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The National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 Public Consultation 4th October 2011 to 5th JANUARY 2012

Growth and quality


Contents

Part 1 The Plan Introduction to the draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

1

Foreword

2 Executive summary 3

Background

4

Planning for growth and quality – Development areas Home Education and learning Community Workplace Arts, media and heritage Corpus planning

5

Implementation of the National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 Bòrd na Gàidhlig’s role Gaelic Language Plans Creating the conditions for implementation Monitoring & assessing implementation

03 04 06 09 11 12 14 18 21 23 25

26 26 26 27 28

Part 2 Implementation of the Plan

6

Implementation strategies

30

Annex 1 Glossary of terms and abbreviations

52

Contact Information

54


Draft national Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

the Plan


Introduction to the draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 This draft of this second National Gaelic Language Plan has been drawn up by Bòrd na Gàidhlig as required by section 2 of the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005, and is hereby published for public consultation under section 2(3) of the Act. As of 4th October 2011, the draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 has been made available for public consultation in booklet form and on the Bòrd na Gàidhlig website at www.gaidhlig.org.uk Responses from individuals or organisations or ad hoc groupings of either are invited by letter and through electronic mail. The consultation period will close at 5pm on 5th January 2012. Responses should be sent to: plana@gaidhlig.org.uk or: National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 Bòrd na Gàidhlig Darach Stoneyfield Inverness IV2 7PA

The draft National Gaelic Language Plan will be reconsidered by Bòrd na Gàidhlig in the light of responses received during the period of public consultation. The Bòrd will then submit a revised draft to the Scottish Ministers for approval. Your response is welcome on any aspect of the draft Plan.

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

The Plan


The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

1 Foreword On behalf of Bòrd na Gàidhlig, I am pleased to submit this draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 for public consultation. While it is Bòrd na Gàidhlig’s duty to prepare a National Gaelic Language Plan, and to take a lead in delivering aspects of it, a key point is that this is a national strategy. The Scottish Government, public bodies, local authorities, Gaelic organisations and members of the public should all have a role in its implementation. It will be through a sense of shared ownership, and everyone taking an active part in its delivery, that the next National Gaelic Language Plan will have the best chance of success. In the context of very tight public spending it is more important than ever that Bòrd na Gàidhlig agrees a way to secure a future for the Gaelic language with those who will be involved with us in delivering the next National Gaelic Language Plan. The National Gaelic Language Plan is our statement of what should be done to promote the use and understanding of the Gaelic language. It sets out how Bòrd na Gàidhlig will make progress with its main activities and it seeks to offer clear advice to local authorities and public bodies on what steps they should take to promote and support Gaelic through their own Gaelic Language Plans. Gaelic is an official language of Scotland. Unlike other languages spoken in Scotland, Gaelic depends entirely on the support of Scottish authorities. As the Scottish public is in favour of steps being taken to ensure that Gaelic continues to be spoken in Scotland, it must be accepted that resources need to be allocated for that purpose. It is not an option to support a secure future for Gaelic without the associated funding needed to achieve this. Expenditure on Gaelic initiatives produces significant economic, educational and cultural benefits for Scotland.

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We have evidence that Gaelic education leads to good attainment with all the cognitive benefits bilingualism offers to our young. So we need to ensure those benefits are available to more young people. We have evidence that Gaelic is a language valued by the majority of people in Scotland. Recent research has shown that 81% of Scottish people do not want Scotland to lose its Gaelic identity. So we need to ensure that Gaelic is used more and promoted as a language for anyone across Scotland who wishes to engage in learning or using it. We have evidence that lifelong bilingualism is a factor in delaying the onset of dementia, so there may even be health benefits associated with Gaelic learning and use among adults. Many challenges remain in reversing the decline of the Gaelic language. The next National Gaelic Language Plan will require a concerted effort on the part of public bodies and local authorities in Scotland, as well as Gaelic speakers themselves, if we are to make the progress required. It is important, therefore, that we listen to all views on this draft and take account of any concerns expressed in the consultation period before submitting the completed National Gaelic Language Plan to the Scottish Government for approval. All opinions on the proposals within the draft Plan will be highly valued and Bòrd na Gàidhlig would be very grateful for your time in submitting those views. Arthur Cormack Chairman, Bòrd na Gàidhlig

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

The Plan


The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

2 Executive summary The National Gaelic Language Plan: status and purpose Section 2 of the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005 requires Bòrd na Gàidhlig to prepare and submit to the Scottish Ministers a National Gaelic Language Plan, and revised versions thereof “no later than 5 years after the date on which the most recent plan is published”. The 2007-12 National Gaelic Language Plan posed the question, ‘Why do we need a Gaelic Plan?’ The answer given at that time still applies, namely that the position of Gaelic is fragile and that, if the language is to have a sustainable future, there needs to be “coordination of effort and direction of resources towards agreed actions and outcomes.” The National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 sets out what these actions and outcomes are and how they are to be implemented. This will involve both Bòrd na Gàidhlig and public, voluntary and private bodies and individuals throughout Scotland. The phrase ‘We will …’, which introduces most of the commitments in the Plan, is to be interpreted in that collective sense rather than referring solely to Bòrd na Gàidhlig. This is a Plan for the whole of Scotland.

Vision The National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 carries forward the first Plan’s vision of a sustainable future for Gaelic as a healthy, vibrant language, increasingly used, valued and respected in a modern, multicultural and multilingual Scotland.

Aims The strapline ‘Fàs is feabhas/Growth and quality’ reflects the three overarching aims which inform the Plan: »» arresting the decline in the overall number of Gaelic speakers in Scotland by increasing the number acquiring the language »» expanding the range of situations in which Gaelic is used, in line with the Gaelic Language Act’s key principle of equal respect for Gaelic and English »» helping speakers of Gaelic, both learners and native speakers, to develop their competence in the language and their confidence in using it, and ensuring that the language itself continues to be healthy and vibrant.

Headline target The Plan’s headline target is to attain stability in the number of people speaking Gaelic by raising the rate at which new Gaelic speakers are created to ‘replacement level’ – i.e. the level at which the loss of mostly older Gaelic speakers is balanced by the creation of new speakers. The specific performance criteria for this target are that the 2021 National Census confirms that the growth in the number of young people speaking Gaelic continues and that by 2031 it has reached replacement level.

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The structure of the Plan The core of the Plan is ‘Section 4: Planning for growth and quality’. This comprises six sections, covering the following development areas: Home, Education, Community, Workplace, Arts, media and heritage, and Corpus planning. The Plan is informed by research on language planning in general and on aspects of Gaelic education, childcare and community in particular. The four standard language planning categories - Acquisition, Usage, Status and Corpus permeate the Plan: Table 1 below indicates the development areas in which each features most prominently.

Table 1 Category

Primary domain: development area

Acquisition

Home

12

Arts, media and heritage

23

Education and learning

14

Community

18

_

_

Workplace

21

_

_

Gaelic Language Plans

26

Home

12

Education and learning

14

Community

18

Gaelic Language Plans

26

Workplace

21

_

_

Arts, media, heritage

23

_

_

Status

Gaelic Language Plans

26

All domains/development areas

_

Corpus

Corpus planning

25

All domains/development areas

_

Usage

Page

7

Secondary domain: development area

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The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

Planning for growth and quality: summary The Plan sets out a range of proposals in pursuance of the headline target and aims set out above, including: »» strengthening the passing on of Gaelic from one generation to the next in the home »» expanding, and developing the effectiveness of, Gaelic-medium education (GME), with the aim of doubling the number of children and young people entering GME each year, within the lifetime of the Plan »» expanding, and developing the effectiveness of, Gaelic-learner education at all levels »» increasing the use of Gaelic in the home, education, community and workplace »» developing the Gaelic arts, media and heritage sector »» enhancing the ability of the language to cope with an increasing range of uses »» creating the environment and infrastructure needed to support these developments in order to ensure that they become part of normal provision »» inclusion of these outcomes, as appropriate, in statutory, voluntary and community Gaelic Language Plans and in Single Outcome Agreements.

