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DISCLAIMER: NOT LEGAL FOR SALE OR USE IN CALIFORNIA ON ANY POLLUTION CONTROLLED MOTOR VEHICLES


Contents

Issue #339

48 The Menace Machine

86 Psychedelic Second Chance

 N U T S & B O LT S 36 HOW IT WORKS:

IS YOUR ENGINE TATTOOED? Part I: Here’s how to tell if a pre-1981 Harley engine has had its VIN altered 42 TECHLINE:

 HOTTEST

86 PSYCHEDELIC

SECOND CHANCE The power of love brings a chopper home

CUSTOM IRON 48 THE MENACE

MACHINE Chaos Cycle’s Hooligan Knucklehead

 MOTORCYCLE BAGGER

RIDING SHOE Comfort on and off the cruiser

KEY TO POWER: HEAD FLOW Intake, combustion chamber, and exhaust flow explained

70 Contrasting Styles

80 BIRD’S THE WORD

70 CONTRASTING

Team Chris Malo’s Indian Buffalo Chip Challenger

STYLES Good like chocolate, only better

 RIDDEN & REVIEWED

 D E PA RT M E N T S SHIFTING GEARS RIDE TO WORK QUOTED & NOTED SCRATCHING & WONDERING HARLEY HERITAGE LETTERS SNAPS WIDGETS CYCLEMART AD INDEX MEMORIES

124 OSCAR RAYBURN

18 20 22 26 28 30 126 138 158 160 162

54 2016 H-D XL1200CX

ROADSTER CX in the city, a roadster for the road 122 AGV SPORT

10 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

COMPASS JACKET A blend of leather and textile AIMag.com


T O P O F F.

AMERICAN MADE LUBRICANTS Sourced from American crude, blended and bottled in America. Specially formulated for American V-Twins. Meets or exceeds all O.E.M. speciďŹ cations.

twi n power-u sa .co m


Contents

54 2016 H-D

XL1200CX Roadster

Page 36

Page 102

Page 112

Page 120

102 YELVINGTON

 HANDBOOK

92 METZLER

128 IT’S ALIVE!

REVERSE All the magic happens in the new rear wheel pulley, no transmission modifications needed

62 JAMES DEAN TOUR

In search of a giant legend

TIRE TEST The ME 888 Marathon Ultra is an outstanding tire!

76 AN ANCIENT

AWAKENING Sweet, visceral sounds rumble through Rome

112 HEADWINDS

LED BULB This simple headlight bulb swap will greatly increase your ability to see the road and any road hazards while riding at night

Making motorcycles rumble on canvas  CLASSIC AMERICAN IRON

98 BOARDTRACK

RACER BRITTNEY OLSEN 20th Century racing torchbearer brazenly battles the boys on mission to preserve American racing history

152 1959 H-D

SPORTSTER XLCH More than just a Harley — it’s a Sportster!

120 HOG HELPLINE:

FAILING BRAKES & ELECTRONIC COMPASS PROBLEMS 80 Bird’s The Word 152 1959 H-D

Sportster XLCH

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12 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

COMMUNICATIONS INC.

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WE SHIP TODAY!

OV E R

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DISCLAIMER: The California Air Resources Board (“CARB”) does not permit the use of aftermarket emission-related part(s) that alter the performance of OEM emission-related devices unless CARB has issued an Executive Order, other than on racing vehicles on closed courses. Check your local laws and manufacturer’s information.

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E DITOR -I N -C HIEF Buzz Kanter E DITOR Steve Lita SteveL@AmericanIronMag.com A RT D IRECTOR Charles W. Queener A SSOCIATE E DITOR Tyler Greenblatt A SSISTANT E DITOR Stephen Long C LASSICS E DITOR Jim Babchak W OMEN ’S POV E DITOR Cris Sommer Simmons O NLINE M ANAGER Matt Kopec O NLINE E DITOR Bryan Harley C OPY E DITOR Keith Blair Powell D ESIGNERS Matt Kopec Tricia Szulewski C ONTRIBUTING Jim Babchak, Giuseppe WRITERS Cucinotta, Sabina D’Oro, M.F. Egan, Eric Ellis, Rick Fairless, Dain Gingerelli, Chris Maida, Donny Petersen, Greg Williams, Steven Wyman-Blackburn C ONTRIBUTING Sabina D’Oro, Kevin Eilbeck, P HOTOGRAPHERS Makoto Endo, Dain Gingerelli, Elayne Maida, Chris Maida, Dino Petrocelli, Pam Proctor, Mark Velazquez SUBMISSIONS: AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE welcomes unsolicited material, but cannot be held responsible for its return unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. All submissions are subject to editing. All letters will be considered as unconditionally assigned for publication and are subject to editing. PERMISSIONS: Material printed in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without written permission. Requests should be directed to Buzz Kanter. AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE is published by TAM Communications Inc., 1010 Summer Street, Stamford, CT 06905, 203/425-8777, FAX 203/425-8775, AIMag.com. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A.

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A DV E RT I S I N G D E PA RT M E N T 203/425-8777 • FAX 203/325-2254 ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Terry O’Brien 203/425-8777, ext. 112 TerryO@TAMcommunications.com

Ken McCurdy 203/425-8777, ext. 108 KenM@TAMcommunications.com

ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Nicole Hart 203/425-8777, ext. 116 NicoleH@AmericanIronMag.com

COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

P R E S I D E N T /P U B L I S H E R Buzz Kanter S E N I O R V I C E P R E S I D E N T / Gail Kanter ASSOCIATE PU B L I S H E R C H I E F O P E R A T I N G O F F I C E R Terry O’Brien C H I E F F I N A N C I A L O F F I C E R Frank Thiel C R E A T I V E D I R E C T O R Charles W. Queener S E N I O R S T A F F A C C O U N T A N T Claudia Garavito S T A F F A C C O U N T A N T Kathy Greco A D M I N I S T R A T I V E Rosemary Cafarelli ASSISTANT This magazine is published with the understanding that the information presented is compiled from many sources and that there is no warranty or responsibility on the part of TAM Communications Inc., the publisher, staff, or contributors of American Iron Magazine as to the legality, completeness, or accuracy of said information.

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SHIFTING GEARS

DIY Tech & Kickstart Motorcycles George could do it faster, but he wanted to share all he knew

More American Iron WHEN AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE FIRST

appeared in 1989, it was created to offer something of everything of interest to Harley riders and be family friendly. The overall quality of content, design, and even paper was higher than most other Harley-oriented magazines at the time, and we still work hard to offer you the best possible package. We tried different approaches over the years. Some were quite popular, and others weren’t. Using this trial and error approach, while paying attention to what our readers and industry leaders tell us, we continue to fine-tune the mix of articles and subjects. The popular blend includes reviews of new bikes and products, tech and DIY, feature and classic bikes, tours and events, and a few quirky and unexpected articles. Over the years we have recognized a

18 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

large and growing audience of Do It Yourselfers (DIY) who enjoy wrenching on their rides. It might be to better understand them, personalize them, or just to save a few bucks. For these people, we can never offer too many tech, install, and DIY articles in any one issue of American Iron Magazine. With that in mind, a few years ago we created an all-tech special newsstand issue called American Iron Garage. It was so popular that we increased it to two issues a year, then up to three issues last year. Now, we are increasing American Iron Garage to six issues a year and offering subscriptions for those who can’t find the magazine locally or just love a great deal. And, yes, we will continue to offer great tech and DIY here in American Iron Magazine, too. To subscribe to our all-tech and DIY American Iron Garage in print (only $19.97 a year in US print or digital worldwide) call 877/204-0774 or sign up at www.aimag.com. For a digital subscription, please go to AIMag.com. Motorcycle Kickstart Classic Ride IF YOU LOVE OLD MOTORCYCLES OR

are just looking for a fun group of motorcycle enthusiasts to ride with, our Motorcycle Kickstart Classic ride will meet up at Wheels Through Time in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, on Thursday, July 28. We will have a number of local rides around the greater Maggie Valley area Friday, July 29. We then ride as a group over to Chesnee, South Carolina, on Saturday, July 30, for a fun-filled day with the local AMCA (Antique Motorcycle Club of America) Legends Chapter. It’s up to each rider if he wants to stay

in Chesnee for the night or ride back to Wheels Through Time. You are running out of time to preregister, which you can do online at AIMag.com or by calling Rosemary at 203/425-8777 x114 with a credit card. RIP George Yarocki IT IS WITH DEEP SADNESS THAT I MUST

say good-bye to my old friend and motorcycle mentor, George Yarocki. Everyone who met 88-year-old George quickly warmed up to this kind, humble, and generous gentleman. George loved old motorcycles and old machinery in general, but his deepest passion was for the short-lived (1928-31) Indian 101 Scout. George was never one to withhold hard-to-find knowledge. He was an amazing source of motorcycle information and mechanical understanding. He insisted owners work on their own bikes at Ft. Yarocki, with him looking on, providing advice and encouragement. I did this with my 1931 Indian 101 Scout more than once. George could have done the jobs faster, but he wanted to share all he knew so that it would carry through the years and generations and not be lost with his passing. We will miss George. He was one in a million. Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

BUZZ KANTER Publisher/Editor-In-Chief, American Iron Magazine Buzz Kanter

@BuzzKanter AIMag.com


RIDE TO WORK

Misunderstood I’m not going to stop riding just because someone doesn’t “get it”

APPENS ALL THE TIME. WE

H

motorcyclists should be used to it, but, honestly, it’s hard to get used to. Riders in America are inherently misunderstood. It could be by family members, co-workers, complete strangers, or even professional comics. I’ll get back to that in a minute. How does the saying go? You can pick your friends, but you can’t pick your family. Yeah, I think that’s it. I was the first in my clan to find my way onto two wheels. My dad, a WWII vet told many tales of the military machinery, but, he was infantry, not a motorcycle soldier. And when I showed up with a modern motorcycle, he was kind of a cross between worried and psyched. He kept asking “when was I gonna bolt a sidecar on that thing,” so I could take him for a ride. And we had fun and joked about it. But, in general, my riding passion was not quickly or easily taken to by my family. So I

20 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

didn’t pick up my motorcycling interest from my family, but from guys I hung around with. I became a Motorcycle Safety Foundation instructor over 13 years ago. And I even see a level of misunderstanding from newbie students. Not just in the mechanics of how to make the machine go (and stop and turn), but also in the inherent risk and responsibility that comes with riding. There’s so much more to motorcycling than reading some instructions in a book and practicing to ride around in a parking lot. Hopefully some of the students that make it through the class get more than a glimpse of what really goes on inside the helmet when riding. A few weeks ago I went to a comedy club with 12 family members and friends. The food was okay, but the service was weak. The second act was doing okay, when his jokes surprisingly turned to a motorcycle related thread. He asked how many people in the audience rode a motorcycle. I swear, I think I heard crickets. Well, he figured he’d continue down this road and went into a couple jokes about “the biker wave” and a funny bit about riding bitch on his buddy’s bike. He didn’t beat a dead horse, and his delivery was okay. I think the audience got a kick out of it and he moved on to the next series of jokes, ridiculing celebrities or politicians. Easy targets there. After the show I got a chance to meet the comic, and I asked him, “Do you ride?” He said, “No, but I’d like to.” And I thought, well maybe your jokes would be funnier if you were

one of us, if you understood us. Surfing motorcycle websites and social media, it sometimes appears like we bikers misunderstand ourselves and each other. This group doesn’t like that group. You’re not cool unless you ride bikes I like. You don’t ride as fast as me, so you’re not a good rider. And look at all my scars, I’m way cooler than you. (Hmmm, those last two go together quite well.) I see it in letters we get from readers: I like my bike, you should put my bike on the cover every month. I don’t like that otherbrand of bikes, and you ran one last month, so I hate you, and I’m gonna threaten you and cancel my subscription. Not much understanding going on there. Now I’m not going to stop riding just because someone doesn’t “get it.” I do it for me. I actually kind of like the fact that not everyone is able to do this thing that we do: riding. It’s not commonplace. And it’s definitely not boring. But how can we expect other motorists, the community, the authorities, and those who are close to us understand and accept us, if we don’t respect and accept each other? And maybe if that comedian I met was one of us, he’d surely have lots of new material.

Steve Lita Editor Steve Lita AIMag.com


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QUOTED & NOTED

American Iron Garage CAN’T GET ENOUGH HOW-TO TECH AND home-built customs? Then pick up a copy of our sister publication, American Iron Garage, which hits newsstands on August 2nd! In addition to DIY tech and reader-built customs, AIG also features in-depth tool and mechanical theory articles, as well as maintenance pieces, shop product reviews, hot new products, and our newest feature, My Garage. My Garage showcases one lucky reader’s home shop/garage, and the entry we choose for publication will receive a free “Wrench This” T-shirt from Greaserag.com! To submit your garage, or home-built custom motorcycle, send pictures to Garage@AmericanIronMagazine.com. Copies of American Iron Garage can also be purchased at Greaserag.com.

The Dream Ride Experience 2016 FROM AUGUST 20-26, MOTORCYCLISTS WILL embark on a 2,000-mile odyssey from Florida to Connecticut. We invite you to come and celebrate the achievements of Special Olympics athletes and enjoy some of the most highly heralded roads and spectacular scenery nature has to offer. The Dream Ride will not only give you an appreciation of the beauty of the open road but will leave you with an unbelievable feeling of giving back to those in need. Join us as we meet and greet Special Olympics Athletes along the way. See the athletes in person as they welcome the rally riders with open arms, heartfelt hugs, and endless smiles. The ride gets started at the PGA National Resort and Spa in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, and will go on for seven uninterrupted days — rain or shine! To make an extraordinary experience even better, on August 28, we will host and judge a bike show at the Farmington (Connecticut), Polo Club, to continue our support of the Special Olympics. For more information, contact Karen DeAngelis at kdeangelis@bozzutos.com or 203-250-5112.

22 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

2016 Kickstart Classic YOU MIGHT WANT TO START STRETCHING NOW because the 2016 Motorcycle Kickstart Classic is right around the corner. Come join us at Wheels Through Time museum in Maggie Valley, North Carolina, on July 28 and 29 for two days of riding the Blue Ridge area with fellow vintage motorcycle enthusiasts. Our first riding day will be in and around Maggie Valley, and on day two we’ll be hauling our old iron down to Chesnee, South Carolina, to join the AMCA’s Legends Chapter and Antique Motorcycles on Main Street. All years and brands of two- and threewheelers are welcome to ride, although we ask that those equipped with kickstarters be allowed to lead the pack. We need the new bikes to pick up parts as they fall off the old ones! And to keep these geezers in running order, Spectro is the official oil of this event. For the most up to date information, visit AIMag.com and follow us on Facebook.

Rock, Rumble & Rebellion Tour THE ROCK, RUMBLE & REBELLION TOUR OFFICIALLY KICKED OFF AT DAYTONA Bike Week with Kuryakyn unveiling the Sturgis Buffalo Chip 35th anniversary Harley-Davidson Road Glide and Epiphone Sheraton II guitar. The stunning bike and guitar will be displayed at the Buffalo Chip throughout the 35th anniversary celebration to be held August 1-14. At the culmination of the Rock, Rumble & Rebellion bash, the one-off commemorative bagger and matching six-string will be up for private sale. Kuryakyn collaborated with renowned custom shop Gilby’s Street Department in River Falls, Wisconsin, to craft a paint scheme that embodies the natural rhythm and artistry behind music in order to bring the Rock, Rumble & Rebellion theme to life. The horsepower is supplied courtesy of Crusher, Kuryakyn’s Performance Division. Check out behind the scenes footage at www.kuryakyn.com/c/rockrumblerebellion. AIMag.com


QUOTED & NOTED

Sturgis Mayor’s Ride

Klocked AWARD WINNING DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKER MICHELLE BAUER Carpenter (Driven to Ride, Above the Ashes) presents her new feature documentary Klocked: Women with Horsepower. Klocked focuses on motorcycle land speed record holders Laura Klock and her two daughters, Erika and Karlee Cobb. In 2006, Laura gained attention in the motorcycle community by setting a national land speed record of 143.659 mph. In 2008, Laura and her daughters became the first mother-daughterdaughter trio in land speed racing history to set records at the same time. The trio has been setting records ever since and have been named some of the most influential women in land speed racing. Through moving and candid interviews, the film takes us into the lives of the women, revealing the strength of their relationship, the love and rivalry between two sisters, and explores Laura’s nonprofit, Helping with Horsepower, dedicated to helping at-risk youth. For more information, check out Klocked.us.

Motors And Music KEEP STURGIS ROCKing by checking out the killer musical acts that the Buffalo Chip has lined up to headline the festival. Starting with Willie Nelson on August 5, you’ll also be treated to 3 Doors Down, Kid Rock, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Miranda Lambert, and comedic tour de force “Weird Al” Yankovic. Check out BuffaloChip.com for even more announcements nearer to the event.

STURGIS CREPT UP ON us quickly, but fear not; we’ve got some of the main events you must fit into your schedule. The City of Riders Mayor’s Ride kicks things off on August 8 at 9 am, a ride benefiting the Sturgis volunteer fire department, Sturgis police reserves, and the Sturgis ambulance service. On August 9, the first annual Good Ride will be led by Carey Hart at 8 am. His new charity ride benefits the Sturgis Brown High School welding class. Head over to GoodRideRally.com to learn more about the charity ride (limited to 125 riders).

Biker Belles Celebration

Michael Lichter Back With Motorcycles As Art Exhibit

ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 9, FROM 8:30 A.M. TO 2 P.M., you’re invited to join the 8th annual Sturgis Buffalo Chip Biker Belles Celebration, a guided ride through the beautiful Black Hills and a day of festivities at The Lodge at Deadwood. The event celebrates women in riding and supports organizations benefitting women’s causes. For the first time ever, the Biker Belles ride will start in the morning at the Buffalo Chip and end at The Lodge at Deadwood. The purpose of this event is to raise funds for local charities that would be of particular interest to these very women. This charity event has been raising monies for worthy causes since its inception in 2009. Your contribution in 2016 will help the Biker Belles continue its mission of charitable giving.

MICHAEL LICHTER’S annual exhibit Motorcycles as Art will be back, allowing you to explore dozens of unique custom bikes paired with corresponding two-dimensional artwork. Lichter curated motorcycle art exhibits for 15 years, with this being his fifth year as head of the Buffalo Chip’s Motorcycles as Art. He has also helped garner the exhibit worldwide renown. The free display will be set up at the Buffalo Chip’s Russ Brown Event Center. AIM

24 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


S C R AT C H I N G & W O N D E R I N G • by Rick “Fearless” Fairless

Flashback to 1987 And My First Sturgis … it’s cool, because we are talking about something we love, custom motorcycles!

EY, YA’LL, THIS YEAR WILL BE

H

my 30th consecutive pilgrimage to the Black Hills! The first year I went was 1987, and I haven’t missed a year since. That first year, I had no idea what to expect, but for some reason I felt a strong urge to go to Sturgis, and I’ve gone every year since. I didn’t have a place to stay, and I didn’t know anybody else going, so I just “poor boy’ed” it and had an extremely large time! When I went up in 1987, I rode my 1965 Panhead and prayed it would hold together all week. For the most part it ran great — ok, it ran good. It ran decently considering the altitude difference between Dallas and the Black Hills. Aside from a few carburetor adjustments and a couple of smoked wires, I was good to go; I promise you I didn’t have to push my Pan no farther than a mile or two. That first year was special, and I

26 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

still remember the overwhelming feelings I experienced that year. Obviously, my first trip down Main Street in Sturgis was unbelievable. I had never seen so many bikes in one place before. There were bikes from all over the country and even some from around the world. All kinds of bikes: some crazy customs and many “rat” bikes to the like that I had never seen before. I thought I was pretty seasoned on custom bikes and had pretty much seen everything out there. Boy, was I wrong! I saw stuff that would make women folk cry and make the men nervous! Lots of beautiful customs with crazy paint, and you know that I know crazy paint! Want to know by far the coolest thing that happened to me during my first Sturgis? Check this out: I was standing in front of the 2 Wheelers shop on Main Street (Hey, Fatland), and somebody said, “Hey, nice shirt.” I looked down at my shirt, an Arlen Ness T-shirt, and looked up to see Arlen Ness himself. I thought I was gonna teetee myself! I was starstruck and didn’t know what to say, but I’m sure Arlen was used to that, even way back then. He asked me where I was from, and I told him Dallas, Texas. He told me that he sold a lot of parts in Dallas, and I told him that most of those parts were probably bought from me! Well, fast-forward 30 years, and I am proud to say that Arlen and his family are really good friends of mine. If you have never met Arlen, you’re missing out on something special, really special! He is truly a god among mortal men! I get goose bumps just recalling that first meeting and how I felt! Hey, write this down in 3" letters so you don’t forget: “Rick Fairless

loves Arlen Ness and everything he has done for the motorcycle industry!” ‘Nuff said about that! As far as rallies go, the Black Hills Rally is the best, but I believe it’s the best because of the beauty and tranquility of the Black Hills. I have ridden those hills with friends that are now riding in Heaven, and I think about them every time I ride those beautiful roads. Some years, I have a display and I “work” while at the Sturgis Rally. I’ve had many different displays in several different parts of the Black Hills. For a couple of years, we had a display at Thunder Road, which is across the street from the Full Throttle Saloon just outside of town. When I say work, brother, I ain’t kidding! For some reason, if I work less than 16 hours a day, 8 days a week, I feel like I’m cheating the company. So working the Sturgis Rally for me means getting to my display before sunup and leaving way after dark. It’s standing on my feet talking to literally thousands of people all day. Long days and nights, but it’s cool, because we are talking about something we love, custom motorcycles! The cool part is that everybody loves his own motorcycle and everybody is always looking to further customize it. The guy with an old Ironhead is as proud of his bike as the cat with a new CVO! And that’s the way it should be. So, as you’re reading this issue of AIM, it’s that magical time of the year when all bikes are beckoned home. Whether you’ve never been there before or, like me, you’ve been there 30 times, the Black Hills of South Dakota is home whether you realize it yet or not! AIM AIMag.com


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H A R L E Y H E R I TA G E • by Jim Babchak

The Black Hills Classic, Sturgis

ACH YEAR, THE MOTORCYCLE

E

world descends on the sleepy little town of Sturgis, South Dakota, and swells its population from roughly 6,000 inhabitants to half a million folks or more in celebration of the two-wheeled motorcycle lifestyle. Folks come from around the globe to partake of this annual ritual, this year designating the 76th anniversary year of the rally. It all began August 14, 1938, under the auspices of the AMA’s Jack Pine Gypsies Motorcycle Club in conjunction with Clarence “Pappy” Hoel, the local Indian Motorcycle dealer in Sturgis at the time. Called The Black Hills Classic, the event originated as a single race; through the years, it has expanded to include a hillclimb, motocross, 1/2-mile short track races, motorcycle stunts, manufacturer demos and demo rides, a bike show with judges and prizes, the mayor’s parade/ride, live concerts, and an opportunity for the faithful to come together, see old friends, make new ones, hang out with fellow enthusiasts,

28 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

compare bikes, attend the Sturgis Drags, and ride through some of the most scenic drives in the country. A ride to Mount Rushmore, a must-see monument dedicated to our four greatest presidents, Custer State Park, and the Black Hills National Forest all add up to some spectacular rides through the Old West. Sturgis has been a continuous event, save for the World War II years when most young men were off serving their country; last year’s 75th anniversary rally had an estimated 720,000 participants. Wow, that’s a lot of folks in one place at one time! It is estimated that $800 million flows into the area annually, so it is the cornerstone of the economy. Walk around Sturgis in any given year and you will notice that 98 percent of all motorcycles at the rally are HarleyDavidsons. “For decades, HarleyDavidson has been the motorcycle of choice for Sturgis Motorcycle Rally fans and a great partner to the City of Sturgis,” said Sturgis Mayor Mark Carstensen. With that in mind, last year the City of Sturgis and Harley Davidson decided to enter into a long-term relationship, cementing their partnership for the next 75 years. “Today it gives me great pleasure to solidify its importance by making Harley-Davidson the official motorcycle of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally,” said Mayor Carstensen. The H-D press release stated “Harley-Davidson and the City of

Sturgis, S.D., are setting their sights on the future — far into the future. In the spirit of the 75th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, the company and city officials are finalizing an agreement covering the next 75 years making Harley-Davidson the official motorcycle of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.” “Harley-Davidson riders have attended the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally for decades. This new agreement will help fuel many more years of freedom, independence, and rebellion for this iconic gathering,” said Matt Levatich, president and chief operating officer at Harley-Davidson. “Riding is a passion passed down through generations, so it’s important we celebrate the legacy and history of Harley-Davidson in Sturgis, while helping creating new memories.” As part of the agreement, a permanent plaza was built on Main Street in Sturgis that includes a stage for events, concerts, and even weddings. The year-round location, completed in time for the 75th rally, is the official HarleyDavidson destination for riders and fans alike. Many films and TV shows have used Sturgis as the background or destination in their story lines. I know here at the History channel (where I work) we have filmed episodes for American Pickers, Pawn Stars, American Restoration and others, and no matter how many shows I’ve seen about Sturgis, I’m always looking for more — it’s that exciting of a venue and that exciting of a happening! If you’ve not been, this year’s Black Hills Classic is August 8-14, and it promises to be another outstanding year. So, break out the old road atlas, a highlighter, and a beer, and plot a course to one of the greatest events of all time. Join the action and adventure this rally holds in store for you. You’ll be glad you did! AIM AIMag.com

IMAGE COURTESY HARLEY-DAVIDSON ARCHIVES

… break out the old road atlas, a highlighter, and a beer, and plot a course to one of the greatest events of all time


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L E T T E R S • Letters@AmericanIronMag.com

WORTHY OF A CLASSIC? Buzz, it was great to see the inclusion of the FXR on your list of American classics. Here’s my 1987 Low Rider Custom. I believe the colors are Brandywine and Crimson. I’ve owned it since 2005, when I purchased it from my cousin. He improved the breathing with Screamin’ Eagle heads, EV-27 cam, Mikuni carb, and Vance & Hines Pro pipes, all done by House of Harley-Davidson in Milwaukee. I’ve added some cosmetics including a Badlander seat, Deuce turn signals, forward controls, and lowered the rear with Progressive shocks. It still runs great and is a real gas to ride. RICH SIEG Fargo, ND

TWO SCORE AND SIX YEARS …

This is me riding my 1994 Road King in Wisconsin on the way to Sturgis.

