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2 0 1 1 T RA FF I C K IN G IN P ER S ON S RE P OR T

Processing of Victims by the Malaysian government Anti Trafficking in Persons and Anti Smuggling of Migrants Act 2007

Enforcement

Victim

Court

Identification of Victim

Victim placed in temporary custody for 24 hours*

Mandatory 14 day interim protection order (IPO) (Magistrate Court)*

Victim placed in Shelter (IPO)

3 month protection order (PO) (Magistrate Court)*

Victim placed in Shelter (PO)

Evidence of Victim is recorded (Sessions Court)*

Production of joint report by Enforcement and Protection Officer*

Enforcement Officer continues investigations*

Legend Victim Processing Prosecution by Deputy Public Prosecutor

Victim is repatriated

Trial proceeds against Trafficker (Sessions Court)*

Law Enforcement Investigation

* O ver-Interviewing of Victims May Cause Secondary Trauma: Victims will be required to recount their trafficking experience as many as seven times (each noted by an asterik), each to a different official according to the Coalition to Abolish Modern-Day Slavery in Asia (CAMSA).

Prosecution The majority of the world’s countries have ratified the Palermo Protocol, which requires the prohibition and punishment of human trafficking crimes. Most of these countries have enacted adequate legislation to criminalize trafficking in persons as defined by the Palermo Protocol. Although 62 countries have yet to achieve a trafficking conviction, the aggregate number of prosecutions and convictions has been steadily rising over the last three years – from 5,212 prosecutions and 2,983 convictions obtained globally in 2008, to 6,017 prosecutions and 3,619 convictions in 2010. Sadly, the number of prosecutions is far outweighed by the number of arrests and

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investigations. And successful prosecutions of sex trafficking offenses far outnumber successful forced labor prosecutions. Confronting labor trafficking can be more difficult, both politically and socially. Unlike sex trafficking, labor trafficking crimes are often committed by persons perceived as respected members of society or accomplished business leaders, who are less likely to be investigated than unsavory characters involved in organized crime or living unlawfully off the proceeds of the commercial sex trade. Despite this obstacle, an increasing number of countries have been able to identify, prosecute, and criminally punish forced labor cases. These successes are driven by commitments of political will, ongoing law enforcement training, and a fuller understanding of trafficking as a crime of modern slavery. These successes can

2011 Trafficking in Persons Report - Intro  
2011 Trafficking in Persons Report - Intro  

The US Department of State issues its annual report on the trafficking of persons worldwide

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