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LOCAL SPORTS 10A

BRADFORD AWARDS 2A

SUNDAY

FARMING TALK SLATED 3A

FEBRUARY 24, 2019

SINCE 1816

NY extends heating assistance The Spectator ALBANY — Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced Monday that $15 million in additional funding is available to help eligible New Yorkers heat their homes following a spate of severe weather over the past month. Starting Feb. 19, households in danger of running out of

heating fuel or having their utility service shut off may apply for a second emergency benefit through the Home Energy Assistance Program. In addition, the application period for both regular and emergency HEAP benefits has been extended until April 26. “Families should not have to choose between heating their homes and paying for other es-

sentials like food or medications,” Governor Cuomo said. “With much of the state remaining in winter’s icy grasp, the availability of this extra funding will help our most vulnerable New Yorkers stay warm and safe through the duration of the season. I encourage anyone who may need help paying their heating bills this winter to apply for assistance.”

“This winter has been especially difficult, that’s why we are taking action to ensure more funding is available through the Home Energy Assistance Program,” said Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul. “Winter heating bills can add up quickly and put a strain on family budgets. HEAP is an essential

see HEATING | 10A

SPCA seizes 16 canines

BRIDGE REPLACEMENTS, ROUNDABOUT

The Spectator

ADDISON — An Addison woman faces charges after several dogs were found running loose on Monday, uncovering poor housing conditions for 16 animals, according to authorities. The New York State Police are currently conducting a joint investigation with both the Town of Addison Animal Control and Finger Lakes SPCA. On Feb. 18, the New York State Police responded to 2969 Mose Road in the Town of JEFF SMITH/SCA

This project calls for the 87-year-old truss bridge on Route 415 in Bath to be replaced with a new bridge on a new alignment nearby. The old bridge will carry traffic until the new bridge is ready to open late this year.

Crews begin work on Bath bridge Steuben Courier BATH - Preliminary work is underway on a $7.8 million project to replace two bridges in Steuben County and install a new roundabout. Preliminary work has begun to replace two bridges on State Route 415, one over the Cohocton River in the Town of Bath and the other over Salmon Creek in the Town of Avoca, according to Paul A. Karas, state Department of Transportation Acting Commissioner. The project also will construct a roundabout  at the intersection of State Routes 415 and 53,  near the Bath bridge, enhancing safety and smoothing traffic flow there. “Governor Andrew Cuomo’s in-

vestments in infrastructure are making a difference in communities large and small,” Karas said. “The new bridges and new roundabout at a busy intersection will help ensure that products get to market, make it easier for travelers to get to where they need to go and keep the Southern Tier Soaring.” This project calls for the 87-year-old truss bridge on Route 415 in Bath to be replaced with a new bridge on a new alignment nearby, Karas said. The old bridge will carry traffic until the new bridge is ready to open late this year. Finishing work, including landscaping, demolition of the old bridge and construction of a new fishing access location, is sched-

uled to be completed during the summer of 2020. Nearby, a new roundabout will be constructed at Route 415 and 53, along a route commonly traveled to access  Interstate 86. The roundabout,  scheduled to be opened this summer, will enable  traffic to flow more freely  through this intersection. The project also will replace the 78-year-old Route 415 bridge over Salmon Creek in Avoca, Karas said. Construction is scheduled to be completed this summer. During construction, the existing bridge is scheduled to be closed from April 15 to August 15. Vehicle and pedestrian detours will be posted in advance. see WORK | 8A

see SPCA | 8A

SNAP benefits to be released by March 7 The Spectator

ALBANY — Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced last Friday that all Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program recipients will receive next month’s benefits no later than March 7 – approximately one week earlier than scheduled. The early release is intended to ease the burden on recipients that have been forced

see SNAP | 11A

Landfill puts food waste to use creating energy By Jason Jordan The Spectator

The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates the world produces enough food waste — about 1.4 billion tons — to feed as many as 2 billion people each

year. That’s roughly one-third of the global food supply. In the United States, food waste is estimated at between 30-40 percent of the food supply. This estimate, based on estimates from USDA’s Economic Research Service of 31 percent food loss at the retail and con-

INDEX Classifieds....................................................12-15A Entertainment.......................................................8A Health..................................................................5A Local...............................................................2&3A

sumer levels, corresponded to approximately 133 billion pounds and $161 billion worth of food in 2010. Manhattan-based Klein Kitchen & Bath, a remodel and design firm, surveyed 3,200 people, and found that New York households waste $958 worth of

CONTACT US Obituaries........................................................6A Opinion................................................................4A Outdoors............................................................9A Sports................................................................10A

The Steuben Courier Advocate 10 W. Steuben St. • Bath, NY 14810 (607) 776-2121 www.steubencourier.com

food annually because food has surpassed its expiration date. Worldwide, it’s estimated that 800 million people deal with hunger caused by food insecurity on a given day. In America, 17.4 million U.S. households

see LANDFILL | 11A


2A

LOCAL

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

STEUBEN COURIER

Bradford Fire Awards

IN BRIEF & ON CAMPUS Rotary scholarship applications available

CONTENT SUBMITTED

The Bradford Volunteer Fire Department recently held an awards ceremony. Billy Sanford received an award for Most Training Hours, our first Paramedic! Cody Shaut was honored as Firefighter of the Year. Sharon Murphy from U.S. Rep. Tom Reed’s office, assisted in the ceremony. Sue Beers and Cathy Pierce received the Presidents Award. Awards were presented by Chief Chris Sanford and President Rodney Hoad. Many thanks to all departments that attended. 

Steuben Prevention Coalition seeks entries The Spectator BATH — The Steuben Prevention Coalition after receiving grant funding through the Triangle Fund of Corning, is sponsoring a Public Service Announcement (PSA) Video Contest in Steuben County aimed at promoting awareness of the Social Host Law with the message that “social hosting” is not only dangerous, but illegal. The Social Host Law was passed in

February 2015 in Steuben County, and refers to adults who host parties where alcohol is served on property they control. Through social host liability laws, adults can be held responsible for these parties if underage people  are served, regardless  of who furnishes the alcohol.  Teen parties are a primary setting for underage drinking for high school and college students and high consumption of alcohol and binge drinking. Hosting a party with underage drinking, while the intentions

are to keep the teenagers safe, is illegal. The goal of this project for the Steuben Prevention Coalition is to educate teens and parents on the dangers and consequences that can occur when they allow the use of their home or properties by minors for hosting a party where alcohol is served. To enter the PSA Video Contest, please submit a 1 minute (maximum) video see ENTRIES | 7A

The Rotary Club of Corning is offering scholarships to greater Corning-area high school seniors graduating in June 2019 who are entering continuing education programs of two or more years by fall 2019. The scholarships are also available to second-year students at Corning Community College who are continuing their education at a four-year institution. In past years, awards of up to $1,000 have been made to scholarship winners. The primary criteria for selection is the student’s demonstrated commitment to community service during his or her high school or college years, together with acceptance into a continuing education program of the student’s choice. It should be noted that Rotarians and members of their families are not eligible to receive Rotary scholarships. Scholarship applications are available in the guidance office of area high schools. Completed applications should be typed and must be postmarked by March 8. Applications should be mailed to: Dr. Geraldine F. Wolfe, Corning Rotary Scholarship, PO Box 264, Painted Post, New York 14870. All applications will be reviewed and selections made entirely at the discretion of the Scholarship Committee of the Rotary Club of Corning. Scholarship awards will be announced by early May. Questions may be directed to the applicant’s guidance office or to Dr. Geraldine F. Wolfe at gwolfe44@yahoo.com.

• Alexis Mlott, daughter of Willard and Carla Mlott, of Canisteo, was named to the Dean’s List at Keuka College. Alexis is a senior studying occupational therapy. • Submitted

IN BRIEF & ON CAMPUS Bath Peace Group sets ‘Background’ presentation

On Wednesday, March 6, at 7 p.m., at St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 122 Liberty St. in Bath, the Bath Peace and Justice Group is sponsoring a presentation by Patricia Rodriguez titled “Background to a Border Wall / US Role in Latin America”. She will discuss the role the U.S. government has played in Latin America, especially in more recent decades with Plan Colombia, Plan Merida (Mexico), and the US economic agreements with Central American countries. This has much to do with the reasons behind the mass exodus of migrants fleeing their countries for safety and dignity, and with the numerous killings of social leaders across Latin America in recent years. Rodriguez is Associate Professor of Politics at Ithaca College and a member of the Tompkins County Immigrant Rights Coalition. She has participated in all three Bor-

der Encuentros organized by School of the Americas Watch. The presentation will begin at 7 p.m., with a potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m. (Bring a dish to pass and your own table utensils.) The program is free and the public is welcome. For further information call 607 522-4356.

• BOSTON, Mass. – The following students were recently named to Northeastern University’s dean’s list for the fall semester, which ended in December 2018: Brian Austin and Karleigh Corliss, both of Painted Post.

• DELHI – Brooks Parsons, of Bath, has been cited for academic achievement for the Fall 2018 semester by achieving the Dean’s List at SUNY Delhi.

• BATAVIA – Paige Austin, of Avoca, was named to the Dean’s List for the Fall 2018 semester at Genesee Community College.


LOCAL

STEUBEN COURIER

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

3A

Steuben lists offices up for election Submitted BATH – The Steuben County Board of Elections recently announced the list of county and town offices open for election in 2019, as of Feb. 1. The list is subject to clerks’ verification and other lawful changes, including resignations, retirement, death and local laws. Under the new New York State election reforms, any-

one seeking elected office on a designated party line has from Feb. 26 – April 4 to collect the required number of signatures to appear on the ballot. If more candidates from the same party file petitions for the same office in the same district, a primary will be held June 25 to determine who represents the party in the November General Election. Under the state’s Election Reform for Early Voting, eli-

gible voters may cast their ballot at a location in Bath, up to 10 days before the November General Election.

2019 Open County and Local Offices

(List also located at www. steubencony.org/boe)

County Wide Offices

District Attorney - 4 year term County Clerk- 4 year term

County Coroner - 4 year term County Legislators - 4 year terms * District # 1 – Hornell City District # 2 – Corning City District # 3 – Town of Bath District # 4 – Towns of Cohocton and Wayland District # 6 – Towns of Dansville, Hartsville and Hornellsville District # 7 – Towns of Avoca, Fremont, Howard and

Wheeler District # 8 – Town of Bradford, Campbell and Wayne District # 11- Towns of Addison, Lindley and Tuscarora District # 13- Towns of Caton, Corning and Hornby

*County legislators may serve up to four consecutive 4-year terms before stepping down.

see ELECTION | 6A

Home renewal grants awarded in Steuben County The Spectator

COURTESY STEUBEN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Those cans must have taken some hefting onto the dray, but these fellows are driving the morning’s milk to the cheese factory in Greenwood.

Free presentation on Steuben County farming Submitted Steuben County Historical Society will have a free presentation, “From Wheat to Grapes: The Steuben Farming Story” at 4 p.m. Friday, March 1, at Bath Fire Hall. Society director Kirk House, who will make the presentation, says “Farming in our area goes back well over a thousand years, and European-style farming goes back to about 1790. In early days they poled or drifted their goods downriver to Chesapeake Bay,

like Huck Finn on the Mississippi. Later the railroad carried their produce. “The focus of farming changed over the years, with grain, grapes, potatoes, and dairy all claiming pride of place at one time or another.  In the 1950s, there were 300 dairies in the Town of Bath alone. After that the family farms largely went out, only to have a revival with the influx of Amish and Old-Order Mennonites.” The presentation, third in this year’s S.C.H.S. Winter Lecture Series, is free and open to the public.

IN BRIEF Register for Universal Pre-Kindergarten in Bath VEW Primary School in Bath will register students for its Universal PreKindergarten (UPK) program March 4-14 from 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. in the school’s main office. Children residing in the Bath Central School District who will turn four years old on or before Dec. 1, 2019 are eligible to attend pre-kindergarten in September 2019. UPK is a full-day program that runs from 8:35 a.m.-2 p.m. and follows the district calendar. Free breakfast and lunch is provided daily. Parents are asked to pick up a packet at the school prior to registration. At registration, parents will need to provide the completed packet, proof of residency and their child’s birth certificate, record of most recent physical exam and immunization records. State health laws require children attending school to have the following immunizations to attend pre-kindergarten: polio (three doses); DTaP: diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (four doses); MMR: measles, mumps and rubella (one dose); Hepatitis B (three doses); Hib B (one to four doses); PCV (one to four doses); and varicella: chickenpox (one dose or proof that the child has had chicken pox). For more information, please call VEW Primary School at 776-4123, ext. 5100.  • Submitted

ALBANY — New York State Homes and Community Renewal Commissioner RuthAnne Visnauskas announced last week that a total of $7.3 million will assist 215 households throughout the Southern Tier. The funding is part of $28 million awarded to nonprofit organizations and municipalities that will support 929 households in rehabilitating and improving existing homes, increasing their access to affordable homes, and provide down payment assistance to help families achieve the dream of homeownership. “With today’s announcement, 215 hardworking  Southern Tier households  will benefit from the opportunities that safe,  affordable homeownership  can provide, which are  essential

to keeping the Southern Tier’s economy soaring,” Commissioner  Visnauskas said. “By helping families make upgrades  and repairs to their homes,  we are enhancing neighborhoods  and building safer communities,  which is central to Governor Cuomo’s historic commitment to expanding access to affordable homes across New York State.” The awards complement Governor Cuomo’s unprecedented $20 billion, five-year Housing Plan, which is making housing accessible and combating homelessness by building and preserving more than 100,000 units of affordable housing and 6,000 supportive apartments. The awards are provided through New York State Homes and Community Renewal’s annual HOME Local Program and the Community

see GRANTS | 7A

ON CAMPUS ROCHESTER – The following local residents made the Dean’s List at Rochester Institute of Technology for the 2018 Fall Semester: Durnian Parulski-Seager of Bath, in the chemistry program; Mitch Heard of Avoca, in the game design and development program; Devin Evarts of Avoca, who is in the mechanical engineering program; and Kortnee Danielson of Avoca, who is in the criminal justice program. • Submitted


4A

OPINION

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

Sen. Tom O’Mara:

Goshay:

Higher minimum wage for prisoners?