The Road King features a Reckless Motorcycles audio fairing, chromed stock wheels and front end, LePera Silhouette seat, 10" Demon Cycle apes, and all chrome controls. It also features a Primo Rivera six-speed OD transmission for highway comfort. The picture shows the Evolution 80" with EV-46 cam and Edelbrock heads, although I have recently installed a 113 Ultima El Bruto. I have ridden, quite literally, millions of miles in the last 46 years. CHRIS LACEY Hamilton, ON, Canada

We welcome letters on any subject, whether we agree with the writers or not. Electronic letters, both with and without photos, can be e-mailed to Letters@AmericanIronMag.com. Photos should be high-resolution, JPEG images (at least 300 dpi at 4" x 6"). Please also include your name, address, and a brief description of each photo. And although we reserve the right to edit, shorten, or change your letters so they make no sense at all, we do promise not to mess with your images. That means no phony mustaches, tutus, etc. (However, we may slip an issue of American Iron Magazine into the photo somewhere.) AIMag.com


MIDLIFE CONTROL This is my 2013

FLTRX. I did all the work in my garage with some basic hand tools,

to the American food supply and how carefully the secrets of it are so protected. In an episode of Six Feet Under, a biker had died, and the wife of the deceased gave the bike away to the funeral home. Her comment about motorcycling was “Closest thing to flying without leaving the ground.” I have always thought it was a very appropriate statement. Thanks for the mag. It’s a great one! CHUCK POLER Via Internet

AN AMERICAN DREAM After a

except the paint. All I wanted to do was change the pinstripe, and the entire project just snowballed from there. Some might say I’m having a midlife crisis (ha!) — what do they know? BART MATSON Via Internet

REFLECTIONS This is Charles Vaughn

staring his 2013 FLD in the eye. CHRIS WILSON Via Internet

lifelong longing for it, I finally started riding a couple years ago, at the age of 44. My family came to this country in 1981 (during the era of Harley’s revival) from Sicily dirt-poor and looking for a better life. Bandanas and jean jackets were very cool at that time, let alone straddling a Harley. I always dreamed of owning one someday. Your magazine encompasses the cool factor of Harley-Davidson in a very nostalgic way. Although I have become very successful (in my own terms, I guess) as a financial advisor, I really didn’t appreciate the fruits of such labor as much as when I finally purchased my first Harley (a couple of years ago). I knew then that I had finally completed

32 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

• On Line: AIMag.com • Address Letters For Publication Letters, American Iron Magazine, 1010 Summer St., Stamford, CT 06905. Fax 203/425-8775. E-mail Letters@AmericanIronMag.com. Include name and address. Letters may be edited. • Subscription Services Write to American Iron Magazine, Subscription Services, PO Box 3000, Denville, NJ 07834. E-mail custsvc_ameriron@fulcoinc.com. • Back Issues Back Issues, American Iron Magazine, 1010 Summer St., Stamford, CT 06905. Call 203/425-8777, fax 203/425-8775, or Buy directly from GreaseRag.com. • Reprints & Permissions Publisher, American Iron Magazine, 1010 Summer St., Stamford, CT 06905. Fax 203/425-8775. • Privacy Policy American Iron Magazine may allow others to use its mailing list. If you do not want your name included, please contact Subscription Services by mail, e-mail, or fax. • Advertising Call 203/425-8777.

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ARMED WITH INFORMATION

Jeff Hennie, your article was decisive and accurate, but you should view a documentary regarding the 17 percent of the 2013-14 US corn crop that fed livestock. You might want to watch a 2013 documentary titled GMO OMG (it can be seen on Netflix) regarding corn producing and the power of protected patents. GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) should cause great concern about what we eat; that is, until it comes to a point that the information is protected by outlandish laws and rules. As for ethanol in our gasoline, that crap sucks. But what the American public does not understand is its harm

READER SERVICES

If your copy has a significant production flaw send it to us within six months of the on-sale date. We will replace it and give you a FREE 1-year subscription (or extension). Send your defective magazine with your name and address to: my journey. I now have the best wife, the best son, the best career, and the best bike anyone could ever hope for. MARK LUCHESA Dayton, PA

American Iron Magazine, 1010 Summer St. Stamford, CT 06905 AIMag.com


ABOUT TIME I promised myself

back in 1995 that I would own a Harley before I was 50. I was then 31,

and now I’m 51. I bought my first bike last July, and, yes, it’s a Harley! It’s a 2013 883 Sportster XL. All I can say is that I love it! The ride, the sound, and the "breeze therapy"! Nothing like it. Thanks for the great magazine, it’s a great complement to my bike. Extremely helpful, just awesome. Keep up the great work! JESSE HUNT Mt. Olive, NC

HOT ROD HARLEY? Love the organ

donor bike (issue #336). I always loved fast Harleys and the pro-stock look over bling and chrome. Also love that it’s street legal, although I don’t see any turns. At 139" and short pipes, it has to sound ridiculous, too. Props to Mr. Baker. If he hasn’t already, he may want to consider some wheelie bars. The author explains that Bert always wanted to build a hot rod Harley. However, I see a S&S engine with a Baker drivetrain on an aftermarket frame and custom parts. Now, I do see a few H-D goodies sprinkled about: my all-time favorite Sporty tank, a wheel here, a caliper there. Does that make it eligible? I only poke fun due to the fact that for most of my riding life I have eaten the infamous “that’s not a real H-D” rhetoric: from the Ironhead Sportster (in fact, all AMFs at the time) to the FXR and the V-Rod. Curiously enough, the statements have come from someone on a completely aftermarket custom H-D! All that remains OEM is the title! Not at all implicating Mr. Baker, this article just had me reminiscing. But I would love to have this phenomena explained to me before I croak. B.T. Via Internet

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME Here’s my 60th birthday present to myself: a AIMag.com


2013 Road King CVO, fresh off the showroom floor. My wife also took me to Milwaukee to tour the H-D Museum and Harley plant. Now I’m 63, and the bike already has 21,000 miles on it. Still hitting the open road with friends! TOM PTAK Milledgeville, GA

ROADSIDE FIRST AID Thanks for your article in Issue #336 by Allan McCarthy on roadside first aid. It may help keep an injured biker alive. I do have one question, though. The article discusses treatment using an ABCSS protocol, meaning dealing with breathing before bleeding. In my various first aid courses, including Battlefield First Aid during my Army training (many decades ago), we were taught to address bleeding before breathing. The reasoning is that applying a dressing or a tourniquet to stop bleeding takes only seconds while dealing with breathing takes minutes. A victim could bleed out while an aid provider is working hard to get him/her breathing again. Can Mr. McCarthy comment about this?

People who take our class know that during their rapid assessment on an unconscious person, they should address severe bleeding first if they are able to apply a tourniquet to a limb. Then they can quickly address breathing. Outside of limbs, massive bleeding is both difficult to control and often internal, which is nearly impossible in the field to do anything about other than treat for shock.” Training is key. Both ABCSS and MARCH emphasize rapid assessment. If trained well, the first responder can, according to Vicki, “triage and prioritize” quickly and identify the best treatment steps in a given situation. Vicki also noted: “We are training bystanders in a one-day course. There is a limit to how much that can be taught in a general community class in just one day. Giving students clear simple instructions that are easy to understand builds confidence to act in a stressful situation.” — Allan McCarthy

34 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

As I’m sitting here at work reading your magazine, I was hoping that

Ruby might make it into Letters. She is a strong, reliable, and beautiful 2003 Road King. Last week, after a ride down to the beach, I promised her something special, and I think appearing in the magazine might be it. Make my old gal happy. MATTHEW ROPER Via Internet

STREET ATTITUDE In the late ’90s, I emailed a tech question in to AIM. Not only was the question and answer

REBIRTH Here is my 2007 Street Bob

in 2010, on beautiful Capistrano Beach, California. I bought it for $9,000 from a

couple who needed the money to pay for their soon-to-be-born child. It was completely stock, and I decided right away I did not want a blacked-out look. I really wanted a nice balance between black and chrome and as old school as possible. The pipes are 2-into-2 Vance & Hines, the rear fender was chopped, the stock rear lights were slammed in, and the saddle was swapped out for a brown leather one from the Harley catalog. Thanks for the wonderful mag every month!

printed in your mag, but I also received an e-mail response from none other than Buzz. Wow, that personal effort really earned my respect. I’ve been a loyal subscriber ever since. Thought I’d show you my fun toy I named Attitude, a 2006 Dyna Street Bob that my wife, Connie, surprised me with for Christmas in 2005. By mid-January, when it was just broken in, I had the big-bore kit installed along with a Thunderheader, cam, air cleaner, and Screamin’ Eagle race tuner to give it some more giddyup. Break in all over again. Shortly after, I put on drag bars and lost a lot of shiny bits back when chrome was still what everybody else was doing. I scored the bikini fairing for $10 and thought it gave it a hot rod look. Now I see H-D has released a black Low Rider that looks a lot like ‘Tude (copycats!). This bike is a thrill to ride. Looking forward to another decade or three of AIM!

STEVE MOORE Dana Point, CA

JIM HUNTER Ogden, UT AIM

CLIFF TERRY Koror, Republic of Palau

ABCSS (Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Shock, Spinal Motion Restriction) is the treatment protocol used by Accident Scene Management (ASM) in its training. I believe Cliff is referring to the MARCH treatment protocol (Massive Bleeding, Airway, Respiration, Circulation, Hypothermia) that is used by the military and a number of other organizations. Here is Vicki Sanfelipo’s (RN/EMT) response, Executive Director ASM/Road Guardians (Bystander Assistance Programs): “After much discussion, our team of professionals decided to use ABCSS as our approach to trauma. We teach participants to do a rapid assessment —which always starts with determining consciousness. If the accident victim is conscious and he’s breathing, skip right to bleeding!

RUBY, YOU’RE LIKE A DREAM

AIMag.com


H O W I T W O R K S • by M.F. Egan

Is Your Engine Tattooed? Part I: Here’s how to tell if a pre-1981 Harley engine has had its VIN altered

Editor’s note: We ran this two-part series a number of years ago but figured it was time to run it again as a guide for someone looking to buy a basket case bike, as per the How It Works in Issue #337. HAT A PREPOSTEROUS IDEA! NOBODY tattoos a motorcycle, right? You tattoo skin. Hey, I got your attention, didn’t I? Yes, people do tattoo motorcycles. In the Biker Vernacular Dictionary, tattoo means to illegally alter, modify, or change the vehicle identification number (VIN) on a vehicle (motorcycle) to make it appear legitimate and qualify for licensing and sale. Today, altering a VIN (engine number) is a criminal offense and, in most jurisdictions, is associated with felony auto/motorcycle theft. When a motorcycle is reported stolen its VIN goes on a National Hot Sheet that’s available to all police and licensing authorities. Effectively, that VIN cannot be used to transfer ownership or for license renewal until the stolen motorcycle is recovered and the VIN restored. The VIN on the motorcycle matches the VIN on the title/registration so a quick verification beyond the license plate can be made by the police when a vehicle is pulled over to verify its legal status. The stolen bike is more valuable together than in parts so the thief considers renumbering the engine with a clean number. He makes up a number, checks that it’s not on the hot sheet, and then applies for a lost title using the new number. Most DMV officials today want to see the motorcycle and

W

As you can see on this 1968 XLH, the engine number is on a raised boss that’s the same color and texture as the rest of the crankcase. Note the style of the pre1970 letters and numbers.

have an inspector verify the VIN. Now he (the fraudulent thief) has a title with a good engine number that needs to be transferred onto the stolen machine in order to make it saleable. The paperwork process to legitimize a stolen bike can be very entailed and time-consuming, so a lot of bike thieves avoid that hassle by dismantling the motorcycle and selling the parts cheaply to turn a quick profit. When the cost of goods sold is zero, all the money that comes in is profit. However, sometimes a guy (fence) buying the hot engine may take the time to alter the VIN and thus turn a bigger profit because the engine can then be put in another stolen chassis and resold quickly. The thief and fence usually have a number and letter stamp set that are close in size and shape to the factory’s original-style numbers used on the genuine machine. It’s then just a matter of removing the stolen machine’s VIN from the crankcase boss and restamping the counterfeit replacement number in its place. Actual tattooing techniques run all over the block from sloppy to very sophisticated. The sloppily altered restamps are the most obvious, if you know where to look and what to look for. The sophisticated altered number tattoos may take an expert or professional law officer specializing in VINs to detect the counterfeit. The two important points are that today altering a VIN is illegal, and tattooed VINs come in different levels of sophistication. Altered Means Hot? IT’S IMPORTANT TO CLARIFY THAT ALL altered numbers do not necessarily mean that the motorcycle was stolen. Until the early 1960s, the military motor transport mechanics and some Harley dealers altered engine numbers as part of an engine rebuild business practice.

36 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


HOW IT WORKS

Restamping the legitimate VIN on a replacement engine avoided paperwork and lengthy title change procedures. The dealer rebuilt used engines from wrecked or dismantled machines when business was slow in the winter and put them on the shelf. A customer would come in with a blown engine looking for a replacement. The dealer would take a rebuilt engine, number stamp it with the blown one’s engine number and install it in the customer’s bike. Down the road went the happy customer. To add to this unorthodox policy, some states’ licensing departments restamped their own version of a number on the engine boss during the licensing process. Years later, the dealer- or DMV-altered engine number might be discovered during an inspection by police auto theft details, enforcing altered number laws, and be subject to impoundment. Even though the current number was not stolen and appears legitimate, the number and boss are altered and illegal by current standards. How does a state DMV handle this so as not to punish a legitimate motorcyclist? Some states reissue a title with an assigned number on a separate VIN tag that is bonded and/or riveted to the engine and frame with the questionable engine number. The state-reissued VIN cancels the altered number liability so that the motorcycle can be operated ad infinitum without worry of forfeiture. There are some bikes running around with no genuine H-D engine number as a result of a new replacement case or engine substitution during the course of its life. Red Flags BACK TO BRASS TACKS: HOW DOES A

potential buyer determine whether the VIN is good or bad? Clint Eastwood’s character in the Dirty Harry movie series clearly stated a universal philosophy: “Know your limitations.” When in doubt, get a second opinion. If you’re in the market for a Harley, you have probably developed a circle of like-minded, Harley riding acquaintances. No doubt one of them is probably going to have the capability to identify bad numbers. Recruit that party to go along to look at the bike for sale. If that’s not an option, talk to a Harley dealer or shop mechanic about looking at the potential purchase for you and offer to reimburse them for

38 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

Starting in 1970, the new engine/frame number identification system consisted of nine digits with a star-stamped outboard of each end, as illustrated by this right crankcase from a 1979 Sportster.

their time. Have him check it out thoroughly. His opinion might land you a great buy or protect you from throwing away your hard-earned money if there’s a problem with the bike. There are a lot of red flags to look for when examining a Harley for sale. Before you even look at the motorcycle, you might consider an old saying, “When buying a camel, don’t first look at the camel. Look at the camel trader.” If your dream bike is parked in the middle of dozens of new boxed television sets and VCRs in the seller’s motel room, that would be a red flag. When the seller knows less about the bike than you do, that could be considered a red flag. If there’s no puddle of Harley oil under the bike, that might be considered a red flag. When asked about the title, the seller says it’s in a safety deposit box, but he’ll give you a bill of sale until he can get the box key from his grandmother. He’s probably got a bridge to Brooklyn he’ll let you have as part of the deal. If the price is too good to be true, that’s a red flag.

If the bike passed all the aforementioned tests and you still want to consider it, then you need to look at the engine number. Where is it? On most Harley V-twin engines (pre-1969 back to the late 1920s) the engine number is on a raised boss centered in the upper left crankcase just under the center case cross bolt location. On 1970 and later Harley twins, the engine number is on the upper right side of the engine’s crankcases. Which side is the left side of a motorcycle? As you sit in the cycle’s saddle facing forward, the left side of the machine is under your left leg. What if you’ve located the engine number boss but can’t make out the number very well because the engine cases have been painted black? It’s just about a sure bet that the engine numbers are bogus. Black and olive drab green painted cases were used on WWII military-model Harleys only. Before and after that period, until the factory began powdercoating engine cases in the 1980s, black paint on crankcases was used primarily by thieves to camouflage and AIMag.com


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HOW IT WORKS

mask the altered uneven boss and the restamped numbers on stolen motorcycles. That is, unless the bike is a customized one. Then a set of powdercoated cases is not uncommon. If you want to prove this theory, ask the seller for a lacquer thinner-soaked rag to remove the paint from the number boss. If the boss is uneven or riffled with mailbox size numbers from Dooley’s Hardware, you may want to reconsider your potential purchase or get it professionally inspected before you lay out any cash. The Engine Boss LET’S TALK A LITTLE ABOUT THE ENGINE number boss. It’s a raised boss with the same color and texture as the rest of the crankcase. It does not have a machined surface making it dead flat. The area where the numbers are stamped on the boss is a soft textured surface with rounded edges. The boss will vary slightly in size from model to model, year to year. The depth of the boss will vary with the engine type and size. The boss should have smooth, rounded corners flowing into the main crankcase half. While some are cast rounder than others and some are cast very square-edged, they still harmonize with the crankcase half. The normally rectangular boss can be part of a raised relief that flows from the center of the top edge up and is used as the raised crankcase cross bolt surface face. Another style boss may have small knobs jutting out of the top edge disrupting its rectangular shape. Yet another boss is set in a dish-shaped rectangular relief with the vertical edges surrounding it like a bowl. These shape variations act as anti-altering and detection devises. If a file or mill cutter is used to cut the deck surface of the relief or raised boss to remove the genuine engine number, the tools will cut into the vertical surface of the surrounding material. This will stand out as obviously altered with new machined edges. A Numbers Game NOW THAT YOU KNOW WHERE THE

numbers should be, how do you identify them? I’m going to briefly outline two rules of thumb. From the teens to 1969, H-D used its own straightforward, standard method to label and identify the year and model, which was incorporated

40 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

The exception to the new rule is 1980s year designator as JO as shown on this 1980 Shovelhead engine case.

exclusively in the engine number. It was the only number on the motorcycle used as the vehicle identification number. There were also model number designations similar to the VIN, but usually containing additional letters. The model designation would sometimes appear on the bill of origin/title as the VIN from The Motor Company. The contradictory model on the title versus the engine number was an OEM error that took a lot of explaining before

a DMV would change and correct the title to reflect the engine number as the VIN. A few examples of this are illustrated by the chart and the paragraph right after it. The Model Chart contains all known models produced in 1958. There were 15 models offered for the entire year. Interestingly enough, there was an overlap of the racing models. The side valve continued on page 131

MODEL CHART Year 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958

Model FL FLH FLF FLHF G GA XL XLH XLC XLCH XLRTT KR KRTT ST B

Type OHV OHV Foot shift Foot shift SV SV OHV OHV OHV OHV OHV SV SV 2-cycle 2-cycle

Compression Medium High Medium High Medium Medium Medium High Medium High High High High Medium Medium

Displacement 74" 74" 74" 74" 45" 45" 55" 55" 55" 55" 55" 45" 45" 165cc 125cc

Electrical 6V 6V 6V 6V 6V 6V 6V 6V Magneto Magneto Magneto Magneto ?????? 6V 6V

VIN Prefix 58FL 58FLH 58FL 58FLH 58G 58G 58XL 58XLH 58XLC 58XLCH 58XLR 58KR 58KR 58ST 58B AIMag.com


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T E C H L I N E • by Donny Petersen

Key To Power: Head Flow Intake, combustion chamber, and exhaust air flow explained

T

HERE CAN BE NO COMBUSTION AND CONSEQUENT

power without air, lots of air. Therefore, airflow, or, more precisely, engine breathing, is key to both an efficient stock engine as well as a more performance-oriented one. There are two other ways to create power, either by using a sophisticated electronic ignition that coordinates spark timing to air/fuel delivery, or increased cubic inch displacement that creates more swept volume as the piston rises in the cylinder on the compression stroke. There are three other factors that interrelate because they deal with air delivery: flow, squish, and increased compression. All three come together with a performance cylinder head. The head may be a modified stock one or an aftermarket manufactured product. Surely, the manufactured performance head has more chance to make higher levels of power. First, head port flow must facilitate the movement of air and fuel from the carburetor/EFI into the combustion chamber. The port connects the manifold to the chamber. Obstructions must be minimized. Faster, higher volume laminar airflow delivery needs encouragement. Port shape will take advantage of principles of physics like Bernoulli’s principle, narrowing the port towards the combustion chamber to speed up airflow volume. Laminar flow gives faster delivery but does not mix the air and gas. Also, the valve seat and valve head’s contact patch are crucial to efficient airflow both into and out of the head. Secondly, inside the combustion chamber, squish turbu-

 42 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

The iconic S&S teardrop air cleaner has an elongated, built-in needle appendage (arrow), which S&S calls a stinger cone. This cone points at the middle of the induction throat from the outer breather cover.

lently mixes the fuel charge. Squish promotes a higher percentage of burn, producing more power and leaving fewer emissions as an environmental benefit. Third, increased compression without spontaneous combustion builds pressure on the incoming mixture. Sparking this burnable mixture will create more expanding heat downwards on the piston crowns during their power stroke to spin the flywheels faster. Heat and pressure are the same thing. One will create the other. Airflow (air delivery in and out) is the ultimate factor in creating power. Increasing displacement, compression, utilizing squish, and a superior ignition are all subsidiary to air delivery. If there is no air, gasoline cannot burn! The air filter and housing is, quite simply, complicated. Air delivery begins with the air filter housing and air filter. The filter must clean the incoming air without impeding its flow. The performance air filter housing shape and design features may include several variations. There may be a tuned induction; the air filter design, shape, and volume ability in combination with manifold length and shape tune to the size of the engine and performance potential. This work requires flow bench testing, dynamometer confirmation, and tweaking. This work is usually in the realm of the serious racing crowd. Then there’s ram flow induction, in which the breather arches forward into the air stream (wind) to use motorcycle riding wind velocity to force more air into the induction tract. A pleated filter made from cotton fibers is the current favorite, followed closely by synthetic media filtration. Paper and foam filters are yesterday’s technology and are not the best choices for the high-performance crowd. A wider pleated filter allows more air to traverse its layered cotton fibers. Some filters are open to air flow; the air AIMag.com


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breather housing has no sides to cover the filter pleating and only a cover plate, perhaps with a stinger cone appendage, attached by long bolts to a backing plate. The backing plate will have a built-in air horn. Other designs include a side cover over the pleated filter that has open holes for more and easier air induction. There can be an internal air horn at the outside induction (carburetor or EFI) throat. This circular berm surrounding the induction throat is built into the inner housing cover. It converts slower turbulent airflow to fast-moving laminar airflow. Often you’ll find an elongated, built-in needle appendage pointing at the middle of the induction throat from the outer breather cover. S&S calls this a stinger cone. The stinger directs air smoothly into the bore of the carburetor or EFI throttle body with reduced turbulence and resultant increased laminar airflow. Getting rid of the burned gases is complicated and exhausting. Exhaust port design is different from the intake ports, where much finessing takes place. The only goal with the exhaust is to get rid of the spent gases as fast and expeditiously as possible. There is no mixing or encouraging laminar flow as the upcoming piston (on the exhaust stroke) brutally forces the gases out the performance polished exhaust port. Spent exhaust pulses are forced out around the exhaust valve through the head’s exhaust port and into the header system to the mufflers. However, the exhaust process gets complicated very quickly. Exhaust headers and muf-

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A flathead engine has its cylinder bore (arrow) and combustion chamber off to the side of the intake and exhaust valves.

flers experience temperature changes as the exhaust gases begin cooling, starting right from the cylinder head to the muffler tip. Temperature changes create pressure differentials. Cooler and, thus, denser exhaust gases attempting to exit the muffler react to the hotter vacuous regions back up near the head. The gases traveling out of the hotter header pipes have less density. The cooler, higher density muffler gases turn back and travel up the exhaust pipes into the less dense areas. Kinetic wave exhaust gas pulses will return up and go back through the pipe many times before finally expelling out the muffler. Exhaust returns back up the pipe because of vacuums created by the aforementioned temperature changes of the gases as they proceed down the pipes. The exhaust system is a busy place, with pulses going back-and-forth thousands of times per minute (rpm), creating rolling waves (kinetic pulses) back and forth through the exhaust system before finally leaving the muffler or tailpipe. This process is exhausting (pun intended). If the waves return at the wrong time with an open exhaust valve, then the virgin air/gas will be bastardized (reversion) by the returning spent gases, causing a loss of power. Returning exhaust pulses must be timed to bounce off the back of the exhaust valve when closed. The length of the header pipes is tuned by the pipe designer to manage these wave pulses. The exhaust system must be the correct length and diameter to handle the volume of exhaust gases expelled from the head. Different size

engines have different exhaust requirements. Bigger engines need larger diameter pipes than stock ones. A loud exhaust such as drag pipes will cause a loss of low rpm power, in particular on a stock Evolution engine. Drag pipes allow reversion of spent exhaust gases to return and pollute the combustion chamber on stock engines, as well as many performance-tuned ones. Drag pipes become more functional on larger — much larger — engines, particularly dragbikes. Therefore, the muffler does much more than appease the EPA and CARB noise pollution police. The lowly muffler is a technical piece of equipment that also controls and times exhaust (temperature/pressure differential) kinetic pulses. Torque cones in the exhaust header pipe are an exercise in physics. Torque cones are also known as tork cones, or anti-reversion valves in mechanic-speak. Torque or tork refers to engine power. Anti-reversion refers to the prevention of exiting exhaust gases from returning and soiling the fresh intake charge in the combustion chamber. Cone describes the shape of this small, but effective, part. The cones are simple affairs: tubular metal about an inch long that sits inside the top of the exhaust header pipe where it bolts to the cylinder head’s exhaust port. The cone narrows a little from the head into the pipe, causing semirestriction, but still allowing exhaust pulses to exit. Even though the cone will semirestrict the all-important spent exhaust gas flow from the head, exiting gases overcome this by speeding up since the same amount of gas must pass in the same time. Most people buy an exhaust because it looks or sounds good, having no idea of the engineering complexity involved based on the inviolable laws of physics. A properly designed exhaust header and muffler will time the returning pulses to bounce off the closed exhaust valve. It is of utmost importance that the contaminating pulses of burned gases are timed to bounce off a closed exhaust valve. Exhaust manufacturers know this timing procedure and will build it into quality exhaust systems.If allowed back into the combustion chamber by an open exhaust valve, the virgin intake of air and gas will be bastardized by the returning spent exhaust gases. This, of course, will reduce engine power (torque). An antireversion torque cone lends assistance AIMag.com


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THE BEST FUEL-INJECTION TUNER ON THE MARKET This is the new and improved version of the award winning PowrPro fuel tuner, now using the latest accelerometer enabled software for precise real-time tuning. Once you install the PowrPro you can say good-bye to old-school EFI “mapping products” and O2 sensor hassles. The PowrPro reacts to the bike’s acceleration to adjust for the optimum air/fuel mixture, under every kind of load and under all existing conditions. And here’s the really great news, should you need to adjust your bike’s air fuel ratio outside of the acceleration area, you can do that now with your smart device and our cloud based app.

