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StevenGGlas man 2012

Architecture Portfolio


Steven Glassman

Bachelor of Architecture History Minor Business Minor stevenrglassman@gmail.com 530.219.4432


Table of Contents

1

T.I.G.E.R.

20

Urban Incubator

10

A House awaiting Death

26

Diverging Voids

15

Network of the Horizons

31

Masieri Foundation

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Spring 2012

Winter 2012

2011 Fall

T.I.G.E.R.

The Interactively Green Experiential Residence Studio

Fifth Year. Thesis/Terminal Project. One quarter of preliminary research, Fall 2011. Two quarters of design, Winter/ Spring 2012. This Project was archived by the UO Architecture & Allied Arts Department.

Professor & Mentors

Nancy Cheng (UO Professor) with Michael Great (AAM Architects) as acting mentor.

Site

Media Utilized

Autodesk: Revit Architecture, Vasari, Ecotect, AutoCAD. Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign. Ink. Copic markers.

Project Description A 24-story residential tower in Portland’s South Waterfront District. This Thesis project was an exploration into possible ways for incorporating architecture as a learning experience into sustainable design practices. Such an endeavor will promote healthy living and ensure that future generations will continue to thrive. Through a system of conscious and subconscious interactive elements the building encourages sustainable learning in “Moments of Green Living.” The building creates continual interaction with sustainable features like renewable power generation and water systems that recycle all waste products produced by the residents.

T.I.G.E.R.

South Waterfront, Portland, Oregon.

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Portland

Spring 2012

Winter 2012

Before 1990, Portland’s South Waterfront District represented a landscape that had been dominated by the effects of industrial buildings, which had left the area severely contaminated. However, on November 13, 2002 the Portland Bureau of Planning adopted the South Waterfront Plan which outlined various goals to transform the South Waterfront into an EcoDistrict. Portland’s EcoDistrict Initiative creates an enabling strategy to accelerate neighborhoodscale sustainability. As a result, the South Waterfront area could be developed into a model for livable and sustainable high-density development.

2011

Portland, Oregon

Fall

Node Diagram

Rec Node

-Point of Decision -Major activity area -Plaza space -Display for South Waterfront

Secondary Nodes -Zones of experience -Transitional links -Outdoor spaces -Public-Private blending

Destination Nodes -Destination spots -Neighborhood Points of interest -Public locations

Transportation Node -Street car access -OHSU Tram access -Pedestrian Bridge access -Automobile Entrance

Commercial Avenue -Avenue of Retail / Commercial -Pedestrian Friendly

Site

Building Form Journey

T.I.G.E.R.

-

The South Waterfront

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Design Process Journey

-

The building’s North Facade accelerates the strong winds from the Northwest towards wind turbines located on the East corner of the building. This creates an incredibly efficient energy production system.

-

Autodesk’s Vasari Program allowed me to analyze the wind flow patterns of the site to find the perfect building form that would increase the wind speed and optimize the building’s potential energy production.

Wind

-

Water/Green

The South facade of the building is formed to create green terraces where residents are able to interact with the water collection systems of the building. Water moves along the South Facade through the green arteries that connect each of the green terrace nodes. These arteries allow plants to grow up the PV panel lattice work which defines the South Facade as an area of Photosynthesis.

-

Autodesk’s Vasari Program also illustrated how the building’s form created a pocket of low air speed on the South side of the building, which allows for safe outdoor terraces.


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T.I.G.E.R.

2011 Spring 2012

Winter 2012

Fall


T.I.G.E.R. has three major building programs. The first and also the largest of these is devoted to residential apartment and condominium units. The residential component is comprised of 137 units that range from 500sf. single floor studios to 1,200sf. two floor condos.

The second program element is the Community Eco Education Center (C.E.E.C.) The ecology center teaches visitors about the Williamette river’s ecosystem and the importance of sustainable practices.

Spring 2012

3

Winter 2012

2

Fall

1

2011

Building Program The third program element is comprised of outdoor spaces that focus on water reclamation while also encouraging livability, sustainability, and education in the neighborhood. A Living Machine facility recycles that entire Tower’s waste water along with all the site’s grey water to create potable water for the Tower’s reuse, while a community garden also provides an area for hands on environmental activity.

