND PROJECTS WHDSE DESIGN GUARANTEES INCREMENT AL VALUE A RETURNS ON INVESTMENT TIME) IN ORDER TD STOP IT BEING CONSIDERS AS A MERE SOCIAL EXPENSE,

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Th e E n t r a n c e Oppositions and Overlaps

The 1st design challenge was situated in a non-space, a hypothetical landscape that was developed through a personal abstract reflex to the question posed in the brief. This project will take you out of the studio and into the campus. You will be tasked to interrogate, analyse and respond to a physical condition – moving from subjective and willful experimentation to a more considered approach to the making of space and place. As an extension to one of the project themes – opposition – two sites have been selected as the context for this brief: Site A [TOP] – parking threshold (more specifically the level change from the student parking lot to the pavement and across the road. Site B [BOTTOM] – Eastern no-man’s land (the left over space between the eastern envelope of the 1st year studio and Annet road. Each of these sites present various challenges that have both similarities and contradictions. The first stage in this project is to study these two, simultaneously, similar and opposing conditions with the aim to extract design tools that will be translated through the design process. Your analyses must look at; physical conditions that are fixed/static components AND fluid elements. As a parallel process to this site analysis you must stay alert to the experiential aspects of the site, with particular attention to the themes for this project OPPOSITIONS and OVERLAPS.

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PROJECT PROCESS: Part 1-A – mapping Part 1-B – descriptive touchstones Part 2 – preparing for concept Part 3 – conceptual response Part 4 – resolution, scale and representation (architectural drawings)

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Fold out Page

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Professional Office 1. Propertuity 2. Kothari Associates [New Delhi, India]


Propertuity

Leading Neighborhood Development. We are an African Company, with an African Energy. Our passion lies in identifying and solving the urban challenges faced by African cities. We do, however, believe in the power of border busting collaborations! We actively seek out artists, architects, designers, development and operative partners from across the globe who share our commitment and optimism for urban renewal. Together with our specialized team, we work to infuse innovation and layered authenticity into each of our projects. Our core purpose is to inspire a new way of being through enlightened development. Our business does not start and stop with development. We work intuitively in response to the needs of the community by creating unique concepts and mixed-use spaces that will meaningfully engage people with their urban environment. Through architecture, planning, design, art and investment, we seek to regenerate the culturally rich and dynamic neighborhoods across our Continent by combining these core tenets to activate communities, promote transformation and create spaces with character and a lasting quality. ROLE IN OFFICE: -- In house design work -- Liaising with consultants -- Construction documentation -- Visualization -- Snagging

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AREAL EMPIRE: The Aerial Empire complex is a collection of six ervens and seven old buildings. Once home to hat making factories in the 1930’s and later Aerial Manufacturers, whom this building takes its name inspiration from, the buildings have today retained their industrial purpose. Propertuity acquired the building in 2013 and has developed the space into a mixed-use residential, retail and manufacturing opportunity for creatives. The buildings of Aerial Empire are an eclectic combination of styles as the spaces organically grew together over time. This represents the nature of the different and unique uses within the buildings. In the redevelopment this diversity has been maintained and is the source of inspiration. The buildings facade has become an extension of the artists canvas where murals have been commissioned to fill the courtyard which forms the central communal space.

Design

Construction

Office Work

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127

Steven John Moore

10 m


128

University of Johannesburg


10 ERVEN 10 ERVEN is still in the design stages for a new high-rise residential development in the Maboneng precinct. The delapedated site will be transformed into 3 towers with a combination of retail and commercial on the ground levels.The exsisting context of the site consists of delapedated warehouses and factories that will be reused as the cladding for the tower pedastils. The project is currently in the construction tendering process, whilst ongoing design development takes place.