PowrPro Black retains it’s simple plug and ride connection, for a simple installation.

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TECHLINE

to this process, warding off returning pulses that could re-enter the combustion chamber. Returning exhaust pulses bounce off the (anti-reversion) torque cone. Torque cones are a necessity on drag pipes or improperly tuned exhausts on smaller engines. The Twin Cam 88 has an exhaust restriction known as an anti-reversion step in each exhaust port. Reversion exhaust gas pulses bounce off the anti-reversion step built into each 1999-2006 TC 88 head. Torque cones do not work as well on engines bigger than 96", which is why the TC 96 does not have an exhaust anti-reversion step. Installation of aftermarket anti-reversion torque cones into the exhaust header pipes, where they meet the exhaust port on Evolution models, is easily done and inexpensive. An under-square motor affects engine breathing. All Harley Big Twins and Sportsters are under square engines. An under-square or long stroke engine occurs when the cylinder/bore diameter is less than its stroke length (piston travel length). This gives a bore/stroke ratio smaller than 1:1. The stock Evolution bore (3.498")/stroke (4.250") ratio is .82:1. The advantage of a longer stroke (under-square) is that the piston will stay at TDC (Top Dead Center in the cylinder) for a longer time, so torque will increase because of superior breathing capability. The old axiom that longstroke engines make more torque is related to this. It’s not so much that they make more torque; it’s that they make more torque relative to horsepower, which needs bigger valve(s) at top end speeds. The smaller bore reduces the area available for valves in the cylinder head. Therefore, valves are generally smaller in an under-square engine. Topend horsepower needs bigger valves or four-valve heads. However, big inch strokers with large diameter bores can use a larger intake valve. Combustion chamber design is paramount for efficient engine breathing efficiency and performance. The old adage that there is more than one right way to do things is never more true than in head design. However, it took HarleyDavidson many decades to approach efficiencies in combustion chamber design. The revolution began in 1984

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This head has a D-shaped combustion chamber which is used in conjunction with a flat top piston.

with the Evolution. Modern combustion chamber design begins with the flathead. The flathead is the least efficient. The 45" flathead (1929 to 1973), also known as a Sidevalve, has its combustion chamber off to the side of the camshaft-actuated intake and exhaust valves. There is no purposeful plan that encourages faster (laminar) airflow into the combustion chamber or out of it. The rounded, shallow chamber is met with a flat top piston with no air/fuel mixing capability to ensure a burnable ratio. Efficiencies are absent. This was in a time where gas was cheap, and pollution was unimportant. The flathead remained in production for longer than any other Harley-Davidson and justifiably gained the reputation for being a workhorse, albeit a slow one. Flat top pistons are very efficient when combined with a squish band. This type of chamber did not appear until 1984 with the Evolution. It further improved with the Twin Cam in 1999. The Hemi-head engines begin with the Knucklehead (1936-47), Panhead (1948-65), Shovelhead (1966-85), and the Ironhead Sportster (1957-85); all use this type of head and combustion chamber. The hemispherical combustion chambers and a hemispherical-matching piston dome are also very inefficient. This engine type depends primarily on cubic inches to create power. The design is better than the flathead, but still inept. People love their Hemi-heads, and such rock groups as the Beach Boys glo-

rified this engine. Hemi-heads also had their day when inefficiency, gas guzzling, and emissions didn’t matter. The Hemi-head valve angles are too wide, creating side thrust issues of valve-tovalve guide support contact. This side loading limits valve lift capabilities, producing high-wear characteristics, tappet bleed down (ticking tappets), and frictional loss of horsepower. Hydraulic lifter bleed-down creates extra unwanted space in the valvetrain. This causes noise, but, more importantly, prevents the valve from opening as far as specified. Thus, less air and fuel are delivered into the combustion chamber. The performance aftermarket lends a hand to the Hemi-head by adding a narrow angled squish band on the lower part of the piston dome with a matching one in the chamber. This will go unnoticed by most. However, the close contact of these squish surfaces as the piston dome rises into the combustion chamber turbulently mixes the air and gas to burn a higher percentage of what is already there. This provides higher engine efficiency and performance. The D-head is used with the Evolution Big Twin (1984-2000). The D-shaped squish band is used in conjunction with a flat top piston. This combination gives the rider the fastest stock Harley-Davidson to date. The design cannot be overestimated relative to what went before. It does this by simply mixcontinued on page 157 AIMag.com


TAKE YOUR BIKE. DITCH THE STRAPS.

Install removable base onto ‹o†u|u-bѴ;uou]-u-];Yoouĺ

Tighten the bar onto the bike’s tubular frame.

Drive into the latches. Your bike is secure.

Your motorcycle becomes an extension of your trailer. Now, the trailer’s shocks are absorbing the impact of the road instead of your bike’s shocks. Less bouncing means -v-=;uub7;-m7mov|orrbm]|ou;ঞ]_|;mv|u-rvĺ

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Chaos Cycle’s Hooligan Knucklehead

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AIMag.com


text by

eric ellis photos by

mark velazquez

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ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

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T

HE OLD SAYING “THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS

right” might apply to most businesses, but when it comes to ground-up custom bikes, it’s often best to leave things in the hands of a professional. As the owner of Chaos Cycles in Mastic, New York, George Stinsman will let the customer guide him to building the bike of his dreams, but when it comes down to brass tacks, George’s years of experience, knowledge, and preferences have the final say. For example, take the bike on these pages. The owner, Thomas Ferrante, came to George wanting an old-school bike that handled well, rode better than his bagger, had floorboards, and was comfortable – something like a Softail. George took into account everything Thomas asked for and knew exactly what he wanted to build: a hooligan machine that could be flogged hard yet retained the old styling his shop is known for, and one that could draw a crowd wherever it went. Needless to say, a Softail-based machine was nixed from the equation, and George instead handbuilt a FXR-style frame. Based on stock specs with 36 degrees of rake, George knew what every FXR lover and Harley purist know — the FXR is the best-handling bike the MoCo ever built. To go along with the frame, he welded up a swingarm complete with lattice-style bracing made out of round bar stock. Between the frame and the swingarm he had the perfect setup for a real hellraiser. A solid chassis is useless without a good suspension, so George sourced a front end off a 2007 GSXR-750. To secure the legs to the bike, he made his own triple trees complete with a mount to secure the GSXR stabilizer. Out back, Progressive Suspension 970 Piggyback shocks were bolted in place. For the wheels, George went for a muscle car look with a 21" RC Components wheel leading the front and a 16" American racing car wheel on the rear, which he adapted to fit by machining his own hub. Both wheels are wrapped in Metzeler rubber, with a meaty 200mm bringing up the rear. The GSXR’s Tokico caliper is up front, and an ISR caliper is mounted at the rear. Now, one thing you wouldn’t expect to see cradled in a

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 The perfect setup for a hellraiser

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performance-oriented setup like this is a vintage-style engine. But, as George says, “We like to piss off purists by doing things like putting a Knucklehead in a FXR-style frame.” And that’s exactly what he did with a fresh-out-ofthe-crate S&S Cycle KN93 mill. Backing up the engine is a BAKER Drivetrain Powerbox six speed and an Ultima 2" open belt primary to carry the vintage vibe through the drivetrain. A 2-into-1 exhaust with a 3" scallop-style tip was welded up, and while it looks relatively straightforward, George says creating the slight arch in the tail section was rather tedious. The sheet metal and its accompanying details are where George really exhibited his shop’s true craftsmanship. The front fender hugs the 21 like a second skin, perfectly wrapping the lip of the RC rim. At the rear of the bike a deep seat pocket was created by fabricating a rear fender cowl with an incorporated oil tank. The gas tank was crafted out of flat sheets of steel and made to look like traditional Fat Bobs. To add a bit of retro style to them, however, the rear sections were coved to emulate a ’50s-style Corvette. The

handmade fender mounts, dash, and accents were drilled for that old speed hole look and finished with Cast Blast coating. As for the essentials, George added a set of Joker Machine floorboards and made a custom set of traditionally styled apehanger handlebars. To keep everything as clean as possible, the clutch and front brake cables were run internally through the bars. George made the bike street legal with a horn, Moto Gadget speedo, and turn signals front and rear. The Rivera Primo headlight houses the front blinkers, and a pair of blinkers was mounted on the license plate tag. After painter Bob Mango doused the bike in several coats of Candy Tangerine with Cream accents, the build was capped off with a custom stitched seat cover made by Angel Tiza. When Thomas saw the finished bike for the first time he was amazed; it looked way better than he ever expected, but, more importantly, it handled like a dream, or, as George says, “like it’s on rails.” Thomas has been tearing up the streets on his new machine like a real menace — which is pretty fitting seeing as how his nickname is “Menace.” AIM

TECH SHEET •

Owner: Builder: Year/model: Time to build: Powdercoater: Painter: Color:

Thomas Ferrante Chaos Cycle 2015 Menace One year Prizmatic Bob Mango Candy Tangerine and Cream

POWERPLANT

Engine: Builder: Displacement: Cases: Flywheels: Connecting rods: Cylinders: Pistons: Heads: Cam: Valves: Rockers: Lifters: Push rods: Carb: Air cleaner: Exhaust: Ignition: Coils: Wires: Charging system: Primary:

S&S Cycle KN93 S&S Cycle 93" S&S Cycle S&S Cycle 4-1/2" S&S Cycle S&S Cycle 3-5/8" S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle .420" S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle Super E Joker Machine S&S Cycle S&S Cycle ACCEL S&S Cycle Compufire Ultima

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Transmission: BAKER Drivetrain six-speed Final drive: Chain EK CHASSIS

Frame: Rake: Front forks: Swingarm: Shocks: Front wheel: Rear wheel: Front brake: Rear brake: Front tire: Rear tire: Front fender: Rear fender:

Chaos Cycle FXR style 36" Showa, GSXR-750 S&S Cycle Progressive RC Components 21" American Racing car wheel 5.50-16" with Chaos Cycle hub Tokico ISR Metzeler 120/70-21" Metzeler 200/60-16" S&S Cycle Chaos Cycle with built-in oil tank

ACCESSORIES

Headlight: Taillight: Fuel tank: Handlebars: Risers: Seat: Floorboards: Speedo: Dash: License bracket: Hand controls: Foot controls:

Rivera Primo Alloy Art S&S Cycle S&S Cycle Joker Machine Angel Tiza Joker Machine Moto Gadget S&S Cycle S&S Cycle ISR S&S Cycle AIMag.com


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N E W B I K E R E V I E W • by Dain Gingerelli

2016 H-D

XL1200CX Roadster CX in the city, a roadster for the road

CCORDING TO HARLEY-DAVIDSON’S promotional literature the new XL1200CX Roadster is aimed dead-square at young riders, often termed Millennials. But tell that to the older guy — think Baby Boomer— who cast an envious eye on the Roadster, with its Velocity Red Sunglo paint shining brilliantly, which I had just fired up in the parking lot. And for the record, I’m of the Baby Boomer generation, too, and I rather enjoy this Sportster. The older guy said nothing, though. He just stared, transfixed by the bike, soaking up the sum total of its parts and color. A chromed, low-slung handlebar catches the eye first, and behind it sits the familiar 3.3-gallon peanut-style gas tank; folks on Juneau Avenue now deem it a “walnut” tank, although if we’re going to break from tradition, I’m for calling it a “pecan” tank, even if it might send the wrong message as to its exact function and use. So, there we were, standing in the parking lot with the older guy still wistfully gazing at the bike while I nonchalantly let the Roadster’s rubber-mounted 1200cc engine (Millennials and Baby Boomers alike would never refer to a Sportster engine in terms of cubic inches, although for the record the 1200 qualifies as a 74") warm up, chugging and singing out the proverbial potato-potato-potato cadence that all Harleys are known for. I especially enjoy the XL1200CX’s exhaust note, a result of the new free-flowing shorty mufflers that create an unmistakable baritone burble, so unlike the wimpy, semi-flatulent sounds that resonate from most stock bikes today. Satisfied with the engine having oil in all its internal nooks and crannies, I sought first gear — an easy task, as Harley engineers have used every conceivable trick in their toolbox to minimize clutch lever pull effort on Sportsters, so when you snick the five-speed tranny’s shift lever up or down, your foot is rewarded with a positive click — and rode away. As the engine’s rpm rose to a crescendo, the exhaust note only got better, no doubt prompting the older guy’s pulse to quicken even more. I have no idea whether or

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NEW BIKE REVIEW

not that Baby Boomer eventually bought a Roadster on account of that little episode, but The Motor Company is hedging its bets that Millennials will use similar sidewalk experiences to decide that it’s time to step up and make a purchase. The betting, too, is that the deal includes a new Roadster. As one Harley spokesman, Michael Spaeth, who heads the marketing team that put Millennials in the Roadster’s crosshairs, recently stated on a public radio broadcast: “…the new Roadster that we just launched [is] really targeting that kind of urban demographic.” So, what sets this XL apart from all others in the Sportster stable? Plenty, really, even though the XL1200CX, rated at 549 pounds dry, shares the same basic platform in terms of frame and engine with the other 1200 models. Besides that drooping handlebar, you’ll see that the Roadster rides on all-new, blacked-out cast aluminum wheels wrapped with Dunlop/Harley-Davidson rubber, and this is the only Sportster rolling with an 18" rear wheel and tire.

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The front 19" wheel is supported by a 43mm inverted fork — the only one in the Sportster lineup — that has triple-rate springs calibrated to its Premium cartridge damping system. The rear shocks are based on this year’s new nitrogen gascharged units for Sportsters, which have threaded collars to precisely adjust spring preload to suit your weight and riding style. Moreover, the fork and shocks offer a claimed 4.5" and 3.2" of travel, more than any of the suspenders found on the other Sporties. The suspension’s spring and damping calibration are well-matched to soak up bumps in the road, too; clearly better than any other Sportster does. The Roadster’s suspenders are less prone to bottom out, too, and the ride transmits less road surface feedback through the customformed seat and rubber-wrapped folding footpegs. Things aren’t quite as pleasant at the handlebar, though. Simply, the handlebar is too wide, measuring about 32" from end to end, which forces you to assume a riding position

AIMag.com


NEW BIKE REVIEW

that makes you feel as though you’re ready to do a pushup. Here’s my fix: by nature, any Harley’s purpose in life is to be modified, and by that right I’d change the bar to better suit my riding needs. There’s enough room to shorten the bar at both ends without disrupting space for the hand controls, so I’d clip about 1/2"-3/4" from each end. That would slightly raise the angle of your torso in relation to the steering stem, improving the rider triangle in the process. Doing so would also relieve some pressure from your wrists and hands while pulling them in for a more definitive “feel” of the front end when cornering (think road racer ergonomics). A by-product of clipping the handlebar also means a narrower bike, essential for splitting lanes or filtering forward through an urban jungle’s stop-and-go traffic. And from a cosmetic standpoint, shortening the handlebar would reduce its gull-wing effect in relation to the bike’s styling lines. For the most part, though, there’s not much customization necessary to make the Roadster look cool. The fenders have been bobbed to the extreme, so they’re shorter than those on any other Sportster; the belt guard and muffler heat shields have racer-like slots for a sportier look; the taillights are integrated into the turn signals that are posted onto the bare-bones rear fender struts, and the license plate attaches to Harley’s signature Dark Customs left-side mounting system. Staring back at you is a 4" electronic analog tachometer with built-in digital read-out speedo and gear indicator. All minimalist features that are popular with urban bikers. And then there’s the seat. Positioned 30.9" off the deck,

it’s styled in the spirit of all café racers. The seat’s rear hump helps position you in the rider’s triangle, and you’ll notice a grab strap on the rear portion. That’s for a passenger (DOT law requires the strap), making this a two-up motorcycle. The upholstery is designed to mimic body armor that’s so popular among Millennials today, but, more to the point, the seat is so darn comfortable, yet slender enough for using body English when leaning left and right while cornering on your favorite back road. Speaking of which, I took our test bike on my favorite 50-mile loop, which includes an assortment of cambered and off-cambered turns mixed with contorting S’s and sweepers. It’s a loop that begins only a few miles from my doorstep. The Roadster seemed to enjoy it, too, and it’s on roads like my loop that lets bikes such as the Roadster shine. Suddenly the CX’s wide handlebar conformed better to my crouched riding position (although I’d still clip the bar ends!), and the Roadster’s shortened steering head angle (27.4 degrees included fork angle with 5.5" trail) allotted for positive feedback during turn-ins. As with other Sportsters, flicking the Roadster from side to side still requires a fair amount of body movement to initiate, but it’s certainly tolerable and doesn’t spoil the ride at all. The twin front brakes (11.8" floating rotors with two-piston calipers) did a fine job of whoaing and slowing the Roadster, even though feedback through the controls remains vague by sportbike standards. As with all Sportsters, ABS is optional on the Roadster. In an odd twist, Harley rates the Roadster’s engine torque at nearly 10 percent higher than the rest of the

T E C H S H E E T • 2016 H-D XL1200CX Roadster

Length: Seat height: Ground clearance: Rake: Trail: Wheelbase: Engine: Compression: Fuel system: Transmission: Front tire: Rear tire: Fuel capacity: Oil capacity:

86" 30.9" 6" 28.9 degrees 5.5" 59.3" Air-cooled, 1202cc (73.4") Evolution 10:01 ESPFI Five-speed chain 120/70R-19" M/C 150/70R-18" M/C 3.3 gallons 2.8 quarts

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Shipped weight: GVWR: Front brake: Rear brake: Exhaust system: Front forks: Rear shocks: Front wheel: Rear wheel: Handlebars: Colors: MSRP:

549 pounds 568 pounds Dual-piston caliper Dual-piston caliper Shorty-dual with chrome tapered mufflers with laser cut black heat shields 43mm inverted forks 36mm emulsion shocks Black offset, split five-spoke cast aluminum Black offset, split five-spoke cast aluminum Low-rise, 32" wide Veloctiy Red Sunglo, Billet Silver/Vivid Black, Black Denim, Vivid Black $11,199-11,749 AIMag.com


NEW BIKE REVIEW

XL1200 lineup. Apparently those free-flow mufflers do more than emit a cool sound. Claimed torque is 76 ft-lbs. (compared to 70.8), but at a slightly higher rpm (3750 vs 3500). Fuel metering is smooth and consistent, with the payback being an easy-to-ride motorcycle, even through the twisties. If you find yourself in too high a gear for a corner, not to worry — just twist the throttle and the engine’s torque pulls you back up to speed. Or do it right, down shifting to maintain your pace. Either way seems to work, depending on how perfect you want to zoom by the apex while tucked behind the low handlebar. The low bar works in your favor during long stints in the saddle at freeway speeds, too. Essentially, the wind forcing against your torso helps support you, relieving your wrists from having to fully support your weight during the ride. Unfortunately, the opposite holds true for aroundtown riding, as the constant stop-and-go riding eventually taxes your wrists and hands. Roadster pricing begins at $11,199 (Vivid Black), jumping to $11,599 for color (as on our bike), and peaking at $11,749 for two-tone paint. Options in-

clude ABS ($795) and Harley’s Smart Security System ($395), which includes a key fob for keyless ignition. Will Millennials warm up to these prices? Time will tell. In the meantime, the bike could easily become a favorite for more than a few Baby Boomers looking to put more spring in their Sportster step. AIM


T O U R • by Dain Gingerelli

James Dean Tour

In search of a giant legend

HE MOTORCYCLE IS THE GREAT EQUALizer in our lives. Put two people on separate bikes, and suddenly the world around them becomes impartial to whom they are or what they do for a living. Now for the spoiler alert: that mobileutopian moment is easily disrupted when we include a celebrity on two wheels in the equation. When the phrase motorcycle celebrity enters the conversation, one name, more than any other, probably comes to mind for most people. Chances are that you envisioned the silver screen’s dashing hero of the movie The Great Escape. That person, of course, is the late Steve McQueen, and today, surviving motorcycles from his garage garner big

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bucks at auctions. Moreover, even though that larger-thanlife hero really didn’t make “the jump” in the movie — stuntman Bud Ekins was the rider who launched the Triumph stand-in bike over the barbed wire fence — motorcyclists idolize McQueen more now than when Hollywood fans paid tribute to him at the box office when he was alive. Simply, McQueen remains an iconic figure among bikers because he rode and raced motorcycles with a passion, not just because he was paid large sums of money to do so in movies. There’s another Hollywood figure deserving similar, if not equal, billing with McQueen. That would be James Dean, who also rode motorcycles with a passion off-screen. Dean was an aspiring movie actor who was on his way to the top of the billboards when he tragically lost his life in an auto AIMag.com


accident on September 30, 1955. He was driving his Porsche 550 Spyder to participate in the sports car races scheduled at Salinas, California, the following weekend. Dean was just 25 years old, and two of the three movies he starred in had yet to even be released. Only East of Eden had been screened; Giant and Rebel Without A Cause were still in the can when he died. Dean’s name has been immortalized in many songs, too, with perhaps the most popular being the verse by the Eagles: “James Dean … you were too fast to live, too young to die.” There’s also a James Dean memorial along the highway in Cholame, California, about a quarter of a mile from the actual spot where the accident took place on H 46 (formerly 466 in 1955). I figured that would be as good a AIMag.com

Our tour included scenic Highway 58 and its curves and rolling hills. A largerthan-life James Dean shadows “James Dain” (bottom) and our bikes parked in front of the Dean portrait, both at Blackwell’s Corner.

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TOUR

destination as any for a motorcycle tour, so I invited my brother Alan to join me to pay homage to this memorable figure. Our route took us several hundred miles north into Central California, and we rode a pair of baggers that mirror the era when Dean was killed: a Harley-Davidson Road King and an Indian Springfield. We started our ride from our shared mountain cabin in Running Springs, California. The place needed a little spring cleaning after sitting during the winter snows, and time spent there also meant that we could leave for our tour without having to claw and crawl our way through Los Angeles traffic. We took to the road early in the morning, following Interstate 15 to the H 395 cutoff, leading us north to Kramer Junction (referred to as Four Corners by locals) before turning west onto H 58 towards Bakersfield. On our right sat a huge solar energy field, one of many that have popped up in the Mojave Desert during the past 10 years. We’d see more alternative energy farms — huge wind turbines this time — in the Tehachapi Mountains later in the ride. We also took the time to scout the infamous Tehachapi Loop, one of the seven wonders of the railroad world. This section of track takes into account the Tehachapi’s notoriously steep grade; by looping back and around on itself, trains can more easily make the climb to the other side of the mountain. This engineering feat was accomplished in 1874-76 by 3,000 Chinese laborers and was engineered by William Hood and J.B. Harris. The 28-mile length of track includes 18 tunnels and 10 bridges, plus the famous 360degree loop that can be viewed from Keene Road, just off H 58 itself. There are also places to park your bike roadside to watch as trains emerge from tunnels like big worms digging their way out of the ground. The distant sound of their big diesel engines groaning against the grade is just as impressive.

We followed the scenic route from there, exiting on CR 223 south to Arvin. Along the way we caught some fantastic vistas of the San Joaquin Valley below, and, most importantly, we bypassed Bakersfield and its beehive of truck stops. The tiny town of Arvin resembles something you’d see south of the border, a product of the migrant population that’s settled there to work the agricultural fields of the valley. Turn left at CR 184 to I-5, and take that north a few miles to the Mariposa/Taft exit that puts you on SR 166 before later turning right onto SR 33 at the town of Maricopa to head north. It’s pretty much a straight line ride on both roads, and if you’re lucky enough to make this ride during the springtime as we did, you’ll be treated to the fragrance of orange blossoms from orange groves on either side of the highway. Actually, these should be considered orange tree forests, because they seem to go on and on for miles. The windshields on our bikes served us well, blocking the bees and other insects before they slammed into us. Eventually, the citrus “forests” make way for the hundreds of oil pumps

The roadside memorial at the junction of highways 41 and 46 is supported by James Dean fans who leave trinkets and other mementos such as this license plate. It seemed fitting, too, that we visited the Mission San Miguel during the same tour.