A

Unit Type A: Young couples with one or two children. These sustainability minded families hope to teach their children about the merits of green living.

B

Unit Type B: Large Families with 2 or more children. These large families are open minded to living in residential complexes as long as these buildings promote walkability, green-living, and provide plenty of outdoor recreational zones for their children to play.

C

Unit Type C: This market type includes elderly couples or young couples hoping to start a family. These two groups live ecofriendly lifestyles and encourage active lifestyles among their piers.

T.I.G.E.R.

Target Market Types

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Level 20 Floor Plan

1” = 125’

1’ = 1/32”

N

Spring 2012

T.I.G.E.R.

Site Plan

Winter 2012

Fall

1’ = 1/32”

2011

Level 21 Floor Plan

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A

B

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

1’ = 1/16”

1’ = 1/16”

1’ = 1/16”

1’ = 1/16”


B

C

C

15%

Studio 15% Apts. Floor Plan 1’ = 1/16�

2011

Spring 2012

12%

- 16 Units @ 2,090-2,500 sf. - 4 Bedrooms - Kitchen + Dining Room - 2 Living Room - 2.5-3 Bathrooms - 1 Den - Laundry Closet - 1 Office

Unit Type A has a crossback layout where the living room and kitchen are located on the first floor of the unit while 1-2 bedrooms and a den are located on the second floor. This allows for each unit to have access to both the South and North Facade.

Winter 2012

58%

-

Unit Type B is the largest of the unit types with a living room and kitchen on the first floor while on the second floor 4 bedrooms, 2 dens, and an office provide ample living space for the larger families. The second floor has access to both Southern and Northern light.

-

- 20 Units @ 950-1,250 sf. - 2-4 Bedrooms - Kitchen + Dining Room - Living Room - 2-3 Bathrooms - 1 Den - Laundry Closet

Unit Type C is a single floor unit with 2-4 bedrooms.

- 21 Units @ 420-730 sf. - 1-2 Bedrooms - Kitchen - 0-1 Living Room - 1 Bathroom - 0-1 Small Office - Laundry Closet

Studio Apartments comprise the rest of the tower units. These are small single floor units.

-

T.I.G.E.R.

A

- 80 Units @ 630- 1,250 sf.. - 1-2 Bedrooms - Kitchen + Dining Room - Living Room - 1.5-2.5 Bathrooms - 0-1 Den - Laundry Closet

Fall

Unit Type Floor Plans

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3 5 4

4

1

1 Sun AC Current PV Panels

7 6

3 2 Wind DC Power

2

1 2 3 4

DC/AC Converter Battery Backup Hydrogen Fuel Cell Methane

Grey Water Facilities Grey Water Potable Facilities Potable Water Black Water

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Power Flow Diagram

Water Flow Diagram

-

-

Anaerobic Reactor Anoxic Reactor Greenhouse Aerobic Reactors Clarifier Wetland System UV Filter Grey Water Cistern

Wind Turbines on the North side of the building allied with Grey water is collected on the roof and the Tower and then photovoltaic panels on the South side produce energy for the moves down the south facade where it finally reaches the cistern building. Methane gas produced by the Living Machine heats in the basement. Then the grey water is reused in the toilets of the kitchen stoves and the heating systems in the residential units. residential units. The black water is then filtered by the Living Machine to become potable water which supplies all the water needs of the Tower. Thus, the building utilizes a completely recycled based water system. 75% of the Living Machine filters all of the Tower’s black water while the remaining 25% filters black water from neighboring buildings in the South Waterfront.

-


Spring 2012

T.I.G.E.R.

Winter 2012

2011 Fall

Sustainable Design Features

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C.E.E.C.