Presidency makes America special

Legislation called the “Prison Minimum Wage Act” was recently introduced and referred to committee in both the state Senate and Assembly. Every legislative session there are always proposals that spark a strong reaction from voters. This is one of them. The legislation (Senate Bill Number 3138), sponsored by two state legislators from Brooklyn, proposes to TRIPLE the taxpayer-funded minimum wage for state prison inmates to $3 per hour for the work thousands of inmates do in state prisons including cleaning, maintenance, and manufacturing products. According to the measure’s sponsors, the purpose of their legislation is “to end the last vestiges of slavery and embrace the spirit and the promise of the Thirteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution by providing a minimum wage of $3.00 an hour to inmates.” They say the fiscal implications of their legislation will “be determined.” Of course, we know it would cost taxpayers millions of dollars. According to the memorandum of support the sponsors filed for their proposal, “A study from the Prison Policy Institute found that inmates in New York State are amongst the lowest paid incarcerated people nationwide…They cannot form unions, do not have a right to workers’ compensation if they are injured on the job, and are required to participate in programs as assigned which, if they refuse, could lead them to face disciplinary measures such as solitary confinement and loss of goodtime credits…New York State must do better. Our prison system should not be one which is focused on punishment; rather, it should be dedicated to rehabilitation.” All of the above, in the words of the sponsors themselves, speaks for itself about their intent and thinking. For anyone interested in reading more, including the legislation itself, I have posted a link to it on my Senate website (omara. nysenate.gov) as part of a broader “Join The Fight” petition in opposition to the “Prison Minimum Wage Act.” Everyone can reach his or her own conclusions on the Act. I strongly op-

pose it. No, prisoners cannot form a labor union, nor should they be able to. Yes, prisoners refusing to participate in an assigned program are disciplined. They should be.  Moreover, if you don’t think prisons in New York State have become institutions more focused on rehabilitation than punishment, ask a local correctional officer. This state has gone out of its way focusing on rehabilitation -- too far out of the way, many argue -- to the risk of correctional officers and prison staff who work in these dangerous environments day after day, night after night.   In my opinion, the “Prison Minimum Wage Act” is an unbelievable proposal, especially with New York facing a multimillion-dollar budget deficit and when the state is already failing to live up to its promise of higher wages for hardworking, law-abiding employees like the Direct Service Professionals (DSPs) who care for our citizens with developmental and intellectual disabilities.  As I said recently: Be fair to Direct Care before coddling criminals. There was a time when a proposal like this one would not have a chance of becoming law. However, members of the governing extreme-Liberal, New York City-centric Democratic majorities in the Senate and Assembly sponsor the legislation. In this new New York State Legislature, there’s just no telling what might be approved.  Consequently, I encourage Southern Tier and Finger Lakes residents who oppose the “Prison Minimum Wage Act” to sign an online petition on  omara.nysenate.gov  (click on the “Join The Fight” icon near the top of the home page). If you agree with me, thank you for signing the petition and raising your voice for some common sense. 

By Charita M. Goshay More Content Now

In 1857, Americans — well, American men — elected James Buchanan, a president who hid behind states’ rights and did virtually nothing to stop the spread of slavery. He allowed his cabinet of cronies and prosecessionist southerners to run wild in their corruption. As the nation hurtled toward civil war, Buchanan left it up to his successor to find a way out. Sometimes, you get the president you need. Despite his generals’ best efforts to lose the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln preserved the Union, freed 3.1 million people from slavery and still managed to build the Continental Railroad. Plenty of people, north and south, thought Lincoln was a dolt and a rube who couldn’t figure his way out of a burlap sack. Some newspapers went full racist, calling him “Abraham Africanus,” along with criticisms and accusations that would have broken a man of today. But Lincoln was the president America needed, even if America didn’t

know it. Herbert Hoover had the know-how to keep Europeans from starving after World War I, but Franklin D. Roosevelt was the president Americans needed to rescue them out of the abyss of the Great Depression and to lead the country at the onset of World War II. Hoover wanted to let the economy correct itself. Roosevelt knew people needed more than their own bootstraps. They needed a president willing to help those living closest to the ground. Law and order Sometimes, when you vote your anger and fears, you get the president you deserve. In 1968, Richard Nixon wrapped his campaign in the “Southern Strategy,” tapping into the vein of white, working-class resentment,

all while dog-whistling promises to restore “law and order.” He was re-elected by a country that initially gave Watergate little thought, but he did generational damage to a nation that couldn’t conceive of their president as an unrepentant criminal. Sometimes you need a president who reminds you of the importance of being an active and engaged citizen; lest we forget, we live under the single-most ingenious form of government in human history. Because it is, the American presidency has withstood ineptitude, corruption and self-interest. It has endured private misbehavior and public blunders. The office was crafted with the understanding that presidents would make mistakes. We seem to be in a space right now where presidents either are flayed for every flub or people are pretending they didn’t hear what they just heard. Power by virtue of our vote Pundits and columnists get paid to opine, but time, tide and history reveal the true measure of a president. Follow-

ing a temporary deal Jan. 25 to reopen the government, ultra-conservative pundit Ann Coulter tweeted that Donald Trump replaces the late George H.W. Bush as “the biggest wimp” to serve as president. At 19, Bush flew 58 combat missions in World War II, including one in which he was shot down by the Japanese. The closest Coulter has come to combat is once getting hit in the face with a cream pie. The American presidency is at its best when it’s respected and understood by those who occupy the office. What makes America exceptional is this: Presidents possess power only because we allow it by virtue of our vote. If we fail to remember this, if we fail to be vigilant when granting them that power, we have only ourselves to blame for what happens next. James Buchanan, by the way, tops most historians’ lists as the worst president. Ever. We’re still here, aren’t we? Reach Charita at charita .goshay@cantonrep. com. On Twitter: @cgo shayREP

LETTER TO THE EDITOR To the Editor, “Hear instruction, and be wise, and refuse it not.” Wisdom instructed in Proverbs 8:33. It then goes on to say in verses 35 and 36, “For  whosoever finds me (wisdom)  findeth life, and shall obtain favor of the Lord. But he (or she) that sinneth against me (wisdom) wrongeth his (or her) own soul. All that hate me (wisdom) loves death.” Within our state’s recent

law we have broken one of the top 10 laws of the world. That is law #6. That’s pretty close to the top. It says in simple words, “You shall not kill/murder.” Exodus 20:13. This law does not look lightly upon disobedience. His, the Law Maker’s, final decision is much higher than this nation’s Supreme Court. If there is no genuine repentance and undoing quickly done, judgment will surely arrive,

and it will be severe. Let’s make today the day this legalizing murdering the preborn at any stage of its gestation to a newborn come to an end, and dear ones repent, or we do not know the when or how punishment will come upon us all. Allow wisdom the right in all decisions making now and all tomorrows.

Elouise Hults, Beaver Dams

LETTERS POLICY • Letters must be received by 3 p.m. Wednesday. LIMIT 300 WORDS. Letters may be held for up to three weeks. • Letters should be typed/printed. Email submissions preferred to news@steubencourier.com • Letters subject to editing for length/content. If major changes are required, we will notify the author. • Letters become property of The Courier and cannot be returned to sender. • Letters must include the writer’s full name, mailing ad-

dress and phone number. We will contact letter writers before we publish their submissions. If we cannot confirm the identity of the writer, we will not publish the letter. We will publish the writer’s name and home city only. Anonymous letters will be discarded. No exceptions. • Letters endorsing candidates or proposals are accepted up to 3 p.m. on the Wednesday three weeks before the scheduled vote. Rebuttal letters will be accepted two weeks before the scheduled vote. No letters will run in the

The Steuben

Courier Advocate

Sunday edition printed immediately before a vote. • Thank you letters not accepted. • Letters will be rejected if they do not meet the above specifications, or slander an individual or organization. • Publication of letters at discretion of editor.

Note: The views expressed on this “Opinion” page do not necessarily reflect the position of the Steuben Courier Advocate.

10 W. Steuben St. • Bath, NY 14810 (607) 776-2121 • Fax: (607) 776-3967 www.steubencourier.com • facebook.com/Steuben.Courier Office hours: Mon.-Thurs. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Fri. 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

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Editorial Department Shawn Vargo, Editor svargo@the-leader.com

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HEALTH

STEUBEN COURIER

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

WORKOUT:

Crawl strengthens whole body By Marlo Alleva More Content Now

You can turn just about any activity into a workout. Whether it’s vacuuming or even playing with the kids on the floor, with a little thought, simple moves can be turned into quick fitness. Speaking of being on the floor, that is a great segue into today’s exercise. Our move today is a bear crawl. You just need a big enough area to crawl forward and backward on your hands and feet. You will be working your upper body, core and lower body, while getting your heart rate up. To begin this move, bend in the hips, placing  your hands on the floor shoulder width wide. Engage  the midsection for balance and stability. Once you are on all fours and feel comfortable, it is time to start

MCN

crawling. Start by extending your left arm in a forward motion placing it on the floor in front of you, and bringing the right leg forward at the same time. As soon as you have your balance in this split stance position, proceed to walk forward with your right arm and your left leg.

Continuing this crawling motion for at least four to eight times forward, then do the same thing going backward, leading with your legs and following with your arms. Continue this motion for as long as you are  able to stay down on all fours. Stand up and rest  periodically to catch your breath and let

the blood flow back down from your head. This is an agility move that you can throw in from time to time just for fun or to get your heart rate up. Marlo Alleva be reached at vzpa@msn.com.

can falu

LOCAL HEALTH NEWS IN BRIEF Blood drives

The American Red Cross will hold the following blood drives. Call 800-RED-CROSS to schedule appointment. • Feb. 25, 1-5 p.m., at Steuben Center for Rehabilitation and Healthcare, 7009 Rumsey St. Ext., Bath. • Feb. 27, 11:30 a.m.5:30 p.m., at American Legion Post 173, 14 W. William St., Bath. • March 9, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., at Centenary United Methodist Church, 3 W. Washington St., Bath. • March 21, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., at Avoca Central School, 17-29 Oliver St., Avoca. • March 22, 8:45 a.m.-2 p.m., at Steuben County Office Building, 3 E. Pulteney Square Bath. • March 28, 11:45 a.m.-5:45 p.m., at Hammondsport Fire Department, 8521 State Route 54, Hammondsport. • March 29, 9 a.m.1 p.m., at Davenport &

Taylor, 7571 State Route 54, Bath.

Clinics

Immunizations clinic Steuben County Public Health will offer immunizations: • From 4:30-6:30 p.m. Feb. 26 at Steuben County Public Health, County Office Building – G1 off D.S.S. lobby, Bath. • From 1-3 p.m. March 13 at Steuben County Public Health, County Office Building – G1 off D.S.S. lobby, Bath. • From 4:30-6:30 p.m. March 26 at Steuben County Public Health, County Office Building – G1 off D.S.S. lobby, Bath. All clinics are by appointment only. All vaccines recommended for children are available for children who are uninsured or whose insurance does not cover the cost of vaccines. All adults should get one dose of the whooping cough vac-

cine called Tdap, especially those who will be around infants less than 12 months old, since infants are at greatest risk of life-threatening complications from whooping cough. Public Health has Tdap vaccine and most other adult vaccines, and charges a fee based on a sliding scale ($5-25/person) for those without insurance. Medicaid is also accepted. Call the Steuben County Public Health office at 6642438 or 800-724-0471 to schedule an appointment or for information. HIV clinic Steuben County Public Health sponsors free and confidential HIV testing clinics, by appointment only at Steuben County Public Health Clinic Rooms, County Office Building, 3 E. Pulteney Square, Bath. These clinic services are available to all residents of Steuben County for HIV counseling and testing. Resi-

dents seeking testing and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, which include Gonorrhea, Chlamydia and Syphilis, can call for a referral. For an appointment or information, call Steuben County Public Health at 664-2438 or 800-724-0471.

Transportation assistance

If you are a senior citizen without transportation to necessary, non-emergency appointments, please call 2-1-1 HELPLINE by dialing 2-1-1 or 800346-2211 and ask for Steuben Coordinated Transportation. Donations are accepted but there is not a fee for any services given. Residents of any age interested in becoming a volunteer driver and a vital part of our community are also invited to call for more information. (Mileage reimbursement is available to volunteer drivers.)

5A


6A

OBITUARIES & LOCAL

ELECTION

Continued from 3A

Municipal

City of Corning Mayor - 2 year term Councilman Ward 2 – 4 year term Councilman Ward 4 – 4 year term Councilman Ward 6 – 4 year term Councilman Ward 8 – 4 year term City of Hornell City Chamberlain - 4 year term Alderman Ward 1-10 - 2 year term Addison Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk –4 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 4 year term Avoca Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term (1) Councilman – 2 year unexpired term Bath Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Bradford Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Tax Collector – 2 year term Cameron Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Campbell Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Tax Collector – 2 year term Canisteo Town Supervisor – 4 year term

Town Clerk – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term (1) Councilman – 2 year unexpired term Superintendent of Highways – 4 year term Caton Town Supervisor – 4 year term Town Clerk – 4 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 4 year term Cohocton Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Corning Town Town Supervisor – 4 year term Town Clerk – 4 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 4 year term Dansville Town Supervisor – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Erwin (2) Councilman – 4 year term Fremont Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term Town Justice – 4 year term Greenwood (2) Councilman – 4 year term Hartsville Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Hornby Town Supervisor – 4 year term Town Clerk – 4 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 4 year term Hornellsville Town Supervisor – 4 year term Town Clerk – 4 year term

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

(2) Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 4 year term Howard Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Jasper Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term (2) Assessor – 4 year term Lindley Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Prattsburgh Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term Pulteney Town Supervisor – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term

Tuscarora Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term (2) Assessor – 4 year term Tax Collector – 2 year term Urbana Town Supervisor – 4 year term Town Clerk – 4 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Wayland Town Supervisor – 4 year term Town Clerk – 4 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 4 year term Wayne Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term

Rathbone Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term

West Union Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Tax Collector – 2 year term

Thurston Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term (2) Assessor – 4 year term Tax Collector – 2 year term

Wheeler Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term

Troupsburg Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term Town Justice – 4 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term Tax Collector – 2 year term

Woodhull Town Supervisor – 2 year term Town Clerk – 2 year term (2) Councilman – 4 year term Superintendent of Highways – 2 year term

OBITUARIES

Marguerite Eleanor Rice Marguerite Eleanor Rice, age 93, of Bath, NY died Friday February 15, 2019 at home. She was born March 2, 1925 in Buffalo, NY the daughter of the late James and Theresa (Hoy) Rice.  She retired from Philips Lighting in Bath after 30 years of service.  She was a Charter Member of the Hammondsport Moose Club.  Marguerite was an avid reader and enjoyed doing ceramics.  She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She was predeceased by

her husband Eldon F. Rice  and son John F. Rice.  She is survived by her daughter Marjorie (Alex) A. Cole of Watkins Glen, NY,  son, Stephen (Irene) Rice of Bath, NY, daughter-in-law, Janice Rice of Bath, NY and many grandchildren, great grandchildren and two great great grandchildren and nieces and nephews.   A graveside service will be held at the Pleasant Valley Cemetery at the convenience of the family.  Condolences may be made at  www.fagansfuneral home.com.

Norma W. Haskins Norma W. Haskins, age 97, of Bath, NY died Tuesday February 19, 2019 at the Taylor Health Center. She was born December 16, 1921 in Warsaw, NY the daughter of the late Walter G. and Hazel (Baker) Woodley. Mrs. Haskins retired from the Bath VAMC where she worked as the Chief of Library Services. She volunteered at the Historical Society in Bath

OBITUARY POLICY The cost of publishing an obituary in this newspaper is $80, including one photo. Obituaries must be placed by an accredited funeral home. The deadline is Thursday at noon. Obituary and photo must be emailed to news@steuben courier.com

and at the VA where she was instrumental in helping start the Military Museum at the Bath VA. She was a member of NARFE and she was an U.S. Navy Veteran. She is survived by her daughter Kathleen (James) Silfer of Myrtle Beach, SC, son Lee (Brenda) Haskins of Bath, NY and daughter Debra Haskins Mead of Smithtown, NY; four grandchildren, Jeremy Haskins, Christopher Haskins, Matt Silfer and Megan Silfer and seven great grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband John A. Haskins and two brothers, Walter Woodley of Rochester, NY and Gerald Woodley of Monroe Falls, Ohio Visitation will be held at the Centenary United Methodist Church in Bath on Saturday February 23, 2019 from 1:00-2:00 pm with a funeral service to follow at 2:00 pm with Reverend Eleanor Collinsworth officiating. A graveside service with Military Honors will be held on Monday February 25th at

1:00 pm at the Bath National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers memorial donations in her name may be made to the Centenary United Methodist Church, 3 West Washington St., Bath, NY 14810. Condolences may be made at www.fagansfuneralhome. com.