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TOUR

that seem to magically sprout from the ground. These big metal monsters have been pumping crude oil for more than a hundred years now, and you’ll be passing through one of the first oil fields established in America. We set our bikes on cruise control for most of this stretch, and that’s when we appreciated that the Harley’s left-side switch was easier to manipulate than the Springfield’s switch on the right side of the handlebar. The town of Taft forms the nucleus for this oil field, and for many years Standard Oil kept its operational headquarters there. A petroleum museum in town offers much more background, and when you consider that 2.8 trillion barrels of crude oil have been sucked out of the ground here, it���s easy to understand how busy Taft and the surrounding countryside has been over the years. We followed 33 north to Blackwell’s Corner at the junction of 33 and H 46. There, Alan noted how the Springfield’s windshield was set farther forward than the King’s, and that the Indian even felt larger and more spacious. Checking the spec sheet, the Springfield’s wheelbase is 4" longer than the King’s. The Harley’s more compact size became more obvious when the road became twisty, and turn-in happened sooner with the Milwaukee bike. Those are only minor differences that some people might take into account when bike shopping, but overall both bikes are more than up to the task of all-day travel. Blackwell’s Corner happened to be Dean’s final stop before he turned left (west) onto SR 46 leading to his fateful head-on collision with a 1950 Ford driven by a young college student named Donald Turnupseed (true name). Apparently Turnupseed was turning left (north) onto H 41 and didn’t see Dean’s car approaching from the east. The accident happened at 6:45 pm, and by chance that was about the same time we approached the junction of 41 and 46, which today bears the name James Dean Memorial Junction. But we made it there only after taking time at Blackwell’s Corner to check out some of the James Dean sights and

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It’s time to shake, rattle, and roll at Parkfield, known as the Earthquake Capitol of the World. The two markers (below) illustrate how much movement has taken place between the Pacific and North American tectonic plates at a rate of about 2.33 inches per year since 1931.

souvenirs offered by the combination gas station/store/diner. In fact, it contains a 1950s-style diner, and you can use the opportunity to stage some Dean-and-you photo ops. Next, we visited the impromptu and unofficial roadside memorial at the 41/46 junction. James Dean fans continue to feed this memorial site with their own tokens of tribute before motoring on down the road to Cholame and the official memorial next to the Jack Ranch Cafe. The stainless steel structure paying homage to Dean was constructed in 1977 by Japanese sculptor Seita Ohnishi. Fittingly, the name Cholame means “the beautiful one,” a description given to the region by the Yokut Indians long ago. I also took the time at the memorial to place a motorcycle piston that a friend asked me to leave there. He’s a big James Dean fan. We continued on to Paso Robles at the junction of H 101 for the night, and during dinner at a local diner, Alan and I happened to see an old friend, Keith Code, who used to road race with us back in the 1970s. Code currently runs the California Superbike School, and he was on his way home after instructing at Laguna Seca Raceway that day. We kiddingly traded lies about how fast we were and such and generally had a nice time catching up on one another’s lives. Like I stated above, motorcycling has a way of equalizing AIMag.com


TOUR

Our Indian Springfield, parked along bridge leading into Parkfield, is ready to rumble. Look closely at the bridge’s railing, and you’ll see that it’s bent from earth movement directly below.

us all, which helps us maintain friendships through the years as well. The next morning we steered the Road King and Springfield north onto Highway 101 for a few miles, exiting for a brief visit to the Mission San Miguel before venturing through some of the narrow country roads that lace this part of central California on our way to the small town of Parkfield. The route took us past rolling hills, cow farms and horse ranches, then up and over the ridge line, giving us another striking vista of the valley below. We continued on to Parkfield, stopping to check out the infamous San Andreas Fault that’s directly beneath the bridge that leads into town (population about 30). Parkfield is considered earthquake central, and many seismologists have placed delicate instruments there to measure the movement between the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. A monument positioned within one of the town’s scenic and interesting displays helps to illustrate how much the two tectonic plates have shifted against each other in the course of time, making it easier to understand just how much movement is going on. Based on what we read on one plaque, our mountain cabin should become beachfront property within the next few millions years. A rather sound investment, I think. During prime time hours, the local café serves some interesting and, from what I’ve been told, healthy meals. Also, take time to check out the bridge leading into town. Note that its side railings have slight bends. That’s the work of the fault line directly below, and perhaps one day the seismic activity will morph the bridge into a beach pier. We had several options for a route back to our cabin in the San Bernardino Mountains and, interestingly, we rode parallel to the San Andreas Fault most of the way home. We

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Here’s the San Andreas Fault, which also composes the creek that runs beneath the bridge and next to the thriving little town of Parkfield.

chose to get back on SR 46, taking it west for a mile or two, turning left onto Bitterwater Road to take us south to 58. We turned left onto SR 58, taking the scenic route all the way to 33 at McKittrick. We turned right (south) heading to southbound I-5. We stopped at Ft. Tejon for lunch, then continued to the exit for SR 138 east and the final leg toward our mountain cabin. Had we made this trip a couple of weeks sooner, the road would have been lined with bright orange California poppies, the state flower. Even so, there were plenty of colorful wild flowers to entertain us on the back roads that we covered, and most of all the trip let us pay homage to a fellow bike enthusiast who died years ago when he walked among the giants of Hollywood’s silver screen. AIM AIMag.com


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Contr ast Style ing s 70 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

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Good like chocolate, only better

text by

greg williams photos by

dino petrocelli

A

S FORREST GUMP’S MAMA

always told him, “Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get.” Translation: the Gumps believed that life is random, and that it’s important to just roll with whatever flavor you dig out of the box. Eric Warenchak subscribes to a similar belief system. Getting back into motorcycling after a decade-long hiatus, his first bike was a Buell

that he modified as a café racer. Next, he personalized a 2004 Road King, and with 27,000 miles on the clock, thought he was happy with the results, at least until he visited his local Harley dealer, Brunswick HarleyDavidson in Brunswick, New York, to get some parts for his bike. What he saw on the showroom floor changed the way he looked at Harleys. Sitting on the showroom floor was a brand-new 2012 Softail Slim. He had found his favorite piece of chocolate. AIMag.com

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“The dealer salesmen offered me a deal I couldn’t refuse,” Eric says. “So I traded in the Road King and rode out on the Softail Slim.” Remember what we said about the box of chocolates? Eric fully embraced the random event — he wasn’t looking to upgrade, it just happened. Eric gravitated to the Softail Slim’s styling because he thought it had a throwback look, possessing a timeless quality. It’s a modern spin on an older-style bike. But that didn’t mean Eric wasn’t prepared to put some of his own spin on his new Slim. A few months into ownership, Eric changed the brake and clutch levers to Harley-Davidson contrast-cut pieces. His friends couldn’t help but chuckle because they knew where Eric was headed — down the unending path to another custom build. But Eric wanted to savor every moment of this new adventure, so he took his time deciding precisely what direction to go; he didn’t want a bike that wouldn’t fit in with styles 10 years further down the road. He sought a timeless look. “I saw a lot of black bikes, and a lot of black-and-chrome bikes,” Eric explains. “But there weren’t a lot of black-andcontrast-cut bikes, so that’s the way I headed.”

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Consequently, Eric’s custom Softail Slim evolved slowly. In Stage One — as Eric calls it — he installed a Legend Suspensions Air Ride system to the rear. It was important to him that, above all else, the motorcycle remained comfortable to ride and be able to handle the ruts and potholes of upstate New York roads. “But when I parked it, I wanted to be able to air it down and have a motorcycle with a nice look to it, with the fender hugging the rear tire,” he says. Comfort was also the reason Eric didn’t install a big wheel up front. He wanted to run a larger, if somewhat fatter, tire, opting for a 3.5-21" 50-spoke Ride Wright wheel wrapped in chunky Metzeler rubber. Eric also modified the fork with Arlen Ness contrast-cut lower legs and upper covers. The fender was left stock, but extension blocks were fabricated to raise it above the tall fat tire. The stock headlight has been modified with an Arlen Ness Fire Ring to incorporate directional lights on the outer edges, and the headlight itself is a Harley-Davidson Daymaker. Topping off the package, a set of Mid-USA 4" risers clamp onto the stock handlebar outfitted with Performance Machine contrast-cut handgrips to complement the Harley-Davidson contrast-cut levers.

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Eric selected Battistini floorboards and shift linkage from the Arlen Ness catalog, and he further modified the foot controls with Harley-Davidson contrast-cut components. At the rear, Eric put on a matching 16" Ride Wright 50-spoke wheel with a HarleyDavidson contrast-cut pulley. At that point, he called Stage One done. That is, it was done until about a year later, when Roland Sands Design introduced a bolt-on 200mm rear fender and a seat kit for the Softail Slim. When Eric saw those new pieces, he decided it was time to move the bike into the Stage Two development phase. While swapping out the Harley-Davidson rear struts and sheet metal, Eric bought a larger 18" Ride Wright 50-spoke wheel to replace the original 16-incher. He also upgraded the brakes with — no surprise, given the bike’s

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theme — Arlen Ness contrast-cut dual-piston calipers front and rear, with rotors from a Softail Breakout. To continue the theme-related look at the rear, Eric also installed Arlen Ness contrast-cut rear lights that function as brake, running, and directional signals. The contrast-cut theme continues on intake and exhaust. Slant-cut exhaust tubes from Roland Sands Design went on the outlet side to move spent gases, and a Screamin’ Eagle contrast-cut air cleaner filters air particles before oxygen enters the fuel injection system. Stage Three of the Slim’s progression towards becoming a full-on custom happened when Eric decided to give the engine cases the contrast-cut treatment as well. He bought a black primary cover from Harley-Davidson and jazzed it up with a contrast-cut derby cover from Performance Machine. Cam cover, transmission cover, and rocker box covers are also contrast-cut components from The Motor Company. Topping off Stage Three included a fresh paint job for the gas tank and rear fender. But what was supposed to be a simple black paint

job with a silver leaf skull design on the tank turned into a fiasco. The first silver leaf artist didn’t come close to meeting Eric’s expectations, and there was only three days remaining before photographer Dino Petrocelli, who’d been assigned to shoot the bike for this magazine, would take the bike into the photo studio. “I had to buy a replacement tank online and have it shipped overnight to my paint shop,” Eric explains. Jesse Palmer, at 1945 Speed & Custom in Troy, New York, painted the replacement tins and airbrushed a ghosted skull onto the tank – just in time for the images featured here to be taken. Although Eric stores the Softail Slim in a heated and carpeted garage, that’s all the pampering this bike receives. “With the air ride and big tires, she rides fairly nice,” he says. “I’ve got some trophies for the bike, but I’ve put more than 22,000 miles on it now. Building something pretty and not riding it doesn’t work for me — it has to be functional.” No doubt, Eric picked an exceptional piece of chocolate from the box. Better yet, he made it even tastier. AIM

TECH SHEET •

Owner: Builder: Year/model: Cost to build: Time to build: Painter: Color:

Eric Warenchak Brunswick Harley-Davidson and Jerry Dawson 2012 Harley-Davidson Softail Slim $32,000 Two years 1945 Speed & Custom, Troy, NY Black w/ghost skull

POWERPLANT

Engine, year/model: Builder: Displacement: Heads: Cams: Valves: Rockers: Lifters: Pushrods: Air cleaner: Exhaust: Ignition: Coils: Wires: Cam cover: Primary cover: Transmission: Final drive:

2012 Harley-Davidson Softail Slim H-D 103" Stock Stock Stock Stock /H-D contrast-cut covers Stock Stock Screamin’ Eagle Roland Sands Design slant cut Stock Accel Stealth Accel H-D contrast cut H-D w/Performance Machine derby cover Stock H-D contrast cut

CHASSIS

Frame: 2012 Softail Slim Rake: Stock

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Stretch: Front forks: Mods: Swingarm: Front wheel: Rear wheel: Front brake: Rear brake: Front tire: Rear tire: Front fender: Rear fender: Fender struts:

Stock Stock Arlen Ness contrast-cut legs and covers Stock w/Legend Suspension Air Ride 3.5-21" Ride Wright Fat 50 5.5-18" Ride Wright Fat 50 Arlen Ness contrast cut two piston Arlen Ness contrast cut two piston 140/70-21" Metzeler 200/50-18" Metzeler Stock/modified Roland Sands Design 200mm Roland Sand Design 200mm

ACCESSORIES

Headlight: Taillight: Fuel tank: Oil tank: Handlebars: Risers: Seat: Pegs: Chain guard: Speedo: Dash: License bracket: Mirrors: Hand controls: Foot controls: Levers:

Stock w/H-D Daymaker and Arlen Ness Fire Ring Arlen Ness Deep Cut Stock Stock Stock Mid-USA 4" RSD Arlen Ness floorboards Stock H-D Stock Kuryakyn Arlen Ness Mini Oval H-D contrast cut H-D contrast cut H-D contrast cut AIMag.com


E V E N T • by Giuseppe Cucinotta and Sabina D’Oro • photos by Sabina D’Oro

An Ancient Awakening Sweet, visceral sounds rumble through Rome

T

HIS IS ONE OF THE LARGEST INTERNA-

tional gatherings of Free Chapter in Rome, staged from April 22-24 and organized by four groups of Free Chapter Italy. Four groups acted as the party hosts organizers: Renegades 1St Rome, DCCLIII AC Rome, Partenope (Napoli), and V45 (Terni). They arrived in the Eternal City from all over Italy and Europe, tired from long and rainy trips, but full of happiness and a desire to share wonderful moments together. Neither the bad weather nor the lengthy trip deterred them, and each of the hundreds of bikers showed up ready to invade Rome and celebrate the city’s birthday. The organizers chose a wonderful camp at the gates of the city, with the sea nearby, as the rally headquarters. From here, you can start imagining the beauty of the monuments, vast natural wonders, and sensuous delights. The place is surrounded by the typical stone pine trees, a symbol of Rome, and the scent of sea drifts over on the western wind, wafting into the campers’ tents. Everyone was dressed in soft leather vests, a sort of fresco detailing their Harley’s lives: nicknames, groups, rallies, and banners telling the story of every biker. Beneath the leather jackets, men and women — so many girls — share in their Harley passion, wanting to hug themselves again and spend some days together; women and men freed from their daily roles and hierarchies. They’re free to stay together, free to talk about themselves, free to believe in the healing power of the trip and the group. They were so free that they welcomed a couple of

journalists to join, exhibiting rare kindness and sensitivity; each one of us was accommodated onto a driven bike in order to join and report the afternoon’s parade along the streets of Rome. The sound of 320 engines shook us from inside. The hum of potholes seemed a fragmented dissonance, steadily becoming a single, harmonious song. There was music in the air. Let’s go! Everybody was there: veterans, rookies, old friends, new members. The atmosphere was so friendly that they all seemed to have known each other for a long time. The city opened up as we passed. People shook hands, said hello, and smiled while the wheels caressed the pavement which has welcomed the passage of the world for over two thousand

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years. Yet on this day, it seemed that Rome awaited our Harleys to make it that much more beautiful. The bikers’ hair in the wind provided a touch of color to the cloudy day. The rain seemed to understand the moment, and not a single drop fell to spoil the party while the caravan made its way into this wonderful town. It was a celebration of Rome’s birthday, and perhaps one of the most beautiful gifts that the city could receive is the music that makes everybody (passersby, tourists, even Romans stressed by our traffic jam) give a smile and a greeting. The bikes make up one single body that dances in accompaniment with the engine in an exciting choreography. The road linking the sea to the city center, via Cristoforo AIMag.com

Colombo, was illuminated by hundreds of custom frames and forks reflecting the light. It all became a living and buzzing river. Music came from the touring bikes’ speakers, and the bikes-snake was very organized. Its choreography was complex, slow, and regular. The road captain and the safety checked that no one got left behind, and that no one should be left alone or without assistance. The convoy crossed the town’s entrance gates and happened upon the baths of Caracalla, with its gardens, and the masted avenue, both preludes to the Circus Maximus, the site of the Roman Empire games, which saw centuries of horse racing, challenges, concerts and events, and was now becoming a heartening hug for nearly 400 Harleys. We were ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

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EVENT

in the valley between the Palatine and the Aventine Hill, a creek that ideally divides the new city from the old town. On the right, the beauty of ancient Rome reveals itself, with the remains of the imperial palaces that still overlook the Palatine hill. And on the left, the eyes hit modernity: the FAO building and San Saba district. Today we celebrate the eternal beauty of Rome. As we curved on the right, the long motorbike snake crossed via del Teatro Marcello. International Free Chapter Founder and President Patrick Bego stopped at a red light near a horsedrawn fiacre, on which tourists romantically visit the Eternal City. Both the bike and the horse seemed to look at each other and wink, for each was proud to ride these millennial roads. Piazza Venezia welcomed us with a shy ray of sunshine. A crowd of tourists was ready to catch thousand of pictures. They were there to immortalize the Vittoriano and the Duke’s palace and felt fortunate to be able to bring home an image of a Rome embellished by Harleys. The journey continued; we headed towards the symbol of the magnificence of Rome, the Coliseum. The pillars of the Flavian Amphitheatre, also known as the Coliseum, reflected a romantic light. The white marble coupled with the passing of the bikes became a canvas of light effects that surprised tourists. A portion of the convoy stopped at the lights and exchanged incredulous smiles. “Do you realize where we are? The Coliseum!” Roaring engines, dark vests, shiny pots, and colored helmets attracted everyone’s attention. Even the fake gladiators tried to extort photos in the shade of the symbol of the great Roman Empire. Two myths stand in comparison: the shiny, catchy Harleys and the huge, magnificent, and imposing Coliseum. Moving ahead, we rode to Trastevere, the medieval quarter, with its narrow streets and walls of pellitory in bloom: springtime. And although clouds had not given truce, the city had blossomed. Children were enchanted by this orderly, slow parade, while adults greeted with their hands, momentarily rediscovering their childlike enthusiasm. “Everybody has a Harley in his heart. It is convenient and customizable. It can be similar to you, be your shelter, your escape from the routine, your moment of thoughtlessness. When you're on your bike, the wind caresses your hair and takes away all the bad thoughts,” one of the Roman invasion bikers said. “For us, it’s a childhood dream come true. It cancels the

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ages, wipes away our worries, our hardships, our commitments, and the heavy burden of our working days,” said Sasà, a Renegades member. It’s a traveling companion, and even those who have not ridden a Harley or weren’t lucky enough to get on board seem to know it. Overcoming the historical center and Piazza del Popolo, our tour ended uphill at the Gianicolo, one of the most beautiful terraces in the world. Rome is at your feet, towering, mammoth, and voluptuous. A toast to its 2,769 years. She doesn’t look her age. The mild Roman weather took us back to our campsite where we hurried to get ready for an amazing evening of fun, an evening spent together, free. We were the kings of the world; we ride Harleys. Happy birthday, Rome, and thank you, Free Chapter. AIM AIMag.com


Bird’s

The Word

Team Chris Malo’s Indian Buffalo Chip Challenger

F text by

dain gingerelli photos by

kevin eilbeck

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ORGET REALITY SHOWS AND OTHER VICARIOUS THRILL-

and-adventure specials you might see on television these days. This bagger, which began life as a 2015 Indian Chief Classic, is about real life. It’s part of the Buffalo Chip Challenge, a build-off that for the past six years has featured custom bikes built by high school students from South Dakota’s Black Hills area. This is one of the two baggers that the students created for this year’s challenge and, as you can see, it’s the kind of bagger that you’d be proud to own. Now here’s another dose of reality: you can own this Indian bagger — if you attend the annual Legends Ride at this year’s Black Hills Motorcycle Classic, where you can submit the highest bid when the Indian and its stablemate, a comparably customized Victory Cross Country 8-Ball (featured in #338), are auctioned off prior to the afternoon ride. Simply, the highest bidder gets his or her choice of bikes, and second-highest bid nabs the remaining bike. Auction proceeds go towards the Black Hills Special Olympics and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum and Hall of Fame. Most recently, this rolling charity financed the purchase of a much-needed bus for the Special Olympics athletes, and there will be plenty more goodness to come, thanks to all the players involved in the annual Chip Challenge.

AIMag.com


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As we pointed out in last issue’s Victory Chip Challenge bike feature, the two baggers are part of a program that embraces students from local high schools to be part of the hands-on build from start to finish. The program is sponsored by the Buffalo Chip, and the big chief for the actual bike builds is Keith Terry, the coordinator between Chip owner Rod “Woody” Woodruff and the two bike-team leaders, Chris Malo (of Baggsters, in charge of the Indian build) and Randy Cramer (Dakota V-Twin, who are in charge of the Victory build). Before the builds get underway, one more element is added to the equation — parts vendors that supply some of the coolest custom bike parts in the business. It starts with each team enlisting a signature builder whose parts constitute the bulk of what you see on the bikes, although the sum total of the parts may include other players as well. In the case of

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this Indian, the signature pro name is John Shope and his Dirty Bird Concepts line of bagger products. But the real stars of the show are the Black Hills high school students themselves, because they are entrusted with turning the wrenches, swapping all the parts, sanding the body panels for new paint, and making sure that every new custom bike component that’s tacked onto the bikes remains tacked on. “We had a great bunch of kids, as usual,” says team leader Chris Malo about the completion of this year’s Indian Classic. Chris pointed out, too, that his team had help from another industry insider, Matt Beckdolt of Carl Brouhard Designs. “Matt was as enthusiastic as the kids!” Chris adds. “He helped out pretty much every day.” Obviously, the nine students who stuck around during the three months to complete the build (students met at Chris’ shop in Spearfish three times a week) benefited the

AIMag.com


most. As Keith Terry is quick to say, “This project is intended to teach the high school students some skills to use with their hands, so when they graduate from school they’ll be in a better position to get jobs.” They also learn about responsibility and accountability, because at the end of the project each year three students are awarded scholarships. Those scholarships amount to more than just peanuts. The top scholarship recipient is presented $5,000, and second and third receives $2,500 and $1,000 respectively. That’s nice seed money for continuing an education into, say, a trade-tech school or local college program. For the most part, the Indian’s build went smoothly. The RC Components wheels — a new 26" Exile wheel resides up front, while the concealed rear is RC’s generic 16" full-dish, and both hoops received fresh Vee Rubber skins — went on smoothly. Dirty Bird Concepts goodies include fenders,

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saddlebags, side covers, taillight assembly, stiffer fork springs, a custom dash, and hand controls, all familiar components that have become staples among bagger builders worldwide. We’ll drop a few more names you might be familiar with, too: Carl Brouhard Designs supplied the foot controls and floorboards, and Jeff Kreun of Kreun Kustoms provided the stylish seat that some lucky auction bidder will perch atop during long rides toward the horizon. Rusty Jones Customs got into the act with an air ride rear shock to help shore up the suspension, and Chris reports that the team learned a thing or two about chassis and steering geometry when they tacked on the Kewl Metal rake and stretch kit to the steering head so that the big 26" RC wheel and Vee Rubber tire have some wiggle room. The team tinkered with the 111" engine, too. Tom Keith from Indian of Sturgis helped them install a trio of Indian’s aftermarket cams that, we’re told, were developed with assistance from ace cam-grinder Lloydz. Cams always work best when the engine breathes freely, and to that end the team tacked on a Dirty Bird air cleaner to the intake side and a Trask Performance/Dirty Bird Concepts exhaust system at the big motor’s south side. Finally, it was time for paint, and that’s where some drama played out in this build. “We had to switch painters,” Chris told us, and any bike builder who has been in that predicament knows how difficult it can be to find another painter ready to drop other jobs to take on another. So, after the kids prepped the body panels they searched for someone to hose on the shiny stuff. Jamie’s Repair in nearby Rapid City

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answered the call before handing over all body panels to Tim Peterson at Flat Earth Graphics for striping and gold leaf. By chance, Rapid City also happened to be the place where the new Indian and Victory baggers rolled out into the public’s view for the first time. It was show time at the local bike show where both baggers bagged first-place awards. Then it was on to St. Paul, Minnesota, for the Donnie Smith Car and Bike Show. Fifteen of the students were able to make the trip to St. Paul where they took turns working the booth at the show, fielding questions and generally explaining how the Buffalo Chip Challenge works. Oh, and the two teams also scored firsts in their respective classes again, going two for two.

always use additional funding, the Special Olympics kids deserve all the money that can be raised, and, most of all, auction money earned is a tribute to the kids who worked so hard to convert the stock Indian and Victory tourers into cool baggers. Real life doesn’t get any more dramatic than this, folks. AIM

You could call it a fairytale ending if you want but, in truth, the story doesn’t end there. We’ve still got that bidding war to settle at the Legends Ride, where the bikes will be displayed at the Franklin Hotel prior to the auctioneer sounding the bell to get the bidding underway. Let’s hope that the prices go really high! The museum can TECH SHEET •

Owner: Builders: Year/model: Time to build: Painter: Graphics: Color:

Buffalo Chip Chris Malo, Keith Terry, Black Hills High School students 2015 Indian Chief Classic Three months Jamie’s Repair, Rapid City, SD Tim Peterson, Flat Earth Graphics, Spearfish, SD Dupont Cherry Red, gold leaf with red pinstripes

POWERPLANT

Engine: Displacement: Cylinders: Connecting rods: Pistons: Heads: Cams: Valves: Rockers: Lifters: Pushrods: EFI: Air cleaner: Exhaust: Ignition: Coils: Wires: Oil pump: Primary cover: Transmission: Clutch: Primary drive:

2015 Indian Thunderstroke 111 111" Stock Stock Stock Indian performance Stock Stock Stock Stock Stock Dirty Bird Concepts Dirty Bird Concepts, built by Trask Performance Stock Stock Stock Stock Stock Stock 2015 Indian Stock Stock

84 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

Final drive: Belt CHASSIS

Frame: Triple trees: Neck: Front fork: Shock: Front wheel: Rear wheel: Front brake: Rear brake: Front tire: Rear tire: Front fender: Rear fender:

Stock Kewl Metal Kewl Metal Dirty Bird Concepts springs Rusty Jones Customs RC Components, Exile 26" RC Components, dish 16" Stock Stock Vee Rubber 120/50-26" Vee Rubber 180/60-16" Dirty Bird Concepts Dirty Bird Concepts

ACCESSORIES

Headlight: Taillight: Dash: Seat: Speedo: Foot controls: License bracket: Mirrors: Levers: Hand controls: Saddlebags: Side covers: Audio:

Indian Dirty Bird Concepts Dirty Bird Concepts Kreun Kustom, Black Hawk, SD Stock Carl Brouhard Designs Dirty Bird Concepts Indian Stock Dirty Bird Concepts Dirty Bird Concepts Dirty Bird Concepts MTX Audio AIMag.com


It’s the ride ;,!;1!ħ'89W When the sun meets the horizon and there’s nothing in front of you except the open road. That’s the only way to live. '; 3;38$@$£' -29<8!2$';3&!@W

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Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. © 2016 GEICO


The power of love brings a chopper home

I

T’S A LONG BIKE WITH A LONG HISTORY TO

match. Rick Fairless, the mastermind behind Strokers Dallas, built this chopper more than 15 years ago. He says it was his personal bike, one he vowed to keep and ride for years to come. But then one day, Dallas Stars hockey player Richard Matvichuk caught Rick in a weak moment and talked him into selling it. “Richard’s a big guy,” Rick explains and continues “and he loved this chopper. So, I agreed to sell it to him on the condition that he’d sell it back to me when he was done.” Richard’s stint with the Dallas Stars ended after the 2004

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season. He moved away and took the chopper with him, but he eventually moved back to Dallas.“He returned, minus my chopper,” Rick says. “He’d sold the bike while he was away, just not back to me!” But like a lost kitten, the chopper found its way back to Rick. “A guy called me and said he had one of my bikes and wanted more information,” Rick says. “Now, this happens often. Someone will phone and say their bike is one that I’ve built or customized, and they think it came from me. About half the time, it’s not one of mine. But this one rolled in here, with different paint and different wheels, but I knew it was mine. And when the guy told me he’d got it from a guy who AIMag.com


text by

greg williams photos by

pam proctor

got it from a guy who was a hockey player, well, that just validated the story for me.” But the chopper was just a bit too radical for what the “new” owner wanted in a long bike. He was prepared to sell it, and Rick wasn’t shy in letting him know that he wanted it back. Rick originally built the chopper in 1999. He started with a rigid frame sporting a steering head rake of 43 degrees with 10" of stretch to the backbone. The frame itself came from legendary builder Pat Kennedy, a guy who’s been crafting chopper frames, motorcycles, and parts since the late 1960s. An extended hydraulic front end placed the front wheel well out in front, and Rick had installed disc brakes AIMag.com

ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

87


front and rear. Power came from an Evo-style S&S 112" motor. Rick described the original gas tank as one with some “hard and straight lines to it.” And then, as stated above, Rick sold it, lost it, and found it. The last time Rick saw the long bike had been when hockey star Richard left town with it. When the bike was returned to the Strokers Dallas compound, Rick decided to reconstruct the long chopper as a retro machine, something that could have come full bore from the peace-symbol-laden and tie-dyed heyday of the late 1960s and early1970s, an era that Rick, in case you haven’t noticed already, especially appreciates. The bike’s disassembly saw a blur of wrenches and hands

88 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

until there was really no discernable sign that there was even a chopper in the shop. Sticking to the spirit of the rebuild, though, no modifications were made to the original Pat Kennedy frame. However, Rick ordered a new 28"-over stock springer front end from another legendary name in the industry, Sugar Bear, who’s especially known for his unique and long springer forks. “He’s a friend of mine,” Rick says of Sugar Bear. “And I love the way his forks look [with that distinctive lower rocker].” Indeed, the most recognizable components of a Sugar Bear springer are the swirl-form rockers that help set the front end’s proper trail specs. Rick dug wheels from an unknown manufacturer out of AIMag.com


“He’s a friend of mine,” Rick says of

Sugar

Bear. “And I love the way his forks look.”

what he calls “the dungeon.” Rick actually has two large storage areas that are chockablock with old motorcycle parts that he’s salted away. Often, the two dungeons yield just the right parts for many of his custom builds. In the case of this rebuild, the wheels are a 21" front brakeless hoop and a 16" rear rim, complete with an old GMA pulley brake. Both wheels are of unknown origin. The handlebars started life with a set of Strokers Dallas 2"-tall risers. Then, Rick mocked up a few options in an attempt to position the controls closer to the rider. Ultimately, he drilled and milled a set of flat steel plates from a Victory lowering kit to hold a set of bars bent to shape by the crew at Strokers Dallas. AIMag.com

Rick selected a Paughco 4-gallon gas tank to replace what was originally on the bike, and the Strokers Dallas crew ingeniously turned a glass doorknob into a gas cap for it. The oil for the dry-sump engine remains stored in the original Pat Kennedy tank; a hard-plumbed oil cooler is found in front of the tag bracket on the primary drive side of the chopper. The cooler’s copper lines add a distinctive look as well. Rick wanted to replicate a traditional king/queen Captain America-style seat, so his shop cut and formed a metal pan to follow the Pat Kennedy frame’s lines and rear fender. The tall seat also sports a sissybar — common for bikes of that era — that was fashioned by the Strokers Dallas crew. When completed, the seat pan was sent to Aric Brookshire ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • 89


of Boss Hogg Custom Motorcycle Seats in Dallas where it was wrapped in black cowhide. The S&S engine was taken down to the bare cases for inspection. Although many miles had been logged on the Evo-based powerplant, the engine’s lower end only needed fresh bearings and gaskets. The top end was treated to new rings and the cylinders were lightly honed. To give it the appearance of an old-school mill, Rick opted to install a set of Xzotic Pan-style rocker box covers.