Community Eco Education Center

-

The Community Eco Education Center (C.E.E.C.) allows the residents and visitors of the neighborhood to learn about the biological organisms of the Willamette river and the water filtration systems of the residential tower. By utilizing various childfriendly learning activities, this ecological center educates children, and thus future generations, on the importance of the river’s health for the sustainability of the entire Northwest Region. Representing the first two floors of the T.I.G.E.R. the iconic facility pulls in visitors from the South Waterfront’s Recreational node with educational activities that stimulate the senses. These activities come in the form of engaging water filtration systems and hands-on interactive displays that not only provide factual information about building systems but also show current statistical data about the efficiency of residential units in the tower. Children can compare their family’s sustainable efficiency with that of other residents in the Residential Tower. Wall displays also provide information about the local and regional riparian ecosystems to educate visitors about the complex ecosystems that depend on the Willamette River for survival. These userfriendly educational activities excite the senses of all ages. On the second floor of the C.E.E.C. building are the various classrooms, research labs, and meeting areas that support the learning activities of the facility and are heightened places of energy and excitement where children can expand their understanding of the river ecology. On the exterior of the first floor is an outdoor lab and fish nursery where children can learn about the river’s ecosystem rehabilitation.

- 1 Computer Wall Display Area @ 2,000 sf. - 1 Classroom @ 1,100 sf. - 1 Computer Meeting Room @ 1,500 sf. - 4 Research Labs @500 sf. - 1 Outdoor Lab @ 1,200 sf. - 1 Fish Nursery @ 2,700 sf.

Level 1 Floor Plan 1’ = 1/32”

Level 2 Floor Plan 1’ = 1/32”


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T.I.G.E.R.

2011 Spring 2012

Winter 2012

Fall


1

2

1

2

Perspective of the community garden from the riverfront greenway.

Perspective of the Southern facade’s terrace green spaces and their connection with the wind turbines.


Perspective of the Unit Type B’s first floor showing the living room and kitchen.

Spring 2012

Winter 2012

4

Fall

3

2011

Moments of Green Living Perspective of the Unit Type B’s second floor showing the NorthSouth light access.

Site Section

3

4

T.I.G.E.R.

1” = 200’

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Studio

Fourth Year. One quarter of a Media Class followed by one quarter of outside studio design. Winter / Spring 2011.

Professor & Mentors Jim Givens (UO Professor)

Site

Somewhere in the Northwest along Washington’s Pacific Coastline near Seattle.

Media Utilized

Autodesk: Revit Architecture, AutoCAD. Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator. Pencil Sketches.

Project Description

This project started as part of Professor Jim Givens’ Media Class “From Concept to Building” to design a “beautiful room” for a fictional “House Awaiting Death.” Initially designed as only the living room, I took inspiration from old sailing ships to create a powerful living room that arced back to man’s ancient roots with the ocean. After the class’s completion, and with the help of Professor Givens, I continued the design process to design the rest of the home around this central living room.

Winter 2011 Spring 2011

House Awaiting Death

A Design originating from the analysis of what makes a “Beautiful Room.”

A

A House Awaiting Death

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A

This project initially started as an analysis into what makes a “Beautiful Room” for Professor Jim Givens’ Media class. For the media class I designed a living room that represented the focal point of a “House Awaiting Death.” Essentially I was designing a beautiful living room that was part of a fictional house located in the Northwest that looked out onto the Pacific ocean, which was also frequently passed by ships travelling to Seattle. Taking inspiration from old sailing ships, I designed the room to arc back to humanity’s past connections with the ocean. After the completion of the media class, I took it upon myself to continue the design process and design the rest of the building around this “Beautiful Room.” With the help of Professor Givens, I finished the design. The essence of the context for a house awaiting death is one of pure connection to the sea, to the horizon, to that life after death. This essence is about the ocean, about how it pulls and tugs on one’s soul. Critical imagery included wooden sailing ships, the ocean waves, and the rocky shore.