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3 Background Rationale The rationale underpinning the National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 is as follows: »» Gaelic has been spoken in Scotland for close to two millennia. It was the original language of the Scots and became the determining factor in shaping Scottish identity. Gaelic belongs to all of Scotland. »» Gaelic development provides significant economic benefits by creating new Gaelic-related jobs, contributing to the overall community confidence that leads to job creation and by giving Scotland a distinctive and, in terms of tourism, a highly marketable, image. »» Speaking two or more languages has been conclusively shown to enhance aspects of cognitive development, especially in the young. »» Although more than 50% of EU citizens are bilingual, Scotland and the UK’s record on this is acknowledged to be poor: the example of Gaelic-English bilingualism can help change a national mindset which has become reconciled to speaking only one language, as well as offering a model of language acquisition with a proven record of success. »» Bilingualism provides different windows on the world and so contributes to building the multicultural outlook that modern life demands.

The context The 2001 National Census showed that the number of Gaelic speakers in Scotland had fallen since 1991 but that the rate of decline had begun to slow down and, in particular, that the number of young Gaelic speakers had risen. This was largely due to the success of Gaelic-medium education, supported by the improvements during the past few decades in the status of Gaelic and in the range of provision available in the language. Nonetheless, the position of Gaelic in Scotland continues to be a precarious one. Because of the age profile of the 2001 cohort, the 2011 Census is expected to show that the number of Gaelic speakers has continued to fall, albeit more slowly, and, crucially, that the rate at which new speakers are being created needs to increase significantly if the overall decline is to be reversed.

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The Plan


The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

The Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005 The Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act was passed by the Scottish Parliament in 2005 with the stated purpose of “securing the status of Gaelic as an official language of Scotland commanding equal respect to the English language”. The Act builds on existing legislation on the rights of Gaelic and other minoritised languages, including the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Persons belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities (1992), the Council of Europe’s European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (1992), and clauses relating to Gaelic in education, media, crofting and land legislation of the UK and Scottish Parliaments. The 2005 Act required Bòrd na Gàidhlig to submit to the Scottish Ministers a National Gaelic Language Plan, outlining a strategy for increasing the number able to speak Gaelic, encouraging its use and facilitating access to Gaelic language and culture. It also authorised Bòrd na Gàidhlig to require public authorities to submit and implement their Gaelic Language Plans within the framework provided by the National Plan. The first National Gaelic Language Plan was published in 2007 and covered the period 2007-2012. The Plan for 20122017 meets the Act’s requirement for a revised plan to be submitted no later than 5 years after the first.

National Outcomes The National Gaelic Language Plan contributes to the Scottish Government’s National Outcomes as follows: Development Area Home | Education and learning

National Outcome Number

National Outcome Statement

5

Our children have the best chance in life and are ready to succeed.

4

Our young people are successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and responsible citizens.

3

We are better educated, more skilled and more successful, renowned for our research and innovation.

11

We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own actions and how they affect others.

2

We realise our full economic potential with more and better employment opportunities for our people.

Arts, media and heritage

13

We take a pride in a strong, fair and inclusive national identity.

The whole Plan

15

Our public services are high quality, continually improving, efficient and responsive to local people’s needs.

Community | Workplace

10


4 Planning for growth and quality - Development areas Introduction The six development areas covered in this section – Home, Education, Community, Workplace, Arts, media and heritage, and Corpus - are dealt with individually for the sake of clarity but it is important to stress that they are interrelated and interdependent, with progress in one area often complementing or inspiring developments in another. Children who acquire Gaelic in the family, for example, should be able to develop it in school and to use it for leisure in the community. Corpus planning will ensure that the language meets their educational needs and a lively cultural scene will help maintain their interest. Acquisition Home education

usage community workplace

culture

language

arts

corpus PLANNING

media heritage

Similarly, an organisation may be involved in more than one development area. For example, a Health Board in a Gaelic speaking area may be expected to have a bilingual corporate image, to encourage Gaelic speaking staff to use the language to patients and to collaborate with others in providing bilingual children’s services. Organisations may also become involved in the promotion of Gaelic indirectly, for example when a development agency supports Gaelic activity under its cultural tourism remit. The ‘Who’ column in the Implementation Strategies section of the Plan (from page 30) indicates which organisations or groups are expected to have an interest in particular areas. The Plan’s recommended approach to planning for growth and quality is, for these reasons, a holistic one which embraces all six development areas.

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The Plan


The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

HOME

We recognise the importance of passing Gaelic on to children in the home and the need for an increase in the number of children acquiring Gaelic in this way.

Rationale Most languages are passed on from one generation to the next in the home, a process referred to by linguists as ‘intergenerational transmission’. In many minoritised language contexts this process has ceased to be effective, leading to a spiral of decline in the number of speakers of the language. This has been the position with Gaelic in recent years. Reinvigorating the intergenerational process is important for three reasons: »» by creating new Gaelic speakers it contributes to reversing the decline in the number of people speaking Gaelic »» it helps Gaelic move closer to a position of ‘natural growth’ where its future is less dependent on the school and other institutions »» the first language learned, traditionally referred to as the ‘mother tongue’, is usually the one to which speakers feel the greatest loyalty, which they are most comfortable in using and are therefore most likely to wish to pass on to the next generation. Aims

1 To raise critical awareness of the importance of the home as a domain for acquiring Gaelic We will develop and implement a strategy to raise awareness of the importance of passing on Gaelic to children in the home. This will target ‘prospective parents’, namely individuals who speak Gaelic fluently, have some Gaelic or are simply supportive of the language, and who are likely to become parents in the future. There will be a particular emphasis on the adolescents and young adults who have come through Gaelic-medium education (GME) in recent years and who constitute a new generation of Gaelic speakers of child-raising age. The strategy will entail a publicity and information campaign on the importance of learning Gaelic in the home, involving print, broadcast and electronic media, face-to-face mentoring services (including home visits and presentations in ante-natal clinics) and participation in group work and events. This process will be led by a Gaelic organisation (or organisations), working with local authorities and other services such as Health. The Bòrd will encourage its inclusion in Gaelic Language Plans and in Single Outcome Agreements.

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2 To provide practical support in regard to passing Gaelic on to children in the home This part of the strategy will include: »» provision of advice and mentoring, support groups and associated events »» practical support, including Gaelic tuition geared to the needs of parents who wish to raise their children as first-language Gaelic speakers and who lack confidence in their own Gaelic ability »» encouraging the formation of informal family support networks, including Gaelic speaking grandparents, other Gaelic speaking members of the extended family, and neighbours and friends »» developing and supporting appropriate services, including childminding, wraparound care and pre-school groups, to support the development of young children’s language skills »» increasing the provision of leisure resources and activities, including books, television programmes, DVDs and web-based facilities that can support parents’ efforts to establish Gaelic as a language of the home. Bòrd na Gàidhlig will initiate the strategy by bringing together individuals, groups and agencies with an interest in Gaelic parenting in order to agree a plan of action and to create networks for continued collaboration. Where appropriate, the Bòrd will encourage inclusion of the outcomes set out above in statutory, voluntary and community Gaelic Language Plans and in Single Outcome Agreements.

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The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

EDUCATION AND LEARNING

We recognise the importance of Gaelic-medium education (GME) as the principal means by which new Gaelic speakers are created at present and will seek to increase the numbers in GME substantially, while continuing to value and support other forms of Gaelic education such as Gaelic-learner education (in schools and in FE, HE and informal education settings) and Gaelic awareness raising (e.g. GLPS and Scottish studies courses).

Rationale According to the National Census reports, the number of Gaelic speakers in Scotland fell by 7,300 between 1991 and 2001, an average annual fall of 730. Over this period, new Gaelic speakers were being created in a range of situations, including the family, Gaelic-medium education, learners’ classes in schools and colleges, and adult classes. The most productive of these in terms of numbers, and also the only one for which reliable figures are available, is Gaelic-medium education and it is therefore the category used here to calculate the required ‘replacement rate’. Local authority data indicates that GME was attracting around 300 new entrants per year in the decade leading up to 2001, most of whom are likely to have been recorded in the Census as Gaelic speakers: in other words, without them the annual fall reported by the Census would have been around 1,000. That is, therefore, assumed to be the underlying rate of decline – i.e. the number of mostly older Gaelic speakers being lost each year. Assuming that the 2011 Census report presents a broadly similar picture to 2001, the rate at which new Gaelic speakers are created will, therefore, need to increase to around 1,000 per year if the decline is to be arrested. While some of these new speakers will come from the family or from Gaelic-learner education - of all kinds - most will need to be created, as now, by Gaelic-medium education. The implication of this for Gaelic education is that the current annual GME intake of 400 children per year will need to be more than doubled within the lifetime of the Plan, coupled with smaller, but significant, increases in the numbers learning Gaelic in the home and as a second language (in primary and secondary school, further and higher education and informal adult education). The doubling of the GME numbers requires a 15% year-on-year increase during the period 2012-17. This significant expansion of Gaelic-medium provision is the keynote of the National Plan, on which the success of much of the rest of the Plan depends. It will require effective workforce and capital planning, substantially increased funding and a continuing political commitment. Bòrd na Gàidhlig will encourage inclusion of this outcome in Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements, as appropriate.