Gas and air come together in a S&S carburetor with a DaVinci upgrade. The exhaust exits through a set of custom-bent pipes, capped with traditional cocktail shaker mufflers. Peace signs were welded into their open ends before being sent to Meclec Metal Finishing in Fresno, California, for plating. Strokers Dallas foot controls and a handful of spacers were also chromed, while several other small parts were treated to a coat of black by Custom Powder Coating in Dallas. The psychedelic paint job stems from ideas bred in Rick’s fertile imagination. He passes along his mystical doodles and thoughts to paint artists Gary Queen and Mike Cissell at Other Side Customs in Dallas for the final spin. It’s up to them to bring the art to life, and you’ll see every color of the rainbow in this colorful interpretation. “I’ve ridden the bike many miles, and it’s just an amazing machine,” Rick says of the chopper that he resurrected in 2014. “It’s very stable, and with that long front end, it does steer differently, almost like a rackand-pinion steering.” Rick renamed the motorcycle Susie, in honor of his wife. He insists that the throwback chopper will have a permanent history with the Fairless family and says, “This is the chopper I’m going to keep forever, and I won’t let it go again.” AIM

TECH SHEET •

Owner: Builder: Year/model: Time to build: Chromer: Polisher: Powdercoater: Painters: Colors:

Rick Fairless Rick Fairless Strokers Dallas (RFSD) 2014 RFSD custom chopper Six months Meclec Metal Finishing Inc., Fresno, CA RFSD Custom Powder Coating, Dallas Gary Queen and Mike Cissell, Other Side Customs, Dallas Every one on the color wheel

POWERPLANT

Engine: Builders: Displacement: Horsepower: Cases: Flywheels: Cylinders: Pistons: Heads: Cams: Rocker covers: Carb: Air cleaner: Exhaust: Ignition: Charging system: Primary cover: Transmission: Case: Gears:

1999 S&S Cycle RFSD/S&S Cycle 112" 125 S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle S&S Cycle Xzotic Pan-style covers S&S Cycle, DaVinci upgrade RFSD RFSD Dynatek Dyna S Dynatek Dyna S 32 amp Performance Machine BAKER Drivetrain six-speed BAKER Drivetrain BAKER Drivetrain

90 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

Clutch: BDL Primary drive: Performance Machine Contour 2" Final drive: BDL GMA belt CHASSIS

Frame: Rake: Stretch: Front forks: Front wheel: Rear wheel: Rear brake: Front tire: Rear tire: Rear fender: Rail:

1999 Pat Kennedy 43 degrees 10" Sugar Bear springer 28"-over 2.75-21" 6.00-16" BDL GMA pulley/brake Avon MH90-21" Avon 200/60R-16" Pat Kennedy RFSD

ACCESSORIES

Headlight: Taillight: Fuel tank: Oil tank: Handlebars: Risers: Seat: Pegs: License bracket: Mirrors: Hand controls: Foot controls: Levers:

CCI with RFSD bracket RFSD Shot Glass Four-gallon Paughco Pat Kennedy RFSD/Victory lowering kit RFSD 2-1/2" RFSD RFSD RFSD RFSD RFSD RFSD RFSD “dungeon” AIMag.com


THRUSTER

TRACER

Made in the USA

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R E V I E W • by Chris Maida

The ME 888 Marathon Ultra is an outstanding tire!

METZELER TIRE TEST

Y Salvo Pennisi (with hat) and his crew did an excellent job of keeping everything running smoothly during our time in Sicily. That’s Metzeler’s director of marketing, NAFTA, Chet Plewacki, in the white shirt.

92 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

OU’VE GOT TO HAND IT TO THE CREW AT Metzeler. Whether it’s designing a new tire or planning a fun way to test it, they know how to do the deed! I base that statement on the trip I took to Sicily several months ago to test Metzeler’s ME 888 Marathon Ultra on the beautiful and twisty roads on and around Mt. Etna. But I’m getting ahead of myself. Before I tell you about Sicily, how we tested the ME 888, and how it performed, I should tell you what brought this about. Though the ME 880 was a great tire, the folks at Metzeler were not satisfied with how long it was lasting on American roads. Based on the testing they had done on the roads of Europe, as well as their extensive European tire testing facilities, the tire should have been having a longer service life. This was not acceptable to either Metzeler or Salvo Pennisi, manager of the testing department and the man tasked with finding out what was different about American roads and what changes needed to be made to the ME 880. Salvo, a very friendly and dedicated man, felt the only way to answer that question correctly was to conduct an in-depth, 11,000-mile tire test from Alaska to Florida on a variety of American and Canadian roads using various AIMag.com


REVIEW

motorcycles. They found that they needed to make important tweaks to the five major factors of their ME 880, namely its profile, contact patch, ply line, tread pattern, and tread compound. In other words, design a completely new tire. They came up with the ME 888 Marathon Ultra, which has been in service for over three years and has an excellent reputation with riders and builders alike. Let’s discuss these five categories as we compare the ME 888 to the ME 880, starting with the three aspects of its structure. The ME 888 has a new multiradius profile that increases the tire’s handling abilities, allowing the rider more precision and control of his bike in turns. The sidewalls have a new, rounder profile to increase the tire’s damping effect so it can absorb more road irregularities and give the rider a more comfortable ride. The crew at Metzeler also decreased the central curvature of the tire by over 50 percent, which means the tire has a wider footprint — more rubber on the road. This, as you would expect, increases the tire’s mileage, grip, and high-speed stability. These improvements resulted in a 17 percent wider contact patch to distribute wear over a larger area and a 14 percent larger footprint to distribute the stresses the tire is subject to over a larger area, which reduces the stress on any one section for an increase in mileage. The tire’s ply line was also redesigned to move these stresses away from the tire’s belts in the tread and to the sidewalls, thus reducing the tire’s structural fatigue. This particular improvement is why the ME 888 retains all its handling and traction characteristics throughout its service life. As for the tire’s tread pattern, compound bridges, which are the sections of rubber between the tread grooves in the

At the Cantine Russo, we toured the vineyard with Robert Corsello, the winery’s export manager. Here’s Salvo (fourth from right) and his uncle Franco (fourth from left), as well as my fellow journalists and Chet in the courtyard of the building used in three of the Godfather movies.

We stayed at the beautiful Castello di San Marco, a castle that’s now a luxury hotel and spa.

94 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


REVIEW

ful town of Taormina. After all, we tire, have been strategically had to ride somewhere to test the positioned in the tread pattern to tires, so why not show off some of increase the tread pattern’s stabilthe best of Sicily at the same time? ity. This increases the tire’s ability We stayed at the Castello di San to transfer thrust to the pavement Marco, a beautiful castle that is during acceleration, as well as renow a luxury hotel and spa. This is duce wear (since the tread is not where we had most of our meals, wiggling around) and keep the were introduced to the grooves fully open when in conME 888, and talked and compared tact with the pavement for maxinotes about the tire’s performance. mum water drainage. We also went to Cantine Russo, a There’s also a section right Just one of the many tire-testing devices Metzeler uses at its facility wonderful winery on Mt. Etna, down the center of the tire (cenin Milan. where we toured the vineyard with tral full rubber strip) without any Robert Corsello, the winery’s export manager. Needless to grooves in it, which acts as a small slick for better grip dursay, their wines, which we tasted that night at our hotel, were ing hard acceleration. Even the angle of the walls of the outstanding! Salvo also surprised us with a special treat: we grooves has been redesigned and improved. These angles visited his uncle and aunt, Franco and Giovanna Platania, now vary according to the direction of the stress acting on the tread compound for better wear characteristics and water Baron of Santa Lucia, who own Castello degli Schiavi, a historic building used in three of the Godfather movies. If you drainage. The width of the grooves also increases as it goes look at the top right corner of the photo om page 94, you’ll from the center of the tire to the shoulder (differentiated see the balcony where Al Pacino stood when his wife was groove geometry) for better water dispersal and traction in killed when she started their car in the first movie. wet conditions, which increases riding stability. Lastly, the Our last stop was Milan, where we saw Metzeler’s imME 888’s tread compound has been changed to improve its pressive research and tire-testing facility. This is where they wet-skid resistance and its abrasion resistance. That’s a diffitest new tread patterns, compounds, etc. and beat the tires cult thing to do since what you do to improve one characterup in very inventive ways to see how they will perform. istic usually decreases the effectiveness of the other. As you Once a new design passes the laboratory tests, it’s onto one can see, it took a number of changes in each of the five categories to get the improvements the crew at Metzeler wanted. of several test tracks for another round of tests and abuse. The bottom line: as you can tell by the headline for this Now that you know what makes the ME 888 so different article, the ME 888 is an outstanding tire. I rode a Softail, from the ME 880, it’s time to tell you about our test/tour. Dyna, and Sportster fitted with these tires and found that Salvo and his crew did an excellent job of setting up a twothe bike’s cornering capabilities were reached before hitting day tour of Sicily, which brought us to wonderful places to the limits of the ME 888s. In fact, many times I went into a see and ride while also accomplishing their primary goal: turn too fast or too wide on purpose to see what the tire having us ride a variety of Harley-Davidson models fitted with ME 888 tires on a variety of road surfaces in all types of would do when I had to do some fast maneuvers to make road situations, on both sunny and rainy days. Of course, the the turn. Of course, I didn’t mess up to the point of almost crashing, but in every instance the ME 888 performed perMetzeler crew had nothing to do with it raining on us, but it fectly and predictably, allowing me to get out of trouble. The did give us all the opportunity to try out the ME 888s in wet only time I got the tire to skid on purpose was in a descendconditions. We rode through small, quaint villages, picturing hairpin turn in the rain. I positioned the bike on the very esque towns, along the seashore, on long and fast straightinside corner of the turn, where the pavement descended aways, curvy mountain roads, highways, and even tight hairpin turns up and down the side of Mt. Etna to the beauti- steeply and turned very sharply. When halfway through the turn, I slammed on the rear brake. Of course, the rear tire skidded; no surprise there. However, the excellent part was that as soon as I released the rear brake, the tire immediately regained its grip even though I was sliding sideways and down a steep grade on a wet road! I was able to finish the turn in complete control. Perfect! I highly recommend the Metzeler ME 888; definitely put it on your very short list when looking for new tires for your bike. I’ll end with this thought: buying cheap tires is a bad way to save a little cash. I say that because crappy tires may not get you out of a jam if you need to make a quick course correction or stop abruptly. The few bucks saved are nothing compared to the cost of a busted bike, or worse, because your tires weren’t up to the task when needed. Never cheap out on your tires! They are the only things connecting you to the road. AIM Grabbing a great seafood meal right by the seashore, where else?

96 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


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Harley-Davidson is a registered trademark of Harley-Davidson Motor Company * Not legal for street use on any pollution controlled motorcycle


A M E R I C A N I R O N FA M I LY • By Bryan Harley

Boardtrack Racer

Brittney Olsen 20th Century racing torchbearer brazenly battles the boys on mission to preserve American racing history Olsen triumphantly raises the checkered flag

98 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

D

ON’T LET THE BABY FACE FOOL YOU. BEHIND the doe-like eyes lies the spirit of a fearless competitor. Because by the time bubbly Brittney Olsen zips up her racing leathers, her inner Shirley “Cha Cha” Muldowney comes out as she twists the grip of her 1923 Harley boardtracker and barrels into dirt track corners at 70 mph on a motorcycle with a contact patch the width of a bicycle tire. Powered by a boosted 68" engine, the old Harley is push-started, has no brakes, no clutch, and no transmission, all part of the perils of vintage motorcycle racing. But as soon as the flag drops, she’s on the gas and charging into corners. Before long, Olsen’s found her line and is tracing smooth laps around half-mile ovals such as Black Hills Speedway and historic Meade County Fairgrounds on her way to victory. Vintage motorcycle racing isn’t only Brittney Olsen’s passion, it’s her mission. Along with her husband, Knucklehead savant Matt Olsen, they formed 20th Century Racing with the goal of “preserving the magnificent history of American motorcycle racing through our old motorcycle racing adventures. We do this by educating current and future motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world with our motorcycles and the racing that we do.” AIMag.com


The Olsens accomplish this objective not only by competing in vintage motorcycle races and attending events like Born Free and the Handbuilt Motorcycle Show, but through social media channels such as Facebook and Instagram. Thanks to their online presence “[we’ve] had such a huge reach.” A video Brittney did for a Champion spark plug contest boosted this reach. While the $50,000 grand prize would have been nice, Olsen’s primary goal was to explore the extent of their following in order to help spread 20th Century Racing’s mission statement. On her blog she listed getting votes from all seven continents as one of her objectives. Within two weeks she started getting e-mails from places like Nepal and Pakistan from people who had seen her video. Support poured in from places she didn’t even know existed, and when the contest concluded, Olsen had reached her goal. Another of her goals is to save the original Sturgis HalfMile dirt track at the old Meade County Fairgrounds. The location of the track happens to be prime Sturgis real estate, and the city has tossed around the idea of using the property for residential development. Olsen said the city is also planning on building a new, world-class facility in Sturgis, another nail in the coffin of the old dirt track. But with a history of racing that stretches back about 100 years, the old

Olsen isn’t afraid to hold the throttle wide open as she finds fast lines around dirt tracks.

AIMag.com

ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

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A M E R I C A N I R O N FA M I LY

dirt oval is steeped in historical significance. “It’s the half-mile track that started the rally. It’s the biggest piece of motorcycle racing history our state has to offer. If I’m living up to my mission statement, the time to save it is now because the city is planning on developing it and getting rid of it,” said Olsen. So 20th Century Racing is organizing the Spirit of Sturgis Vintage Motorcycle Festival at the track in late August. The idea was spawned during a conversation between Olsen and Indian Motorcycle Sturgis owner Bruce Eide last year. So impressed with the job she did promoting vintage motorcycle racing on the 1938 Spirit of Sturgis Indian Sport Scout he sponsored, Eide approached Olsen with the idea of promoting a vintage festival sion turned to racing vintage similar to Barber, and the seeds motorcycles. Matt happens to for a benefit to honor the track be the son of Carl Olsen, who were sewn. started working on Harley Big The Spirit of Sturgis Vintage Twins before he was out of high Motorcycle Festival is schedschool. Over the years, Carl’s uled to take place August 26-28. Cycle Shop has established itself It will be instilled with the spirit as one of the leading restorers of of Pappy Hoel, from gypsy old Knuckles, and Matt was tours through the Black Hills to raised in the shop. half-mile vintage motorcycle On their first date, Brittney races on the historic track. said, “We talked about old There will be an old motorcycle bikes, we talked about boardexhibition, a swap meet and trackers. Then, he informed me The idea to get hitched at the Wall of Death came to the Olsens while antique flea market, vendors, that they were still racing standing in line for a carnival ride. Oil & Ink Expo artwork, and a boardtrackers, which I had no party on the infield post-race. idea that they were, but I had my mind made up on building The festival will be an all-ages affair, with field games on this old Excelsior motorcycle into a boardtracker. So he was bicycles for kids under 16 planned along with motorcycle explaining to me about this 1913 boardtracker that he had field games for kids over 16. Olsen said kids will be taught built.” And the foundation was set. how to kickstart a vintage bike. Their passion for old bikes is so deep that they got marIn addition to its historic ties to the rally, the Sturgis ried on the stage of the Wall of Death. They came up with Half-Mile holds a special place in Olsen’s heart. She won the idea at a county fair while standing in line for the her first vintage motorcycle race there in 2014 and calls it the “best track that I’ve ever seen, no divots and foot holes.” Zipper. The thought of having a carnival crew come out for their wedding occurred first. The couple just so happened to She’s excited about the prospect of getting a “blue groove” be wearing their Wall of Death T-shirts when the idea during this summer’s festival and calls racing on the halfstruck. Next thing they knew, they were calling Charlie mile track “glorious.” She even has dreams of having a Ransom while standing in line for the Zipper. Ransom was house that sits on a hill overlooking the track. Little wonder Olsen is so passionate about saving this his- the first to know they were going to get married. At their wedding, they eschewed traditions like a garter toss for a toric Sturgis site. She’s a South Dakota girl who grew up in the small town of Worthing. She got married and is raising a first dance inside the Wall itself, followed by a full daredevil show performed around them. Instead of a money tree, the family there. She even took the MSF course in Mitchell cash Ransom and the Wall riders collected during the taught by Laura Klock. “I wanted to have her name on my performance was handed to the bride and groom. For a card and to be able to say that I got my South Dakota state wedding present, Matt gave her a 1923 engine for her motorcycle license from a Motor Maid,” said Olsen. boardtracker. You might say that racing has been in Brittney’s blood Being nontraditional is the Brittney Olsen way. What since she was a child. She rode her first dirt bike when she other 27-year-old girl runs around in vintage garb and beats was 3. Her father took her to drag races when she was the boys on dirt tracks, racing 100-year-old motorcycles? growing up, bought her a go-kart when she was in fourth Her love of old motorcycles and vintage racing in a technolgrade, followed by an ATV the next year. Soon she was flat track-racing ATVs. At 15, her father gave her a custom-built ogy-driven world is an anachronism, as Olsen channels the spirit of pioneering women motorcyclists like Effie Sportster. But she still wasn’t hooked on racing motorcycles Hotchkiss every time she takes the track. Don’t let the cute as she continued to hold onto her dream of racing top fuel smile fool you. Dismiss her as just another pretty face, and dragsters and funny cars like her idol, Shirley Muldowney. soon you’ll be eating dust in her wake. AIM It wasn’t until she met her husband, Matt, that her pas-

100 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


T E C H • by Chris Maida

YELVINGTON REVERSE

All the magic happens in the new rear wheel pulley, no transmission modifications needed

H

OW MANY TIMES HAVE YOU FOUND YOURSELF

Here’s our 2016

1 Street Glide Special

with its rear section on a bike jack at Yelvington with its seat, saddlebags, mufflers, rear shocks, rear drive pulley, and rear brake caliper and bracket removed. The battery’s negative cable has been disconnected using a 10mm wrench.

struggling to back your Harley Touring bike out of a corner, parking spot, or wherever? Sucks, doesn’t it? Well, the crew at Yelvington has a simple and easy way to end that hassle forever. And it has nothing to do with altering the transmission or any other major component on your bike. All the magic is done in the rear wheel pulley. Just swap out the stock rear pulley and axle for one of Yelvington’s reverse units, and then add a few other Yelvington parts onto the bike. This unit will fit all 2009 and later Touring models, and Yelvington is hastily working on manufacturing the product for older models and cruisers. Once installed, going in reverse is as simple as pushing a button, letting out the clutch, and walking the bike backwards under its own power just as you do when you walk it forward. A cool gadget like this (introductory price $1,995) is just what you’d expect from a company started by a few guys with NASA (yup, the rocket people), NASCAR, NHRA, and various US defense contractor credentials. After four years of R&D, the crew at Yelvingon offers a simple way, engineered for strength and durability, to propel your bike in reverse. It’s constructed of aircraft billet aluminum, advanced polymers, and highstrength steel and bronze alloys. All the major parts were created by Yelvington engineers and designers and built in the USA using precision CNC machinery. So how does it work? In a word, great! When you push the Harley-Davidson accessory switch included with the Yelvington kit to On, you hear the air compressor build up pressure and then shut off once it has moved and engaged a splined

gear in the Yelvington pulley. This mechanism causes the forward motion of the stock rear drive belt to turn the TOOLS NEEDED • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Blue Loctite Red Loctite Blue tape Teflon tape Plastic mallet T-25 Torx T-40 Torx 5/32" Allen 3/16" Allen 5/16" Allen 10mm wrench 5/16" wrench 7/16" wrench 9/16" wrench 3/4" socket 15/16" socket 1-7/16" socket 3/8" drive extension Torque wrench (in-lbs.) Torque wrench (ft-lbs.) Rear belt tension tool Rear wheel alignment tool 

Here’s where all the magic happens: the stock

2 rear drive pulley is replaced with this Yelvington drive unit, which has exactly the same tooth count as the stock pulley. No tranny modifications or additions are made.

102 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


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Joe positions the Yelvington unit onto the rear

3 wheel exactly like the stock pulley, with the rear flanges engaged with the stock cush drive system, while Mike holds the wheel and keeps the rear drive belt out of the way.

Mike then aligns the outer bearing and shuttle

4 gear using his finger. You can also use the supplied Yelvington axle to do this.

5

The Yelvington axle comes assembled, so Mike removes the bolt, large washer, and spring from the core of the axle. Mike then puts a skin coat of anti-seize on the axle. No left axle spacer is used with the Yelvington reverse/pulley unit.

104 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

With all the axle holes lined up, Mike sends the

Using the supplied Yelvington tool, Mike

and partway into the rear wheel. Note that the actuator in the axle (arrow) is facing to the rear and is fully forward in its slot.

forward in its slot, so the actuator can slide into the reverse unit and click into place in the notch in the shuttle gear, as Mike taps the axle into the wheel until it bottoms using a plastic mallet.

6 axle into the swingarm, Yelvington rear pulley, 9 depresses the actuator while keeping it fully

With the axle protruding from the right side of the

After jacking the bike up so the wheel clears

7 wheel hub about 1", and the fully forward axle

10 the worktable, Mike positions the stock rear

After the stock brake caliper bracket is slipped

11 the right side of the axle to move the actuator

actuator exposed on the left side, Mike installs the stock ABS sensor with its tab engaged with the notch on the wheel hub.

8 over the end of the axle, its other end is

engaged with its mounting tab on the swingarm. You’ll need to angle the front of the wheel to the left to get the bracket onto its mounting tab.

drive belt on the top of the Yelvington reverse/pulley unit and rotates the tire as he pushes the belt onto the pulley.

Mike now slips the same Yelvington tool into

to the left, which shifts the Yelvington unit into reverse. He then rotates the pulley to ensure the wheel turns in reverse. If needed, repeat Step 10. AIMag.com


Product Comparo: Bohn Armor Pants vs Kevlar Jeans

C O O L

The Case for

Ac!onSta!ons Boss Paul English talks about the dierences in lower body protec!on op!ons.