Winter 2011 Spring 2011

-

House Awaiting Death

A Beautiful Living Room

N Site Plan 1’ = 1/64”

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Winter 2011 Spring 2011

B

A

N Floor Plan 1’ = 1/16”

A

B

House Awaiting Death

A

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Section A 1’ = 1/16”


A

When you first arrive to the house awaiting death, you must walk up large stone steps. Through their length these steps force the visitor to think about each step and fully appreciate the experience that each one has on the procession towards this holy temple. From the structural expression of the building one already gets a sense of the connection to sail boats. After entering through the thick stone masonry walls one is met with a long dark hallway with a bright light on the right of the hallway. The hallway’s walls are made of river stone and vertical stripes of light are arrayed along the viewers left wall towards the final bright light of the living room. The roof is a low one made of timber planks. When the visitor finally arrives at the terminus of the tunnel’s journey they are met by a large open room with timber masts holding up a thin wooden roof. At the center of the space there’s an area set a few steps below the hallway’s elevation. It’s zone is set apart from the rest of the room as if marking it as a center of refuge. This zone looks out towards the sea. Hanging from the ceiling overhead are curved sheets of wood that sway with the wind coming through the room’s open windows. They make one feel like the ocean’s waves have somehow pierced the solitude of this temple and pulled you out into the ocean itself.

Winter 2011 Spring 2011

-

House Awaiting Death

A House Awaiting Death

Section B 1’ = 1/16”

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The Revit Families created for the fenestrations and structure of the house are based off of sailing ship imagery. All these families are completely parametric, which allows for easy adjustments when the design of the house alters with each revision.

Winter 2011 Spring 2011

House Awaiting Death

-

A

Parametric Revit Families

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“We are connected to the people beyond the curvature of the Earth and this relationship creates an unmeasurable bond.”

Studio

Fourth Year. Six Week Lyceum Competition 2011. Designed in Fall 2010.

Erin Moore (UO Professor)

Site

The intersection of The Great Salt Lake Desert and Interstate 80, Utah. North side of I-80 between mile marker 21 and 22 .

Media Utilized

Autodesk: Revit Architecture, AutoCAD. Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator. Ink. Copic markers.

Project Description

A 20,000 sf. Rest Area that engages a proposed Land Art Installation entitled “Earth Curvature.” The rest area provides space for “experience of place” and additional spaces for engaging the specific context.

Fall 2010

Network

of the

Professor & Mentors

Horizons

Network of the Horizons

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“We are connected to the people beyond the curvature of the earth and this relationship creates an unmeasurable bond.�


My Design Concept

-

The Site’s connection to the cities beyond the horizon defines the structural layout of the structure’s shading device.

Program Digits

- Central Courtyard Space @ 8,500 sf. - 4 Secondary Public Spaces @ 1,850-3,800 sf. - 24 Rooms for Lodging @ 400 sf. - Cafe for 50 people @ 1,500 sf. - Men/Women Restrooms @600 sf. - Mechanical Room @ 600 sf.

The concept for my design is based on the idea that all people are connected to each other and it is that connection that gives our society strength and structure. No longer is any place defined by the barrier of the horizon. Instead we are connected to the people beyond the curvature of the earth and this relationship creates an unmeasurable unity and bond between the various cities of our society--no matter what the distance. The shape of the structural system of the building is derived from this idea. The angular directions from the starting point of the building’s site in the Utah Salt Flats to the various major cities that define the periphery of our nation relate directly to the layout of the building’s structural members. These members not only create an elaborate framework for the building but also provides support for the large sail-like shading devices that symbolize each city’s dedication to supporting and aiding the other cities in times of need. Therefore, these fins protect the building from the desert’s harsher environmental elements. Consequently one united group of people, or in this case united cities, creates a formidable and resilient structure.

Fall 2010

This project was for the 2011 Lyceum Competition, which was a six week process to design a 20,000 sf. Rest Area that engages a proposed Land Art Installation entitled “Earth Curvature” located in Utah’s awe inspiring Great Salt Lake Desert. This “Earth Curvature” Art Installation was made up of 341 logarithmically decreasing spaced poles which form a straight line in space intersecting the curvature of the earth at the site. The Salt Flat site is a water-leveled surface where one can actually witness the curvature of Earth. The art piece engages a passive audience of continuous traffic, who moving at a high speed more readily experience the curvature of the Earth and perhaps now have a greater awareness of our planet and ourselves. The goal of the competition was to conceptualize a Rest Area for visitors of the Salt Flats that would not only encompassed all the necessary elements needed to support their visit to the site and to the “Earth Curvature” art piece but also was an art piece in itself. The Rest Area must represent some greater and more meaningful idea.