She enjoyed putting on retirement parties for coworkers. She loved spending time with her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren whenever she could.  She loved her time out in the sun, attending dance recitals as she loved to dance was she was younger.  She also loved All things Elvis. She was predeceased by her parents Ernest and Cleone Shaut, brother Teddy Shaut, brother-inlaw, Robert Vanderhoef and great grandson Jaydan Posten.  She is survived by her children; Teresa and Ben Brockway of D’Iberville, MS and great grandchildren, Charles and Lillian, Troy and RobRoberta ‘Bertie’ in Thompson of Bath, NY, Jean Thompson Andrea and Scott Allison of Addison, NY and grandRoberta ‘Bertie’ Jean children, Morgan and Thompson, age 76, was Chase, Susan and Steven born January 30, 1943 in Lester of Claremont, NC, Bath, NY and died Febru- Kelly and Joe Fessey of ary 16, 2019 at her home in Mauston, WI and grandBath.  She graduated from children, Aiden, Shawn Haverling High School in and Keegan, Jessica and 1961.  Bertie retired from Joshua Doren of LawPhilips Lighting in Bath.  renceville, PA and great Bertie was an avid reader.  grandchildren, Rowan and

Ada, and Joshua Thompson of Gauthier, MS. Her adult grandchildren, China Davenport of Gulfport, MS, Gabriel and Angie Brockway of LaQuinta, CA, Levi Brockway of Atlanta, GA, Hope Mosher of Beaver Dams, NY and great grandchildren, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Lindsey and Johnny, Holly and Justin Posten of Horseheads, NY and great grandchildren Justin and Jordan, Ashley and Brian O’Reilly of Catawba, NC and great grandchildren, Jon, Layla and Finn, Michael Dean of Clarement, NC and Alexander Dean of Newton, NC, her sisters, Barbara Vanderhoef of Addison, NY and Beverly and Harold Risley of Rathbone, NY, sister-in-law, Mary Shaut of Bath, NY and many nieces, nephews and their families. Arrangements will be held at the convenience of the family. Burial will be in St. Catherine’s Cemetery, Addison, NY. Condolences may be made at  www.fagans funeralhome.com.


COMMUNITY

STEUBEN COURIER

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Calendar Policy:

All content submitted for inclusion in the Community Calendar is subject to approval by The Steuben Courier Advocate prior to publication. Email news@steubencourier.com directly with your calendar listing/changes. Thank you.

Volunteer opportunitites

Steuben RSVP, an organization dedicated to connecting community minded seniors with volunteer opportunities has announced several openings. Whether you want to assist once a week, once a month, or as an on-call substitute, your time is greatly needed and appreciated. • CareFirst would like you to consider joining them for their new group called “Worker Bee Teas”. This is a drop-in weekly workshop every Tuesday from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Come lend a hand for whatever time you can give on administrative projects at the CareFirst Volunteer Suite in Painted Post. Light refreshments provided. This is a great chance to assist others and make new friends! • Steuben County RSVP would like assistance with a onetime event on Tuesday, March 5 from 10-11 a.m. in Bath. Help support at-risk youth and learn about how human trafficking is affecting our communities. We are looking for a few volunteers to assemble gobags and learn about ways you can assist these children. Please call Mary at 664-2298 for more details. • Steuben County Office for the Aging is seeking volunteers interested in assisting with the Powerful Tools for Caregivers program. This evidence-based program offers a series of classes designed to

give caregivers the skills they need to take care of themselves as they take care of a loved one. Volunteers will be trained and certified in the material for the program and will work alongside OFA staff to offer classes on an ongoing basis. Volunteers will be asked to facilitate twice per year. Please call Mary at RSVP for additional information. • Project Care is seeking volunteer drivers in the greater Bath area. Drivers transport clients age 60+ to medical or personal appointments using your own vehicle. Mileage reimbursement available. Volunteers can work as much or as little as their schedule allows. Do you have an hour to give someone a ride? Call Steuben County RSVP at 607-6642298 or email maryd@ co.steuben.ny.us for more information.

Meetings

• The Save the Lyon Commission will hold a meeting on Monday, Feb. 25, at 6:30 p.m. at the Old National Hotel. • The Board of Education of the Bath Central School District will hold a special meeting on Thursday, Feb. 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Haverling High School Library. • Cornell Cooperative Extension of Steuben County will hold public board and program committee meetings in 2019 and welcomes public comment at the beginning of each meeting. All meetings will be held at the Steuben County Office Building Annex (2nd floor conference room), 20 E. Morris St., Bath, at the times specified. Members of the public are requested to RSVP their attendance at these meetings to 607-6642300 or bmc5@cornell.

Steuben Sheriff • Steuben County Sheriff Jim Allard reports that on Feb. 19, deputies arrested Jason A. Novak, 42, of Dyke Road, Beaver Dams, following an investigation into a reported motor vehicle rollover crash on County Route 41 in the Town of Hornby. It is alleged that Novak operated the crashed vehicle while in an intoxicated condition. Novak was charged with Driving While Intoxicated, Aggravated Driving While Intoxicated, blood alcohol content greater than .18%, and moving from lane unsafely. Novak was released on traffic summons to appear in the Town of Hornby Court. • Steuben County Sheriff Jim Allard reports that on Feb. 16, deputies arrested Alicia Fay Young,

GRANTS Continued from 3A Development Block Grant’s Housing Program funding round. Since 2011, housing rehab and homeownership funds under these programs have assisted more than 8,200 households. Awards for the Southern Tier included Steuben County. $600,000 was granted to Community Progress, Inc. for the replacement of six

BOWLING ROUNDUP

edu. For more information, call 607-664-2300 or visit putknowled getowork.org. Board of Directors Meetings fourth Thursday of each month (except where specified), March 28 (Finance Committee meeting prior, 4:30 p.m.), May 23 (Nominating Committee meeting prior, 4 p.m.), June 27 (Finance Committee meeting prior, 4:30 p.m.), July 25, Aug. 22, Oct. 24 (Finance Committee meeting prior, 4:30 p.m.), No Board of Directors Meetings in April, September or November; 4-H Youth Development Program Advisory Committee Meetings, third Thursday of odd months, 6 p.m., March 21, May 16, July 18, Sept. 19, Nov. 21; Community Health & Financial Well-Being Program Advisory Committee Meetings second Thursday of odd months, 5:30 p.m., March 14, May 9, July 11, Sept. 12; Agriculture & Natural Resources Program Advisory Committee Meetings second Tuesday of odd months, 4:30 p.m., April 9, June 11, Aug. 13, Oct. 8, Dec. 10. • The Alzheimer’s Association Rochester & Finger Lakes Region helps community members who live with the disease and their care partners learn more about Alzheimer’s, share their experiences and connect with others who understand. For more information go to alz.org/rochesterny. All meetings require preregistration. To register, call 800-272-3900. • Village of Bath Housing Authority Board meetings will be held at 3 p.m. every fourth Monday of the month (except where a holiday occurs, then it is the week before). • Disabled American Veterans Chapter 7

meets on the third Monday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Bath American Legion Post 173, 14 W. William St., Bath. For more information contact Commander Arvel Miner at 607-281-7941 or Adjutant Anthony Ritter at 607-368-9251. New members welcome. • Bath Baby Café, 9-10:30 a.m. every Friday at the Dormann Library. The Baby Café is a free drop-in support program designed for pregnant women, breastfeeding moms, and all families. Staffed by trained professionals from the county – Public Health, Healthy Families, WIC, and others. Certified Lactation Counselors are also on site every Friday to help with any breastfeeding questions or concerns. All programs are free and offer both mothers and children support and social opportunities. For more information, call Steuben County Public Health at 607-664-2438.

Events • Fellowship Dinner the first Sunday of each month following 11 a.m. service. Grace Bible Baptist Church, 6875 E. William St., Bath. 607776-7503, gracebible baptistbath.org. • Vegetarian buffet luncheon free to the community every third Saturday of the month at 12:15 p.m., held at the Corning Seventh-day Adventist Church at 121 Fuller Avenue, side entrance. Call 962-7994 for information. • Bath Presbyterian Church will serve Lenten Lunches Wednesday, March 6 to Wednesday, April 10, from 11:30 a.m.1 p.m., at 6 East Morris St., (parking behind the church). Prices vary.

POLICE BLOTTER 39, of Beaver Dams, following a traffic stop on Reynolds Avenue, Corning. It is alleged that Young was intoxicated and impaired by both drugs and alcohol. Young was charged with Driving While Ability Impaired by drugs and alcohol combination. Young was released on traffic summons to appear in Corning City Court on a later date.

7A

pear in Hornellsville Town Court on a later date.

• On Feb. 17, deputies arrested Kevin D. Vantreese, 22, of Canisteo, following a traffic stop on County Route 66 in the Town of Hornellsville. It is alleged that Vantreese was intoxicated by alcohol. Vantreese was charged with Driving While Intoxicated, Aggravated Driving While Intoxicated .18% blood alcohol content or higher, Suspended Registration and Operating a Motor vehicle with no insurance. Vantreese was released on traffic summons to ap-

• On Feb. 17, deputies arrested Graham W. Mitchell, 36, of Robie Street, Bath, following a traffic stop on West Washington Street. It is alleged that Mitchell was intoxicated by alcohol. It is further alleged that Mitchell was previously convicted of an alcohol related offense which required him to utilize an interlock device while driving. Mitchell was charged with driving in excess of the posted speed limit, Operating a motor vehicle without an interlock device installed as required, a Class A Misdemeanor, and Driving While Intoxicated as a Class E Felony. Mitchell was arraigned at the Village of Bath Court and released to reappear at a later date to further answer the charges brought against him.

manufactured homes in Steuben County through the HOME Local Program. The New York State Community Development Block Grant program provides financial assistance to eligible cities, towns, and villages with populations under 50,000 and counties with an area population under 200,000, in order to develop viable communities by providing decent, affordable housing, and suitable living environments, as well as expanding

economic opportunities, principally for persons of low and moderate income. The HOME Local Program funds a variety of activities through partnerships with counties, towns, cities, villages, private developers, and community- based non-profit housing organizations. The program provides funds to acquire, rehabilitate, or construct housing, or to provide assistance to low income homebuyers and renters.

Campbell Building Supply League 2/16/19 Women High Game Kelly Smith 171 Nadine Rusak 167 Rita Hoover 141 Men High Game John Kleckner 238 Kris Francisco 224 Joe Eaton  213 Women High Series Kelly Smith 486 Nadine Rusak 448 Rita Hoover 372 Men High Series John Kleckner 621 Joe Eaton 566

Kris Francisco 544 Team High Game wooden nickel 853 Campbell Bld Supply 803 R L Trucking 763 Team High Series wooden nickel 2409 Campbell Bld Supply 2282 R L Trucking 2201 Standing Wooden Nickel R L Trucking Lowe Sales OH Mercy Laser Art Studio Campbell Building Supply

WHAT’S YOUR STANCE?

Take our poll on steubencourier.com! POLL RESULTS How do you cope with the odd winter we are having? Hibernation – I’m not leaving the house! - 34% Skiing/ice skating-enjoy the weather - 33% Netflix binging - 22% Cuddling by the fireplace - 11%

POLL QUESTION Recently President Trump declared a National Emergency so that he could shift funding to get the border wall built between the United States and Mexico. Do you think that this is a National Emergency and do you believe that “The Wall” needs to be built?

ENTRIES

Continued from 2A

entry by March 31. Entries will be judged by a panel of Coalition members during the first week of April. The winning entry will be aired at local theaters prior to regularly scheduled movies during the months of May and June for the Prom and Graduation season. First and second runners up PSAs will be utilized by the Coalition during community events, town hall meetings and school events. While it is not required to register for the PSA Video Contest it is appreciated so that we can keep you informed of the progress and deadlines. For full details and eligibility requirements, please contact the Steuben Prevention Coalition at 607-776-6441 ext. 202 or at cbanik@dor.org.

Send us your community meetings and events. Please email news@steubencourier.com


8A

ENTERTAINMENT

LOCAL LIBRARY HAPPENINGS - SEE WHAT’S GOING ON

MORNING MINUTES WORD OF THE WEEK yellow back [yel-oh-bak] (noun) a gold certificate.

TV TRIVIA What was another name for the TV show “Lassie”? A. “Jeff’s Collie” B. “Jeff’s Adventures” C. “Jeff and Lassie” D. “Lassie Saves the Day” (Answer at bottom of column)

NUMBER TO KNOW 13: The average person laughs 13 time per day.

THIS DAY IN HISTORY Feb. 24, 1836: In San Antonio, Colonel William Travis issues a call for help on behalf of the Texan troops defending the Alamo, an old Spanish mission and fortress under attack by the Mexican army.

FEATURED BIRTHDAY Movie actor Billy Zane (53)

QUOTE OF THE WEEK “When your work speaks for itself, don’t interrupt.” — Henry J. Kaiser

TRIVIA ANSWER A. “Jeff’s Collie”

Hornell Public Library 64 Genesee St., Hornell, 607-324-1210 Blind Date with a Book The Hornell Public Library will be celebrating “Blind Date with a Book” all during the month of February by offering patrons the chance of checking out a surprise book. “Blind Date Book Displays will be located in the Young Adult area. Select a book based on the hints on each book. After you check it out bring it home and unwrap it. Will your date be awesome or a dud? There’s only way to find out. Go home with a “mystery date” today!

SPCA

Continued from 1A Addison, to assist the local dog warden with the report of numerous dogs running loose and dogs being kept without adequate shelter. Preliminary investigation led to involvement of the Finger Lakes SPCA. A total of 16 canines (10 adults and six puppies) were seized by the SPCA. The seized animals are now being evaluated and cared for by the SPCA. The owner, Susan L. Clark, was issued an Appearance Ticket for Agriculture & Markets Law Section 353-B (Inappropriate Shelter for Dogs Left Outdoors). The investigation is still ongoing.

WORK

Continued from 1A “Steuben County is thankful for the state’s investment in our transportation infrastructure,” said Steuben County Manager Jack Wheeler. “These improvements will benefit our residents, businesses, and travelers for decades to come.” Steuben County Legislative Chair Joseph Hauryski, R-Campbell, agreed. “I am pleased to see the state making this kind of investment in  improving the infrastructure  in Steuben County,” Hauryski  said. “We certainly appreciate  it.” State Senator Thomas O’Mara, R-Big Flats, said  he appreciates the ongoing  work of our regional Department  of Transportation to undertake and complete these vital infrastructure projects across the Southern Tier. “Now more than ever our communities, motorists, and taxpayers deserve a strong commitment from the state to rebuild our local and state roads and bridges,” said state Assemblyman Phil Palmesano, R-Corning. “Thank you to the New York State Department of Transportation for this commitment.” Motorists are reminded that fines are doubled for speeding in a work zone. In accordance with the Work Zone Safety Act of 2005, convictions of two or more speeding violations in a work zone could result in the suspension of an individual’s driver license. For up-to date travel information, call 511, or the mobile site at m.511ny.org. Follow New York State DOT on Twitter: @NYSDOT, Find us on Facebook at facebook. com/NYSDOT.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

Libraries: Submit your events using the formatting here and email to news@steu bencourier.com. Note: If you do not receive an automated response, your email was not received. Please call 607-776-2121.