Design

Office Work

129

Steven John Moore


Kothari Associates Design office New Delhi, India

The Kothari Group is a comprehensive organization of design professionals that include Architects, Engineers, Town planners, Interior Designers, and Service Specialists. Since the parent Organization was founded in 1936, the firm has completed more than 1,000 million rupees in architectural, planning and engineering projects with distinguished quality in design. These projects range from offices, banks, hospitals, university campuses, hotels, embassies, airports, IT, auditoria, planetariums, museums, commercial centers and research laboratories to high-rise buildings, urban spaces, and residential houses. Our philosophy is simple and direct. Each space we plan and build must work efficiently for owners and occupants. It must be built in time and within the specified budget. Each project must satisfy its economic goal be it a public institution with minimum profits. It must make an aesthetic contribution to the community. We respect the neighborhood in which we built by designing in harmony with what was there earlier. We believe that the unique functional needs of each client must shape our design. Each plan must be fitted to meet the complex of local conditions & desires and at the same time reflect the continuous advance of technique and knowledge. Only by meeting these requirements we can fulfill our responsibilities as Consultants. ROLE IN OFFICE: -- Tender proposals -- Head design team -- Construction documentation -- Site inspections -- Visualization -- Liaising with consultants

130

University of Johannesburg


131

Steven John Moore


P O L I S H E M B A S S Y R E F E R B I S H M E N T: The Embassy of Republic of Poland, situated in New Delhi, was built in 1970s and has been, since then, a landmark in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architectural history. The Embassyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s functions & services have been, since then, modified. A refurbishment is required so as to upgrade the building in compliance with the current legal & technical standards as well as to satisfy the present needs of the client.

Construction

Office Work

132

University of Johannesburg


133

Steven John Moore


134

University of Johannesburg


K A U T I L YA M A R G : KAUTILYA MARG is a high end residentual building loacated in the centre of new delhiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most luxsurious areas. The project was joind when the initial design was already done. Construction documentation, drawing updates and site inspections was done during the time spent on this project.

Design

Construction

Office Work

135

Steven John Moore


BA R C FAC I LI T Y: The BARC facility is a newly commissioned nuclear research facility on the outscirts of New-Delhi India. The total site area is 150 acers of barren land. Due to tha nature of the project limited access was given to use the project in portfolios. The renders included is of the entrance precinct of the site. This development includes all the administrative areas, healthcare and overnight fecilities.

Design

Office Work

136

University of Johannesburg


137

Steven John Moore


138

University of Johannesburg


N A YA R A I P U R R A I L WA Y S T A T I O N : Railways form a very important aspect of the transportation network in the region as well as in the state. It helps to transport a large quantity of minerals within and outside of the state. The railway network in the state is operated by the south eastern railway headquaters in bilaspur. The other lines are from Raipur to bilaspur and Raipur to Visakhapatnam. The railway lines and station provides facilty for mass communication and goods transportation over the region.

Design

Office Work

139

Steven John Moore


L I C I N D I A [ M U LT I P L E X ] : The building has been well planned for maximum space utility. elimination of any negative spaces allows the full utilization of the far. The service cores are designated as per the functions of each floor. no infiltration of any kind will into any other blocks will be observed in the building. The redevelopment of the site will be done in two phases. in the first phase, the office building will be retained and the development of the retail cum office space will be carried. The second phase would include the relocation of the office building into the phase i structure and development of an office space in the previous location.

Design

Office Work

140

University of Johannesburg


141

Steven John Moore


6

Personal Interest 1. Light 001 2. Light 002


6


144

University of Johannesburg


UPSIDE DOWN IDEA The re-imaging of reclaimed materials. All the materials used to build the light was gathered from numerous site visits at a verity of building sites. The upside down light bulb flips any idea on its head to show a new perspective.

145

Steven John Moore


146

University of Johannesburg


THE LIGHTHOUSE A simple construction of a lighthouse type table lamp. The construction was made by using every day house hold items and is meticulously crafted together.

147

Steven John Moore


Steven John Moore | University Of Johannesburg | UNDERGRADUATE  

Selected works | 1st, 2nd, 3rd and BTech years

Steven John Moore | University Of Johannesburg | UNDERGRADUATE  

Selected works | 1st, 2nd, 3rd and BTech years

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