Horizons

-

of the

Project Description

Network

The Network of the Horizons

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DN

DN

Site Plan

N DN


Secondary Courtyard Space

Public Space Semi-public/SemiPrivate Space Private Space

Pubic to Private Transition Diagram

N Floor Plan 1” = 50’

Program Diagram Lodgings Bath & Shower Area Cafe Mechanical Room

of the

Primary Courtyard Space

Network

Circulation through Courtyard Heirarchy Diagram

Horizons

Fall 2010

Zones of Inspirational Lighting

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PV Panels located adjacent to the parking lot between the EastWestbound I-80 Traffic Lane supply the minimal energy needed by the Rest Area.

The Shading Structure of the Rest Area blocks the direct rays of the Summer sun while also allowing the daylight of the Winter sun to seap through the cracks in its canvas beams. This winter daylight heats the individual lodges of the rest area during Utah’s cold winters.

Rainwater runoff falls on the polyester shading sails and follows the sail’s curve until it reaches a gutter system connected to the masts which further guide the water to the beams of the shading structure. Pipes then direct the runoff down the length of the beams until it reaches the underground cistern.


Thermal massing aids in heat retention from skylights which decreases energy demand.

Fall 2010

Network

of the

Gutter-Maste Assembly allows for Rain Water catchment system

Horizons

Butterfly Bolt Connections

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Central Courtyard Space


Fall 2010

Horizons Network

Central Courtyard Space Night Perspective

of the

Exterior Night Perspective

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Fall 2011

Urban Incubator Studio

Professor & Mentors Don Genasci (UO Visiting Professor)

Site

Old Town, Portland, Oregon.

Media Utilized

Autodesk: Revit Architecture, AutoCAD. Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator. Ink. Copic markers.

Project Description

A 26-story mixed residential and commercial tower in Portland’s Oldtown District. This studio had various goals aimed at developing an urban plan and a structure that would promote the livability and the economic rejuvenation of Portland’s Old Town District. The goals were to create a place that would promote the exchange of ideas which in turn could promote innovation for Portland’s economic stability.

Urban Incubator

Fifth Year. One quarter. Fall 2011.

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Portland’s Old Town Historic District represents an area of immense potential for future development and this studio analyzed a hypothetical scenario where a portion of the district was redeveloped. The Old Town District is located in the Northwest area of Portland bordering the Willamette River. The area represents a dynamic transportation hub. At the North end of the site is Portland’s historic Amtrak Union Station, one block South of that is the Greyhound bus station, to the Northwest the Broadway Bridge pulls in automobile and bicycle traffic, and to the East the Steel Bridge supports automobiles, pedestrians, bicycles, and the MAX Light Rail which travels directly to the cross street between the train and bus stations. As a result, our site, the blocks between NW Broadway to NW 5th Ave and the Union Station to NW Glisan St., represents a powerful transportation hub that acts as an essential cultural gateway into the Portland community. The studio started with an urban remodeling of these blocks just South of the Union Station followed by a more thorough design look at one of these blocks. My urban design for the neighborhood restructured the site into a center of culture and art. Using a system of hierarchical urban spaces, the building forms would support an active pedestrian lifestyle. The buildings themselves would house functions as either residential or cultural buildings, which would support the neighborhood’s arts and entrepreneurship. Seasonally rotating art displays in these new urban spaces would support a cultural fervor in the area, there by transforming the district into a powerful and inspiring cultural gateway for visitors arriving into Portland.