Kevlar reinforced jeans are popular with riders of all kinds of bikes. Draggin Jeans were among the first on the market, and there are now many similar versions available. Many riders are interested in how these compare to the Bohn Pants. Q: Paul, please explain the dierences between Kevlar riding jeans and the Bohn Pants. PE: In short kevlar has great abrasion resistance and is excellent for gravel rash when you’re sliding down the road. With the Bohn System we’re focusing more on Impact Protec!on - the vulnerable ‘corners’ you land on and damage - knees, hips, and elbows and shoulders with the shirts. An unprotected impact in these places can put you in the ER and o work. And hurts! Q: But won’t your armor grind through in a wreck? PE: Actually in over 15 years, we’ve never seen our armor significantly damaged at all! This is because in a crash, we tend to bounce and slide, scrubbing the speed o. Q:The Bohn System has to be worn under jeans as an extra layer, isn’t that hot and a hassle? PE: Posi!oning armor snugly against your body is the best way of providing comfortable and discrete protec!on so that it’s in the right place if you have a fall. Yes, it’s definitely an extra step compared to jeans - but on the other hand you can then wear your own jeans, or whatever pants you choose. It gives you a lot more op!ons. Q: But isn’t it hot? PE: The only !me you no!ce the Bohn Pants being hot is in the heat of the summer when you’re a stands!ll, say sing on your bike at a light. At that !me of year eveything’s hot! Otherwise they breathe really well in all seasons; and we do have op!ons of a mesh shell material and also a winter thermal solu!on. Q: What about pung armor into kevlar jeans? PE: Some companies do have this op!on, which on first impressions is a good idea. But what actually happens is the armor ‘flops’ around the outside of your leg as it’s aached to the jeans - so you can imagine that it won’t be in the right place if you actually do hit the ground. Q: So do I need to upsize your jeans for the Bohn Pants? PE: Surprisingly most people find that their exis!ng regular-fit, or relaxed jeans fit perfectly over the Adventure Pants - that’s because the armor mainly fits where your jeans are loose. Q: Don’t the Bohn Pants make your jeans look bulky? PE: No one can see you have anything but your jeans on! Q: And you make armored shirts too? A: We think of the pants and shirts as ‘A System’ that protects you without having to wear full armored gear - specially in the heat. Q: OK. so what’s the best choice for me? PE: As a lifelong rider myself - I love to have choices in bikes, accessories and gear. Many riders are happy with kevlar jeans, and most are very well made. We’re so proud of the Bohn Adventure Pants and the amazing customer reports we get, but everyone has dierent priori!es.

My suggeson is to give us a try we’ve a Great Can’t Lose 90 Day Trial Oer! And they’re made in the USA too!

M OST OF US THINK THAT 1: I’M NEVER GONNA CRASH 2: P ROTECTION IS WORN ON THE OUTSIDE , LIKE LEATHER JACKETS AND SUITS .

A ND

THAT ’ S

OK.

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TO TELL YOU ABOUT

A DIFFERENT WAY OF THINKING .

AND

FOR MANY RIDERS LIKE ME ,

IT MAKES A

LOT MORE SENSE.

BUT FIRST HERE’S THE PROBLEM. I DONT RIDE FAST, AM CAREFUL AND USUALLY CONSIDERATE. BUT ITS THE OTHERS - TRAFFIC, TRUCKS, DOGS AND DEER, GRAVEL AND DIESEL SPILLS. FACT IS I’M MORE NERVOUS THAN I WAS. BUT I REALLY LIKE RIDING IN JEANS AND MY FAVORITE JACKET AND I JUST DON’T WANT TO GET ALL SUITED UP EVERY TIME I RIDE. SPECIALLY IN THE SUMMER WHEN WE RIDE MOST. SO

WHEN

GEAR

I

HEARD ABOUT THIS BOHN

- IT’S

LIKE ARMORED LONG

JOHN’S, IT GOT ME THINKING.

GOOD VIDeo ONLIne

WWW.GETMOTORPANTS.COM

I USUALLY WEAR A BASE LAYER ANY WAY, COMFORTABLE UNDER MY JEANS, AND FEELS GOOD ON TOP. SO THIS BOHN BODYGUARD SYSTEM IS LIKE THAT BUT WITH SLIM PADS SET INTO POCKETS ALL AROUND.

BASICALLY WHERE YOU’D LAND IF YOU WRECKED. ONCE I HAVE THEM ON YOU CAN BARELY SEE OR FEEL IT’S THERE, AND MY NORMAL JEANS FIT RIGHT OVER. SO THEY’RE COMFORTABLE TO WEAR ALL DAY ON THE BIKE, AND ARE COOL WHICH IS IMPORTANT. THERE’S LOTS OF IMPRESSIVE CRASH REPORTS ON THE SITE, BUT I HAVEN’T BEEN DOWN MYSELF. THANKFULLY. IT WORKS FOR ME, I FEEL SECURE. YOU SHOULD CHECK IT OUT ONLINE, AND I’D SAY GIVE ‘EM A TRY, AS YOU GET 90 DAYS TO ACTUALLY USE THEM WITHOUT HASSLE. I GOT THE PANTS FIRST, BUT THERE’S A GOOD DEAL FOR THE PANTS/SHIRT COMBO. MADE IN THE USOFA TOO. CHECK THEM HERE:

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Mike now slips the Yelvington right-side

12 torque restraint into the front half of the

Using the cam plate on the right side of the

15 restraint assembly onto the swingarm’s left

18 axle, a 3/8" drive extension, and the proper

13 adjuster, which replaces the stock unit, onto 16 Mike’s new line of Suspension Technologies

19 Yelvington-supplied actuator spring into the

swingarm’s axle slot. If needed, lightly tap it into place using a flat-bladed screwdriver and a plastic hammer, and/or drop or lift the bike a little to take pressure off the rear axle.

Mike installs the Yelvington left torque

axle slot. If needed, lightly tap the assembly into place using a plastic mallet and/or drop or lift the bike a little to take pressure off the rear axle.

Mike slips the supplied Yelvington axle

Mike now reinstalls the shocks, which are

the right end of the Yelvington axle.

USA high-performance rear shocks, using blue Loctite and a 3/4" socket. Mike torques the bolts to 35-40 ft-lbs.

measuring tool, Mike makes the axle the same distance from the swingarm pivot shaft on both sides of the bike. He then snugs the axle nut using a 1-7/16" socket.

On the left side of the bike, Mike slips the

center of the Yelvington axle. He then puts some red Loctite and the Yelvington-supplied large washer onto the Yelvington axle bolt.

Mike uses a 3/16" Allen on the Yelvington left

To install the axle bolt against the pressure

the proper H-D tool to set the rear belt tension. Once this is set on the left side of the wheel, Mike must bring the rear wheel into alignment.

the bolt with his left thumb while turning the bolt using his right hand. He then torques the bolt to 40 ft-lbs. using a 15/16" socket.

17 torque restraint assembly’s front setscrew and 20 of the spring, Mike presses in on the head of Mike can then thread on the stock axle nut,

14 but he leaves it only finger-tight for now. 106 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


Mike can now torque the stock right axle nut

21 to 95-105 ft-lbs. using a 1-7/16" socket. Joe

holds the Yelvington axle adjusting cam plate using a 3/8" drive extension and ratchet to keep the axle adjustment from changing.

Mike torques the rearmost of the two lower

24 Yelvington torque restraint assembly’s

setscrews to 100 in-lbs. using a 5/16" wrench and locks it down using a 9/16" wrench.

Mike installs the Teflon-wrapped Yelvington

27 air line fitting into the right end of the

Yelvington axle using a 7/16" wrench. This should be the final position of the fitting, between 2 and 3 o’clock.

Mike installs the supplied stainless steel

Mike then pops the stock axle E-clip onto

22 the end of the Yelvington axle using a plastic hammer.

Mike then snugs the front lower Yelvington

25 setscrew using a 3/16" Allen and locks it using the 9/16" wrench.

28 braided air line onto the Yelvington air

compressor using a 9/16" wrench. He then covers the frame tubes under the right side cover and in front of the ABS unit with blue tape.

After threading the air line up into the seat

23

With red Loctite on all three of the remaining Yelvington torque restraint assembly’s setscrews, Mike torques the rear Yelvington axle setscrew to 100 in-lbs. using a 3/16" Allen.

108 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

29 area and inboard of the ABS system’s three 26

Mike reinstalls the stock brake caliper using the stock hardware and a 5/16" Allen. He torques the bolts to 43-48 ft-lbs.

brake lines, Joe positions the air compressor in front of the stock ABS unit and secures it using the supplied Yelvington bolt and a 5/32" Allen. AIMag.com




 Mike routes the air line behind the frame

30 tube by the side coverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top rear mounting

point, down along the inner side of the frame tubes (wire ties), and back to the axle fitting where he attaches the line using a 9/16" wrench.

The X-Ray Vision of

Nick Veasey

Limited Edition Diasec Prints

To remove the ignition switch, Joe pushes

31 up on the button under the right lower corner of the switch cover while turning the key counterclockwise past the Unlock position on the switch.

Using an adjustable wrench, Joe removes

32 the nut on top of the ignition switch and sets it aside.

AIMag.com

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rear wheel in the opposite direction. You then operate your bike just as you would to walk it forward. Just pull in the clutch lever, shift the transmission into first gear, and let the clutch out just a little to slowly

Joe removes the stock switch cover from the

33 front end by removing the two bolts (one per side) using a 5/32" Allen.

Joe now connects the other end of the

36 bike’s stock accessories harness, which is

secured under the left side cover towards the bottom, to one end of the Yelvingtonsupplied harnesses. He then resecures the connector to its stock location.

walk the bike backward. You’ll hear the reverse setup in the rear pulley working as you do this. Once out of the parking space, put the bike back into neutral and turn off the Yelvington reverse, which disengages the splined gear in the Yelvington pulley. Then shift the bike back into first gear, and ride away. It’s that simple! The unit requires no maintenance and comes with a one-year warranty. As for where to do the install, what better place than with the guys who designed and install it every day on a variety of H-D Touring bikes? I spent the day at the Yelvington facility in Seminole, Florida, with Senior Engineer/Operations Manager Mike Alex and tech Joe Kruger as they installed one of their reverse setups on our test bike, a 2016 Street Glide Special, as I shot and wrote the accompanying photos and captions. As you’ll see, this kit can be installed in a home garage by experienced wrenches (Yelvington recommends dealer installation) using standard tools, a belt tension tool, a rear wheel alignment tool, and a bike jack. A bike lift will make the job easier, but it’s not required. Note: The parts shown in this installation may vary from the final production units. AIM

Joe loosens the two bolts that hold the fuse

After removing the stock switch blanks,

34 Joe installs the Yelvington-supplied H-D

switches using the supplied hardware and a T-25 Torx.

37 block mounting base to the frame using a

T-40 Torx so he can route the Yelvington harness into the stock battery area. He then retightens the bolts before moving to the next step.

After attaching the new Yelvington

38 harness to the connector from the

Yelvington air compressor, Joe buries the connectors under the other wiring. He can then reattach the battery ground cable and reinstall the seat and the rest of the stock parts.

After attaching the bike’s existing acces-

SOURCES

reinstalls the stock switch cover onto the front end. He then reinstalls the ignition switch, cover, and spring the same way he removed it.

YELVINGTON 727/233-3610 YelvingtonUSA.com

35 sories harness to the new H-D switch, Joe 110 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

WHEN INSERTING THE AXLE into the Yelvington rear pulley and the stock rear wheel, if the axle will not go in easily, the right end of the axle is not in T I P S & the center of the T R I C K S right wheel bearing. Try lifting the right end of the axle up or down. Do not force the axle through the wheel by hitting it hard with a hammer. Only taps with your palm or a plastic mallet are needed when it’s properly aligned. At this point, only insert the axle into the wheel as far as the fully forward Yelvington axle actuator, which must be exposed at this point. When removing the ignition switch, be sure to hold the spring that’s under the cover so it stays inside the cover as you remove the switch from the bike. Also, if you don’t move or touch the switch base, the switch and cover and spring will go right back into the base without using the special H-D tool.  AIMag.com


T E C H • by Chris Maida • photos by Elayne Maida

HEADWINDS LED BULB This simple headlight bulb swap will greatly increase your ability to see the road and any road hazards while riding at night

I

LOVE SIMPLE UPGRADES! BEING ABLE TO MAKE A

Here’s our 1999 Road

1 King in the driveway

and ready to get a new Headwinds LED headlight. Be sure to put a towel over the front fender to protect it.

simple parts swap to fix a problem or weak area of performance on a bike is like taking a pill to get rid of a headache. It’s quick, easy, and makes my life more enjoyable. Upgrading from the stock halogen bulb on your Harley to one of Headwinds’ H4 LED headlight bulbs (#8-9030-H4/$99.95) is just that kind of upgrade and definitely worth the cash and time to make it happen. We did this upgrade on a 1999 Road King, and the change was dramatic. This LED setup boasts a low beam that’s much brighter than the stock high beam, with a wider field of light thanks to the LED’s 1,800 lumens compared to the halogen’s 1,100 lumens, yet the LED uses less power than the stock bulb. The Headwinds kit includes the LED bulb, driver, fan

(keeps the bulb cool and improves performance and longevity), and threeprong connector. Installation is all plug-and-play. No wires to cut or splice. Just plug stuff together, stuff it into the headlight bucket, and hit the road. The accompanying photos and captions lay out the entire process from start to finish. We didn’t have to adjust our headlight after the install, but you should check yours just to be sure. You can see how to do that on the Headwinds web site or in the manual for your bike. TOOLS NEEDED • • • •

Blue Loctite Electric tape #1 Phillips screwdriver Front fender cover 

If your bike has a beauty ring, use a #1 Phillips

2 screwdriver to remove the screw and nut that

hold the beauty ring. Then remove the ring and set it aside for reinstallation later.

112 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


Use a #1 Phillips screwdriver to remove the stock

Now pull the rubber boot from back of the head-

3 ring’s screw, and then remove the stock ring and 6 light to uncover the bulb-holding assembly. set it aside for reinstallation later.

Without touching the head, insert the new

9 Headwinds LED setup the same way as the

stock bulb was positioned, noting the three alignment tabs.





 Then secure the new Headwinds LED bulb

4

Use a #1 Phillips screwdriver to remove the three holding ring screws that are around the bulb. Do not touch the other screws (arrows), which are for aligning the headlight’s beams. Remove the holding ring and lay it aside for reinstallation.

Release the stock bulb by pushing down and in

7 on each tang of the holding clip. Then lift the

10 using the stock holding clips. Note that one of the three alignment tabs is larger than the other two (arrow).

holding clip up and away from the bulb. The clip is on a hinge, so it will not fall off.

With the Headwinds LED bulb’s wiring harness

11 through the stock rubber boot, reinstall the 5

You can now unplug the stock headlight assembly.

114 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

8

Without touching the glass, just lift the bulb from the headlight housing.

boot onto the light housing. Fully seat it by pushing down on the center of the boot with both thumbs once the hole is lined up. AIMag.com


AIMag.com

ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

115


 B

A



With a little blue Loctite on the threads,

12 screw the new Headwinds fan unit onto the back of the bulb until it fits snugly. Then connect both the bulb and fan harnesses to the LED driver harnesses by aligning their internal tabs.

Headwinds supplies a foam stick pad to secure

15 the LED driver to the headlight housing. We

went with some wire-ties on our installation. Be sure to engage this clip (A) with the slot

18 (B) when reinstalling the stock trim ring.

Then secure the ring with the stock screw and a #1 Phillips screwdriver.

The fan connectors click into place, while the

13 bulb connectors just slide together and are

then secured by screwing on the connectors together.

Connect the Headwinds LED driver plug to

16 the stock headlight bulb plug. We then wrap the plugs with electric tape. Before going any further, check that both beams on the new headlight work.

Reinstall the beauty ring if you have one,

19 using the stock screw, nut, and #1 Phillips screwdriver.

Position the stock headlight housing in the

Wrap the two connectors with electric tape to

14 help keep them dry.

116 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

17 stock shell the same way it was before, and secure it using the stock three screws and a #1 Phillips screwdriver.

20

Here’s how the stock low beam lights up. AIMag.com


WWW. G E T K LO C K E D . C O M

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This is the new Headwinds LED low beam,

21 much better!

22

Here’s how the stock high beam lights up.

This is the new Headwinds LED high beam.

23 As you can see, there’s a big difference between the two! AIM

SOURCES HEADWINDS 626/359-8044 Headwinds.com

118 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


C


HOG HELPLINE

Failing Brakes & Electronic Compass Problems During my usual visual and operational checks in Q: preparation for a morning ride, I found that the front brake lever was frozen. As such, I had no control of the front Is the front brake lever or rear brake pedal on your ABS-equipped bike frozen, but there’s no trouble code? It may be a sticking valve in the ABS system’s hydraulic control unit (HCU). Corrosion or dirt in the valve might cause this to happen. To prevent this, have your tech flush the brake system and replace the brake fluid every two years as part of regular maintenance.

brakes. I rolled the bike into the garage and drove my car the rest of the day. I stopped by my local dealer and talked with my mechanic who has always done all the service and work on my bike. When I told him the problem, he immediately diagnosed it as a failed HCU and asked if I would like to put in an order for a new one, as they are currently on back order. I placed the order. He went on to say that he had replaced several of these over the past few months. I trailered the bike two days later to the dealer. As soon as the two mechanics grabbed the lever, they said in unison, “Another failed HCU.” Any part can fail, I understand that. Up until this point, all repairs were made to things that I understood, at least in principle. But I was not familiar with the HCU (Hydraulic Control Unit). How could it be responsible for the sudden and total loss of the font brakes? I researched this issue, and I found that the HCU, also known as the Hydraulic Brake Modulator, is a key component within the ABS. When it receives a specific signal from

the wheel sensors, it modulates the brakes when required to prevent the wheels from locking up. How can a malfunction of the HCU result in brake failure when it is clearly stated in the bike manual provided with each ABS bike that, “If ABS becomes defective, you will still have operational brakes, but without ABS”? No other ABS that I know of within the automotive or motorcycle industry will cause the sudden and total loss of the braking system when the ABS fails. That violates all safety-engineering principles. When the H-D HCU fails, it will either take out the rear or front brakes, depending on the position of the solenoid valve at the moment of failure. JACK Via Internet

Yes, Jack, sometimes parts A: and systems fail. Your technician made the comment about

To submit a question to our H-D-certified mechanic, who has been working in dealerships for over 20 years, send in as much info about the problem and bike as possible to Hog Helpline, c/o American Iron Magazine, 1010 Summer Street, Stamford, CT 06905, or e-mail SteveL@AmericanIronMag.com. Sorry, but due to volume, we cannot respond to requests for personal replies or to all letters.

120 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

another failed HCU. But that rather irresponsible statement notwithstanding, I have never seen this issue at my dealership. It makes sense that the problem is in the HCU. If one of the valves were to stick, it could keep the master cylinder pressure from getting to the caliper. Thus the stiff lever and the capability to still roll the bike back into the garage. Corrosion or dirt in the valve might cause this to happen. As part of regular maintenance, has your tech been flushing the brake system and replacing the brake fluid? Your DOT 4 brake fluid should be changed every two years. The brake fluid is hygroscopic, meaning it can absorb water. Water can corrode parts in the brake system including the valves in the HCU. Your bike has relatively high mileage and some moisture may have accumulated even with regular flushing. The ABS is designed to shut down and give you a warning light if something electronic fails. In this AIMag.com


case, it appears to be a mechanical failure which the electronics cannot detect. If the valve is physically stuck, the brakes won’t work, with or without ABS. You could compare it to a master cylinder on your car going bad and freezing up. Push as hard as you want; the pedal is stiff, but the brakes don’t work. ABS doesn’t detect pressure changes, so it doesn’t “think” anything is wrong. I’ve checked on the availability of that part. It was due to come off back order at the end of May. There is a special ordering procedure for the part, so you should get your dealer to order the part now, if he hasn’t already. I bought a Road Tech ElecQ: tronic Compass Kit (#7444102) to replace the useless Harley-Davidson temperature gauge for my 2005 Electra Glide. It worked great for a while. Now, it only works when I stop. I’ve heard of a service kit (#74633-02A) that is supposed to fix the problem (funny you would have to pay for something to fix the thing you already paid for). Anyway, I’m won-

dering if you’ve encountered this, or know of anyone who has? Anyone have one they don’t want? Maybe moved on to a GPS? It was really handy when it was working properly. Thanks for any information. Cheers! TOM ANGUISH Via Internet

Yes, Tom. I remember inA: stalling those compasses, going into the movie theater parking lot, and driving around in big circles in order to calibrate them. Talk about funny looks from the citizens. Then, the customer would come back in a week or so with the compass card stuck or spinning around nonstop. The service kit you mentioned would fix the problem. It is a new sensor assembly that relocates to the back of the motorcycle. The part is obsolete at this point, but your dealer can still get the part through a parts vendor that stocks obsolete parts from The Motor Company. When I checked, the vendor still had a good number of the kits in stock. The kit will have instructions for installation and calibration. AIM


P R O D U C T R E V I E W • by Steve Lita

AGV COMPASS JACKET A blend of leather and textile WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU COMBINE WAXED COTTON canvas and soft .09mm thick buffalo leather into one jacket? You get a cool-looking cruiser jacket with a vintage look and rugged construction. While some folks may not look to AGVSport for traditional cruiser gear, it has plenty of models available for the V-Twin riding market. This Compass jacket is an excellent choice for a comfortable all around summer jacket. There are three generous air vents located at the front shoulders, and one large rear zip vent across the back, to keep you cool when it’s hot out, and a removable quilted thermal vest liner for chilly mornings. Comfort abounds thanks to the micro mesh lining in the body of the jacket with silk lining in the sleeves, plus there’s four-way elasticated fabric panels in the inner arm and body side to prevent binding. Additionally, padded neoprene is used in the collar area for

comfort. The Compass keeps the wind out with the aid of an interior flap under the main #7 gun metal finished zipper. There is one breast pocket and two front hand warmer pockets with zipper closures on the outside, and three interior pockets for all my stuff. Protection is added with the use of CE shoulder and elbow protectors and an 8mm memory foam back pad. AGVSport utilizes double stitched key seam construction for maximum tear resistance. The fit of the Compass is snug, and can be adjusted via velcro straps on both sides of the jacket at the waist, but the collar and sleeve cuffs utilize gunmetal finished snaps. It’s a bargain at just $249 and I found no break-in time needed. It was a comfortable fit right off the rack. AIM SOURCES AGVSPORT 619/401-4100 MotoNation.com



122 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

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ISSUE

#339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

123


P R O D U C T R E V I E W â&#x20AC;˘ by Bryan Harley

OSCAR RAYBURN RIDING SHOE Comfort on and off the cruiser ALPINESTARS MIGHT NOT BE THE FIRST NAME TO COME TO mind when thinking about gear tailored for the cruiser crowd, but thanks to its Oscar Collection of riding gear, that could soon change. The Alpinestars Oscar Rayburn Riding Shoes ($249.95) are made of high-quality leather, soft to the touch but resistant to the elements. Protection includes an extra layer of padding in the ankles, and internal reinforcements in the toe and heel. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re solidly constructed; after five months of wear, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a stitch out of place. The shoes bear the usual scuff marks on the toe and creases where feet bend, but they otherwise hold up to wear. These shoes rate high in comfort. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an extra layer of padding and leather stitched into the upper inside portion of the shoe. The insole isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overly thick, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comfortable nonetheless. Likewise, the sole itself is thinner than most riding boots but flexes well and provides ample tack. Since I cover a lot of

ground at rallies and events, I appreciate the comfort when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m off the bike. My single grievance is that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a bugger to get on. The tongue of the shoes is stitched to the sides, so they have to be unlaced a few rungs to get them opened up wide enough to squeeze a foot in. Luckily, the heel pull-tab loop comes in handy when wedging my dogs in. Did I mention these are a sharplooking pair of riding shoes? The Rayburns are so stylish, I often wear them for nights out even when Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not riding, thanks to their good looks and comfort. Add in durable construction and reinforcements in strategic places to the equation, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a fresh alternative to the standard motorcycle riding boot. AIM SOURCES ALPINESTARS Alpinestars.com

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S N A P S • compiled by Tyler Greenblatt

DUAL PURPOSE DEUCE Here is a

picture of my 2002 Harley-Davidson Softail Deuce. Bought back in 2012, I've spent the past couple of years making it my Deuce. Whether bobbing round Dirty Jersey avoiding potholes or heading out for a weeklong ride with the boys, my Deuce keeps a smile on my face every time, all the time! Some of the add-ons include apehangers, 2" drop, Screamin’ Eagle seat, and Michelin Commander tires keep her glued to the pavement. I swapped out the Screamin’ Eagle seat with the recliner-like sundowner seat and strapped on my Tombstone tour bag, and I laid down the miles. Your magazine is the real deal. Never miss an issue! Look forward to receiving it in the mail every month. Keep it coming. BOB Via Internet

Got a bike you think belongs here? If so, send a few high-resolution (300 dpi at 8" x 8" minimum) images to Letters@AmericanIronMag.com or American Iron Magazine, 1010 Summer Street, Stamford, CT 06905.

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FOR THE LOVE OF THE BUILD My

name is Heidi, and I am writing because my fiancĂŠ Michael built a beautiful bike from the ground up. Mind you, he is a-one-of-a-kind welder and fabricator. So this isn't just some plain Jane bike. My first gift from the man was a custom-built, free-standing earring rack. Instantly fell in love â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but back to the bike. He just had it titled and has put about 30 miles on it. However, he recently hurt his back in his sheet metal shop and had to go in for emergency surgery. He is slowly recovering. It is a beautiful bike, and a lot of love and attention has gone into building it. HEIDI POOLE Via Internet AIM

THE JOB IS NOT DONE UNTIL YOU FLASH YOUR TUNE

W W W . F L A S H Y O U R H A R L E Y. C O M


M O T O C U LT U R E : Artist Makoto Endo

You know this one ... the classic 1951 Panhead featured in Easy Rider.

It’s Alive!