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Aims

1 To extend access to, and participation in, Gaelic education and learning We will work to bring about a 15% year-on-year increase in the number of children entering Gaelic-medium education, from a baseline of 400 per year in 2011-12. This will entail, as a first step, continuing to increase public, and especially parental, awareness of: »» the cognitive, cultural, social and professional advantages of bilingualism in English and Gaelic »» the effectiveness of Gaelic-medium immersion education as a means of bringing learners to the level of communicative competence in Gaelic at an early stage. This will be done through: »» a major publicity and information campaign, aimed at making parents and prospective parents aware of Gaelic-medium education and its benefits »» continuing to provide information, advice and practical help to parents on how to request and to access Gaelic-medium education, and to local authorities and other educational providers on how to set up and develop provision. The publicity and information campaign will feature the print, broadcast and electronic media, face-to-face advisory and mentoring services and community events, and will involve various Gaelic organisations and other agencies working in partnership. There will be a particular emphasis on expanding, and enhancing the quality of, provision at the 0-3 stage, in line with the Scottish Government/COSLA Early Years Framework and the recommendations of the 2011 report, Joining the Dots A Better Start for Scotland’s Children. There will also be a special focus on maintaining continuity and progression at key transition points such as 3>preschool, pre-school>primary, primary>secondary and secondary>FE/HE. A statistical baseline will be maintained to assist in planning and monitoring progression. We will also support the expansion of Gaelic-learner education (GLE) in primary and secondary schools, in further and higher education and in informal adult education, and will encourage further development of the methods used in order to make GLE as effective as possible at bringing learners to the level of communicative competence in the language. We will strengthen the infrastructure for Gaelic education and learning generally by: »» establishing capital and workforce planning on a national basis in order to provide a solid foundation for continued development »» supporting the recruitment of a confident, appropriately trained workforce in order to service the proposed expansion of Gaelic and, especially, Gaelic-medium education, including a review of the delivery of preservice and inservice teacher training in the context of Teaching Scotland’s Future (the ‘Donaldson Report’) and consideration of initiatives such as paid sabbaticals to enable teachers to learn Gaelic

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The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

»» identifying sources of capital funding to support expansion in provision, with a particular emphasis on creation of dedicated Gaelic Schools, to include existing funding sources such as the Gaelic Schools Fund, the Scottish Futures Trust and Developer Donations »» working with the Scottish Ministers and local authorities to ensure that there is adequate revenue funding for the development of Gaelic education »» ensuring that outcomes relating to education are covered in organisations’ Gaelic Language Plans and in Single Outcome Agreements, as appropriate.

2 Equal respect and parity for Gaelic education and learning In order to consolidate the status of Gaelic education and learning as an established feature of educational provision in Scotland, Bòrd na Gàidhlig will: »» investigate with the Scottish Ministers the possibility of creating a legal entitlement to Gaelic-medium education »» ensure Ministerial guidance is issued defining Gaelic-medium and Gaelic-learner education and the outcomes expected from them »» ensure that the principles and practices of Curriculum for Excellence are implemented fully in Gaelic and Gaelic-medium education at all levels »» create support networks within Gaelic education, including arrangements for agreeing a national strategy for curricular and resource development.

3 To enhance delivery of Gaelic education and learning We will enhance the quality of Gaelic-medium education and learning, within the overall context of Curriculum for Excellence, in order to maintain and extend its appeal to parents and its acknowledged effectiveness in regard to language acquisition and general educational achievement. We will do this by: »» continuing to develop and refine immersion methodology in order to increase the total achieving fluency in Gaelic and in particular to enhance the standard of their Gaelic in terms of range of vocabulary and grammatical accuracy »» encouraging further development of national guidance, training and resources and of staffing at local level to ensure learners with Additional Support Needs can reach their full potential in Gaelic-medium education. We will support both Gaelic-medium and Gaelic-learner education through continued production of high quality learning/teaching and assessment materials, in all areas and sectors and in a variety of media and formats. This will include guidance on terminology and orthography. We will also work towards a common set of standards based on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF).

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4 To strengthen the context in which Gaelic education and learning operates We will strengthen the context in which Gaelic-medium and Gaelic-learner education operates through a variety of means, including: »» raising awareness among parents, education professionals and the public of the research findings on bilingualism and immersion education, both in an international context and in relation to Gaelic in particular »» providing support to parents with children in GME and in Gaelic education generally so that they can increase the use made of Gaelic in the home, including tuition in Gaelic and in Gaelic literacy, and providing advice and assistance with homework, new Gaelic terminology and related matters »» increasing the range of educational and leisure resources available for use in the home, including books and web-based facilities »» developing leisure and recreational activities in Gaelic, locally and at national level »» establishing mutually supportive links between schools with GME or GLE and their communities, especially in areas with Iomairtean Gàidhlig status or 20%+ Gaelic speakers »» developing courses and resources for GME secondary classes aimed at raising awareness of Gaelic culture, Gaelic career opportunities and issues such as the importance of passing on Gaelic to children in the home »» developing curricular inserts, as part of the proposed Scottish studies courses, on Gaelic language and culture, including a new approach to mass Gaelic teaching along the lines of the Youth Music Initiative.

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The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

COMMUNITY

We recognise the importance of the community as a context for developing Gaelic usage and for implementing the Gaelic Act’s key principle of equal respect for Gaelic and English.

Rationale Communities in which Gaelic is in everyday use are important in themselves and should be supported. They are also a resource which allows learners and native speakers alike to use Gaelic in real situations, enabling them to enhance their competence in it and to gain an appreciation of Gaelic as a living language which is recognised and respected and is of value to them. It is important, therefore, to support and strengthen such communities and to recognise, and to make use of, the skills of the Gaelic speakers who live in them. The language is under pressure in many of the areas concerned, for example from migration (out and in) and from a lack of confidence, on the part of younger speakers in particular, in their command of Gaelic, but there are also indications of a renewal of interest in Gaelic in some communities and an underlying commitment to their Gaelic heritage which can be built on. There are new types of Gaelic community which are important and will be supported, such as learner support groups and internet-based virtual communities, but the main focus will be on creating and reinforcing language vitality in communities with a threshold level of Gaelic usage, including Iomairtean Gàidhlig areas and communities with 20% or more Gaelic speakers. It is important that learners of Gaelic in particular have the opportunity to use the language in community settings so that they can develop their skills and maintain their interest in the language. This is especially true of the young people in Gaelic-medium education to ensure that they do not associate Gaelic solely with school but rather that they see it as a language of relevance to their everyday lives, now and in the future, which they will want to use and to pass on to their own families. There are close links between economic and cultural development. Gaelic-related initiatives, particularly in education and the creative industries – i.e. broadcasting, publishing, festivals and other arts events and venues - have created significant employment in communities where traditional economic development models had proven less successful. In all, the ‘Gaelic economy’ is estimated to create, directly, over 1,000 fulltime posts. It is also widely recognised that revival in language and culture can act as a stimulus to community confidence, creating the conditions for social and economic development.

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Aims

1 To create a positive attitude to Gaelic in the community We will raise awareness of Gaelic in the community and will work to enable Gaelic speakers to use Gaelic as their language of choice in as many situations as possible, in line with the Gaelic Language Act’s key principle of equal respect for the language. Gaelic Language Plans will play a key role in creating the conditions for this, including: Statutory Gaelic Language Plans Bòrd na Gàidhlig will require the public authorities producing statutory Gaelic Language Plans to provide opportunities for the public to use Gaelic in accessing their services and to make increased use of Gaelic in conducting their business, including its use on signage and leaflets, in meetings and at events. Voluntary Gaelic Language Plans Private businesses, social enterprises, arms length organisations (ALOs) and the voluntary (third) sector will be encouraged and supported to produce voluntary Gaelic Language Plans which provide opportunities for the public to use Gaelic when engaging with them, including use of Gaelic on signage and leaflets, in meetings and at community events. Community Gaelic Language Plans Bòrd na Gàidhlig will bring together community representatives, Gaelic organisations, enterprise agencies, private businesses, relevant local authority departments and public authorities in order to produce Community Gaelic Language Plans, with the aim of increasing the use of Gaelic in the community and of giving communities a greater sense of ownership of Gaelic language development in their area. Communitybased support workers will be an important element in this process. Consideration will be given to incentives to communities, such as awards and, for example, designation as ‘Gaelic Communities’ (with the advantages and obligations that such a status might bring).

