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CommonVoice Fall/Winter 2011

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The Sterling College Community Newsletter

A look at what’s inside...

Campaign Update—4 CommonVoice

Stories We Like—8

For the latest news check CommonVoice online  voice.sterlingcollege.edu

Why Vermont Works—9

Loon Conservation—11

Reflection—12

Protect the Lowells—21


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The CommonVoice is published by Sterling College in Craftsbury Common, Vermont. Editors Will Wootton Tim Patterson Design & Layout: Ethan Darling Proofreaders Micki Martin Contributing Writers Will Wootton

Wrecking Apathy:

A Farewell Letter from Anna Schulz

Tim Patterson Tommy Gardner Alexis Zimba-Kirby Julie Olsen

Anna Schulz is a native of Johnson, Vermont and a 2009 graduate of Harvard University.

Jody Stoddard

Anna served for two years as an Americorps volunteer in Craftsbury, coordinating local

Margaret Ramsdell

food projects for Sterling College and Craftsbury Academy. She wrote the following letter to the Sterling Community upon leaving Craftsbury to move to Oregon in July.

W

hen I left Vermont six years ago to head off to college, I couldn’t have been more excited

to get the heck out. I wanted to eat sushi instead of green beans, go to art museums

instead of demolition derbies, and more than anything, get swallowed up by hundreds of thousands of people who didn’t know a single thing about me. Then, of course, after a few years of all that, I graduated and got this job in the local foods industry up here in Craftsbury. And I couldn’t have been happier about it. I think you all know that something really special is happening in Vermont right now. It has to

Contributing Photographers Tim Patterson Christopher Marshall Richard Patterson Alexis Zimba-Kirby Front Cover “Blueberry Harvest” by Richard Patterson Letters, comments, and submission of

do with a lot of things, from farming to food to community, but I don’t think anyone is quite

articles, poetry, fiction, and photographs

sure how to explain it. What’s important to me, though, is that rural Vermont is becoming an

are welcome and should be e-mailed to:

increasingly good place for young people to live. I don’t want to get the heck out of Vermont anymore. I want to come home to it. I’m excited to go exploring, but once I’m tired of sunshine and no humidity and a total lack of deer flies, I’ll be ready to come home. And you know what? Now, coming home to my great-grandparents’ old farmland in Johnson doesn’t seem like drudgery. It seems like a darn good possibility—a privilege, even. You can attribute what’s happening in Vermont to a lot of things, but frankly, if someone asked me, I’d say that Vermont is special because we have an extraordinary number of people who give a damn. The people I know here tend to care about their land, their food, and their neighbors, and that matters a lot. Of all the wonderful things Sterling teaches its students, I’m most impressed by this little school’s ability to totally wreck apathy. Keep doing that, please.  2

tpatterson@sterlingcollege.edu

Mission Statement The Sterling College community combines structured academic study with experiential challenges and plain hard work to build responsible problem solvers who become stewards of the environment as they pursue productive lives. CommonVoice


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Commencement 2011:

Honoring our 12th Baccalaureate Class

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terling’s 12th Baccalaureate class, their families, and the College community assembled for commencement exercises amid the gardens and westerly views of Houston House, with the wind buffeting the microphone in an imitation of thunder. Genuinely thunderous was Senator Bernie Sanders, who had recently gained national recognition for his eight-hour stand-up filibuster that went viral, especially across college campuses, and has now been published as a book. Bernie received an honorary Sterling degree, Doctor of Letters, for his years of public service to Vermonters and to the nation. The senator spoke of his previous visits to the heart and soul of Vermont, as he once referred to the Kingdom, and urged the students to take up the learning and traditions they had gained at Sterling, carry them further afield, and apply them to the important issues of social justice facing

May 2011 Graduates Nicholas Beauregard Natural History

Jonathan Belcher Sustainable Agriculture Zachary Buckley Natural History Maria Burger Conservation Ecology

their generation. 