Fred & Harriett Taylor Memorial Library 21 William St., Hammondsport 607-569-2045

Indoor Walking is held Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 9-10 a.m. Walk away the pounds with various Leslie Sansone Walking DVDs. Dress in comfortable clothes, wear sneakers, bring a bottle of water and plan on enjoying yourself. Walking takes place in the lower level of the library. Walking will be on Feb. 25, 27. Little Bookworms Story Time. Bring your child to the library for stories, activities, and snack on Wednesdays from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Little Bookworms will be held on Feb. 27. Feb. 26, 6:30-7:30 p.m., “Intro to Guitar,” a presentation by musician Bruce T Holler. Bruce will explain how the guitar works, parts of the guitar, different types of guitars, how to tune the guitar, cost of guitars and the different materials, chord structure, and what to expect from guitar lessons. The presentation is open to all ages and there is no charge. Call 607-5692045 to sign up. Indoor Walking is held Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings from 9-10 a.m. Walk away the pounds with various Leslie Sansone Walking DVDs. Dress in comfortable clothes, wear sneakers, bring a bottle of water and plan on enjoying yourself. Walking takes place in the lower level of the library. Indoor walking will be on March 1, 4, 6, 8, 11, 13, 15, 18, 20, 22, 25, 27. Little Bookworms Story Time – Bring your child to the library for stories, activities, and snack on Wednesdays from 10:30-11:30 a.m. March 6, 13, 20, 27. March 2 – The Potato Battery, from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Designed for ages 8 and up, this is an opportunity to learn about electronic engineering (STEM). You’ll learn answers to questions like, How does an LED work, What is an electrolyte, and more. Audrey O’Neill will be presenting this program, along with Dan O’Neill. Sign up at 607-569-2045. March 4 – MAC User Group Meeting. The MAC User Group meets at 10:30 a.m. The topic will be “WORD PROCESSING ON MACS.” Visit their website at www.hportmug. com for schedules and

past topics. March 11 – Hammondsport Book Club meets from 6:45-7:45 p.m. The book for March is Hillbilly Elegy:  A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, by J.D. Vance. The selection for April 2019, White Teeth, by Zadie Smith, by will be available to pick up at the March meeting. Newcomers welcome.   March 12 – The Crafty Quilters meet at 2 p.m. There is no fee and newcomers are welcome. Bring whatever sewing or quilting project you might be working on, or come for fresh ideas. The Crafty Quilters meet on the second Tuesday of the month.                March 12 – Library Trustees Meeting - The Board of Trustees meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. The public is welcome to attend the open session.                                                     March 21 – Cruise On: All You Need to Know to Plan the Perfect Caribbean Cruise, from 6:30-8 p.m., presented by Todd and Phyllis “PJ” Johnson. Call 607-5692045 to sign up.      

Benedek Memorial Library

(formerly Savona Free) (607) 583-4426 Mary Helen Joint Meeting House 7 McCoy St., Savona savonafreelibrary.org Register for events: email savona@stls.org, call, or at the Library. Feb. 26, 12-2 p.m., Library Board Meeting. The library board will meet as a regularly scheduled meeting. The public is welcome to attend. For more information call (607)5834426. Meetings are regularly held on the fourth Tuesday of the month except for the months of July and December. Feb. 26, 4-5 p.m., Teen Advisory Committee Meeting. Teens who would like to help plan events, recommend items for the library, and volunteer to help the library are welcome to become part of the Teen Advisory Committee. Come join the fun and have a voice in the library. Call (607) 583-4426 for more information. Feb. 26, 5-6 p.m., Friends of the Library. The Library is looking for anyone wanting to be a friend of the library. Come to our meeting and help us plan fundraisers, events, and other ways to help the library become a center for all in our community to come to. Feb. 28, 4-6 p.m., and March 2, 10 a.m.- 12 p.m. Minecraft at the Library. Come play a multiplayer game of Minecraft. We will have computers set up with a closed Minecraft world for players to explore and interact. Open to all ages. A par-

ent or guardian must be present for any child 8 and under. There will be snacks and drinks available. Registration is required. March 14, 10 a.m., Story Hour! There will be stories, games and interactive play in the Early Literacy Room. Registration is requested. March 15, 7 p.m., Movie Night! Come and join the fun at the Movie Night showing Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald. Grindelwald escapes and begins to gather power. Can he be stopped before he can build the power to rule over all non-magical beings? Rated PG-13. This event is free. Popcorn and soda available. All are welcome. You can bring your own snacks, or share snacks with everyone. March 26, 12-2 p.m. – Library Board Meeting. The library board will meet as a regularly scheduled meeting. The public is welcome to attend. For more information call (607) 5834426.  Library Board Meetings are regularly held on the fourth Tuesday of the month except for the months of July and December. March 26, 4-5 p.m. – Teen Advisory Committee Meeting. Teens who would like to help plan events, recommend items for the library, and volunteer to help the library are welcome to become part of the Teen Advisory Committee. Come join the fun and have a voice in the library. Call (607) 5834426 for more info. March 26, 5-6 p.m. – Friends of the Library. The  Library is looking for anyone wanting to be a friend of the library. Come to our meeting and help us plan fundraisers, events, and other ways to help the library become a center for all in our community to come to. March 28, 10 a.m., Story Hour! There will be stories, games and interactive play in the Early Literacy Room. Registration is requested.

Cohocton Public Library

8 Maple Ave, Cohocton (585) 384-5170 Story Time Thursdays 10:30 a.m. Storytime is a fun, interactive, and educational program for children and their caregivers. Each week the program will feature stories, crafts, and activities based on a particular theme. Intro to Quilting Mondays, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Nancy Freelove is getting us quilting! Join us for this great intro class with beginning projects. Fabric and some tools required. Ozobots and Coding – Feb. 28, 5 p.m.

Check out new and old technology, the science of cooking, and challenge yourself to try something new.

Repair Clothes Feb. 25, 5:30 p.m. Check out this awesome sewing series with Nancy Freelove to try techniques and learn a new skill.

Yoga Classes Chair Yoga, Feb. 26, 6 p.m. Kundalini Yoga is a dynamic form of yoga that integrates yoga postures and meditation techniques for total mind and body wellbeing. Join us for an all ages introductory class or Chair Yoga, with certified Kundalini instructor Elisa Leone. Yoga mats are recommended, but a beach towel will work for this class! Check out serenityyogawithelisa. com.

Bone Builders Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. Bone Builders is a free hour-long exercise and education program for those 55 and older. It is designed to reduce or halt the risk of osteoporosis in both women and men. Participants of all abilities can benefit from this program.

Book Club Feb. 27, 12 p.m. Come join us for a friendly discussion of this month’s selection. Copies are available at the Library. Teens and adults welcome. Coffee, tea, and light refreshments.

Homesteaders Club March 1, 6 p.m. This month we will have a working meeting to packet seeds for our seed library. Bring anything you have to get rid of and get first dibs on some amazing seeds for this year. If you are interested in gardening, small scale farming, canning, preserving, or anything else homestead related, this is the spot for you.

MediCare Advice and Assistance March 6, 12:30-2 p.m. A representative from FidelisCare will be on hand to help answer MediCare questions and navigate MediCare issues with you.

BeyBlade Club! March 7, 21, 6-7 p.m. Bring your stadiums and Beys and “let it rip”! Grade-school aged kids are welcome to this open event.

Tinker Thursdays Thursdays, 5 p.m. Oobleck! March 7 – Celebrate Dr. Seuss and make Oobleck slime. Irish Soda Bread March 14 – Learn to make this classic quick bread. Shrinky Dinks March 21 – Reuse plastic to create earrings, keychains, and more! Recycled Race Track March 28 – Challenge your friends to make the coolest track. • Submitted


OUTDOORS

9A

Using snow to learn about wildlife By Oak Duke

WHAT’S UP at MOSSY BANK PARK February 24, 2019 – As in most years, happenings in nature at Mossy Bank Park are a little slow in mid-winter, as many lifeforms are dormant. It is a great season for reading and thinking. To this day, the greatest thinker in Natural History was Charles Darwin, whose birthday was February 12, 1809. It is often said that nobody can understand modern biology without a solid appreciation of Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection. So how are Darwin’s ideas holding up these days? Hang on, to answer that question this article is about to get deep and technical, but hopefully you can follow. Darwin famously observed, from agricultural breeding exercises and observations of plants and animals in Nature, that lifeforms are not immutable, that they change over time. Without the knowledge of genetics, he theorized there must be transmissible traits, passed through generations, and acted upon by everything else in Nature in such a way as to assure that only the fittest traits survive. If so, there should be a common ancestral tree of life, from which all present forms arose. Biologists since Darwin have tried to understand this hereditary tree. Living at the same time as Darwin but unknown to him, Gregor Mendel discovered the transmissible elements of heredity we now call genes. What biologists call the Modern Synthesis, combines the ideas of Darwin with the genes of Mendel, giving Darwin’s theory an actual mechanism of action. So far, so good. As scientists worked harder to understand genes, Watson and Crick discovered the molecule DNA held the genetic code in a chemical language that has proven to be the same in every known lifeform studied to this very day. This is very compelling evidence that life arose only once. The information for every function of life is to be found on DNA. This information is copied by transfer RNA (t-RNA) and carried in the cell to organelles called ribosomes, which assemble the proteins necessary for all the cell’s components. If life originated only once, the composition of ribosomes (r-RNA), should be very similar in all living things, and it is. How similar the r-RNA is from one lifeform to another should allow the construction of a chemical tree of life. This work was done by Carl Woese who found it worked very well for all multicellular lifeforms and those microscopic forms that have their DNA contained in a nucleus. But bacteria, cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), and

STEUBEN COURIER • SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

D. Randy Weidner archea (a whole new domain of bacteria-like living things that Woese discovered), do not have a nucleus. Rather their DNA is free within their cells. In these forms it was very difficult to establish a hereditary tree. The reason seems to be that these forms readily share their genetic material among themselves; so strict selection via heredity is not operating. This has real world implications, for example, it is the cause of much antibiotic resistance. All the above is pretty much proven and not controversial. Now for the fun part. Urey and Miller showed that inorganic chemicals in a vial sparked by electrical impulses (sort of like lightning) can self-assemble into organic molecules, the building blocks of life. When RNA first formed, it started putting these chemicals together. This assembly probably happened randomly on primordial Earth until another structure arose, a membrane. Biochemists have shown membranes can self-assemble too, perhaps on a clay surface. When membranes surrounded RNA which doubled to be more stable DNA, a primitive cell was born. Interestingly, bacterial membranes and archea membranes are chemically distinct, so membranes probably arose at least twice. It is believed that cells with a nucleus, all of which have membranes like archea, arose when an Archean captured and incorporated bacteria, or perhaps parts of bacteria, into itself. This provided them with energy producing organelles (mitochondria and chloroplasts), a membrane for their nuclear material, and a way to divide with all parts intact. These nucleated cells did not share DNA as readily as bacteria and archea, and divided and differentiated by Darwinian selection into all complex life, an event called by some, the Darwinian threshold. So old Darwin did not do too badly. In the very earliest stages of evolution there was probably a lot more sharing than true hereditary natural selection, but later on selection became the primal force. And even in multicellular life today, there occurs so-called ‘lateral gene transfer’ (gene sharing outside of heredity), an important source of variation. Nature never gives up on things that work.

By the end of February in our neck of the woods, unless you enjoy skiing or running a snowmobile, snow is starting to get old in more ways than one. For most of us, long gone are the days when we felt as if winter, with its ubiquitous white stuff covers trees picturesquely, drooping down their limbs with the weight of a fresh snowfall. Not too many oohs and ahs over pictures of snow anymore. More like “ugh.” Sure, we all long for spring, seeing things “green up.” But while the snow is here, all the animals in the forest are busy writing their stories on that large white piece of paper for us to read. And it’s a true story. The blackboard (if they have those in schools anymore in this digital age,) or more like it the whiteboard gets wiped clean, with each snowfall. Understanding of animal behavior is not just handed to us. We have to get out there and walk, look, and think. And what an advantage! What a great way to organically learn about the amazing life of wild critters that we share the planet with. One can almost feel sorry for our more southern brethren in this way who rarely, if ever, get a chance to observe the comings and goings of wildlife by reading their stories in the snow. Reading the snow, following animal tracks is a lot like reading a book or a story. And we have to read carefully at times because there are exaggerations, understatements, even mistakes. And lots of incomprehension in the snow to trip us up. But there are good tracking books and reference information accessible through the Internet where answers and knowledge can be readily found. When a whitetail casually walks through the woods they put their back foot almost perfectly into the track of

OAK DUKE

A flock of hen turkeys leave a lot of tracks in the February snow. the front hoof. So, when we see tracks, they are almost always, a combination track of the back hoof and the front hoof, unless the animal is running. As a whitetail runs, it throws its back feet ahead of its front feet, like a big rabbit. And remember, when following a deer, the tracks always “point” in the direction the animal is traveling. A whitetail’s track is pointed in front and flared out with a space between the two sides of the hoof in back. More than one tracker has gotten a bit mixed up by backtracking a deer, going the wrong way. Hey that’s how we learn. Deer tracks become exaggerated in older snow. Over time, a track will usually widen, especially after a slight thaw. And reflecting on recent temperature fluctuations, we can backdate the track and get an idea of when the animal passed by. Small deer often trick us in that way. A yearling whitetail will sometimes leave a mark in the snow that expands through daytime thawing. Some expand perfectly proportionately, others a bit more distorted. Another exaggeration, which we often see with deer tracks in the snow, is caused by the animal’s speed of motion. The more quickly a whitetail moves, the longer the track and the more it flares out. When a deer is picking its way along, slowly browsing

on twigs the tracks are relatively dainty. The animal is up on its toes. But when it decides to run, the hoof becomes splayed and it’s dew claws, actually two toes slightly up above where we would think its ankle would be, then become evident in the whitetail’s tracks. And of course the faster the animal is moving, the deeper the track, the more flared out, etc. And remember, the dewclaw marks are the sign of the back of the track. And the track points us in the direction of flight. We may think that a large animal makes a deeper track. But that’s not always true. The whitetail which is loping along to catch up with its buddies will splay it’s hoof, making a bigger impression (in the snow and in our minds,) even though the actual deer may be of identical weight or even smaller in body size! So tracks can fool us. Many times we fail to see or realize the significance of what we read in the snow. And then, once in a while, it will hit us like a bolt out of the blue. And there it is. Understanding. What are some clues to tell us whether it is a buck or doe? Bucks tend to hit licking branches slightly more than does, and of course if they are still carrying antlers…which becomes more and more rare as winter turns to spring, they may rub on a

small tree. And the shavings are evident on the snow at the trees base. Shavings at the base of a deer rub tell us its age and when the buck passed. “Back tracking” or checking out older sign, can tell us as much as following the deer into the more recent past. It’s easy to get mixed up when attempting to either follow or backtrack a deer. Whitetails seem to always cross each other’s tracks sooner or later. And then we have to decipher or sort out which track is “ours.” Deer seem to make tracking them difficult because they like to walk down the same trails as their kin. Unraveling the thread of a lone whitetail’s trail is impossible sometimes. It’s difficult to distinguish a buck from a doe by the track alone, especially a young buck from an old doe. An older, and therefore a larger buck, especially when rutting will leave a very distinct track in snow. Bucks often drag their toes, leaving a line or drag mark in the snow. Old bucks have a tendency to toe out slightly. Doe’s and smaller buck’s tracks appear to be more “lined up.” as they walk. One thing for sure, deer tracks in the snow will lead us to the edge of our knowledge of whitetails, the edge of that windswept field between our ears.