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The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

2 To sustain language vitality in communities where it is in widespread use We will strengthen communities in which Gaelic is in everyday use by: »» gathering information on community language revitalisation projects elsewhere and developing and disseminating models of best practice »» investing in economic and social development in such communities in order to encourage young Gaelic speakers to choose to live there »» encouraging and assisting communities to provide services for learners of Gaelic, such as residential or activity courses, both as a commercial exercise and as a means of building bridges between the traditional Gaelic areas and the new urban Gaelic communities.

3

To create and increase situations in which Gaelic can be used We will create as many opportunities as possible for people to use Gaelic as their language of choice in public situations and in a range of social and more formal community events. In particular, public authorities and organisations in the private, social enterprise and voluntary sectors will be encouraged – through the Gaelic Language Plans process and by other appropriate means - to deliver Gaelicmedium services and activities as part of their core work and will be supported in this through provision of translation services, staff development and funding. This will include the church, a traditional pillar of Gaelic usage in the community.

4 To increase opportunities for adult learners and young people to use Gaelic We will encourage Gaelic speakers to use Gaelic as much as possible in the community, including both Gaelic learners, young and old, and native speakers who lack confidence in their Gaelic ability. We will establish, support and publicise networks of Gaelic conversation circles and other opportunities for adult Gaelic learners, and others who lack confidence in Gaelic, to use the language in informal settings, including bilingual and/or Gaelic community meetings and events, in order to enable them to develop their competence in the language. Parents with children in Gaelic-medium education will form a priority group in this context. Bòrd na Gàidhlig will make it easier for adult learners to access on-line Gaelic learning resources and courses by developing, with key partners, the LearnGaelic.net website. With regard to the young people in Gaelic-medium education, the Gaelic organisations, local authorities, voluntary groups and interested individuals will establish, support and develop regular extra-curricular activities and trips, including clubs and sports activities, and occasional non-school based events such as summer activity camps or play schemes.

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WORKPLACE

We recognise the importance of the workplace as a context for extending Gaelic usage, reinforcing individuals’ language skills and enhancing the perceived status of the language.

Rationale The workplace provides an important opportunity to develop speaking, reading and writing skills in Gaelic. Employers can encourage acquisition and development of such skills by recognising them in the recruitment process, including them in staff development programmes and, generally, encouraging more use of Gaelic in the workplace. This will have the twofold benefit of assisting the language development of individual workers and increasing the range and quality of services available to the public. It will also help to develop a sense of the equality of respect set out in the 2005 Act and an appreciation of the value of Gaelic, to the individual and the community, in terms of employment opportunities. Aims

1 To create a positive attitude to Gaelic in the workplace We will encourage and support employers to ensure that Gaelic is seen, heard and used in workplaces as part of their routine operation, that the ability to speak, read and write Gaelic is recognised as a job-related skill and that an increasing number of posts are designated as ‘Gaelic essential’ or ‘Gaelic desirable’. The Bòrd will encourage inclusion of such outcomes in Gaelic Language Plans in the public, private and voluntary sectors – and in Single Outcome Agreements, with a particular emphasis on Iomairtean Gàidhlig areas and communities with over 20% Gaelic speakers.

2 To sustain language vitality in workplaces, particularly in areas where Gaelic is in widespread community use We will gather information on projects elsewhere designed to sustain or increase minority language use in the workplace and will develop and disseminate models of best practice.

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

The Plan


The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

3 To create and increase situations in which Gaelic can be used in the workplace We will work with employers and trade unions to encourage staff and service users to use Gaelic as a language of choice in the workplace. This will include identification of existing tasks where Gaelic could be used amongst staff and creating new opportunities such as conversation circles or bilingual meetings. We will also explore means of identifying Gaelic speaking staff within organisations, e.g. through use of badges or signs, for the benefit of colleagues and the public, and of creating awards and designations – for example, ‘Investors in Gaelic’ - which recognise positive action by organisations which invest time and money in promoting Gaelic.

4 To increase opportunities for staff to learn Gaelic and develop their skills in the workplace We will work with employers and trade unions to initiate and support Gaelic Awareness and Gaelic language training for staff. This will include an audit of existing Gaelic skills and of training requirements and inclusion of Gaelic skills development in existing CPD frameworks.

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ARTS, MEDIA AND HERITAGE

We recognise the importance of the Gaelic arts, media and heritage, both for themselves and for the contribution they make to creating awareness of, and interest in, Gaelic and by providing opportunities to use and develop the language.

Rationale Language and culture are closely interlinked: loyalty to a particular language is usually inspired, not only by the language itself but by what it represents in symbolic and emotional terms for its speakers and the cultural values that it embodies. Awareness of heritage, by presenting a continuum from the past to the present, provides a foundation on which to progress linguistic and cultural identity into the future. The media and publishing, for their part, have an important role to play in enhancing the profile of Gaelic and enabling more use to be made of it in various domains. Together, arts, media and heritage provide an important context for Gaelic development and will help attain the Gaelic Act’s key principle of equal respect and the Plan’s headline target of stability in the number speaking Gaelic, in the following ways: »» strengthening the sense of emotional commitment of Gaelic speakers, and other interested individuals, to Gaelic through increased involvement in, and appreciation of, Gaelic heritage, media and art »» contributing to the development of the tourist industry by offering visitors a unique cultural experience and, generally, by establishing a profile for the Highlands and for Scotland that is distinctive and highly marketable in tourism terms »» raising awareness and appreciation of Gaelic in the wider socio-cultural context »» providing opportunities for fluent speakers and learners to use the language and for non-speakers of Gaelic to engage with it and to begin the process of learning it »» creating employment opportunities for Gaelic speakers, readers and writers »» contributing to the key principle of equal respect for Gaelic and English. Aims

1 To invest in excellence We will identify, support and invest in individuals and organisations aiming to achieve excellence in the Gaelic arts, media and heritage sector, in order to increase the numbers of practitioners at community, national and international level.

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

The Plan


The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

In particular, we will seek to create a permanent infrastructure in Gaelic of arts-based services in support of all sectors of the Gaelic revival.

2 To invest in quality artistic production We will increase the range and quality of productions which enhance the status of Gaelic, encourage the acquisition of Gaelic speaking, reading and writing skills and provide opportunities to use Gaelic as part of the creative process. Generally, we will support increased use of Gaelic across the spectrum of the arts, media and heritage in Scotland.

3 To invest in audiences, access and participation We will develop existing audiences and create new ones and will develop new opportunities for people to access and participate in Gaelic arts, media and heritage.

4 To invest in the Gaelic cultural economy We will work to increase the number of employment opportunities within the Gaelic arts, media and heritage sector through broadening of investment. This will include increasing the proportion of additional non-public monies, thus creating a more sustainable model.

5 To invest in partnerships We will normalise the presence of Gaelic arts, media and heritage within Scottish public life, with a particular emphasis on supporting educational establishments and initiatives. The delivery of the arts, media and heritage strategy will be co-ordinated through the National Gaelic Arts Strategy (NGAS) forum, made up of representatives of Bòrd na Gàidhlig, Creative Scotland, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, MG ALBA, BBC Alba and COSLA, supported by a wide network of arts, media and heritage organisations as associate members of the NGAS Forum. The structure of this section is aligned with Creative Scotland’s five key objectives, ensuring a strong strategic framework within which to support and develop the sector. Where appropriate, Bòrd na Gàidhlig will encourage inclusion of the outcomes outlined above in statutory, voluntary and community Gaelic Language Plans and in Single Outcome Agreements.

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CORPUS PLANNING

We recognise the importance of developing the Gaelic language to ensure that it is fit for all appropriate purposes and for use in the growing range of contexts in which it features.