Portland

Urban Space Diagrams

Fall 2011

Portland, Oregon

Urban Incubator

-

Old Town

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Residential Units Workshop Space Live-work Loft Residential Units Business Center & Community Center Spaces Community Activity Room Commercial Retail Space Access Core

Fall 2011

This Urban Incubator studio had various goals aimed at developing an urban plan and a structure that would promote the livability and the economic rejuvenation of Portland’s Oldtown District. The goals were to create a place that would promote the exchange of ideas, which in turn could promote innovation for Portland’s economic stability. This design represents a possible solution for that endeavor. Through the use of balconies, green roofs, communal multipurpose rooms, and public outdoor spaces in the urban plan; one promotes positive social interaction between the residents and workers of the building that may in turn aid in the expansion of Portland’s sustainability ideals as well as the growth of communication between Portland’s innovative business leaders and entrepreneurs. The block is essentially partitioned into four sections. The Northeast/ Center section acts as an urban public space while the Southeast L-shaped building houses live-work loft units. This building’s architectural character arcs back to the historic industrial style of the Old Town neighborhood. The Southwest and Northwest sections are essentially one building with a large three-story inclosed atrium between them that connects the central public space to the energetic NW Broadway avenue. The architectural style of the Southwest section pays tribute to the industrial style of Old Town while the Northwest section represents a powerful symbol of change and modernization through the use of the tower. The bridge element that connects these two sections symbolizes the neighborhood’s recognition of the past while also illustrating its acceptance for the need for change. The base of the entire block is devoted to commercial retail space while the next five floors of the West building are devoted to workshop spaces and also the business and community center facilities. These more public floors act as a barrier separating the private residential units in the tower and the live-work building from the bustling energy of NW Broadway. The bridge and tower elements of the West building are devoted to residential units, with the possibility of the units in the tower being utilized as workshop units. This allows the program of the tower to actually fluctuate and adapt to the changing economic needs of the community.

Urban Incubator

-

The Urban Incubator

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N Level 1 Floor Plan 1’ = 1/32”


Fall 2011 1’ = 1/64”

Level 7 Floor Plan

Level 20 Floor Plan

1’ = 1/64”

1’ = 1/64”

Urban Incubator

Level 2 Floor Plan

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20th Floor

Green Roof Recreational Zones

-

Green Roofs act as recreational areas for residents. These communal areas not only promote the spread of ideas between the residents of the building but also between the employees of the structure’s various starter companies. This creates a positive atmosphere for people and ideas, which ultimately supports innovation.

or 7th Flo

loor 2nd F loor 1st F


The residential units of the tower not only provide a place of private refuge for the residents but also promote a strong visual connection to the rest of the city through balconies, outdoor terraces, and green roofs. These rooms can also be easily converted to office units, which further adds to the building’s longevity through cyclical economic shifts.

Residential Terrace Space

-

A green terrace space at the center of the residential bridge promotes positive relationships between the residents. Its separation from the rest of the office and workshop zones makes it a more private unique space for the residents.

Fall 2011

-

Urban Incubator

Tower Residential Units

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Live-work Loft Residential Units

Tower Residential Units


Green Walls exist on the South and North side of the tower to not only promote Ecodistrict lifestyles but also help to defend from excessive heating of the building during warmer months. While the South side of the Tower is largely protected by these green walls, the North side utilizes louvers to allow more light to reach the living units of the North side/

Communal Multipurpose Room

-

At the south side of the residential bridge that connects the tower with the Southwest building, there exists a large communal gathering room. This room promotes the view down Broadway and can be utilized for various uses such as weddings, birthdays, and town meetings.

Fall 2011

-

Urban Incubator

Green Walls & Louver Building Systems

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Spring 2011

Diverging Voids A 520 sf. home.

Studio

Professor & Mentors Rob Thalon (UO Professor)

Site

15th and Ferry St., Eugene, Oregon.

Media Utilized

Autodesk: Revit Architecture, AutoCAD. Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator.

Project Description

A 520 sf. ballooned framed house. This design was the final examination of Professor Rob Thalon’s Residential Construction class. The requirements were to design a small home around 500 sf and we were tasked to provide a complete set of construction documents needed to actually build the structure.

Diverging Voids

Fourth Year. One quarter. Spring 2011.

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This project was the culmination of Rob Thalon’s quarter long Residential Construction class. The requirements were to design a small home around 500 sf. and to provide a complete set of construction documents that would allow the structure to be built. For this project I designed this small home to have a half floor switch back system. This would allow for greater spatial variety and an overlapping of spaces to maximize the feel of the small home. This timber building uses balloon framing to allow for the combination of two slopping roofs running in opposite directions. This creates a unique spatial expression which can be experienced in the connection between the living room and kitchen areas. Likewise, the half floor living room allows the kitchen countertop to have a secondary function as another seating area when entertaining a large number of guests. Finally the bedroom is located on the second floor which allows for a private refuge away from the more public joint living room and kitchen experience.