10A SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

SPORTS

STEUBEN COURIER

Section V Alpine Skiing Finals Submitted The Haverling Varsity Alpine Ski Team recently competed in the Section V Finals. The athletes skied two Giant Slalom (GS) and two Slalom (SL) runs where their times were combined to determine their place.  Skiers from the Wayne County Finger Lakes League, Monroe County League, and our local Southern Tier Race League converged at Swain to compete in the two contests.  The participating schools were divided into Class A and Class B, based on student population.

On Wednesday, Feb. 13, the Haverling girls competed against Class B schools in blizzard-like conditions.   Senior, Madison Shuart finished in 22nd place in the GS and in 18th place in the SL.  Senior, Arlene Yahn finished in 25th place in the GS and 23rd place in the SL.  The girls did not receive a team score as 3 racers are required to compete. On Thursday, Feb. 14, the Haverling boys competed against Class B schools. The conditions were clear and sunny.  Senior, Jason Burg finished in 17th place in the GS, and in 10th place in the SL. 

Burg finished both races with his two new best times of the season. Connor Bell finished in 34th place in the GS, and 33rd in the SL.  Senior, Hunter Colomaio finished in 42st place in the GS, and in 39th place in the SL. Junior, Teddy Robbins finished in 20th place in the GS.    The boys team finished in 15th place for all Class A and B schools for both the GS and SL races. “Swain had the best conditions I’ve seen all season for this event,” commented Coach Wolfe.

Savona head coach Mike Mouzon said. ‘Despite the outcome, I think we have something to build upon for next season.’ Caiden Crego led Lyons with 27 points and Jasmine David poured in 21. Hailey Soporowski led the Panthers with 11 points and Kiara Barron posted 10 points.

with 20 points while Machuga added 11 points and Jordan Sutryk posted nine points. Jesse Pensyl posted 12 points for Whitesville.

ROUNDUP Knights advance in sectional play TOM PASSMORE/SCA

Above | Haverling’s Jordan Deats puts up a shot. Below | Haverling’s Austin Palmer puts up a shot as he evades a Dansville defender.

Mustangs upset Rams

Steuben Courier BATH — Dylan Race drilled a 3-pointer with under a minute remaining for No. 11 Dansville to propel the Mustangs over sixth-seeded Haverling 52-46 in the first round of the Section V Class B2 playoffs Wednesday in Bath. Haverling led 24-18 after 16 minutes and held a 40-31 lead late in the third quarter. Ben Caruso powered the Mustangs with nine

second-half points, three 3-pointers, and Arrik Gerber contributed eight of his 13 points in the final two quarters. Caruso led Dansville with 19 points while Drew Morrow and Jacob Failla each chipped in eight points and Race had four points. Alec Sestak posted 17 points for the Rams while Jordan Deats added 16 points and Justin Marshall contributed 11 points.

ADDISON — No. 6 seeded Addison used a strong second half to power past No. 11 North Rose-Wolcott in the first round of the Section V Class C1 playoffs Wednesday. The Knights traied by one at halftime, but went on an 18-0 third quarter run that propelled them to victory. Bionca Conklin had eight of her team-high 22 point in the third and Megan Bulkley added four points in the frame. ‘Bionca had a great night for us,’ Addison head coach Corey Driskell said. Tayah Jackson contributed nine points, 10 steals and five assists and Conklin also contributed 10 rebounds. Addison advances to the quarterfinals against thirdseeded East Rochester at 2 p.m. Saturday. Lyons 100, Campbell-Savona 55 LYONS - Fifth-seeded Lyons got offensive in its 100-55 win over No. 12 Campbell-Savona in the opening round of the Section V Class C2 playoffs. ‘They pressed the entire game, I thought we played well early. 55 is a good output for us,’ Campbell-

HEATING Continued from 1A resource that helps so many New Yorkers across our state make ends meet.” Households are ordinarily only eligible to receive one regular HEAP benefit each winter, and then one emergency HEAP benefit in the event of an energy crisis. Beginning Feb. 19, households that have already received a regular and emergency benefit during this

Bradford tops Whitesville in sectional play

BRADFORD — No. 7 seed Bradford got past tenth seeded Whitesville 62-23 at home Tuesday in the opening round of the Section V Class D2 playoffs. “Our defense created the offense tonight!,” Bradford head coach Mark LaBarr said. “Good way to open sectionals!” The Braves jumped out to a 22-4 lead after eight minutes on the strength of three 3-pointers from Steven Spina and four points from Blaze Machuga, Joseph Miller and Kobi Wakeman. Bradford continued its onslaught in the second quarter, outscoring Whitesville 17-2 to take a 39-6 lead into halftime. The Braves cruised in the second half for the victory. Spina knocked down a total of six 3-pointers and led Bradford HEAP season will be able to apply for additional assistance if they are faced with the possibility of having a utility shut off or running out of heating fuel without the means to replenish it. New York State’s persistently cold temperatures and snowfall, has caused more than 35,000 households to seek assistance so far this year. The amount a household receives from HEAP depends on their income, household size and how the home is heated. A family

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Section V Class B2 BATH — Seventh-seeded Haverling earned a 54-16 home win over Rochester Prep Tuesday in the opening round of the Section V Class B2 tournament. The Rams led 27-9 at halftime and never looked back in the contest. “It was nice to have a home sectional game and all eleven players got playing time,” Rams head coach Randy Abrams said. Danielle Ward led the Rams with 12 points and nine rebounds while Abby Spiess posted 11 points. Haverling had nine different players contribute points. Deyshalis Brown led Rochester Prep with 10 points. “They (have) beaten us both times, but we’ve been competitive both times so we’ll back on the hardwood over the next couple of days on work on the little things that will be important come Friday,” said Abrams.

of four can have a household income of up to $55,178 per year, or $4,598 per month, and still qualify for help. A household that heats with oil could receive more than $2,200 in total assistance this winter. Overseen by the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance, HEAP is 100 percent federally funded. Applications for emergency HEAP are accepted at local departments of social services in person or by telephone.


LOCAL

STEUBEN COURIER

LANDFILL

Continued from 1A were food insecure at some time during the year, according to a 2013 USDA study. In addition to serving as a glaring reminder that the world could be doing more about global hunger, food waste is now being blamed as a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, as food breaks down and produces methane in the world’s landfills. The USDA study found that, “Food waste, which is the single largest component going into municipal landfills, quickly generates methane, helping to make landfills the third largest source of methane in the United States.” Many facilities in America are looking at ways to harness the methane for energy consumption. The Steuben County landfill is one of them. According to the county’s website, it began operating  the active landfill gas control and collection  system in November of  2010. The facility, owned by Steuben Rural Electric Cooperative, uses gas from the County  landfill to run engines that produce electricity to be sold on the grid. “The methane in landfill gas is considered to be a 21-times more potent greenhouse gas than Carbon Dioxide. So, by collecting the gas and destroying it via the flare, greenhouse gases are eliminated and unpleasant odors are greatly reduced around the landfill,” it further explained.

Landfill methane may be used to power industrial processes, arts and crafts, as pipeline gas and vehicle fuel. However, the packaging food comes in is also under fire from those advocating for less waste. Steps are also being taken to assure that food never becomes waste, and packaging ends up reused or recycled. At the federal level, the USDA and EPA launched the U.S. Food Waste Challenge, an initiative to help consumers safely store food and understand food date labels, new guidance to manufacturers and importers on donating misbranded or sub-spec foods, and research on innovative technologies to make reducing food loss and waste cost effective. In 2017, New York State passed a “Farm to Food Bank” law, that would provide a refundable tax credit to farmers of 25 percent of the wholesale value of food donated to food banks, a benefit of up to $5,000 annually. According to the New York State Farm Bureau, the law resulted in the donation of 10.6 million pounds of food donations to the state’s regional food banks in 2018, and 9 million pounds in 2017. During the announcement of the 2018 total in  December, Food Bank Association  Chair Kathleen Stress said, “As chair of the  Association I get to see the broad reach that our agricultural partners have and the wonderful  bounty that helps to provide wholesome food for families  in need across our great state. Food banks rely heavily on fresh produce  to maintain nu-

tritional meal standards. The nine member food banks of the  Association are blessed  to have such dedicated partners who help with food while also giving of their time and talent.” Now, the state is enlisting municipalities in the  fight to reduce food waste. The DEC has made $1.2 million in grants available to municipalities initiating or expanding programs to reduce wasted food, donate wholesome food and recycle food scraps. In terms of recycling, many municipalities have enlisted in “no sort” recycling services, making it easier for those creating waste to do the right thing. More recycling in-turn, means less garbage weight and costs for municipalities at local landfills. Hornell claims to be the first community in Steuben County to engage in separation and collection of recyclable materials, and has since adopted a  “no-sort” program. At local county landfills and transfer stations, most recyclable materials are accepted at no charge, including paper goods like newspaper, magazines, glossies, catalogues, telephone books, junk mail, white and colored paper and envelopes; #1 and #2 labeled plastic containers; glass items, including clear, green and amber glass jars and bottles; Cardboard items like, corrugated Cardboard, cereal boxes, tissues boxes and clean pizza boxes; all metal human and pet food cans; scrap metal; waste oil and filters; fluorescent light bulbs and propane tanks are also accepted at no charge.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

11A

SNAP

Continued from 1A

to stretch February’s benefits for more than six weeks because of the recent unprecedented shutdown of the federal government. “We will not allow the abject failure of leadership in Washington to jeopardize the ability of families to put food on the table,” Governor Cuomo said. “This early release of food benefits will provide a measure of relief to New Yorkers who rely on this critical program to make ends meet.” About 2.7 million individuals and 1.5 million households rely on SNAP benefits to make ends meet. The federal government directed states to issue SNAP benefits on Jan. 17 due to the government shutdown. Approximately 1.4 million households received their February benefits three weeks earlier than normal, to ensure sufficient funding was available. In addition to issuing SNAP benefits early, the Governor has extended the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Food Drive, which was set to conclude this week. Recognizing the increased strain on food banks and pantries, the Governor extended the food drive through the end of March to help state agencies collect additional food during a critical time for local banks and pantries. The food drive, cosponsored by the Food Bank Association of New York State, calls on  State agencies to collect  food items or monetary donations for their local community food banks, food pantries, and other service-oriented programs.  Over the past 18 years, state agencies have collaborated with community-based organizations to collect more than 587,000 pounds of food amounting to approximately 490,000 meals for those  in need. The food is donated to the nine food banks that make up the Food Bank Association of New York State. To donate or volunteer, visit the Food Bank Association’s website at www.feedingnys.org/donate.


12A SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

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14A SUNDAY,

CLASSIFIEDS

FEBRUARY 24, 2019

STEUBEN COURIER

Legals-Bath

Legals-Bath

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State (“SSNY”) for 7 Star Trucking LLC on May 7, 2018. The company has been formed to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under the LLCL. The county in which the office of 7 Star Trucking LLC is to be located is Steuben. The street address of the principal business location is 349 May Street, Bath, New York 14810. The SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and the post office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him or her is 349 May Street, Bath, New York 14810.6tz 2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24

Notice is hereby given that an order entered by the Supreme Court,Steuben County, on the 16th day of January 2019, bearing Index Number 20181565CV, a copy of which may be examined at the office of the clerk, located at 3 pulteney Square East, Bath New York grants me the right to assume the name Laine Evelyn Valenti. The city and state of my present address are Corning NY; the month and the year of my birth are November,1999 the place of my birth is Ogdensburg, New York; my present name is Emma Elizabeth Gilbert.

“ The Marina at City Harbor, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on February 2, 2018. Office location is Chemung County. Principal place of business is 330 East 14th Street, Elmira Heights, NY 14903. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 330 East 14th Street, Elmira Heights, NY 14903. Purpose: any lawful business.”6tz2/10,2/17,2/24,3/ 3,3/10,3/17

Legals-Bath

"Maryalice Kaprielyan Little, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 27, 2018. Office location is Steuben County. Principal business location is 9949 Woodcock Road, Painted Post, NY 14870. SSNY is designated as the LLC's agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 9949 Woodcock Road, Painted Post, NY 14870. Purpose: any lawful b u s i n e s s . " 6 t z 2/3,2/10,2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10

“Chemung Capital Realty LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on January 18, 2019. Office location is Chemung County. Principal place of business is 365 Upper Oakwood Avenue, Elmira Heights, NY 14903. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 365 Upper Oakwood Avenue, Elmira Heights, NY 14903. Purpose: any lawful business.”6tz 2/3,2/10,2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10

EVANS MILLS HOTEL VENTURES LLC Articles of Organization filed with NYS SOS on January 25, 2019. Office of the company located in Steuben County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process so served is Evans Mills Hotel Ventures LLC, 11751 East Corning Road, Corning, New York 14830. Purpose: any lawful b u s i n e s s . 6 t z 2/10,2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17

WATERTOWN HOTEL VENTURES LLC Articles of Organization filed with NYS SOS on January 25, 2019. Office of the company located in Steuben County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process so served is Watertown Hotel Ventures LLC, 11751 East Corning Road, Corning, New York 14830. Purpose: any lawful business.6tz2/10,2/17,2/24,3/3 ,3/10,3/17

CPR Practice, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on February 13, 2019. Office location is Steuben County. Principal place of business is 85 Denison Parkway East, PMB 209, Corning, NY 14830. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 85 Denison Parkway East, PMB 209, Corning, NY 14830.. Purpose: any lawful b u s i n e s s . 6 t z 2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24,3/31 HEBE AESTHETICS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/4/19. Office in Steuben Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 193 Chemung St., Apt 201, Corning, NY 14830, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.6tz 1/20,1/27,2/3,2/10,2/17,2/24

“ 708 Stewart of Ithaca, LLC:

Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on January 22, 2019. Office location is Chemung County. Principal place of business is 63 Lesky Road, Horseheads, NY 14845. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 63 Lesky Road, Horseheads, NY 14845. Purpose: any lawful business.”6tz,2/3,2/10,2/17, 2/24,3/3,3/10

Market Street Services: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 28, 2018. Office location is Steuben County. Principal business location is 80 East Market Street, Corning, NY 14830. SSNY is designated as the LLC's agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 80 East Market Street, Corning, NY 14830. Purpose: any lawful business."6tz 1/20,1/27,2/3,2/10,2/17,2/24

"SEPAC Machining, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 28, 2018. Office location is Chemung County. Principal business location is 1580 Lake Street, Elmira, NY 14903. SSNY is designated as the LLC's agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 1580 Lake Street, Elmira, NY 14903, NY 14903. Purpose: any lawful business."6tz1/20,1/27,2/3,2/1 0/2/17,2/24

North Aurora of Ithaca, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on May 14, 2018. Office location is Chemung County. Principal place of business is 63 Lesky Road, Horseheads, NY 14845. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 63 Lesky Road, Horseheads, NY 14845. Purpose: any lawful b u s i n e s s . 6 t z 2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24