Rationale The Gaelic revival of the last two decades, coupled with the proposals for continued development outlined in this Plan, mean that the range of purposes for which Gaelic is used and the variety of topics and domains involved is constantly growing. It is important, therefore, that work continues to be done on strengthening the fabric of the language to equip it for these challenges and, generally, to maintain it as a healthy, vibrant language. It is also important that support services such as translation and interpretation are available and that they operate on a sound professional basis. Gaelic corpus planning: Aims We will strengthen the fabric of the Gaelic language by encouraging: »» adoption of SQA’s ‘Gaelic Orthographic Conventions’ »» collaboration on the creation and use of new Gaelic terminology »» the issuing of guidance on register, style and grammar »» production of resources related to the above »» the creation of a Gaelic Language Academy as a co-ordinating agency in relation to the above. Translation and interpretation: Aims We will support the development of a professional translation and interpretation service in Gaelic by encouraging: »» application of professional standards, including certification of translators and interpreters »» provision of training in translation and interpreting skills, at various levels »» maintenance of a register of translation and interpretation services, containing information on the specialisms and experience of agencies and individuals.

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

The Plan


The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

5 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17 Bòrd na Gàidhlig’s role Bòrd na Gàidhlig’s role in implementing the National Plan will involve: »» providing advice to the Scottish Ministers, as required by the 2005 Act »» offering advice to public authorities on the preparation and implementation of their Gaelic Language Plans, as required by the Act »» bringing together interested parties - public authorities, private and voluntary organisations and individuals - to agree on strategies for action »» participating directly in development work, both independently and in collaboration with others »» commissioning research »» providing funding for developments that help to deliver the National Gaelic Language Plan.

Gaelic Language Plans Gaelic Language Plans represent one of the principal mechanisms to be used by Bòrd na Gàidhlig in progressing implementation of the National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17. The Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005 granted authority to Bòrd na Gàidhlig to issue a statutory notice to any Scottish public authority, cross border public authority or the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body, requiring that body to produce a Gaelic Language Plan setting out how it will use and enable the use of Gaelic within its relevant functions. The primary purpose of a Gaelic Language Plan is to enable organisations to deliver more and better services to current and future Gaelic users and to raise awareness of the language. It represents an organisation’s public statement of commitment to Gaelic but should also function as a working document that supports the development process. The four key Gaelic Language Planning categories are expected to permeate all Gaelic Language Plans, namely: »» acquisition: enabling people to develop speaking, reading and writing skills in Gaelic »» usage: enabling the use of Gaelic in a range of social, formal and work settings »» status: expanding visibility, audibility, recognition and respect for Gaelic »» corpus: developing the quality, consistency and richness of the Gaelic language. Whilst Gaelic Language Plans will be unique to each organisation, Bòrd na Gàidhlig requires that all Plans contain the following key targets: »» equal respect for Gaelic and English as normal practice »» informing the organisations’ policy on Gaelic

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»» bilingual corporate identity, including logos »» the completion of a Gaelic skills audit amongst all Staff in Year 1 of a plan »» the provision of Gaelic awareness and Gaelic skills training at an early stage of the plan »» a recruitment policy which recognises Gaelic language abilities as a valuable skill »» offering Gaelic services actively as a normal part of the organisation’s work. The Statutory Guidance for the development of Gaelic Language Plans under the 2005 Act requires that they are reviewed and updated by the public authority and resubmitted to the Bòrd for approval within five years. The Bòrd will normally expect public authorities to include more ambitious commitments in subsequent plans than those in their current approved plan and for good practice to be developed further in future plans. In addition to this general guidance, Bòrd na Gàidhlig is continually developing and growing a body of good practice in relation to Gaelic Language Plans. This resource is published on the Bòrd na Gàidhlig website and forms an invaluable toolkit. Bòrd na Gàidhlig has a dedicated Gaelic Language Plans team within the structure of the organisation and has a responsibility to assist public authorities in the development of their plans. Each authority is assigned a lead officer, who will be the primary point of contact and who will assist in dealing with queries as they arise. The Bòrd also provides seed funding via the Gaelic Language Act Implementation Fund (GLAIF) with the expectation that public authorities will incorporate Gaelic bilingual provision within their normal budgetary process in the medium to longer term. The Bòrd would not ordinarily expect GLAIF to fund the preparation of Gaelic Language Plans or to fund existing Gaelic activity.

Creating the conditions for implementation In addition to its direct involvement in implementing the National Plan, Bòrd na Gàidhlig will seek to create a positive environment and a supportive infrastructure for this by: »» encouraging positive and informed attitudes to Gaelic through media campaigns »» working with the Scottish Government, COSLA, local authorities and other interested parties to create a positive political climate and a sound organisational infrastructure »» disseminating information and establishing links among individuals and organisations »» commissioning and funding research projects which support the National Plan »» ensuring that distribution of revenue and capital funding for Gaelic is at a sufficient level and is planned in such a way that the most efficient use is made of the available resources »» encouraging public authorities to take cognisance of the National Gaelic Language Plan when preparing statutory Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements »» ensuring that the Plan is in line with the Scottish Government’s National Outcomes and that it aims, in particular, “to foster the delivery of increased pride in a strong, fair and inclusive national identity”.

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

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The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

Monitoring & assessing implementation Bòrd na Gàidhlig will monitor implementation of the development activities set out in the National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17. We will do this by reviewing our own actions, by monitoring the activities of bodies with which we have developed formal partnerships, and by seeking information from other bodies on steps which they have taken to adopt the development activities we have set out in the National Plan. In particular we will: »» monitor how bodies utilise development funding granted by Bòrd na Gàidhlig for the purpose of implementing actions identified in the National Plan »» monitor and review how public authorities implement Gaelic Language Plans prepared under the terms of the 2005 Act and how they use any associated funding »» be a part of the decision-making process on Specific Grants for Gaelic Education and monitor the use made of it by local authorities »» seek information periodically from public, private and voluntary bodies on their engagement with actions identified in the National Plan »» share information, research and best practice with other language communities in Scotland and elsewhere »» monitor official statistics on Gaelic language abilities and provision.

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Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

implementation of the Plan


Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

6 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

HOME

1 To raise critical awareness of the importance of the home as a domain for acquiring Gaelic Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Greater understanding amongst key stakeholders as to the importance of the home in terms of Gaelic acquisition and usage.

Parents and prospective parents targeted in a variety of ways to encourage them to pass Gaelic on to their children in the home.

BnG, Scottish Government Gaelic organisations, LAs, Health Boards.

Start development of material and promote its use from 2013 onwards.

Gaelic Awareness training amongst frontline local authority and health care staff, e.g. teachers, midwives and health visitors, supported by commitments in statutory Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements.

LAs, Health Boards, other relevant public bodies.

Work to be integrated with GLPs, timetabled on an ongoing basis.

Greater community awareness of the importance of the home, through community Gaelic Language Plans and local publicity campaigns.

BnG, Gaelic organisations, other relevant public bodies.

Particular focus in Years 1-3 on Iomairtean GĂ idhlig areas and communities with 20%+ Gaelic speakers.

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2 To provide practical support in regard to passing Gaelic on to children in the home Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Growth in the passing on of Gaelic to children in the home, with the long term aim of reestablishing Gaelic as a self-sustaining language, supported by the school and other institutions but not dependent on them.

Advice and support for families and their support networks on using Gaelic in the home.

BnG, Scottish Government, Gaelic organisations, LAs, Health Boards.

Parental advocacy scheme continuing, 2012-17.

Establishing, supporting and publicising learning and usage opportunities for GM families and their support networks.

BnG, Gaelic organisations, relevant public bodies, LAs.

Through the lifetime of the Plan and in line with the GLP timescale.

Promotion of Gaelic usage in the home to college and university students.

BnG, universities and colleges.

University & college Gaelic Language Plans from academic year 2013/14.

Identification of L1 Gaelic speaking households.

BnG and LAs.

Research to be commissioned in 2012.

A survey of L1 households to identify practical support needs both locally & nationally.

BnG

Survey developed and circulated to households in 2012/13.

Development of practical support mechanisms and activities.

BnG, LAs, Gaelic organisations.

Years 2-5 of the plan.

Support for pre-school services, family support networks, and childminding services, to provide facilities for children from L1 households.

Local authority children’s partnerships, enterprise agencies, social enterprises, NHS.

Focus in Yrs 1-3 on Iomairtean GĂ idhlig areas and communities with 20%+ Gaelic speakers.

Provision of leisure resources and activities for L1 families.

BnG, MG ALBA, LAs, Gaelic organisations, social enterprises.

Establishment of a fund for innovative approaches to supporting Gaelic use in the home, 2012/13.