Making motorcycles rumble on canvas text by

steven wyman-blackburn photos and art by

makoto endo 128 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

HAT’S MORE BADASS THAN GETTING YOUR BIKE

W

painted by a guy who will do so not with paintbrushes, but with chopsticks? I can’t think of anything. Because there’s not. It’s like getting your portrait done in New York City. Except, instead of buying a goofy caricature of yourself, you get one that portrays you as a mother$&(%ing superhero. My New York analogy may be amusing (or stupid, depending on your sense of humor or lack thereof), but it’s also not that far off. During the entire 2015-16 Progressive International Motorcycle Show season in 10 cities, artist Makoto Endo of Niigata, Japan, could be found crouching over a canvas, painting — with chopsticks — the gorgeous two-wheel work of art looming over him. Again. Chopsticks. Using a specific mixture of Indian ink and water, Endo is becoming known for painting motorcycles (and more) at various rallies. His particular style is almost as fascinating as his technique. Wielding a tool I normally use to eat sushi, Endo employs graceful, quick brushstrokes as well as what could be described as violent smacks. This very distinct methodology is all part of Endo’s ongoing quest to capture the ever-elusive sound and feel of the motorcycle engine on canvas. While currently a full-time painter, Endo wasn’t always AIMag.com


one. Before that, art was a hobby while he worked as a creative director of K&L Advertising in New York. Before that, he was an art director for the same company. Before that, Endo lived in Japan, working at Hakuhodo Advertising Agency, the second largest ad agency in Japan. And it’s before all this where our story begins. Having grown up and lived for many years in Japan, Endo is quite familiar with Japanese culture. Maybe a little too familiar. As a kid, many parents (including his own) hated motorcycles. (Endo actually had to share his “first” motorcycle with a friend.) “I can understand why, especially with my generation,” Endo says to my surprise. “Motorcycle gangs were a big issue then. Many motorcycle gangs were very active and fought the police or each other. I lost a couple of my friends that way by accident.” Plus, seeing as Japan’s economy was on the up and up, his job demanded a rigorous work schedule. While working at Hakuhodo, Endo was racking up 200 hours of overtime per month. So, in what he calls an “escape from Japan,” Endo decided to spend a very understandable “long vacation” up to three years in America. (He’s been here since the early 1990s.) Despite calling it an “escape,” when coming to America, Endo embraced a few aspects of his Japanese heritage and has incorporated them into his art, a choice that has gotten him a good deal of attention here in the States. When elaborating how art captured his imagination as a child, Endo in turn described this phenomenon of how bringing over what is exotic and exciting to a different country never fails to dazzle those indigenous people. “It was the cartoon heroes on TV,” Endo says. “As you know, the animated characters in Japan that I enjoyed as a kid are now very popular in the USA.” To make his point, Endo listed the names of various US films based on Japanese ones like Astro Boy, Godzilla, and, yes, The Lion King. Look up Kimba, The White Lion. Like those classic Japanese movies and my beloved anime, Endo brought over the very popular and traditional style of ink and water paintings in Japan, and we’re eating it up for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because it’s exotic. Something Endo did bring with him that we are very familiar with is his love for motorcycles. “I still remember my first motorcycle illustration,” he recalls. “I was in kindergarten. I was sitting beside a 1973 Kawasaki Z2 750RS, and I drew the bike on paper with pencil.” Endo didn’t just draw bikes, though. In fact, he rode a Honda Monkey 50 when he was in elementary school before he got his first nonmotorized bicycle and his license at 16. However, it wouldn’t be for many years until he would paint or ride a Harley. Incidentally, as of this writing, his latest work is of a 2016 Harley Low Rider. “I used only black ink,” says Endo, which is unusual for him. “It made the Harley feel wilder.” AIMag.com

Endo captivates fans young and old at the Progressive IMS, with which he’s toured in 10 cities.

1946 Harley FL Knucklehead.

Bill Dodge’s custom 1952 Panhead, aka Egret. ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

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M O T O C U LT U R E : Artist Makoto Endo

must be made from bamboo. Endo also doesn’t own a Harley, Otherwise they’d break from those but he’s ridden several. “My first concentrated, passionate touches. impression of the Sportster was that “Chopsticks are also difficult to it’s slow,” he comments. “I felt like I control,” he adds, “and a good was riding a horse.” No surprise splash always comes from the there. The bikes in Japan are all unexpected loss of control.” This about speed, especially when Endo dichotomy between wanting to lose was younger. “It was a small comcontrol while wanting to keep some munity when I was in Japan,” says form of it at the same time sums up Endo, regarding Japanese Harley the excitement and thrill of riding. culture, “mostly because Harleys A young couple pose on their Sportsters. It demands extra attention and were very expensive. Japan concentration: “I must keep myself highly tense while I’m produced many inexpensive and high-performance bikes painting,” Endo says. “My goal is to make it feel like, or for that were faster.” you to hear, the sound of the engine. Slapping the painting Now he’s in the land of Harleys. Staying in America with a chopstick is the best way to express and visualize the much longer than he originally planned must have taken its sound. I need special sensitivity for slapping that has to be toll on Endo, though, because he essentially did the same dynamic and delicate.” thing as someone who just says “%$&# it, I’m hitting the But there’s a specific part of the bike that he always road,” and travels across America Easy Rider style, except paints first, which really exemplifies Endo’s quest to bring with art. After 25 years in the ad world, he decided to his paintings to life. Here’s a hint: how do you rev the become a full-time artist. “When I graduated from art engine? Endo always begins by painting the accelerator school, my dream was to be a painter,” he says. grip. “It feels like I’m starting the engine!” Endo exclaims. An avid rider yourself, you shouldn’t be surprised that That’s deep on so many levels. Endo wanted to actually experience our vast American With such a profound approach to painting bikes, it highways (beyond the canvas). When Endo came to the US shouldn’t surprise you that his entire viewpoint is just as emand bought a motorcycle in June of 1994, one of the first phatically intense. When asked if he would paint a moving things he did was ride. “My plan was to go north,” he bike (since most of his paintings picture motorcycles with remembers of that life-changing day. “I just rode north until the kickstand down), Endo replied, “I need 16 to 20 hours sunset. Around 10 pm, I was somewhere in northern to complete a 4' x 6' piece. Moving objects cannot keep Canada. I found that I had ridden 14 hours.” As you can imagine, the roads here are very different from Japan’s. “It’s moving 16 to 20 hours in front of me.” The only way he can paint a moving bike is from a photo, but that never fully mostly because of the scale and size of highways. Also, the captures the moment, which is crucial for him. “A painting varying landscapes are also very different.” is capturing the moment. From a photograph, it’s easier to Now, in addition to riding whenever he has the chance, Endo paints all makes and models of motorcycles, regardless trace the visual aspect, but there’s no deep emotion.” Incidentally, when doing some research on Endo before if they’re stock or customized. He describes them as reaching out to him, I found a YouTube clip of him saying “different types of beauty,” and tries to paint each one probably the most realistic and truest statement anyone exactly as it looks. “I believe every part and shape on a could utter about anything. motorcycle has a meaning In it he says, “Many people that is the result of the GET YOUR HARLEY ENDO-IZED ask me, ‘Why do you paint builder’s passion. I add my motorcycles?’ My answer is, passion to my paintings, but AS OF THIS WRITING, ENDO’S MOST RECENT maybe, ‘Why not?’” I try to express their passion appearance was at the New York International Auto When I asked him about as straight as possible.” Show. Luckily, his “painting tour” will continue that quote later, he said, To create those sensuous throughout the year as he appears at various motor“Let’s assume there’s a lines, Endo mixes Indian ink cycle rallies across the US. Watch Endo do his thing at painter who paints human (“it’s much softer than oils one of these events or, better yet, get a painting of portraits. Do you ask him and acrylics, and is extremely your Harley done. Who doesn’t want his Harley to why he paints human pordark black,”) with water to receive the Makoto Endo treatment? Send a photo of traits? Probably my answer alter the shade. But to heck your bike, and Endo will paint it for you. Starting at why I paint motorcycles is with the ink. You probably 3' x 4' for $1,500. E-mail him at the same reason why artists want to know about the MakotoEndo1234@gmail.com. paints humans.” He finished chopsticks. “I try to make See Endo at the Rhinebeck Vintage Motorcycle by saying, “Motorcycles are every single stroke impactShow, Vintage Motorcycle Festival at the New Jersey beautiful objects. Why are ful,” Endo begins. “I want to Motorsport Park; Triumph National Meeting; Barber they so beautiful? Because create a concentrated, pasVintage Motorcycle Festival; Indian Rally Block Party, they’re the work of bike sionate touch. That’s why I and more. For more information, go to builders or product designuse chopsticks, not a brush.” MakotoEndo.net.  ers. I respect them.” AIM It’s also why the chopsticks

130 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

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HOW IT WORKS

continued from page 40 (flathead) models continued to be produced alongside the new overhead valve models. As it turned out, the obsolete KR SV models were outperforming their class competition in Class C track racing. That just shouldn’t have been. In the model chart, the letters and abbreviations under the column headings

Year 1958 1958 1958 1958 1958

Model FL FLH XL XLH XLCH

Units produced 1,591 195 579 711 239

are explained here to avoid confusion. The F in the model designation after FLF or FLHF means that the motorcycle was equipped with a footshifter and hand clutch. The additional F may appear on the title, causing confusion with enforcement authorities. No F following FL or FLH in the model designation meant that the unit was equipped with handshifter (on the gas tank) and foot clutch. OHV means overhead valve engine configuration and SV means side valve engine. A 74" means 74-cubic-inch engine displacement. The 6V designator means it has a 6-volt battery and ignition with a 6-volt generator to recharging the battery. A Servi-car model G indicated reverse gear in the transmission and tow bar equipped. A Servi-car model GA indicated reverse gear and not tow bar equipped. The XLC and XLCH are both one-year-only, off-road competition racers featured magnetos. Ask a CH owner why his right leg is larger than his left, and he’ll tell you all about trying to kickstart the brute when it’s damp out. The Fairbanks-Morse mag-

Starting Number 58FL1002 58FLH1001 58XL1001 58XLH1487 58XLCH1762

Ending Number 58FL7107 58FLH7099 58XL2533 58XLH2552 58XLCH2489

neto was adopted by Harley-Davidson from a farm tractor. Now, when you hear the disparaging expression "agricultural equipment" referring to an old Harley, you can appreciate its origin. This chart is of production numbers for a sampling of models for 1958 that was published by The Motor Company. You’ll notice a discrepancy between how many were available to how many were actually used. We’ll examine the larger than necessary available sequential production numbers assigned for this sampling of models. It’s another one of those apparently unexplained phenomenon. Something was up with the engine numbering system judging by the large amount of production numbers available for each model that were not utilized. In the case of the 58FL, 1,591 units were produced from a block of 6,105 assigned numbers, leaving 4,514 numbers unused. Would that have been done for no reason? Hardly, something was afoot. The use of the larger amount of sequential production numbers may have been instituted before 1958, but there are no factory records to verify that. What developed from this change wouldn’t be utilized in the Harley-Davidson warranty code until 1962. A new number verification code using the sequential production number was in the process of being developed for the first time at H-D. Let’s get back to the phantom blocks of assigned but unused engine identification numbers we discovered in 1958. Beginning in 1962 and continuing through 1969, the first digit in the production number (the first number following the model letter designator in the engine number prefix) will be an even number for even years and an odd number for odd years. If the sequential production number contains five rather than four digits, the first two numbers

Units Produced 1,591 195 579 711 239

This chart lists starting and ending VINs for 1958 model sampling. AIMag.com

Numbers Available 6,105 6,098 1,532 1,065 727

Leftover 4,514 5,903 953 354 488

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will be even for even years and odd for odd-numbered years. Let’s look at some samples to make sense out of all this. If the numbers on your Harley V-twin engine vary from this code for these years, something is amiss. More engine numbers were required to accommodate the new VIN code. For example, using the VIN 62FL2339, the last number in the year (62) is 2, which is an even number. So the number following the letter L will be an even number, in this case a 2, which makes the engine number legitimate for this application. Now, let’s check the VIN 67XLCH3665. The last number in the year (67) is 7, which is an odd number, so the number following the letter H will be an odd number, in this case a 3, which makes the engine number legitimate for this application. What about the VIN 66FL10221? Is it legit? The last number in the year (66) is 6, which is even, but the production number has 5 digits in it. So the first two digits in the sequential production number following the letter L will be an even number, in this case a 10, which makes the engine number legitimate for this application. One last number: this time we’ll check 65XLH11663. The last number in the year 65 is 5, which is odd, but the production number has 5 digits in it. So the first two digits in the sequential production number following the letter H will be an odd number, in this case 11, which makes engine number legitimate for this application. Beginning with the 1962 model year, the OHV twins were assigned supplemental warranty identification numbers. The warranty identification numbers were identical four-digit numbers with a letter prefix stamped on the frame, front forks, and transmission. These numbers were specifically for tracing purposes to determine association and origin with a particular machine’s VIN registration. The supplemental numbers assigned to the frame, fork, and transmission components are not the same as the engine identification numbers on the engine boss. This system was designed to

be utilized primarily for warranty purposes to verify that a part was genuine for replacement when defective. The numbered components can be traced to the original unit’s VIN that was assembled at the factory utilizing these parts using the build sheet. The secondary benefit went to law enforcement, which now had the ability to trace specific parts back to their VIN origin. If a suspicious bike is found with legitimate numbered components but the engine number appears fictitious, a VIN search may document that the bike was stolen. The bogus engine number would have been used to disguise the stolen unit with costly consequences for the new unsuspecting owner. Until the VIN change in 1970, Harley-Davidson did not use a frame number as the VIN. Somebody out there reading this is jumping up and down yelling, “Hey, man, they had other numbers on some of the parts including the frame in the early ‘60s.” What about that? Those stamped component numbers, other than the casting numbers, were official warranty numbers to verify a machine’s original OEM authenticity and completeness if a warranty problem arose. The fact that they could be traced if stolen didn’t hurt police investigation, but their original purpose was for warranty verification only. They were not used as VIN identification numbers, so sit down and relax. From 1970 to 1980, both the engine and a newly introduced frame number became the vehicle identification numbers on the motorcycle. This new VIN utilized a format with nine digits, which were standardized and different from the earlier format. In the earlier format, the order and breakdown of the digits could be deciphered to identify the year and model. Let’s get right into the modern VIN system. The engine and frame numbers were identical. The identification number created by the new unique posident numeral stamping dies, used on both the frame and engine, were enclosed at each end with a star stamping. The engine number location was switched to the top

Look at the dealer before the camel

AIMag.com


HOW IT WORKS

of the right-side engine case. The number was stamped on the top front area on a smooth boss for Sportsters. Big Twins had their numbers stamped onto the front of the right crankcase. (Note: Many 1970 Sportsters came with their numbers on a boss located at the front of the right crankcase.) The left-hand engine case retained the old raised boss, now blank, that displayed the engine numbers in the past. The frame numbers were usually located and stamped on a slightly raised smooth boss on the right hand side of the cast headstock (frame neck). The stars are not part of or included in the VIN code paperwork. There are exceptions to these rules found in the development period. A standard was established in 1970 for engine/frame number correction if required. The number originally stamped would be left in place and lined out by the factory, and the new or corrected number would be stamped above or below the lined-out number. As previously stated, the new engine/frame number identification system consisted of nine digits with a starstamped outboard of each end. This system utilized the assignment of a twodigit identifier model code for every vehicle manufactured by The Motor Company until 1981. There were over 50 models with as many different identifier codes used in the 1970s. Unfortunately, there’s not enough space here to comprehensively discuss each model. The new 1970 VIN system is made up of the following components to comprise the entire number, including diestamped stars at both ends. The production number begins with the 10000 number group or higher for every model in this period. Let’s dissect the VIN *1A12345HO*, which is for a 1970 FL 1200 model made by Harley-

VIN Code 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A 1C

Model FL-1200 FLH-1200 XLH-900 XLCH-900 GE-750 XR-750

Davidson. The first two digits (1A) indicate the model code or model symbol identifiers, as for a FL-1200, FLP-1200, and FLPF low-compression Electra Glide. The next five digits (12345) are the sequential production numbers. The next digit (H) indicates the motorcycle’s manufacturer, namely The HarleyDavidson Motor Company. The last digit (0) designates the model year, which is 1970. Damage to the numbers and boss can also be the result of corrosion on the aluminum alloy engine cases. These altered numbers could be verified and restored by a state DMV using an assigned VIN. Special construction motorcycles may not have traditional Harley engine numbers but will most likely have an assigned VIN by the DMV. It’s evident that the codes became increasingly more complex to thwart the motorcycle thief. The new codes were designed to trip him up when he tattooed a bogus number on a hot bike and to make its forgery apparent to law enforcement officers. Bottom Line PLAY IT SAFE. IF YOU’RE NOT SURE

about the numbers being genuine or tattooed, about the paperwork being legitimate, or it doesn’t appear to match the bike, get a second opinion from a Harley dealer or shop, your local DMV, or police. Buying a machine by guesswork without verifying its history and legitimacy is risky business. It’s not worth the gamble of having your ride impounded by a suspicious novice police officer with the discretionary power to take it away from you. The burden of proof can be costly and the incident avoided if the cautious route had been followed at the outset. Don’t forget the most important rule: look at the dealer before the camel! AIM

Model Electra Glide Electra Glide Electric start Sportster Kickstart Sportster Servi-Car OHV Dirt/Road Racer

MFG/Year H0/1970 H1/1971 H2/1972 H3/1973 H4/1974 H5/1975

The following chart shows a sample of VIN codes for six of the 20 models offered in 1970.

134 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com

v


v

Summit rear fender with 992 taillights

Summit rear fender with 957 taillights

rear Fender: bad dad’s Summit Rear Fender Bags: Bad DAd’s Stretched Bags Lights: 992 Taillights License Plate: Premium PLAte Frame Wiring: Plug-n-Play Wiring Harness Color: amber whiskey

rear Fender: bad dad’s Summit Rear Fender Bags: Bad DAd’s Stretched Bags Lights: 957 Taillights License Plate: Premium plate Frame Wiring: Plug-n-Play Wiring Harness Color: Charcoal pearl

Also available Speaker Lids with Flush LEDs

more great options from bad dad

FULL BOLT-ON PARTS For your custom bagger project

ORDER TODAY! 260.407.2000 *Available for 1997-2016 touring & select softails


WOW

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

SAVE $279

$439.97

comp at

99

$159

LOT 61485/67421 shown • Welded Steel Joints • Lockable Drawers

27" ROLLER CABINET

SUPER COUPON SAE

$17.97

5

comp at

YOUR CHOICE

Customer Rating

comp at

5999 $159.99

SAVE $100

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

LOT 61258 shown 61840/61297/68146

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL

R PE ON SU UP O C

$

comp at

$179

99 99

$499

$20.26

1199 comp at

$

SAVE 40%

SAVE 75%

1499

Customer Rating

$249.99

4799

LOT 61670 97841 shown • 1800 lb. capacity

comp at

$

Customer Rating

MOTORCYCLE STAND/ WHEEL CHOCK

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $202

R PE ON SU UP CO

6

comp at $ 99 $17.97

LOT 61607/62389 94635 shown

• Each pad measures 25" x 25"

SAVE 61%

4 PIECE ANTI-FATIGUE FOAM MAT SET

$

89

SAVE $78

comp at 99$168.97

Customer Rating

LOT 60338/69381 shown

900 PEAK/ 700 RUNNING WATTS 2 HP (63 CC) 2 CYCLE GAS RECREATIONAL GENERATOR

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP O C

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

comp at Customer Rating

$59.97

LOT 5889 62281 61637 shown

29 PIECE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED HIGH SPEED STEEL DRILL BIT SET

$

$1310.99

comp at

$29999

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 1011

$

• Lift range: 7" - 30"

LOT 69904 68892 shown

1000 LB. CAPACITY Customer Rating MOTORCYCLE LIFT

SUPER COUPON

WOW

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

ANGLE GRINDER UPERON P LOT 95578 S OU 69645/60625 shown C

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R 4-1/2" PE ON SU UP Customer Rating O C

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

comp at

15999

Customer Rating

LOT 69091/67847 shown 61454/61693/62803

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

SAVE $79

• Pair of arbor plates included LOT 33497 60604 shown

Customer Rating

12 TON SHOP PRESS

R PE ON U P S U CO

HP, 21 GALLON 125 PSI VERTICAL AIR COMPRESSOR

SAVE $ $ 99 339

METRIC

LOT 42305/69044/63171

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 66%

LOT 69043/63282/42304 shown

9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED COMBINATION Customer Rating WRENCH SETS

R PE ON SU UP 2.5 CO

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 650+ Stores Nationwide.

R PE ON SU UP CO

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, extended service plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day parking lot sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Earthquake, Franklin, Grant’s, Holt, Jupiter, Maddox, Portland, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking. Not valid on prior purchases. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16.

ANY SINGLE ITEM

20% OFF

SUPER COUPON

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

QUALITY TOOLS LOWEST PRICES

EVERYDAY

3

$11.99

comp at

SAVE 66%

$399

13499 comp at

LOT 61776 61969/61970 69684 shown

comp at

$119.99

5999

LOT 69594 69955 42292 shown

5

comp at $ 99 $34.99

Customer Rating

SAVE 82%

AUTOMATIC BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

SAVE 60

• 3-1/2 Pumps Lifts Most Vehicles • Weighs 34 lbs. LOT 69252 68053/62160 62496/62516 $ 60569 shown

R PE ON ® SU UP RAPID PUMP 1.5 TON ALUMINUM RACING JACK CO

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

SAVE $264

R 12" SLIDING COMPOUND PE ON DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW SU UP O Customer Rating WITH LASER GUIDE C

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$ 99

Item 62429 shown

Customer Rating

LOT 62434/62426 62433/62428 62432/62429

MECHANIC'S GLOVES

YOUR CHOICE

SIZE MED LG X-LG

R PE ON SU UP CO


SAVE $131

$69.99

99

32

comp at

$

Customer Rating

LOT 62534 69643 shown

60 LED SOLAR SECURITY LIGHT

$49.98

comp at

SAVE 80%

calling 800-423-2567. Cannot or HarborFreight.com or by after 30 days from original ses LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores Original t or coupon or prior purcha be used with other discoun . Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. day. receipt l origina one coupon per customer per purchase with Valid through 12/1/16. Limit coupon must be presented.

$999

LOT 47016 shown 67181/62300 Customer Rating

SPRAY GUN

2

comp at $ 99 $7.15

SAVE 58%

• 350 lb. capacity

$

$257

69 comp at

99

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

5

$ 99 $17comp.97at

SAVE 66%

LOT 66537 shown 69505/62418

72" x 80" MOVING BLANKET

$

LOT 61653 3338 shown

1999

comp at

$29.99

Customer Rating

SAVE 33%

LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 250 lb. capacity

Tools sold separately.

MECHANIC'S ROLLER SEAT

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

30" SERVICE CART WITH ER N LOCKING DRAWER SUP PO U LOT 61161/90428 shown CO

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $187

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Batteries included.

Customer Rating

27 LED PORTABLE ER N WORKLIGHT/FLASHLIGHT SUP PO U LOT 67227 shown CO 69567/60566/62532

comp at

$149.99

$6499

SAVE $85

LOT 63069 61369 shown

ADJUSTABLE STEEL WELDING TABLE

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

WOW SUPER COUPON

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • No Hassle Return Policy • 650+ Stores Nationwide • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools • HarborFreight.com 800-423-2567

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 52%

SUPER COUPON OW W D FEE Y VIT 20 OZ. GRA

Includes 6V, 900 mAh NiCd battery pack.

R PE ON SU UP CO

99 SAVE $ $65 comp at $135

69

• Lift range: 5-1/4" to 17"

LOT 69995 shown 60536/61632

$199

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

comp at

99

SAVE $99 $ 99

LOT 62837/99721 shown

400 LB. CAPACITY RECEIVER-MOUNT MOTORCYCLE CARRIER

Customer Rating

R PE ON U P S U CO

1500 LB. CAPACITY ER N MOTORCYCLE LIFT SUPUPO CO

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$24.97

12

comp at

Customer Rating

SAVE 47% $ 99

18 PIECE SAE AND METRIC ER N T-HANDLE BALL END SUP PO U HEX KEY SET CO Customer Rating

LOT 63166/63167/62476/96645 shown

179 99 comp at $311

LOT 62860/62859/63055 60727/62286/69039 shown

10 FT. x 17 FT. PORTABLE GARAGE

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

Customer Rating

R PE ON U P S U CO

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

LOT 69030/69031 shown

VALUE

$ 97

4

1" x 25 FT. TAPE MEASURE

WITH ANY PURCHASE

FREE

SUPER COUPON SAVE $90

$209.99

11999 comp at

$

• 300 lb. capacity • 23 Configurations

LOT 62514/62656 67646 shown

Customer Rating

17 FT. TYPE 1A MULTI-TASK LADDER

$ 99 $14comp.97at

5

LOT 61259/90764 shown

SAVE 59%

Customer Rating

32 PIECE SCREWDRIVER SET

comp at

$68.99

1999

$ Customer Rating

comp at

$269

9999

SAVE $169

LOT 69512/61858 69445 shown

1 TON CAPACITY FOLDABLE SHOP CRANE

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• Includes Ram, Hook and Chain

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

Customer Rating

DIRT BIKE STAND

LOT 67151

SAVE 71% • 1000 lb. capacity

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/1/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO


W I D G E T S • Compiled by Staff

Open Sesame When the ride’s over and it’s time to relax, crack open a cold one with this vintage V-twin bottle opener, made of sturdy pewter. Those who still receive snail mail will need a sturdy opener to flick open the envelopes and quickly cast them aside. This pewter motorcycle letter opener will provide a classy look to your desk and a stylish tool to rip your bills open. Bottle opener, $9.95; letter opener, $14.85. GreaseRag, Greaserag.com, 203/425-8777 Ext. 114.

Shots Fired! Tailgunner Exhaust wants you to keep your pipes simple, with focus on the most important qualities of mufflers: sound, performance, and design. The Tritons are a unique set of pipes designed to make your Harley look and sound like a Harley, with a deeper tone and louvered side vents meant to evoke classic American muscle cars. And speaking of American, all Tailgunner products are made in America, by Americans. The Tritons boast a healthy uptick in performance in the low and middle range. Available in chrome finish, with CNC-machined jet black end caps. $699.99. Tailgunner Exhaust, 508/693-1944, TailgunnerExhaust.com.

All claims and specifications are those of the manufacturers. Submissions are welcome and should include a color digital (300 dpi jpeg) image, detailed description, and suggested retail price. Send submissions to Widgets, American Iron Magazine, 1010 Summer Street, Stamford, CT 06905, or Widgets@AmericanIronMag.com.