Inclusion Solutions, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on February 11, 2019. Office location is Chemung County. Principal business location is 5 Cleveland Hill Road, Corning, NY 14830. SSNY is designated as the LLC's agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 5 Cleveland Hill Road, Corning, NY 14830. Purpose: any lawful b u s i n e s s . " 6 t z 2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24

“Trackside at the Glen, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 7, 2018. Office location is Chemung County. Principal place of business is 17 Level Acres Drive, Horseheads, NY 14845. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 17 Level Acres Drive, Horseheads, NY 14845. Purpose: any lawful business.6tz 2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24,3/31

Smith Retail Group LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on February 19, 2019. Office location is Steuben County. Principal place of business is 6887 Old State Road, Addison, NY 14801. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 6887 Old State Road, Addison, NY 14801. Purpose: any lawful b u s i n e s s . 6 t z 2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24,3/31


CLASSIFIEDS

STEUBEN COURIER

Legals-Bath

Legals-Bath

Legals-Bath

Winning Acres, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on February 12, 2019. Office location is Steuben County. Principal place of business is 11217 River Road, Corning, NY 14830. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 11217 River Road, Corning, NY 14830. Purpose: any lawful business. 6tz 2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Articles of Organization were filed and approved by the New York Department of State on January 8, 2019, pursuant to the provisions of the New York State Limited Liability Company Law. The name of the limited liability company is: Corning Hotel Company, LLC, with its place of business at 66 West Pultney Street, Corning, New York 14830. 6tz 1/20,1/27,2/3,2/10,2/17,2/24

TANGLEWOOD POINT LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/29/2019. Office in Steuben Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 2608 Raven Dr., Sullivan Island, SC 29482. Purpose: Any lawful p u r p o s e . 6 t z 2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24,3/31

Arena Laundromat, LLC: Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on February 4, 2019. Office location is Chemung County. Principal place of business is 209 College Avenue, Elmira, NY 14901. SSNY is designated as the LLCʼs agent for service of process, a copy of which process shall be mailed to 209 College Avenue, Elmira, NY 14901. Purpose: any lawful business.”6tz 2/10,2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17

Notice of formation of : Ahern Consulting LLC Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 1/31/19 office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose.6tz 2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24

Kevin's Pretty Good Company: Located in Steuben county The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is 2880 Chequers Circle Big Flats, NY 14814:6tz 2/3,2/10,2/17.2/24,3/3,3/10

Notice of formation of ROC GAMES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect'y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/1/2019. Office location, County of Steuben. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11413 S. Lackawanna St., Wayland, NY 14572. Purpose: any lawful act. 6tz2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24,3/31

Notice of Formation of GOOF, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Secʼy of State (SSNY) on 12/13/18. Office location: Chemung County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 181 McCann Rd., Horseheads, NY 14845. Purpose: any lawful a c t i v i t i e s . 6 t z 1/20,1/27,2/3,2/10,2/17,2/24

WILLOW'S COLLISION, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/31/2019.Office in Cortland Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY sha ll m ail p r o ce ss t o 4 5 Church St., Cortland, NY 13045. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Principal business location: 181 Port Watson St., Cortland, NY 13045.6tz 2/10,2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10/3/17

Notice of Formation (LLC). Name: 2413 SECOND AVE REALTY LLC. Articles of Organization filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/10/2018. Office location: STEUBEN COUNTY. NY DOS shall mail copy of process to: 2413 SECOND AVE REALTY LLC, 2413 2ND AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY, 10035. Purpose: Any lawful a c t i v i t y 6 t z 2/17,2/24,3/03,3/10,3/17,3/24

EB Chapman Enterprises, LLC County: Chemung Secretary of State is designated as agent of the company for service of process.Address for process: 346 East Franklin S t r e e t Horseheads, NY 14845.. Articles of organization filed on January 29, 2019. Business: Any lawful business p u r p o s e . 6 t z 2/10,2/17,2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17 Addison Diesel & Auto Services LLC, Art. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/30/18. Off. loc.: Steuben Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served & shall mail proc.: 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purp.: any l a w f u l p u r p . 6 t z 1/20,1/27,2/3,2/10,2/17,2/24

Opportunities at your

fingertips Find your next career

IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

VALLEY HEADS MORAINE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/9/2018. Office in Steuben Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 189 Chemung Street, Corning, NY 14830. Purpose: Any lawf u l p u r p o s e . 6 t z 2/24,3/3,3/10,3/17,3/24,3/31

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Carrier Routes

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

Help Wanted HELP WANTED The Leader is now hiring a Nightside Operations staff member. Qualified candidates will possess quick problem solving techniques, some computer skills and the ability to work independently. This is a part-time overnight position. Job duties include, but are not limited to distribution to contractors, cleaning and maintenance of the building, newspaper delivery and nighttime contact. Must be 18 or over with a valid driverʼs license, dependable vehicle and vehicle insurance. Apply in person at The Leader 34 W Pulteney St Corning NY 14830.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Get FAA approved hands on aviation training. Financial aid for qualified students- Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-296-7094

AVIATION TRAINING - work with JetBlue, Boeing, Delta and othersstart here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-655-4358.

Notices LEADER DELIVERY ROUTES The Leader is looking to contract carriers in the following areas:

BATH/CAMERON * Motor Route Available * * Signing Bonus* -restrictions applied

Must be at least 18 with a valid driverʼs license, and a reliable, insured vehicle.

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Please fill out a pre-contract questionnaire at The Leader, 34 W Pulteney Corning NY

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Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094

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Horses & Livestock PUREBRED ANGUS Cattle for sale. Octoraro and Sinclair breeding. 315-879-7343.

For Rent ROOM FOR RENT: 1 bd., $350/month. Cameron, NY. Furnished room Lights & Heat Included Servicemen welcome. Parking available. 607-695-9026

Visit The Steuben Courier Advocate online! Go to: steubencourier.com and like us on Facebook!

15A


16A

LOCAL

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019

Police: Woman allegedly sold cocaine

BATH — A Bath woman faces felony drug charges following her arrest last Friday. On Feb. 15, Bath Village Police arrested Dahna M. Turner, 34, of Bath on sealed indictment warrants with two counts of third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance and two counts of third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance. It’s alleged that Turner sold cocaine, a narcotic drug, in the Village of Bath in 2018. Turner was on felony probation at the time. She was arraigned in Steuben County Court by Judge McAllister and remanded to Steuben County Jail without bail.

O’Mara seeks noms

Niagara Falls freeze

Chamber sets Awards Dinner

The Central Steuben Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual Awards Dinner Saturday, March 9 from 5-8 p.m. at the Bath American Legion, 14 W. William St., Bath. Tickets are $35 each, call 607776-7122 to purchase tickets, RSVP by March 1. 2018 Award Winners: Business of the Year: BondDavis Funeral Home, Karen Swartz; Business Person of the Year: Randy Weaver, Village Pharmacy; Agriculture Business of the Year: Parulski Farms; Appreciation Award: The Agriculture Society Board Members; Community Spirit: Sylvia Collmer; Veteran of the Year: James Emo; The Bath Volunteer Fire Department Award: Jason Causer; The Kanona Volunteer Fire Department Award: Bev Grose; Scholarship in Memory of Curt Hopkins. For updates to go www.centralsteuben chamber.com or www.facebook.com/Central SteubenChamberofCommerce/.

STEUBEN COURIER

Submitted

SUBMITTED

A reader submitted these photos of Niagara Falls frozen over in 1911. People can be seen walking on the falls marveling at the frozen landscape. An excerpt from the reader’s relative that kept the photos states, “Margaret writes: Her mother had a cousin living in Niagara Falls that year. She told the family that she and her neighbors woke up in the night feeling something was wrong. It took a while, but they finally realized that it was the lack of noise. They had all be become so used to the roar of the falls the the silence was unusual enough to alert their senses. Of course at that time nearly all the houses were near the falls.”

• The Spectator

Rochester man faces drug charges

BATH — A Rochester man remains in Steuben County Jail on felony drug charges following his arrest in the Village of Bath. On Feb. 13, Bath Village Police arrested Malik C. Lott, 24, of Rochester and charged him with one count each of third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance, a class-B felony, seventh degree criminal possession of a controlled substance and tampering with physical evidence, a class-E felony. Lott was arraigned in Bath Village Court by Judge Anderson, and remanded to Steuben County Jail on $25,000 cash bail or $50,000 property bond. • The Spectator

Cameron house fire quickly doused

CAMERON MILLS — A fire damaged a home last Sunday on county Route 119 in the Town of Cameron Mills. At approximately 10:45 a.m., the fire was called in by passers-by on their way to church, who noticed smoke pouring from an upstairs window next to the chimney. 911 was called from Cameron Mills Market, as there was limited cell phone service in the area of the home. Neighbors had also called 911, and firefighters were already on their way to the scene. The fire was quickly extinguished, and there were no injuries resulting from the blaze. Initial speculation at the scene was that the fire began in the chimney, however the Cameron Fire Department did not release further information, and would not until the fire inspector had given his report. • The Spectator

Youth Bureau to honor two Submitted

BATH — Two people who have spent decades putting the youth in their communities first will be honored March 4 at the annual Steuben County Youth Bureau Awards Dinner. The honorees for the 2019 event are Mark Recktenwald and Amy Shick. A guidance counselor for nearly 30 years at Haverling High School in Bath, Recktenwald will receive the bureau’s Champion for Youth award, given to individuals who have made a difference in the lives of Steuben youth. A graduate of SUNY Buffalo and Alfred University, Recktenwald has touched the lives of more than 6,500 teenagers and their families through  counseling and guiding, and coaching football. He serves on the boards of Steuben Prevention Coalition and Prevention of Substance Abuse through Bath Hope for Youth/Catholic Charities and is a past member of the Loyola Substance Abuse Services board. Recktenwald also runs the Village of

Bath Police Department’s anger management classes for youth through the county Department of Social Services and the Center for Dispute Settlement. He is active in the Jack Lisi program, which recognizes youth who have surmounted difficulties. Shick will receive the Youth Service Worker of the Year in recognition of her 15 years of dedication to students and their families at Prattsburgh Central School as the Student Council advisor. Shick added on the role of family worker during the past four years. As the head of Student Council, Shick prepares all student-lead activities and now organizes the school’s PreK program through home visits, parent education, paper work, and lending a hand in the classroom. She also serves the community of Prattsburgh through involving student volunteers in local charitable functions such as food banks, stuffing stockings for seniors at nursing home facilities throughout the county and the Prattsburgh Christmas Cheer program.

Local funeral director unleashes tales in book By Jasmine Willis

Genesee Country Express

COHOCTON — A local funeral director has just published his latest tales of the dearly departed. Stanley Swan, of Cohocton, had published his memoirs “Undertakings of an Undertaker: True stories of being laid to rest” in 2015.

As a big fan of Alfred Hitchcock and Rod Serling, Swan’s first fictional book, “Tales Unleashed” covers 28 tales of the unusual. “Tales Unleashed is a little bit of everything from time travel to disappearances,” he said. “They are all stories of the unusual. I think people will find them interesting. I didn’t think I would ever have a short stories book,

but I always enjoyed reading these kinds of stories.” Swan has a blog he keeps up with as he tells about the behind the scenes of an undertaker. Many people from all over the world visit his blog and enjoy the tales. “I started working on this book over two years ago, and I kept coming up with ideas for short stories,” he  said. “When I

got to 28 stories I knew I had enough for a book.” Swan said that working on the fictional book gave him a lot more freedom. When he did his memoirs he had to be careful since they were all true stories. Tales Unleashed can be found on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. Feel free to visit his blog myundertakings.blogspot. com for more information.

ELMIRA – With the approaching celebration of Women’s History Month in March, State Senator Tom O’Mara (R,C,I-Big Flats) announced that he is accepting nominations until Monday, March 18 for the Senate’s 22nd annual “Women of Distinction” program to honor local women making outstanding contributions to area communities. The Senate’s “Women of Distinction” program coincides with a variety of Women’s History Month events across New York. O’Mara and his Senate colleagues annually select one new “Woman of Distinction” from their respective legislative districts.  This year’s honorees will be recognized at a statewide awards ceremony and reception in Albany on Tuesday, May 7. “The ‘Woman of Distinction’ tribute is a meaningful recognition.   I look forward to this annual opportunity to honor an outstanding area citizen,” said O’Mara, whose 58th Senate District encompasses all of Chemung, Schuyler, Steuben and Yates counties, and part of Tompkins County (the city and town of Ithaca, and the towns of Enfield, Newfield and Ulysses).   “We all know someone who makes an enormous difference to the community at large.  Whether she is a service provider, a teacher going above and beyond the call of duty, a businesswoman, or simply a community resident known for her good deeds, I’d like to see her recognized.” The deadline for submitting nominations is Monday, March 18.   Nominations can be submitted online through O’Mara’s Senate website,  www.omara.ny senate.gov  (click on the “Women of Distinction” banner near the top of the home page).   Email requests for a nomination form can be sent to  omara@nysenate. com, or call any of the senator’s offices in Elmira (607-735-9671), Bath (607-776-3201), and Albany (518-455-2091).

ON CAMPUS

• Hartford, Conn. – Lauren T. McRae, of Corning, was awarded Faculty Honors for the fall 2018 semester at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

• The State University of New York at Geneseo has announced its Dean’s List for the Fall 2018 semester: Hannah Fuller of Savona; Taylor Baltz of Cohocton; Angela Binkowski, Leslie Carr, and Grace Marvin, all of Bath.

• BATAVIA – Students honored on Genesee Community College Provost’s List include: Eaommon Clancy and Nivendu Sarode, both of Bath.


Salute to FFA & 4-H

s e r a p e r 4-H p

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER METRO CREATIVE

H T U O Y S ’ TODAY W O R R O M for TO

METRO CREATIVE

About the Future Farmers of America

Founded in 1928, the Future Farmers of America brought together students, teachers and agribusiness to solidify support for agricultural education. In Kansas City’s Baltimore Hotel, 33 young farmboys charted a course for the future. They could not have foreseen how the organization would grow and thrive. Since 1928, millions of agriculture students – no one knows exactly how many – have donned the official FFA jacket and championed the FFA creed. FFA has opened its doors and its arms to minorities and women, ensuring that all students could reap the benefits of agricultural education. Today, the National FFA Organization remains committed to the individual student, providing a path to achievement in premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. Now, the organization is expanding the nation’s view of “traditional” agriculture and finding new ways to infuse agriculture into the classroom.

Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County Many college admission and scholarship committees look at more than just academics. Individuals who possess leadership skills, community involvement, and show initiative typically have greater success in securing various scholarships than those who do not. 4-H certainly promotes growth in each of the areas by providing hands on experiential learning that are youth driven and help improve the communities in which the members are from. Additionally, work experience and responsibility are highly sought after by hiring managers. 4-H members, sometimes without realizing it, already have these qualities as well. A sense of responsibility and dedication from caring for project animals, marketing skills from creating

1B

IN BRIEF Steuben County 4-H thanks YOU!

fliers for a club fundraiser, communication skills from holding an office in their local club, or the ability to plan and organize from participating in county and state events; 4-Hers possess many skills that ready them for the workplace. The 4-H Program is known for producing well-rounded individuals. From public speaking, to animal science, to robotics, the projects are nearly endless. None of this would be possible without the support from local

experts and volunteers. Steuben is fortunate to have passionate, committed volunteers to serve Steuben’s youth year after year. Integrating tradition with new ideas and technologies will allow the program to continue to grow and continue to serve our youth in today’s ever-changing world. To enroll youth or to enroll as an adult volunteer, please visit our website or call us! www.putknowledgetowork.org or 607-664-2300.