An increased number of children being brought up in first-language (L1) Gaelic speaking households, establishing greater frequency of intergenerational transmission.

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Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

EDUCATION

1 To extend access to, and participation in, Gaelic education and learning Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Parents and prospective parents aware of the benefits of being bilingual and of Gaelicmedium education (GME), leading to an increase in the number of children enrolled in GME.

Maintaining, collating, updating and disseminating information on the benefits of bilingualism and Gaelicmedium education, locally and nationally, with parents and prospective parents as an important target.

NATIONAL BnG, SG, Education Scotland, CnamP, Scottish Parent Teacher Council, National Parent Forum.

Ongoing, with an annual review to ensure messages are updated with current developments.

Decision makers aware of the benefits of bilingualism and Gaelicmedium education, leading to a national commitment to GME.

Gaelic Awareness training for key decision makers responsible for sustaining and growing Gaelic medium services across Scotland.

Lead: Bòrd na Gàidhlig (Gaelic Language Plans) Support: NHS, Education Scotland, Gaelic organisations, public authorities, SG.

LOCAL Lead: LAs Support: Parents, NHS, SG, CnamP, Gaelic organisations.

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Ongoing, linked to Gaelic Language Plans.


Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Rapid and substantive growth in the number of children, young people and adults in Gaelicmedium (GME) education and learning across the learning continuum 0-18 and beyond.

Identifying current provision and additional capacity across all sectors of GME to increase the number of learners, with a particular focus on the 0-3 sector.

Lead: LAs Support: BnG, FE, HE, NHS.

Increase year-on-year from 2012. Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) Early Level classes at capacity 2014. CfE Second Level classes at capacity 2017.

Increasing the proportion of the curriculum delivered through the medium of Gaelic, face-to-face and by virtual and distance learning, and with links to the wider school community.

Lead: LAs Support: Stòrlann, SQA, Education Scotland, CnamP.

Increasing year-on-year. 2 courses available through Gaelic at Higher by 2014; then, 1 more per year.

Identifying opportunities for expanding learning through the medium of Gaelic in FE & HE.

Lead: FE, HE Support: Skills Development Scotland, SQA.

2014 and ongoing. 2 GM vocational courses/ modules via distant learning, 2013; then an increase of 2 per year.

Gaelic-learner education (GLE) extended and enhanced, throughout Scotland, in primary and secondary schools, further and higher education and in informal adult education.

Providing more opportunities for people of all ages to learn Gaelic, and about Gaelic, in the context of Curriculum for Excellence (CfE), in all sectors.

LAs, SG, Education Scotland, FE, HE, Skills Development Scotland.

National guidance on GLE written by 2013. Implementation from 2014.

A confident and reflective workforce equipped to deliver a high quality, progressive and supported Gaelic education system, in line with Curriculum for Excellence.

Identifying workforce requirements and establishing a facility in Gaelic education for enhanced delivery of initial teacher education, and opportunities for development and research.

Lead: Strathclyde, Aberdeen and Edinburgh Universities. Support: BnG, Education Scotland.

An increase year-on-year in the number of teachers in Gaelic and Gaelic-medium education.

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Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

CPD opportunities for educational practitioners in Gaelic education and learning, leading to improved experiences for the learners and professional recognition for CPD.

Education and learning staff participating in CPD programmes and improving their teaching skills.

0-18 SECTOR Lead: Education Scotland, Stòrlann. Support: LAs, GTCS, BnG, SQA.

Yearly CPD programme for Gaelic produced before the start of the academic year and advertised to education practitioners.

An increase in the number of schools delivering Gaelic-medium education.

Encouraging capital planning, to provide funding to enhance current Gaelic provision or establish new provision.

SG

2017 (capital fund for new schools including Gaelic Schools).

Expansion and enhancement of Gaelic education embedded in the planning and delivery of education at all levels in Scotland.

Encouraging inclusion of outcomes related to the development of Gaelic education in Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements, as appropriate.

LAs, FE and HE sectors, Education Scotland, GTCS.

Ongoing, within the lifetime of the Plan.

FE, HE Lead: Education Scotland Support: SQA, SFC.

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2 Equal respect and parity for Gaelic education and learning Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Parental entitlement to Gaelic-medium education recognised in law.

Investigating with the Scottish Ministers the possibility of granting a legal entitlement to Gaelicmedium education.

BnG, SG.

2014

National guidance available on Gaelic education and learning, leading to consistency in its delivery.

Producing national guidance on Gaelicmedium and Gaelic-learner education, within the context of Curriculum for Excellence, after consultation and on advice from key stakeholders.

Lead: SG, Education Scotland, Bòrd na Gàidhlig. Support: LAs, SQA, COSLA.

August 2013

Networks established for Gaelic education professionals and other support agencies in order to mentor and share good practice in relation to delivering Curriculum for Excellence in Gaelic.

Establishing and developing national and local networks at different levels and in all sectors of Gaelic education and learning, including virtual and distance learning.

NATIONAL Lead: Education Scotland Support: LAs, BnG, SQA.

GME Head teachers network - Aug 2012.

LOCAL Lead: LAs Support: Education Scotland, BnG.

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GME practitioners network - Aug 2014.

DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

Implementation of The Plan


Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

3 To enhance delivery of Gaelic education and learning Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

More children and young people achieving fluency in Gaelic, with a particular reference to range of vocabulary and grammatical accuracy.

Developing immersion methodology and offering CPD opportunities for staff to enhance their approaches to learning and teaching.

Lead: Education Scotland Support: Initial Teacher Education, GTCS, LAs.

Develop materials and opportunities, 2013.

National guidance on supporting children and young people with Additional Support Needs to reach their full potential when learning through the medium of Gaelic.

National guidance being produced on supporting learners with additional support needs in Gaelicmedium education and learning, as part of the national guidance on Gaelic education generally.

Lead: Education Scotland, SG. Support: LAs, NHS.

Collate information and produce guidance, 2013.

Extended range of Gaelic Education and learning resources available in a range of media and formats to support all areas and sectors of Gaelic learning, within the overall context of Curriculum for Excellence.

Resources being developed in a range of media and formats to suit varied styles and modes of learning, through effective partnership working among the principal Gaelic education service providers.

0-18 SECTOR Lead: Stòrlann Support: Gaelic publishers, MG ALBA, BBC, CnL, Education Scotland, Scottish Book Trust, LAs.

Ongoing, with annual review to ensure resources are in line with Curriculum for Excellence and meet the needs of learners.

LIFELONG Lead: FE, HE. Support: Stòrlann, SFC.

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4 To strengthen the context in which Gaelic education and learning operates Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

More opportunities for adults, parents and carers to learn Gaelic and/or to develop their Gaelic literacy skills.

Promotion and development of Gaelic learning opportunities for parents and carers.

Lead: Clì Gàidhlig Support: LAs, ALOs, FE, parental support groups.

Schools with GME provision to have Gaelic classes for parents by 2015.

More opportunities for GME learners to use Gaelic in the home.

Increasing the range of educational and leisure resources, virtual and actual, available for use in the home by families.

Lead: Gaelic organisations Support: BnG, LAs, MG ALBA, Stòrlann, BBC, CnL.

From 2012

An increase in the availability of Gaelic recreational activities for young people, both in school and the wider community.

Events for young people in the school and community to broaden their language register and boost their confidence.

Lead: LAs, ALOs, Creative Scotland. Support: Gaelic organisations, arts & community groups, sportscotland.

From 2012

An increase in the availability of Gaelic recreational activities for adults.

National and local events aimed at adults.

Lead: LAs, ALOs, Creative Scotland. Support: Gaelic/arts/ community groups.

From 2012

Links between schools with GME and GLE and Gaelic speaking communities.

Schools with GME or GLE using their communities as a resource in areas with Iomairtean Gàidhlig status or 20%+ Gaelic speakers.

Lead: LAs Support: Gaelic organisations, arts/ community groups, Education Scotland.

From 2012

An increase in the number of young people progressing to study Gaelic or courses with Gaelic input in vocational and tertiary education.

Careers officers providing high quality and wideranging information on the advantages of having Gaelic in regard to career choices.

Skills Development Scotland, LAs.

Information on Gaelic careers, from 2012. Regional lists of Gaelic work experience providers, 2013. Careers information in Gaelic, 2015.

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

Implementation of The Plan


Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Greater awareness amongst GME learners of their role in relation to Gaelic and the importance of passing on Gaelic within the family.