After Using the Scavenger you’ll never settle for less. AFTER WATCHING THIS SIMPLE BUT CLEVER LITTLE device in action, I’ll never do an oil change the old way again. But let’s start with a few facts about oil changes. After bringing the engine up to operating temperature, so all the nasty crap inside the engine is in suspension in the detergent oil, you should shut down and pull the plug - the drain plug, that is - to get the dirty oil out of your engine before the crud settles out of the oil again. Unfortunately, you can only drain the oil tank. All the old oil that’s in the engine and oil lines remain, waiting to degrade the new load of oil. Enter the Scavenger. The Scavenger allows you to reclaim all of the old oil from the engine before it can mix with the fresh oil in the tank. Leaving you with a total oil change. Each Scavenger works a little different depending on the year and model, but each kit comes with clear easy to follow instructions and a DVD with videos of how each one is used.

138 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #338

Seeing is believing so go to www.roguechopper.com and see the video of how it works on your bike. Don’t have web access? Call for a free info pack. “Like I said, I’ll never change my oil the old way again.” - Chris Maida AIM

Rogue Chopper, llc 866-877-6483 www.roguechopper.com

AIMag.com


WIDGETS

Cruisin’ Down the Street On My V-twin Aeromach, wheeling and dealing out of Charlotte, North Carolina, is now shipping its patented Cruisn’ Pegs for stock Harley-Davidson motorcycles using the Half-Moon and Tapered footboards. They’re designed to mount on the bottom of stock footboards for riders who do not want to use highway bar-mounted footpegs, do not have highway bars, or cannot comfortably reach them. The Cruisin’ Pegs are machined from T6-6061 aircraft quality billet aluminum. The arms are adjustable in three positions for optimal rider comfort and are available in Flame, Smooth, or Ball-Milled designs. All the required hardware is supplied in stainless steel. $299.95. Aeromach, AeromachMfg.com, 800/990-9392.

Can You See Me? Gain extra visibility and enhance your safety on the road with the addition of a set of Vision X’s 4.5" XMC 10-Watt LED Passing Lamps. Each of these powerful lights pack five times more output than the stock passing lamps and draw six times less amperage. Dramatically improve your performance while increasing visibility and safety. The 4.5" LED Passing Lamps will be available in 2016; Vision X offers a range of LED headlights, sizes 2"-7". From $399. Vision X, VisionXUSA.com, 888/489-9820.

1 (888) 441-3331 crankandstroker.com

Quality Denims & Leathers 140 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


WIDGETS

The Replacements II GMA, a subsidiary of Belt Drives Limited, manufactures a wide selection of specialty and upscale replacement components for both H-D and custom motorcycles. GMA parts are best known for their exceptional quality, fit, and performance. The rear replacement and custom application master cylinders shown here are manufactured by GMA in models to fit and replace both Wagner and Kelsey Hays models. Both styles are offered in natural, black, and polished. $150. Info: GMA, BeltDrives.com, 714/693-1313.

142 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

Nothing Funny ’Bout That Give your bagger a personalized look by replacing the saddlebag latch reflectors with Joker Machine’s new latch inserts. They come in three different styles and colors. Each latch insert is polished, then hard blackanodized or chrome-plated. Hard black latch inserts are machined again after being anodized for a multicolor finish. This is an easy installation, and no special tool is required. Fits 2014 and later baggers. $69.95. Joker Machine, JokerMachine.com, 909/596-9690.

AIMag.com


AIMag.com

ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • 143


WIDGETS

Head Honcho Roland Sands Design (RSD) introduces the latest in its line of jackets that combine form and function. The Honcho combines the best features of a leather jacket with a traditional denim vest. Zip-off sleeves bring dualpurpose function to this contemporary classic. RSD’s attention to detail means flex gussets in the back for ease of motion; rotated, pre-curved sleeves, a slight dropped-back length and relaxed collar opening. When the weather warms, the sleeves zip off via quality YKK zippers. $380. Roland Sands Design, RolandSands.com.

The Replacements The lonesome foghorn blows. Don’t let your scratched or damaged horn cover suffer through another day of black eyes. Replace it with a Drag Specialties gloss black horn cover and bracket, a perfect OEM fit for 19932016 FLT, FLHT, FLHR, FLHX, and FLTR models. The cover and bracket are sold separately. Horn cover, $29.95; bracket, $19.95. Drag Specialties, DragSpecialties.com.

146 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

AIMag.com


Hand Braided Leather Lever Covers Function and Fashion

~The Lever Cover that will not move, slip, slide, or twist. ~And with 19 colors to choose from function and fashion go hand in hand. It’s European, Very Exotic How about a little European infusion? Father-son custom bike team Fred and Len Kodlin have combined their design vision with the craftsmanship of Mustang Seats to create new styles. The saddles are set to fit Dyna and Wide Glide 2006 to present; Sportsters 2004-06 and 2010 to present; for Softail Breakouts there is an optional matching passenger pad. Each seat is available in a two-tone look that features center panels of black or maroon Alcantra with matching or contrasting black or brown vinyl side panels. From $459. Mustang Seats, MustangSeats.com, 800/243-1392.

Call for Free Color Swatches

Get Back Whips

DeerSkin Leather Gloves

Cruise-Mate Throttle Assist

ĸ

Lever Operated

Grips

Leather Rubber

Grip life by the leather phone: 800-461-IRON (4766) www.Ironbraid.com info@Ironbraid.com

DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

On ly $1 9. 99 a Ye a r Wo r l d w i d e AIMag.com Open Wide C&S Custom has delivered the world's widest tire kits for Harley-Davidson V-Rods. These custom kits are available in 240mm, 300mm, 330mm, and 360mm sizes. C&S Custom provides all the components that are required to install the wide-tire kits. Enthusiasts can select length and finish (raw, custompainted, polished, chrome, and over 1,000 powdercoat choices). Accessory options include extended length, chain drive, louvers, nitrous bottle bracket, custom engraved swingarm plates, custom engraved chain guards, and performance brake caliper and racing rotor. C&S Custom recommends a professional installation. Pro-consumers who have mechanical ability should budget a weekend for the conversion. C&S Custom, CandSCustom.com, 336/242-9730. AIMag.com

ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE •

147


WIDGETS

It Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere PSR’s new BTC (Bike Tie-Down Clamps) are a convenient and easy way to secure your motorcycle for transport. These clamps have oval openings for single or double tie-down hooks. Bike tie-down clamps are machined from forged aluminum and have a heavy-duty spring, making them durable and sleek, with a gunmetal finish. They are universal in application for all powersport vehicles and clamp securely to any 7/8" grips. $49.95. PSR, PSR-USA.com.

Want the performance of a great LED headlight without paying $500? No problem, replace your factory Halogen bulb with a RIVCO LED kit! • Super-bright 3600 lumen output rated to last 30,000 hours • Nighttime light field is 30% longer and 15% wider HALOGEN

RIVCO LED

• RFI shielded to produce no radio frequency interference • Daylight-white light rated at 6000 Kelvin with no blue tint

888-801-8222 www.rivcoproducts.com

LED-120 / $149.95 Replaces H9 & H11

• Plug and play installation using stock bulb housing

LED-115 / $149.95 Replaces H7

148 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

LED-100 / $69.95 Replaces H4

Ask about our LED driving light kits!

Hunt the Flock Think of the all-new Street Sleeper III Air Cleaner from Crusher as a heavybreathing wolf in sheep’s clothing. The high-flow intake kits deliver significantly enhanced airflow to all 19992016 Harley-Davidson Twin Cam motors, while lurking discreetly under the factory air cleaner cover for a seemingly stock appearance. Full perimeter and outer-end breathing provides unrestricted airflow for greatly improved performance versus the stock filter element. A unique internal crankcase breather design eliminates the need for external hoses or fittings. The cast aluminum backplate features a large, curved entry to the throttle body for smooth and precise air delivery to the motor. From $159.99. Kuryakyn, Kuryakyn.com, 866/277-9598. AIMag.com


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…And Streeetch Add some attitude to your Softail Slim with Klock Werks new, direct bolt-on, Softail Slim front and rear fenders. Choose from two rear fender lengths that are both longer than stock to give a stretched look. Predrilled to use stock mounting locations and hardware, there is no better way to achieve custom looks. Choose the Smooth for a super clean back fender, or Frenched with a recessed license plate pocket that provides a flush finish. The standard length is longer than stock, and the extended version is another 4" longer. Klock Werks also offers the new Knuckler stamped steel front fender for your Softail Slim (will also fit Heritage, Fat Boys and any other FLST model except Springers). Rear fender from $419.95, Knuckler front fender from $99.95. Klock Werks, KustomBaggers.com.

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WIDGETS

What’s Crackin’? Danny Gray revolutionized the way seats are made two years ago with the introduction of its patented IST (Independent Suspension Technology) line of seats. Now, longtime Danny Gray favorite, the Buttcrack Solo seat, is finally available with IST. IST’s stress relief design features and benefits include reduced pressure points on the tailbone so you can focus on the riding experience and enjoy longer, more comfortable rides. In addition, the Buttcrack Solo's enhanced, sculpted tailbone relief insures the most comfortable ride possible. The seat is covered in black top-grain leather with a soft, subtle texture. The side panels are matching black vinyl that will keep its shape across the high-stress points of the seat. $281.14. Info: Danny Gray, DannyGray.com, 888/443-5516.

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150 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

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OUR PASSION IS OUR POWER

Fit For A King Indian Motorcycle is proud to announce the Indian by King Baby jewelry line for bikers and motorcycle enthusiasts. The collection will feature jewelry and include bracelets, pendants, rings, belt buckles, and key rings. King Baby is world-renowned for creating unique, highly detailed, premium jewelry collections. King Babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indian line is styled with the original aesthetic of Indian Motorcycle and crafted in the USA. Products are now available from selected Indian Motorcycle dealers across North America, King Baby stores (Santa Monica, Sunset Plaza, Nashville, and Caesarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palace, Las Vegas), and at www.kingbaby.com. King Baby, KingBaby.com.

Optimal Optics Quit your squinting. REKS Optics has developed highquality sunglasses for both men and women, all at an affordable price. REKS offers six frame styles, made from high-grade, shatter-resistant polycarbonate lenses. These glasses are lightweight and offer 100% UV 400 protection and are available in soft touch, gloss, and matte finishes. REKS offers three proprietary lenses in a broad range of colors and coatings: Solux, Lumolux, and Chromalux. From $30. REKS Optics, REKSOptics.com. AIM AIMag.com

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152 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

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H-D SPORTSTER XLCH 1959

More than just a Harley – it’s a Sportster! text by

jim babchak photos by

dino petrocelli

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CAIMAG.com

1959 H-D SPORTSTER XLCH


A

ushered in a design with overhead valves, a giant step descent, I remember standing along 5th Avenue forward and a great improvement over its flathead in New York City, decades ago, proudly watchpredecessor. That brought Harley’s middleweight entrant ing the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade while up to date, and speed, with the British motorcycles that sharing a pint of Guinness with a friend of mine were selling so well in America at the time. who’s 100 percent Irish. “Off the boat,” as he In fact, the XL’s 54" (883cc) engine made it among the more than once proudly proclaimed about his heritage. And fastest motorcycles in its day. According to a period road like many Irishmen, he told colorful stories and shared test by Cycle magazine, the XL’s top speed was 101.4 miles wonderful anecdotes about anything and everything, and per hour, and it posted a quarter-mile time of 15.03 seconds, that day he shared the following: “There are only two types making it among the quickest and fastest motorcycles of its of people in this world, Seamus [James in Gaelic] — Irish time. And for 59 years now, Sportsters have been a mainstay people and people who want to be Irish!” in Harley-Davidson’s lineup. “Well said,” I told him, tipped the pint of stout one more But to achieve that remarkable longevity, the Sportster time, and then filed that fun fact needed to evolve and change over away for future reference. time. Models that followed include there are only two kinds of Fast forward 40 years, and a the XLH, XLCH (sometimes truism that I’ve found in the world referred to as Competition Hot), Harley enthusiasts — of Harley-Davidson motorcycles XLR (Racing), XR-750 (Racing), parallels my Irish friend’s thinking. XLA (Army), XLCR (Café Racer), It states: there are only two kinds of XLX (a low-budget 883), XR1000 Harley enthusiasts — Sportster (a dual-carburetor hot rod). We owners, and those who want to own go on and on! Suffice it to owners, and those who want could a Sportster. I happen to be a Sportsay, the mighty Sportster has ster owner, and one look at Bill Van earned its rightful place in Harley to own a Sportster. Dyne’s 1959 XLCH only reaffirms history, and I’m excited to write my passion for Sportsters. about this 1959 beauty that’s owned The history of the Sportster is well-known. When by Dr. William Van Dyne. the Sportster first joined Harley’s lineup in 1957 it Like many motorcycle restorations, Bill’s rebuild was actually based on an earlier model, the veneraof this XLCH was a labor of love, and he rides the ble K and KH that used bike often. Bill was a side-valve engines. passionate biker in the The XL series 1960s and ’70s S A LAD WHO ALSO HAPPENED TO BE OF IRISH

Sportster

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when he rode a 1949 Panhead chopper, but, as often happens, life caught up with him, and in the course of raising a family and supporting a household he distanced himself from our two-wheel sport. But in 2008 he encountered an old riding buddy, Ken, who still had the 1950 Panhead they had customized together way back when. Unfortunately, cancer took Ken’s life shortly thereafter, but Bill restored the old Panhead in his memory, only to sell the bike in 2012. Wanting another Harley, Bill looked for a Sportster to restore; he always favored their looks, and he was impressed by the wonderful sound their engines made. A Sportster, he concluded, would be the perfect bike. He considered many machines; some were too perfect, others too far gone, until finally he spotted this 1959 on craigslist. The old Sporty was in nearby Rome, New York, and it was a running machine, but in need of restoration. In short, it was the perfect bike, so he bought it. The first thing he did was shoot it with rattle can primer. He also rebuilt the brakes, added new chains, and he abated the many fluid leaks that wept lubricants from places that he didn’t even think Sportster engines could leak from. Those tasks completed, Bill rode the bike that summer, all the while formulating his plans for the restoration that followed. The following autumn he did a complete tear down; the restoration process had begun. He painted the frame himself, sending the sheet metal to Frank Daloia for the amaz-

156 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

ing Midnight Blue and Birch White original-color paint scheme you see here. The engine’s bottom end was within tolerance, so he sent the heads and barrels to JJ Cycles in Watervliet, New York, for cleaning and rebuild. He polished the heads himself, and all the chrome (or lack of it) today represents how it came with the bike when he bought it. He rewired the bike to 12-volt specs for more reliability; gave the Linkert DC 12 carburetor new life with its own rebuild; sent the magneto to Morris Magneto for a major facelift; and replaced the transmission’s kicker shaft before reassembling everything as needed. You’ve probably noticed that there are a few items on the bike that aren’t numbers-correct. For instance, the front wheel is from a later year, and the slash-cut mufflers (Bill prefers them to the straight cuts) are add-ons. The front fender is a bobbed unit that Bill got off eBay (he has the original), and a new set of Dunlop tires, a Biltwell seat, fresh cables, coupled with plenty of sweat and hard work, represent the final hurdles cleared to get the bike up and running. Bill sends out a special thanks to Erv Splitgerber of Spitzie’s Harley-Davidson and Mike Maynard for technical advice throughout the project. So to Sportster enthusiasts everywhere, I say “Ride on!” And to all other Harley riders, those who don’t understand the Sportster mystique or simply refuse to acknowledge it, I say come on in … the water is magnificent! AIM

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TECHLINE

continued from page 46 ing the air and gas better, so more of what is already there will burn and produce expanding pressure (power). Efficiency, lower emissions, and speed are the byproducts. The stock Evolution head lessens the valve-to-valve guide angularity, which allows for higher lift cams that open the valves farther into the combustion chamber to deliver more air and gas. However, the centrally located single camshaft with 4-inline cam lobes still exacerbates exhaust pushrod angularity, causing tappet bleed down. Automotive-style hydraulic lifters are a vast improvement over those used in some Hemi-head engines. They work hard against lifter bleed down. Compression can now increase due to combustion chamber efficiency that helps control spontaneous combustion. Performance mechanics soon learned to reshape valve seat overhangs and under-hangs in conjunction with a more rounded valve seat before and after the valve-to-valve-seat seating area to increase velocity and volume of air-fuel entry and exhaust flow. The aftermarket went nuts with this base D-shaped squish band design, introducing a myriad of head port-shaping and contouring designs to improve velocity and, thus, volume of flow. Now there is more air and gas for the squish design to turbulently mix to produce great increases in volume of burnable fuel while maintaining the higher percentage of burn in the available fuel. Performance head designers modify the combustion chamber D-shape into a bathtub shape for a more surround squish band, thus adding performance. This additional turbulence, and superior mixing of air and gas, burns an increasing percentage of fuel delivered. Finally, the Twin Cam oval combustion chamber comes into use with the stock Twin Cam 88 (1999-2006). This head has a type of bathtub-surround squish band with a mating flat top piston to take the mantle of fastest stock Big Twin Harley to date from the Evolution. It’s becoming trickier to improve on the stock designs, although performance people still have many opportunities that are more subtle but effective. The stock Twin Cam’s dual camshaft side-by-side arrangement allows for straighter pushrods with less angularity. This resolves tappet bleed down problems that have plagued Harley-Davidson since the Knucklehead years. This, in combination with the more efficient valve-to-valve guide angularity, allows higher lift cams that open the valves farther into the combustion chamber for increased fuel delivery. The Twin Cam 88 D-shaped exhaust port reduces power robbing exhaust reversion by preventing much of the returning exhaust pulses from re-entering the combustion chamber and bastardizing the virgin fuel. Do not confuse this with the Evolution D-combustion chamber. The D-shaped exhaust port step repulses returning exhaust gas waves. The 2007 to present TC96, TC103, and CVO 110 Twin Cam models eliminate the D-shaped exhaust port with porting changes to increase exhaust flow. Subtle changes improve these engines over the TC 88 design. Next month, I will continue the Key to Power: Head Flow with Heads Make or Break an Engine.

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158 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

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ISSUE #339 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • 159


ADVERTISER INDEX

Please Support Our Advertisers! They Support Us!

7EYE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7eye.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139

Dream Ride Day. . . . . . . . . . . DreamRide.org . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107

NAMZ Custom Cycle Products. 610-265-7100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161

AC Fine Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-742-7071 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109

DynoJet Research Inc. . . . . . . Flashyourharley.com . . . . . .126-127

New Windsor Fire Dept.. . . . . newwindsorfd.com . . . . . . . . . . .143

Airhawk Seats . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-443-2669 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133

eGlideGoodies. . . . . . . . . . . . eglidegoodies.com . . . . . . . . . . .151

Nexx North America . . . . . . . nexxnorthamerica.com . . . . . . . .151

Amsoil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-777-8491 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95

Faärken Biker Stirrups. . . . . . 508-210-2707 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149

National Motorcycle Museum. nationalmcmuseum.org . . . . . . .158

Andrews Products . . . . . . . . . 847-759-0190 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Frankenstein Unlimited . . . . . 913-352-6788 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141

Outrider Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

Arlen Ness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ARLENNESS.COM . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

Freedom Performance. . . . . . 310-324-0415 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97

Performance Machine . . . . . . 714-523-3000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Avon Grips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-334-7477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

Geico Direct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-442-9253 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85

Pingel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 608-339-7999 . . . . . . . . . . . .37, 135

B&W Trailer Hitches. . . . . . . . 620-473-3664 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

Ginz Choppers . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-916-5926 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157

Powertye. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-659-0575 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147

Bad Dad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260-407-2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135

Greene County Tourism . . . . . 800-355-CATS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123

Pro Pad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-403-2714 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159

BadAss Helmets. . . . . . . . . . . 866-334-3563 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159

H-D Motor Company . . . . . . . h-d.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Rampage Powerlift . . . . . . . . 925-405-0365 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

Badland Motorcycle Products 610-265-7100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140

Hannigan Motorsports. . . . . . 270-753-4256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

RC Components . . . . . . . . . . . 800-360-0915 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

BAHN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-294-2827 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C3

Harbor Freight Tools . . . . . . . HarborFreight.com . . . . . . . .136-137

Rider Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . 844-586-0045 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124

Barnett Clutches & Cables . . . BarnettClutches.com . . . . . . . . . .121

HardDrive Parts. . . . . . . . . . . HDTwin.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Ride Like a Pro . . . . . . . . . . . 866-868-7433 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142

BB Comfort Systems . . . . . . . ButtyBuddy.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .159

Headwinds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 626-359-8044 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161

Ride Wright Wheel . . . . . . . . 714-632-8297 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115

Big City Thunder . . . . . . . . . . 704-847-1222 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

HHI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-442-5837 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Rinehart Racing. . . . . . . . . . . 877-264-8282 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Bike Barn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604-521-6444 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

Hill Country Customs . . . . . . . 877-755-4455 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125

Rivco Products. . . . . . . . . . . . 888-801-8222 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148

Biketoberfest . . . . . . . . . . . . biketoberfest.org . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Hitch Doc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-446-8222 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

Rob’s Dyno Service . . . . . . . . robsdyno.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

Black Brand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . blackbrandmc.com . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Hog Covers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-534-5551 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148

Rogue Chopper . . . . . . . . . . . 866-877-6483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138

Bohn Armor Pants . . . . . . . . . 530-898-9269 . . . . . . . . . . .105, 159

Howard’s Hog Horns . . . . . . . 770-992-0034 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122

Roland Sands Design. . . . . . . rolandsands.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .57

Bradford Exchange . . . . . . . . bradfordexchange.com . . . . . . . .103

Indian Motorcycle Co. . . . . . . IndianMotorcycle.com . . . . . . . . .C4

S&S Cycle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sscycle.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91

Buffalo Chip . . . . . . . . . . . . . buffalochip.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .101

Iron Braid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-461-4766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147

S100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203-488-6569 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141

Campus Quilt. . . . . . . . . . . . . 502-968-2850 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

J&P Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 605-347-4983 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

SBS Brakes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sbs-friction.dk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117

Carlini Design . . . . . . . . . . . . carlinidesign.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Jims USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 805-482-6913 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115

Secure Caps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949-441-0438 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161

Chrome Dome . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-951-1980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

K&N Engineering . . . . . . . . . . 800-858-3333 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131

Shinko Tires. . . . . . . . . . . . . . shinkotireusa.com . . . . . . . . . . . .59

Ciro Product Design. . . . . . . . 715-808-0027 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-7

Ken’s Factory. . . . . . . . . . . . . kensfactoryusa.com . . . . . . . . . .123

Solid State Covers . . . . . . . . . 800-543-9304 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

Classic Goggles . . . . . . . . . . . 845-856-4896 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

KlockWerks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GETKLOCKED.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .117

Sport Chrome . . . . . . . . . . . . sportchrome.com . . . . . . . . . . . .140

Cobra Engineering. . . . . . . . . cobrausa.com . . . . . . . . . . . .8-9, 45

Kuryakyn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-277-9598 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Sport RX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-831-5817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149

Continental General Tire . . . . conti-moto.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79

Las Vegas Bikefest. . . . . . . . . LasVegasBikeFest.com . . . . . . . . .75

Tailgunner Exhaust . . . . . . . . 508-693-1944 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151

Corbin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-538-7035 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113

Law Offices of Richard M. Lester 800-531-2424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

Tourrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-962-9695 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157

Crank & Stroker Supply Co. . . 951-296-2166 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140

Leatherworks, The. . . . . . . . . 209-983-9200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161

True-Track . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 818-623-0697 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159

Cruz Tools, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . 888-909-8665 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109

Lehman Trikes . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-3WHEELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Tsukayu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tsukayu.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146

Custom Cycle Engineering . . . 800-472-9253 . . . . . . . . . . .125, 143

LePera Enterprises. . . . . . . . . 818-767-5112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

Twin Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . twinpower-usa.com . . . . . . . . . . .11

Danny Gray Seats . . . . . . . . . 888-443-2669 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119

Load All . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877-241-4330 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132

Ultimate Cycle Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133

Dead Center Cycles . . . . . . . . 866-971-3323 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

Love Jugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 561-701-4661 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146

Vance & Hines . . . . . . . . . . . . vanceandhines.com . . . . . . . . . .4-5

Dennis Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-564-1822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Lucas Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 855-462-9335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Victory Motorcycles . . . . . . . . victorymotorcycles.com . . . . . . . .19

Design Engineering . . . . . . . . ExileCycles.com . . . . . . . . . . . . .149

Marlin Corp.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248-683-1536 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149

Wide Open Custom Plastic. . . 620-795-4421 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161

Direct Cycle Parts. . . . . . . . . . 800-745-6830 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

Missing Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888-489-9984 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

Widow Maker Industries . . . . 602-509-4776 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

Dirty Bird Concepts . . . . . . . . 623-465-5263 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139

Mountain Master . . . . . . . . . . 623-451-7121 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148

Wiley X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . h-dsunglassesbywileyx.com . . . .65

DNA Specialty Inc., West . . . . 310-767-4070 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93

Mustang Seats . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-243-1392 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

Wizards Products. . . . . . . . . . 800-356-7223 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113

Drag Specialties. . . . . . . . . . . dragspecialties.com . . . . . . . . . . .C2

Mystery Design Trikes . . . . . . 214-467-0991 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119

Yelvington Trikes. . . . . . . . . . 727-233-3610 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

The Advertiser Index is provided as a service to American Iron Magazine readers. American Iron Magazine is not responsible for omissions or typographical errors in names or page or phone numbers. If your company is not listed here, please contact Nicole Hart at 203/425-8777 to rectify.

160 • AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE • ISSUE #339

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This magazine is independently published by TAM Communications, Inc. and is not produced by or for Harley-Davidson. AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE (USPS 007-321, ISSN 1059-7891), Issue #339. AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE is published every four weeks by TAM Communications, Inc., 1010 Summer Street, Stamford, CT 06905. Subscriptions are $24.97 a year. Periodical postage paid at Stamford, CT, and additional mailing offices. 203/425-8777, fax 203/425-8775. Contents copyrighted 2016 by TAM Communications, Inc. The magazine is purchased with the understanding that the information is from many varied sources, from which there can be no warranty or responsibility by the publisher as to accuracy or completeness. The publisher reserves the right to reject any advertisement deemed objectionable. It is the advertiser’s or its agency’s responsibility to obtain appropriate release on items described or illustrated in an advertisement. AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE will not be responsible for any error in any advertisement published. POSTMASTER: Please send change-of-address forms and all subscription correspondence to AMERICAN IRON MAGAZINE, Subscription Services, PO Box 3000, Denville, NJ 07834.

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