4-H Youth explore careers Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County NYS Youth Dairy Discovery is an opportunity for dairy interested youth, 14-19 years old, of various knowledge levels to come together and learn about many aspects of the dairy industry. Dairy Discovery is held at Cornell University in Ithaca and is sponsored by the New York State 4-H Dairy Cattle Program. Dairy Discovery is developed and coordinated by PRO-DAIRY, Cornell Animal Science Department and the Dairy Management Group. Dairy Discovery is bringing the future of the industry together in one location to share knowledge and experiences to better prepare and gain a broader perspective of the dairy field. see CAREERS | 3B

If you are interested in more information or attending any of these events, please contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Steuben County at 607-664-2300.

This year’s Steuben County 4-H Delegate Victoria Kelly states “I vastly enjoyed my experience in Albany with 4-H Capital Days. We toured the Capitol building and were able to go out on the Senate and Assembly floors. It was very interesting to learn about not only the governmental function, but also the building’s history and architecture. My favorite part was our visit to the Court of Appeals.”

Every spring and fall Tractor Supply Company helps 4-H with the 4-H Paper Clovers Campaign. This is a nationwide fundraising effort to help raise money for the local 4-H Programs in each county. The money raised locally is to be used for specific initiatives which involve leadership development, career development & exploration, healthy living, and civic engagement. Steuben County is fortunate to have three stores located within the county; but also to have outstanding support from the community! 2018 was a great year! Steuben County 4-H saw the largest contribution during the 4-H Paper Clovers campaign to date! It is so important, as costs rise and competition for other funding sources increase, that we receive these donations! Thank you for your $1 (or more) contribution! It really does add up and make a difference! We anticipate the amount raised this year will impact approximately 50 Steuben County youth who will attend various opportunities across the state and nation! Dates for the 2019 campaigns are March 27-April 7 and Oct. 9-20.

Apply for a 4-H Camp scholarship

4-H serves youth in rural, urban, and suburban communities in every state across the nation. 4-Hers are tackling the nation’s top issues, from global food security, climate change and sustainable energy to childhood obesity and food safety. 4-H out-of-school programming, in-school enrichment programs, clubs and camps also offer a wide variety of STEM opportunities – from agricultural and animal sciences to rocketry, robotics, environmental protection and computer science – to improve the nation’s ability to compete in key scientific fields and take on the leading challenges of the 21st century. 4-H camp provides a unique hands-on 4-H experience that has proven to grow life skills like confidence, independence, resilience and compassion through stages and developed through experiences, not instruction. The result? Kids who are empowered with the skills to lead for a lifetime. The Steuben County 4-H Program sponsors 4-H camp scholarships for Steuben County Youth! For more information visit our website: www.putknowl edgetowork.org or call 607-664-2576. • Courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County


2B

Salute to FFA & 4-H

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

Sponsors sought

Ashlee Zschoche, who represented Steuben County, reflects “I really enjoyed getting to meeting and hang out with new friends from New Jersey, Maine and Wisconsin and getting to learn how 4-H runs in their counties. This trip was cool especially when I got to meet Congressman Tom Reed and other NY officials.”

Washington trip Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County Steuben County is the only county in the state of New York that selects youth to attend the Citizenship-Washington Focus Trip (CWF) in July. CWF is a week-long 4-H citizenship program for youth ages 14-19 that takes place at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center just miles from Washington, D.C. CWF provides 4-H youth with opportunities to explore, develop, and refine their community and civic engagement skills to be outstanding leaders in their communities. Through hands on educational workshops, and sightseeing tours in the “living classroom” of Washington, D.C., youth learn about the history of our nation, the leaders who have shaped it, and how they can apply the leadership and citizenship skills they learn during CWF when they return home. Every summer, thousands of young people participate in the program, which provides opportunities for them to: strengthen their communication, leadership, and citizenship skills on a national level; understand the importance of civic and social responsibilities as they relate to the development of better citizens and see TRIP | 4B

Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County

4-H grows confidence and career readiness Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County When 4-H alumni are asked what helped them the most in preparing for their adult years, the majority overwhelmingly respond: public presentations! Fear of public speaking is one of the most common social fears in both adolescents and adults. Effective communication is a critical life skill, especially with regard to leadership and community action. The 4-H Public Presentations program give youth an opportunity to research a subject of their choice, organize their ideas in a logical order, and learn to speak effectively in

front of people. The experience improves poise and self-confidence. The Public Presentation Program is one of 4-H’s most beneficial and rewarding experiences and is the one most often credited by 4-H alumni as having given them an edge above peers in both high school, college and professional careers. In Steuben County every member is encouraged to do a presentation from the Cloverbud level (age 5-7) to regular members (age 8-18). Topics are chosen by the 4-H member and can be presented at the Club, County, District and State level and are limited only by the youth’s imagination! For more information, contact the 4-H Office 607664-2300.

NYS ABC Trip set for Oct. Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County The 42nd Annual NYS 4-H Agribusiness Career Conference is held in October at SUNY Cobleskill and local agri-businesses. The ABC Trip will be held on October 17-18. The conference is co-sponsored by NYS 4-H, the NYS Farm Bureau, and the State University at Cobleskill. This career exploration conference is open to all youth ages 14 and over who wish to become more aware of opportunities with agriculture and also academic requirements for professional positions available in the various agribusiness. It featured mini-tours to farms and operations in the Cobleskill area as well as seminars, guest speakers and guided tours of the SUNY Cobleskill agriculture facilities. The Steuben County 4-H members had fun participating in a low ropes course at SUNY Cobleskill. In 2018 ABC participants attended one of the campus study sessions: Agricultural Business and Food Systems; Environmental and Energy Technologies; Fisheries & Wildlife Technology; Agricultural Engineering Technology; Dairy Production; Livestock Studies; Equine Studies & Thoroughbred Management; Floriculture, Nursery Management and Landscape Development and Soils/Crops/Turf/Recreation & Sports Area Management; Canine Behavior. Participants also registered for 1 of 5 tracts. Tract 1 – Carrot Farm/ Farm Store and Speaking with a Vet-

erinarian; Tract 2 – An equestrian farm and a farm that produces beef, pork, poultry, eggs and pure maple syrup; Tract 3 – SUNY Cobleskill Milk Quality Lab and Farm Equipment Dealership; Tract 4 – dairy goat farm/retail shop and a weaving operation; and Tract 5 – Hessian Hill Farm - sheep, hogs, cattle, chickens, horses, hay, floral, vegetable, and Christmas Tree farm. Wellingtons Herbs and Spices – a certified organic farm specializing in the production, drying and blending of a large variety of herbs and spices along with growing various vegetables that they sell at their on-farm retail store. Victoria Kelly, one of the 4-H members who attended in 2018, reflects “I greatly enjoyed the experience as a whole. It was very concentrated to fit so many different activities into only two days, but still quite manageable. The campus tour and two study sessions were helpful in connecting this experience to campus. I feel that this see ABC | 4B

In celebration of New York agriculture, volunteers throughout the state will read the book, On the Farm, At the Market, to second graders. Students and teachers will also benefit from hands-on lessons and receive follow up activities. The book will be donated to the school or classroom library with a bookplate recognizing the donor and NY Agricultural Literacy Week (March 18-22). The program takes about 30 minutes per classroom. All activity materials are prepared by NYAITC and schools get to keep a copy of the book for their school. If you are interested in either sponsoring a book that are $12 each and/or being a volunteer reader please contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Steuben County at 607-664-2300. On the Farm, At the Market highlights the story of agriculture with vivid illustrations and a community-centric storyline. Students will understand the importance of agriculture as an economic driver in communities across New York, and develop an awareness for where their food comes from and its journey. From the busy hub of New York City, to the mountains of the Adirondacks, and to the fertility of the Finger Lakes our state is expansive and encompasses all types of agricultural industries. Careers and post-secondary education opportunities are abundant in traditional and developing food-centric industries. Agriculture contributes over $37 billion to the New York State economy and ranks in the top ten in the nation for yogurt, apples, grapes, calves, and onions, among other products. These products and industries allow New York producers to explore all varying scales of marketing and selling: niche markets, direct to consumer selling, food processing, wholesale, and more.


Salute to FFA & 4-H

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

STARR Retreat scheduled Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County The State Teen Action Rep Retreat (STARR) is a three-day funfilled event where 4-H teens, ages 13-19 participate in a variety of workshops and activities meant to challenge, excite and further develop life skills. The event is planned by teens and adults serving on the youth/adult STARR Planning Committee. STARR is April 5-7, at the NYS Fairgrounds in Syracuse. The registration fee is $85 per person plus the $10 4-H enrollment fee (for any non 4-H member). Register with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Steuben

County by March 8. The keynote speaker is Aric Jackson, Preparing the Next Generation to Live Well & Lead Boldly. For over a decade, people have allowed themselves to be inspired and motivated by the words of Jackson. His mission is to teach, inspire, and encourage all those who hear him, and to take the challenge of helping others pursue their goals and dreams. Visit Jackson’s website at http:// www.aricspeaks.com/ for more information. Sample workshops from 2018 included: Computer Science: Simplified; Building Diverse Friendships; Life Net Helicopter Medevac; Smart Social Media Skills, Biofuels and Stove-making; Wild

Edibles and Medicinal History; College 101 Workshop: Freshman Year & Beyond; BioChar; Beginner American Sign Language; Archery; Swing dancing 101; Herbs for Skincare; Color Me Cream, Bag Your Frozen Dream; Tie Dye Socks; From tree to table: The Maple Syrup story; Tai Chi – Developing Inner – Strength Through Mindfulness; Gravity of the Planets; Team Cooking Challenge: MiniJr. Iron Chef; Environmental Conservation; Pre-college/vocational Program Prep for Sophomores & Juniors; Doodling – Line Patterns, Shape, Rhythm in the Zen Tangle style. The 2019 workshops will be available shortly.

NYS Junior Dairy Leaders Program Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County Two Steuben County 4-H members were accepted into the 20182019 NYS Junior Dairy Leaders Program. The NYS Junior Dairy Leaders (JDL) Program is a yearlong program that explores careers in the dairy industry along with hands-on experiential learning for a select group of youth between the ages of 16-19. The future of the dairy industry depends on young people who are well trained and are excited about the range of op-

portunities that exist in the industry. The program presents youth with a realistic view and experience for the dairy industry as a viable, profitable and progressive

business sector young people can look to for career opportunities while also building personal and professional skills. The mission is to give young people an opportunity to build enthusiasm for the dairy industry along with personal, professional, and leadership development in a networking environment while they discover the diversity of career choices in agriculture. Opportunities include: Representing New York at the National 4-H Dairy Conference; Interaction with Dairy Producers and see LEADERS | 5B

3B

Career Explorations at Cornell University Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County

NYS 4-H Career Explorations at Cornell University will occur June 25-27. The purpose of this program is to provide youth with exposure to academic fields and career exploration, to develop leadership skills, to provide hands-on experience in a college setting and to introduce you to Cornell University. The event is made up of two grade specific tracts: University U for youth entering grades 8-9 and Focus for Teens for youth entering grades 10-12. The 2018 University U Program included: Breaking Bonds and Changing Color; Breathing Life into Robots; Gist & the Brain; How We Control the Flow of Light; Nanoengineering; Oxyponics; Polymer Chemistry; Rockets; Run, Jump Lift. The 2018 Focus For Teens Program included: 4-H Geospatial Science; A Tour of Human Development Across the Lifespan; Cardiac Engineering; Dress Code; Engineering the Microbiome; Environmental Engineering; Exploring the Solar System & the Universe; Fossil Collecting; League of Coders; Learning to Program Robots with Baxter; Media Corps; Our World of Polymers and Nanoparticles; Rockets, Boats & Bridges; So you want to be a Food Scientist?; Vet for a Day; and Women in Science.

Steuben County 4-H Robotics Program

Any youth 8-18 years old as of Jan. 1, interested in learning how to build and program a robot to perform various tasks using a Lego Mindstorms EV3 is welcome to attend the Steuben County Robotics Program. 4-H members will also have the opportunity to participate in a robotics challenge on Saturday, April 27, at the Howard Community Building and the 2019 NYS 4-H Robotics Challenge at the NYS Fair. http://putknowledgetowork.org/4-hyouth/4-h-program-areas/robotics. Contact Kim Randall at ksb3@cornell.edu or at 607-664-2571 with any questions. Where: Howard Community Building, Hopkins Road, Exit 35 off I-86. When: Monday evenings from 6-7:30 p.m. • Courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County

CAREERS Continued from 1B This annual state-wide program provides N.Y. youth with fun, hands-on science-oriented learning experiences on dairy production and management topics which feature the unique facilities, industry professionals, and staff of Cornell University. Participants will spend two days on the Cornell campus learning about dairy careers and rotating through a series of hands-on stations which focus on a specific aspect of the dairy field each year. For 2019 youth will understand, observe and participate in technical skill training related to Dairy Herd Health and Management. Dairy herd health and management are

critical in determining the production potential of dairy enterprises. Management of the dairy herd includes: fresh cow monitoring and treatment, foot care, disease control and management, reproduction, genetics, nutrition and records. All of these areas combined with cow comfort and animal handling make for good animal health stewards. Having a good herd health program and managing risk effectively lead directly to a healthier herd, both physically and financially. If you are interested in participating, please contact Kim Randall at ksb3@cornell.edu or 607-664-2571. 2018 marked the 83rd year of the NYS 4-H Capital Days Program which includes two

intensive days in May of tours and lectures. 4-H teen delegates and their chaperones from across New York State learned about state and local government during the 2018 Capital Days Program. During the program 4-H members expanded their knowledge about the public policy process and state government. This year’s Steuben County 4-H Delegate Victoria Kelly states “I vastly enjoyed my experience in Albany with 4-H Capital Days. We toured the Capitol building and were able to go out on the Senate and Assembly floors. It was very interesting to learn about not only the governmental function, but also the building’s history and architecture. My favorite part was our visit

to the Court of Appeals.” Dr. Lenore VanderZee, Executive Director for University Relations at SUNY Caton, was Sunday evening’s speaker and Monday’s dinner hosted guest speaker Julie Suarez, Associate Dean of Government and Community Relations, Cornell University. Participants also toured the Assembly Chambers, met with leaders in state government, members of the court system and officials from a variety of state agencies. Vicky chose to visit the Department of Agriculture and Markets while other participants visited with the Department of Education; Department of Health; Department of Parks and Recreation; and the Department of

Environmental Conservation. Additionally, participants learned about speaking to their legislators and career opportunities in government as they toured state agencies, participated in discussion sessions, and visited with Legislators. Vicky concludes “I met with Assemblyman Palmesano to discuss issues that affect our community. The trip culminated in Senator Gallivan’s address during the closing ceremony. I was delighted to see such friendliness, common sense, and conservative passion in a government official! Lastly, I helped my department visit’s group present on the Department of Agriculture to all the other Capital Days participants.”