Developing PSE inputs for GME secondary classes aimed at raising awareness of Gaelic identity and culture and intergenerational transmission.

Lead: SG, Education Scotland. Support: LAs, BnG.

2012, included in Ministerial guidance. Implementation in schools, 2014.

Children and young people in English medium education aware of Gaelic language, culture and identity and its place as a living language in Scotland.

Providing access to a Gaelic awareness programme as part of the development of Scottish studies courses in Scottish schools.

Lead: SG, Education Scotland. Support: LAs, BnG.

2012, included in ministerial guidance. Development of resources/ CPD by 2014. Pilot in schools, August 2015. Full implementation, August 2016.

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COMMUNITY

1 To create a positive attitude to Gaelic in the community Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Increased use of Gaelic by the public whilst engaging with a range of services and in variety of activities.

Statutory Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements.

Public authorities.

Average of 8 new or renewed Gaelic plans per year.

Voluntary Gaelic Language Plans.

Private business, social enterprises, ALOs, voluntary sector.

As and when voluntary GLPs are submitted to Bòrd na Gàidhlig.

Community Gaelic Language Plans.

Community representatives, Gaelic organisations, local authority education departments, ALOs, enterprise agencies, private business, other relevant local authority departments, public authorities.

Develop and publish the first community language plan in 2013 and develop language plans in Iomairtean Gàidhlig areas and communities with 20%+ Gaelic speakers during the lifetime of the Plan.

Bilingual signage.

Public authorities, Gaelic organisations, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

As part of the Gaelic Language Plans process during the lifetime of the Plan.

Growth in the visibility and audibility of Gaelic in communities across Scotland.

Bilingual publications and publicity. Bilingual and/or Gaelic community meetings and events.

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DRAFT FOR CONSULTATION

Implementation of The Plan


Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

2 To sustain language vitality in communities where it is in widespread use Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Language vitality being sustained in Iomairtean Gàidhlig areas and communities with more than 20% Gaelic speakers, with more young speakers choosing to live in these communities.

Gathering information on models of best practice for language revitalisation projects in such communities.

BnG

Undertake research and publish findings in year 1 of the Plan.

Community Language Plans, making links to economic and social development, for delivery at local level.

BnG, LAs, Housing Associations, HIE, UHI, private enterprise, Europe, Gaelic organisations, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Community language plans will include an initial baseline audit of 16–25 year old Gaelic speakers in the community and will monitor this number and the trend periodically.

Identification of existing Gaelic skills and providing start-up investment to transform these into marketable services locally and further afield.

HIE, LAs, Scottish Government, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Initially in Iomairtean Gàidhlig areas and communities with 20%+ Gaelic speakers during the lifetime of the Plan.

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3 To create and increase situations in which Gaelic can be used Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Increased provision of Gaelic medium public services and activities, extending the use of Gaelic as the language of choice in a range of formal and social domains.

Public gatherings and events held in Gaelic.

BnG, public authorities, voluntary (third) sector.

As part of the Gaelic Plans process during the lifetime of the Plan.

Establishment of community translation services, supported by a network of translators.

BnG, public authorities, Gaelic organisations, voluntary (third) sector.

Initially in Iomairtean GĂ idhlig areas and communities with 20%+ Gaelic speakers during the lifetime of the Plan.

Delivery of GM community education and sports programmes.

LAs, ALOs, Gaelic organisations, voluntary (third) sector.

LAs and Gaelic organisations examining current programmes in 2012/13, with the aim of expansion in 2013/14 onwards.

Public authorities and Gaelic organisations delivering day-to-day services through the medium of Gaelic as a matter of course.

Public authorities, Gaelic organisations.

Initially in Iomairtean GĂ idhlig areas and communities with 20%+ Gaelic speakers during the lifetime of the Plan.

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Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

4 To increase opportunities for adult learners and young people to use Gaelic Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Easy access to Gaelic learning resources, courses and usage opportunities.

LearnGaelic.net as a one stop shop for Gaelic learners, including associated new technologies such as mobile apps.

MG ALBA, BBC Alba, BnG, Board of Celtic Studies.

Ongoing from launch, October 2011, with new materials or information added on an ongoing basis.

Establishing, supporting and publicising networks of Gaelic conversation circles and other informal usage opportunities.

BnG, public authorities, Gaelic organisations, voluntary groups.

Support through existing schemes during the lifetime of the Plan.

Establishing, supporting and publicising regular extra-curricular and nonschool activities and trips for young people learning Gaelic.

Local authorities, ALOs, voluntary groups, Gaelic organisations and individuals.

Partnerships established in year 1.

Establishing, supporting and publicising occasional Gaelic-medium activities, e.g. summer camps for young people learning Gaelic.

Public authorities, Gaelic organisations, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Establish and publish an annual programme of activities.

Bilingual and/or Gaelic community meetings and events.

Public bodies, Gaelic organisations, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Engagement with organisations as part of the GLP process and its associated timescale.

Support for young Gaelic learners to consolidate and develop their skills in less formal settings.

Increased opportunities for fluent Gaelic speakers and learners to use the language together.

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WORKPLACE

1 To create a positive attitude to Gaelic in the workplace Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Increased use of Gaelic by staff in the workplace and when engaging with the public.

Statutory Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements.

Public authorities

Publish an average of 8 new or renewed GLPs per year.

Voluntary Gaelic Language Plans.

Private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

As and when voluntary GLPs are submitted to BnG.

‘Investors in Gaelic’ scheme.

BnG, public authorities, private business, social enterprises, voluntary sector.

Established in 2013/14.

Bilingual signage.

Public authorities, Gaelic organisations, private business, social enterprises, voluntary sector.

Ongoing, as part of the Gaelic Language Plans process and its associated timescale.

Greater visibility and audibility for Gaelic in workplaces across Scotland.

Bilingual publications and publicity materials. Bilingual and/or Gaelic meetings and events. Creating bilingual public interfaces through the medium of Gaelic, e.g. reception services, phone and email contacts.

Greater recognition of Gaelic speaking, reading and writing ability as an ‘essential’ or ‘desirable’ skill in workplaces across Scotland.

Identification of posts where Gaelic will add value to the organisation and to Gaelic language development. Normalisation of Gaelic skills in the recruitment process.

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Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

2 To sustain language vitality in workplaces, particularly in areas where Gaelic is in widespread community use Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Language vitality in workplaces, in support of Gaelic in the local community, and growth in the range of services available to the public through Gaelic.

Gathering information on models of best practice for sustaining and growing minoritised language use in the workplace.

Bòrd na Gàidhlig

Undertake research and publish findings in year 1 of the Plan.

Working with partners to instigate, support and develop workplace mentoring schemes, allowing learners to grow their skills, with support from fluent speaking or advanced learner staff.

Employers, trade unions, Bòrd na Gàidhlig, enterprise agencies, skills training agencies.

As part of the Gaelic Language Plans process and its associated timescale.

3 To create and increase situations in which Gaelic can be used in the workplace Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Increased use of Gaelic in a range of social and more formal situations within the workplace.

Identification of tasks where Gaelic could be used amongst staff, e.g. emails, training groups, appraisals and desk layouts.

Public authorities, Gaelic organisations, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

As part of the Gaelic Language Plans process and its associated timescale.

Creating new opportunities for usage, e.g. informal conversation circles, bilingual meetings. Identification of staff within organisations with Gaelic, for the benefit of other staff and the public, e.g. via an identifying badge/sign scheme.

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4 To increase opportunities for staff to learn Gaelic and develop their skills in the workplace Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Improved Gaelic language skills of staff in speaking, reading and writing, to support the growth of Gaelic workplace environments and to encourage more usage by the public in day-to-day dealings with companies and organisations.

Staff audits of Gaelic skills, including the identification of training requirements.

Public authorities, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

As part of the Gaelic Language Plans process and its associated timescale.

Workforce Gaelic training plans to be included in statutory and voluntary Gaelic language plans. Commitments from employers to embed Gaelic skills development as part of existing CPD frameworks. Establishment of close links between employers and Gaelic skills training providers.

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Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

ARTS, MEDIA AND HERITAGE

1 To invest in excellence Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

An increased number of Gaelic arts, media and heritage practitioners at community, national and international levels, contributing to the status and growth of the language.

Identifying, supporting and developing a network of organisations and hubs of activity, to provide an arts, media and heritage service in support of Gaelic.

NGAS forum and associate members, public authorities, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Ongoing, with regular reviews of delivery.