Spring 2011

-

Diverging Voids

Diverging Voids

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Spring 2011

Site Plan 1’ = 1/32”

West Elevation 1’ = 1/8”

Diverging Voids

N

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B

Window Schedule A : 16”x90” Fixed Window Head Height@8’11” B : 16”x80” Fixed Window Head Height@9’3” C : 16”x24” Fixed Window Head Height@10’2” D : 20”x84” Casement Window Head Height@7’6” E : 134”x126” Casement window Assembly Head Heigth@11’0” F : 36”x48” Casement Window Head Height@7’0”

Door Schedule 1 : 36”x84” Wood Door Head Height@7’0” 2 : 30”x84” Wood Door Head Height@7’0” 3 : 64”x90” Sliding Glass Door Head Height@7’6”

A

A C

Foundation Plan 1’ = 1/8”

South Elevation

1’ = 1/8”

B

Floor Plan 1’ = 1/8”

Section A 1’ = 1/8”


Spring 2011

West Interior Elevation

1’ = 1/8”

1’ = 1/4”

Section B 1’ = 1/8”

Diverging Voids

Roof Framing Plan

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Spring 2011

1’ = 1/2”

Diverging Voids

Section C

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Winter 2010

Studio

Third Year. One quarter. Winter 2010.

Professor & Mentors Jim Tice (UO Professor)

Site

Venice, Italy

Media Utilized

Autodesk: Revit Architecture, AutoCAD. Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator. Pastels

Project Description

A 5-story live/work student hostel along Venice, Italy’s historic Grand Canal. The hostel consists of dormitory rooms for 12 students and 1 faculty professor, along with other amenities such as studio work space, a library, a rooftop garden, and a display space for their work open to the public. The small but strategically placed site is a wedge of property located on the Grand Canal at one of its critical turning points. The site acts as a pivot occuring between the architectural formality of the Grand Canal and the vernacular building along its flank.

Masieri Foundation

Masieri Foundation

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Radial Circulation Diagram

Massing & Filtering Diagram

First Floor Entrance Patio


Half Courtyard Massing Diagram

Structural Diagram

Second Floor Library and Dining Area

This project was the culmination of a quarter long studio with Professor Jim Tice. The project was a 5-story live/work student hostel along Venice, Italy’s historic Grand Canal. The hostel consists of dormitory rooms for 12 students and 1 faculty professor, along with other amenities such as studio work space, a library, a rooftop garden, and a display space for their work open to the public. The small but strategically placed site is a wedge of property located on the Grand Canal at one of its critical turning points. The site acts as a pivot occuring between the architectural formality of the Grand Canal and the vernacular building along its flank. I designed the building around two conceptual ideas: a radial circulation system and a half courtyard massing system. The residents and visitors are actually pulled from the North corner of the building to the building’s Southern facade through a filtering process. This allows for the incredible view of the Grand Canal to be the magnet that pulls and circulates people through the entire building. The building’s overall massing is based off a half courtyard system where the building’s program elements border an attrium space that connects floors 2 through 4.

Second Floor Atrium and Library

Third Floor Atrium and Studio Space

Winter 2010

-

Masieri Foundation

Masieri Foundation

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A

B

B

Second Floor Plan 1” = 250m

A

N First Floor Plan 1” = 200m


Winter 2010

1” = 250m

Section A 1” = 200m

Fourth Floor Plan 1” = 250m

Fifth Floor Plan 1” = 250m

Masieri Foundation

Third Floor Plan

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Night Perspective from Grand Canal


Winter 2010

1� = 200m

Masieri Foundation

Section B

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Steven Glassman

Bachelor of Architecture History Minor Business Minor stevenrglassman@gmail.com 530.219.4432


Steven Glassman Architecture Portfolio 11-15-12