4B

Salute to FFA & 4-H

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

Dog obedience classes for youth set Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County

4-H Livestock Skillathon Team Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County Alyson Chapman, 6th year member of the Canisteo Valley 4-H Stars Club, was a member of the 2018 NYS 4-H Livestock Skillathon Team that placed 9th Overall out of 19 teams and 6th Place team in the Evaluation portion. The objectives of the Livestock Skillathon is to provide youth with the opportunity to blend knowledge and skills acquired in livestock judging, demonstrations, care and exhibition of animals into one activity; to provide youth who have no opportunities for livestock ownership with an opportunity to learn about the importance of livestock and their products to the environment and economy; to encourage youth to continue expanding their knowledge and participation; to recognize youth for their total involvement in and comprehension of the livestock industry; and to instill ethical values, good sportsmanship and product evaluation skills. Since Alyson is now ineligible to participate in the 4-H livestock skillathon contests she looks forward to sharing her knowledge with other 4-H members by helping them gain knowledge to prepare for future 4-H livestock skillathon contests. Through dairy judging and livestock skillathon 4-H members have gained valuable life skills such as communication, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, self esteem, goal setting, disease prevention and teamwork.

4-H Dog Obedience Classes for youth are currently being offered at two different locations on two different evenings. Youth can participate at either or both locations, Tuesdays from 5-6 p.m. at the Howard Community Building basement, Hopkins Road, Exit 35 off I-86, and Thursdays at 6 p.m., at Hillside Children’s Center, Snell Farm, 7320 Snell Hill Rd., Bath. Youth participants age 5-18 years old as of Jan. 1, must be enrolled in the Steuben County 4-H Program. Youth ages 5-7 years old must have an experienced adult on the lead at all times. Non-4-H members may take the course by enrolling as an independent 4-H member. You can enroll as a 4-H member by paying the $10 enrollment fee and completing the 4-H enrollment form, code of conduct form, acknowledgement of risk form and permission/medical release form which can be found at http://putknowledgetowork. org/4-h-youth/club-programs New 4-H members must be enrolled by May 1, to be eligible to enter your dog or other projects in the 4-H division of the 2019

Steuben County Fair. Participants should be prepared to clean up after their dog as necessary. Those 4-H members and dogs attending the NYS 4-H Dog Show must participate in the Steuben County Fair Dog Show. Please note the NYS 4-H Dog Show will be Aug. 17, at the NYS Fairgrounds in the Coliseum (prior to state fair opening). For 2019 the NYS Dog Show will continue to be a ONE Day show for all classes (Grooming and Handling, Obedience, Rally, Agility, Brace). Please note that the Steuben County Fair will still be occurring. DOGS CAN BE MIXED BREED OR PUREBRED BUT PLEASE NOTE THAT THE FOLLOWING BREEDS: American Bulldog; Cane Corso; Doberman Pinschers (miniature Doberman

Pinschers are ok); Husky: Akita, Malamute, Samoyed, Siberian; Mastiff/Bullmastiff; Pit Bulls: American Staffordshire Terrier, Bull Terriers, American Pit Bull Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers; Presa Canarios; Rottweiler; Wolf Hybrid; and Fila Brasileiroe INCLUDING ANY MIXES OF THESE BREEDS AND OTHER AGGRESSIVE DOGS ARE NOT ALLOWED. All dogs must conform to the rules and regulations of the Livestock Health requirements as determined by the Department of Agriculture and Markets. Dogs must have current vaccinations for rabies, distemper, hepatitis, parvovirus and leptospirosis (as appropriate for their age).

4-Hers excel in contests

see DOG | 5B

IN BRIEF How 4-H started

ABC

Continued from 2B trip is the one that closely connects 4-Hers to college and careers because of the time it dedicated to campus and meeting the professors. I know I will take some of what I learned there with me for years to come.”

Visit us online at www.steubencourier.com CONTENT COURTESY OF CORNELL COOPERATIVE EXTENSION STEUBEN COUNTY

Steuben County 4-H members excelled in National Dairy and Livestock Knowledge Contests at the North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE) in Louisville, Ky., in November. Bryce Warriner, 9th year member of the Dairy Dreamers 4-H Club, was a member of the 2018 NYS 4-H Dairy Judging Team that placed 2nd in Oral Reasons and 6th Place Overall. Individually Bryce placed 7th for Ayrshire placings and 5th for Holstein placings. Dairy Judging requires 4-H members to understand the concepts of dairy cattle conformation consisting of evaluating classes of 4 animals each. 4-H members answer questions related to various traits of the animals and give oral reasons about the class. Learning to judge dairy cattle helps develop confidence in one’s ability to make and defend good decisions. They learn careful observation, thoughtful evaluation, intelligent decision making and justification of their decision which equals organized thinking. Dairy Cattle judging is an excellent opportunity for youth to learn about dairy cattle and the dairy industry and to develop skills to face the future challenges of the dairy industry and life.

Upcoming 4-H dates to remember • Feb. 23 – Public Presentations • March 2 – Regional Horse Bowl & Hippology, Finger Lakes District Dairy Bowl • March 23 – Cloverbud Day • March 27-April 7 – Tractor Supply 4-H Paper Clovers • April 6 – Cornell Vet School Open House • April 13 – Spring Garden Meeting • April 27 – Robotics Challenge • May 1 – Enrollment Deadline for New members to exhibit at the 2019 Steuben County Fair. • May 3 – Clothing Revue • June 9 & July 14 – 4-H/Open Qualifying Horse Shows • Aug. 13-18 – 200th Steuben County Fair • Aug. 17, 1 p.m. – 4-H/FFA Market Animal Sale • Oct. 9-20 – Tractor Supply 4-H Paper Clovers • Courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County

4-H didn’t really start in one time or place. It began around the start of the 20th century in the work of several people in different parts of the United States who were concerned about young people. The seed of the 4-H idea of practical and “hands-on” learning came from the desire to make public school education more connected to country life. Rural youth programs became a way to introduce new agriculture technology to adults. A.B. Graham started one such youth program in Ohio in 1902. It is considered the birth of the 4-H program in the U.S. When Congress created the Cooperative Extension Service at USDA in 1914, it included boys’ and girls’ club work. This soon became known as 4-H clubs – Head, Heart, Hands, and Health. In 1948, a group of American young people went to Europe, and a group of Europeans came to the United States on the first International Farm Youth Exchange. Since then, thousands of young people have participated in 4-H out-of-state trips and international exchanges. 4-H began to extend into urban areas in the 1950s.

TRIP

Continued from 2B

leaders; exchange ideas, practice respect, and form friendships with other youth from diverse backgrounds; experience hands-on learning using the historical backdrop of Washington, D.C. In 2018, participants met with staff from Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s office, staff from Senator Charles Schumer’s office, Congressman Tom Reed, and speaker of the house, Paul Ryan. They had a Capitol Tour and were even able to arrange for a White House Tour.


KIDZ BUZZ Salute to FFA & 4-H D R AW I N G W I T H M A R K ! Get a pencil and use the grid below to draw the cow as shown. The grids will help you to line everything up. Keep practicing and having fun!

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

5B

Udderly cool PEXELS

Activity: Make magic milk!

By Erika Enigk More Content Now

H

ave you had a glass of milk today? How about some yogurt or cheese? Are your shoes made of leather? Today, we’re talking about cows and what people use them for. Animal immigrants

Watch Drawing with Mark! • Check your local listings at www.DrawingwithMark.com • Find the award-winning “Drawing with Mark” DVD episodes at Amazon.com.

WORD FIND Cows Social Herd Dairy Eating

Cud Milk Holstein Bulls Steer

Although the cow might now seem like the all-American animal, centuries ago, there were no cows here at all. Over time, different explorers brought cattle from their home countries, and eventually, they became common here. And it’s no wonder people wanted them around. We use cattle for milk, meat, and leather, and we can also train them to do chores like pull farm equipment. Bulls (male cattle) are sometimes used for entertainment such as bullfighting, but there are people trying to end that practice since it ends with the bulls dying.

Pour a thin layer of milk into a shallow pan (like a cake or brownie pan). Drop food coloring in different colors in a few places around the pan. Dip the cotton swab into the dish soap and touch one of the colored circles. The milk will start to move, and the colors will swirl together as the soap breaks up the fat in the milk.

Source: https://funlearningforkids.com/ magic-milk-science-experiment-kids/

Just like us Cows and humans have more in common than you might think, even from before they’re born. Baby cows (called calves) spend about nine months in their mother’s belly before being born. They have different moods, just like us, and use all five senses. They like to be with other cows and get lonely when they’re by themselves. They like a variety of food and eat different things at different times of day — although for cows it’s more like clover in the morning and grass in the evening instead of cereal and spaghetti. Digestion Speaking of food, cows have an interesting way to digest. They eat plants that are hard to

digest, so their stomachs have a system that lets them eat their favorite foods. Some people say that cows have four stomachs, but that’s not quite true. Cows have one stomach with four compartments. When they eat, they swallow without chewing and save the food in the first compartment until they’re ready to start digesting. Then, they bring the food back into their mouths and chew it. What comes out in the end is often used for crop fertilizer.

A N G E L S F R O M T H E AT T I C

By Mark Marderosian

Steuben at New York State Fair Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County 4-H Youth building exhibits are where all of the non-animal projects are displayed. Some project areas include: communications and expressive arts, food and nutrition, food preservation, fine arts, home environment, hobby crafts, child development, wearable art, textiles and clothing, photography, horticulture exhibits including vegetables and cut flowers. Also other STEM exhibits in woodworking, shop projects, electrical science, engineering, construction projects with manufactured components, computer science, geospatial science, renewable & sustainable energy and

You’ll need: • Milk • Liquid food coloring • Dish soap • Cotton swabs

climate change, environmental education. Steuben County 4-H had 111 exhibits from the county youth building that were selected for state fair in the areas of communications and expressive arts, food and nutrition, food preservation, fine arts, home environment, hobby crafts, child development, wearable art, textiles and clothing, photography, horticulture exhibits including vegeta-

bles and cut flowers, and STEM exhibits in woodworking, shop, and electrical projects. Special recognition is given when exhibits in the youth building at the New York State Fair go above and beyond “excellent” - the purple rosette! Seven 4-Hers in Steuben County were awarded this honor in 2018! A testament to the outstanding work our local youth are producing.

DOG Continued from 4B It is highly recommended to also have your dog vaccinated for Bordetella and parainfluenza virus. Participants should consult their veterinarian for further information about these vaccines as well as internal and external parasite control programs. Participating members need to provide a COPY of current vaccinations at the first class or they can be faxed to 607-776-9103. Acceptable proof of Rabies vaccination is a rabies certificate or a copy of the dog license that contains the rabies vaccination information and must include the signature of the veterinarian, the name

of the product used, the date of administration and the duration of immunity. Dogs must be at least six months old to be exhibited at the Steuben County Fair or the NYS Fair. This is a great opportunity to have fun with your dog and learn about being a responsible dog owner. The more well behaved your dog is, the more it is appreciated by family, friends and neighbors. If you are interested in more information about dog obedience visit http://putknowledgetowork.org/4-hyouth/4-h-program-areas/dog-obedience or contact Kim at Cornell Cooperative Extension at 607-664-2571 or email her at ksb3@cornell.edu.

LEADERS Continued from 3B Agribusiness Professionals; Resume Development; On-Farm Production Management Experiences; Leadership Development and Team Building; Dairy Farm and Production Facility Tours in the Northeast and Wisconsin; and Technical Skills Seminars in Herd Health, Calf Care, Dairy Nutrition, and Artificial Insemination The NYS JDL program is sponsored

by: PRO-DAIRY Program, Cornell University Department of Animal Science, Cargill Animal Nutrition, Dehm Associates, Genex/CRI, Northeast Agribusiness and Feed Alliance, Northeast Agricultural Education Foundation, Northeast Farm Credit Ag Enhancement Program, NY Corn and Soybean Growers Association, NYS 4-H Foundation, Professional Dairy Producers Foundation, Select Sire Power.


6B

Salute to FFA & 4-H

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2019 • STEUBEN COURIER

Extension to host Robotics Challenge for 4-H, school teams Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County The Steuben County Robotics Challenge to be held on Saturday, April 27, from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Howard Community Building, Exit 35 off I-86, is open to 4-H members and School Robotic Teams with youth ages 8-18 years old as of Jan. 1. The competition is intended to be fun, educational and motivating for youth interested in robotics, computer programming, Legos,

science, technology, engineering, etc. A team must include at least three members. Teams should bring their own pre-constructed EV3 or NXT robots and computers/equipment used for programming as well as any extension cords/power strips they may need. Teams need to sign up in advance – due to time constraints there will be a limit of to the first 12 teams registered. Registration is due April 12. For rules and regulations and registration information visit http:// putknowledgetowork.org/4-

h-youth/4-h-program-areas/ robotics For more information contact Kim Randall at ksb3@ cornell.edu or at 607-664-2571 with any questions. The Steuben County 4-H Robotics teams also meet Monday nights from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Friends of Howard Community Building and welcome teams to come and practice if they do not have a mat or if they would just like an in- person view of the challenge. Contact Marlaina Bennett at 607-6616383 if interested in attending a meeting.

Back to the Basics in STEM projects Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County Robotics, Coding, GPS/GIS are newer STEM projects that are being offered in 4-H. But there has also been a resurge in learning a traditional STEM project and that is learning how to sew. There was a time when most clubs did a sewing project each year but through the years these declined. Until recently, there was only one

club in the county that did a sewing project each year. Last year there was a new club that wanted to learn how to sew and there was a 4-H educator that could teach the class, so with borrowed and donated machines the mis-

sion was accomplished! The club finished by making a backpack just in time to model in the yearly Clothing Revue in May. More clubs have expressed interest in sewing so through a Tyrtle Beach grant and

proceeds from a county fair fundraiser, three machines were purchased. Those plus the donated machines now make sewing classes available to more members. Two classes are currently in progress. The county has an annual clothing evaluation and clothing revue event at Avoca School where each models their garment. Those over age 13, who get an excellent award, are selected for the State Fair clothing revue.

4-H focuses on healthy living in classes Content courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County As one of the missions of 4-H, Steuben County 4-H has been teaming up with the CCE nutrition programs (EFNEP & ESNY) to offer Cooking Matters for Families Classes to help families live healthier! This sixweek program partners a

4-Her age 8 and up and a parent together to learn about healthy eating, planning meals as a fam-

ily, and working together in the kitchen. Lessons cover meal preparation, grocery shopping, food

budgeting, and nutrition. Participants practice fundamental food preparation skills, reading ingredient labels, and making a healthy meal for the family. Each team takes home a bag of groceries after each class so they could practice the recipes taught that day. For more information on upcoming classes, call us at 607-664-2571!

4-H Shooting Sports Program focuses on positive youth development

4-H Shooting Sports is a comprehensive nonformal education, recreation, and competitive program focused on positive youth development. 4-H Shooting Sports programing utilizes the safe and responsible use of firearms to address youth social issues related to STEM, health living, and civic engagement. In doing so, the 4-H Shooting Sports program provides opportunities for youth to gain valuable skills, practice leadership, and build relationships with non-parent adults. These three critical factors are the building blocks that enable youth to achieve mastery, feel a sense of belonging, explore independence, and act generously. When youth are engaged as resources worthy and capable of development, rather than objects to be fixed, they become competent, confident, connected, caring, character driven, and contributing members of society. Steuben County is currently offering archery classes and plans to expand its program in 2019 to also offer air rifle and hunting & wildlife classes! To receive more information when it becomes available, please contact Jenny Groen at 607-664-2576. • Courtesy of Cornell Cooperative Extension Steuben County

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