Investment in Gaelic creative talent normalised.

Ensuring that Gaelic creative bodies know about Creative Scotland’s 15 investment programmes.

Ongoing.

Supporting Gaelic artists’ residencies.

Information publicised regularly.

Supporting individuals through high level mentoring and career programmes such as internships.

Investigate the establishment of this scheme in year 1 of the Plan, roll-out from year 2.

Encouraging Gaelic artists to take on ambassadorial roles.

Establish and review on an annual basis.

Supporting training and research that develops the sector.

Agree a 5 year programme, 2012.

Reviewing, developing and supporting networks and forums.

Review existing networks and forums in year 1 of the plan.

Ensuring that a wide range of bodies are aware of the part they can play.

NGAS forum and associate members, public authorities, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

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Publicise on a regular basis.


2 To invest in quality artistic production Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Growth in the range and quality of productions which enhance the status of Gaelic, encouraging the acquisition of Gaelic speaking, reading and/ or writing skills and providing opportunities to use Gaelic as part of the creative process.

Identifying and disseminating models of good practice.

NGAS forum and associate members, public authorities, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Undertake research and publish findings in 2013/14.

Supporting organisations and individuals who demonstrate good governance in support of quality artistic production. Supporting festivals and events with high quality creative programmes.

Regularly monitor and review funded organisations.

Information on funding/ commissioning opportunities distributed regularly.

Collaborative investment in quality Gaelic film, TV and digital media production.

Increased use of Gaelic across the wide spectrum of the arts, media and cultural productions in support of Gaelic language development.

Identification of collaborative opportunities to support new quality Gaelic productions.

NGAS forum and associate members, independent production companies.

Statutory Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements.

Public authorities

As part of the GLP process and its associated timescale.

Voluntary Gaelic Language Plans.

Not-for-profit bodies, private enterprise.

Ongoing.

Community Gaelic Language Plans.

Community groups, Gaelic organisations, local authorities.

Publish the first Community Language Plan by 2013 and roll out to Iomairtean GĂ idhlig areas and communities with 20%+ Gaelic speakers during the lifetime of the Plan.

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Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

3 To invest in audiences, access and participation Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Growth in the number of people engaged with Gaelic arts, media and heritage, to raise the status of the language and to encourage new usage opportunities.

Compilation and dissemination of regular listings to interested parties.

NGAS forum and associate members, public authorities, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Research work undertaken and disseminated in 2012/13.

Working with a wide range of arts, media and heritage organisations to normalise Gaelic in their work.

Ongoing.

Engagement in mass participation arts and heritage projects. Working with agencies to develop international work for Gaelic arts, media and heritage. Engagement with, and support for, local and national arts companies and organisations offering access and participation.

Ongoing, with monitoring of participant numbers via annual returns.

Support for communities to provide access and participation opportunities.

Access to support and funds on a regular basis.

Engagement with the National Youth Arts Strategy, the Education and the Arts Creativity Plan, the GLOW creativity portal, and other appropriate initiatives.

NGAS forum and associate members, Education Scotland, any other appropriate bodies.

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Within the first year of the Plan.


Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Growth in the number of people accessing and participating in Gaelic arts, media and heritage outputs.

Encouraging artistic partnerships and collaboration between Gaelic speaking communities across Scotland and abroad.

NGAS forum and associate members, relevant overseas partners.

A focus over the lifetime of the Plan on Iomairtean GĂ idhlig areas and communities with 20%+ of Gaelic speakers.

Engagement with events of national significance (e.g. Cultural Olympiad, Year of Creative Scotland, 2014 Commonwealth Games).

NGAS forum and associate members, public authorities, private business, social enterprises, voluntary (third) sector.

Cultural Olympiad 2012, Year of Creative Scotland 2012 and Commonwealth Games 2014.

4 To invest in the Gaelic cultural economy Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Increased number of employment opportunities within the Gaelic arts, media and heritage sector in support of Gaelic language planning and economic development priorities.

Producing an economic impact study on the role of Gaelic arts, media & heritage in Scotland.

NGAS forum and associate members.

Commissioned within year 1 of the Plan and delivered within year 2.

Supporting the development of Gaelic creative industry hubs in fragile areas for economic and language development.

NGAS forum and associate members, enterprise agencies, Business Gateways.

Small number of hubs identified in year 1. Then, growing their potential.

Providing Gaelic artists with skills and guidance on maximising their economic potential, e.g. Intellectual Property Rights.

NGAS forum and associate members, training bodies.

Training delivered on an ongoing basis from 2013/14 onwards.

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Implementation of The Plan Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

Increased proportion of additional nonpublic monies in the sector, leading to more sustainable investment models.

Supporting key Gaelic arts and heritage bodies to work towards economic sustainability.

NGAS forum and associate members.

Throughout the lifetime of the Plan.

Supporting the development and use of new technology to reduce production costs in the sector.

NGAS forum and associate members, private sector, relevant advisors.

Attracting support from the private sector, sponsorship, business advice and philanthropic support for the sector.

NGAS forum and associate members, arts and business, private sector, Business Gateways, enterprise agencies.

Engagement with Arts and Business Scotland within the first year of the Plan.

Developing Gaelic cultural tourism through the development of partnerships and ensuring regular engagement by Gaelic organisations in national cultural tourism forums and other networking opportunities.

NGAS forum and associate members, Historic Scotland, Museums Galleries Scotland, National Archives of Scotland, Visit Scotland, Event Scotland, private sector providers, CalMac, relevant overseas bodies.

Ongoing.

Maximising the potential of UNESCO designations in Scotland, e.g. Glasgow, Edinburgh and St Kilda, by working closely with UNESCO.

NGAS forum and associate members, Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature, Glasgow UNESCO City of Music.

Throughout the life of the Plan.

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5 To invest in partnerships Outcome

Output

Who

Timescale

The presence of Gaelic arts, media and heritage normalised within Scottish public life, with a particular emphasis on supporting educational establishments and initiatives.

Statutory Gaelic Language Plans and Single Outcome Agreements.

Public authorities

Ongoing, as part of the GLP process and timescale.

Supporting the visibility and audibility of Gaelic arts, media and heritage in Scottish educational establishments.

Scottish Government, local authorities, Scottish Funding Council.

Engagement with the education sector within the first year of the Plan.

Delivery of Gaelic arts, media and heritage learning and activities in the community.

NGAS forum and associate members, public authorities, educational establishments.

LAs and Gaelic organisations to examine current programmes in 2012/13, with expansion in 2013/14 on.

Supporting the delivery of the Curriculum for Excellence in Gaelicmedium and Gaelic-learner education.

NGAS forum and associate members, local authorities, Education Scotland.

Engagement with the education sector within year 1 of the Plan.

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annex 1 Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

Glossary of abbreviations and terms Abbreviation/term

Meaning

ALO

Arms-length organisation

BnG

Bòrd na Gàidhlig

CnamP

Comann nam Pàrant

CnL

Comhairle nan Leabhraichean (Gaelic Books Council)

COSLA

Confederation of Scottish Local Authorities

CPD

Continuing professional development

Education Scotland

Executive agency, resulting from the amalgamation of Learning and Teaching Scotland (LTS) and HM Inspectorate of Education (HMIe)

FE & HE

Further and Higher Education

Gaelic Orthographic Conventions (GOC)

The definitive guide to Gaelic spelling, issued by the Scottish Qualifications Authority.

GLAIF

Gaelic Language Act Implementation Fund

GLE

Gaelic-learner education

GLP

Gaelic Language Plan

GLPS

Gaelic Language in the Primary School

GME

Gaelic-medium education

GTCS

General Teaching Council for Scotland

HIE

Highlands & Islands Enterprise

L1

First language

LA

Local authority

NGAS

National Gaelic Arts Strategy (forum)

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SFC

Scottish Funding Council

SG

The Scottish Government

Single Outcome Agreement

Agreement between the Scottish Government and Community Planning Partnerships.

SQA

Scottish Qualifications Authority

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annex 1


Draft National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17

Contact Information Bòrd na Gàidhlig Darach House Stoneyfield Inverness IV2 7PA Tel: 01463 225454 Email: plana@gaidhlig.org.uk Further copies of this document can be obtained from the same address. This document can also be downloaded from the Bòrd na Gàidhlig website: www.gaidhlig.org.uk

Design by Cànan. www.canan.co.uk

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National Gaelic Language Plan 2012-17