Nicholas Cormier Natural History

From Laura Lea Berry’s Commencement Speech

Eric Ellison Environmental Chemistry

In my admissions essay for Sterling I wrote about being a collector of moments and in my time at Sterling I’ve gathered more than a few that I will carry with me. Kneeling in seaweed with my dear friend Kate, knees soaked, hair in our faces as we realized just how much life can live in a tiny little tide pool. Watching Zach Buckley hushing a class full of students and the instructor so we could listen to a yellow rumped warbler, and Nick Hermes, singing and dancing to Irish tunes. I don’t have any words of wisdom or insightful things for you to carry away from this day except to quote another good friend- ‘we become who we are not only because of what we do, but because of who we chose to be on the inside’. Having spent the last two years with you I have no doubt that you will share your love of this earth with those you meet and you will remind them to pause to notice the magenta buds of the hazelnut and the smell of the air after a spring rain. But if you’re feeling lost, slip off your shoes, or muckboots, or slide your already bare feet into the mud and remember where you came from and your connection to the earth. 

From Stephen Lester’s Commencement Speech

My favorite memory from Sterling is of long nights in the sugar house, impatiently waiting all night for the season’s first draw of syrup. Nights at the sugar house weren’t just about making syrup; they were about the experience of gathering in one place, talking about our days, bemoaning what homework was due, and really embracing the sense of community we have here. We all have our talents and knowledge to share with each other, but now it is time for us to move on from Sterling and share our knowledge with others. As we all leave Craftsbury over the course of the next day, may we reflect on all the support, knowledge, and love we received while here. Let us go out and leave this place, and this family we have grown to love. But may we soon find our next place to be, to embrace & to call family.  wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

Byron Garcia Conservation Ecology Monica Kopp Conservation Ecology Stephen Lester Sustainable Agriculture William Maurice Agricultural Business Systems Kate McGuire Natural History Nell McKay Sustainable Agriculture Jessica Palin Sustainable Agriculture Kayla Phinney Sustainable Agriculture Education Lee Sienkiewycz Sustainable Agriculture Sara Turnbull Sustainable Textile Production Vincent Wisniewski Jr. Natural History 3


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The Sustainable Sterling Campaign:

An Update at the Start of Year IV

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he final year of Sterling’s four-year, $2.3 million Sustainable Sterling

Campaign is upon us, and from some angles it looks disturbingly

similar to Year I, 2008-09, when the Campaign was launched into the

teeth of a then brand new economic “downturn” that quickly earned the title of Recession. We couldn’t delay the launch of the Campaign

back then, and there’s no stopping now on the home stretch. And why

would we want to, when all indications are positive and it appears the College is successfully turning a corner?

Sterling’s Campaign is a collection of fund-raising goals and institutional initiatives, but it has only one overarching objective: to create and

maintain a sustainable financial model for the nation’s smallest residential college. Financial strength can be measured in lots of ways, but 4

operating deficits year after year as Sterling has endured only qualify as fiscal weaknesses, endurable up to a point but capable of turning very serious quickly. So it is good, very good, that the year just past, FY 2011, ended with a surplus. It was a tiny one of just $41,000. But after years of deficits it was satisfyingly huge. The timing was fortuitous, as well: three years ago in the College’s formal reporting to the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), we claimed success in the Sustainable Sterling Campaign would result in a balanced budget by FY 2011. And here we are. The most direct significance of the balanced budget lies in the fact that CommonVoice


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over the course of this year the College won’t also have to be paying off a debt from the previous year. Instead, we have the opportunity

to break the cycle of deficit operations. And in fact the current year is shaping up to be in the black, as well.

If there’s a science to creating multi-year fund-raising goals, it is one

Sterling does not practice. Nor do we make goals based on “need,”

because financial need and the ability to raise money have little to do with one another. Instead, we employ the art of forecasting how much money we think Sterling can successfully raise over a period of time.

In Year I, 2008-09, the College raised $728,000, almost evenly split be-

tween unrestricted and restricted funds. In year II, the College raised $402,000, but had hoped that year to raise $500,000.

And last year, Year III in the Campaign, we just topped the $500,000

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ably. But the other measure is how that money is used, what it can accomplish by way of strengthening an institution. The Sustainable Sterling Campaign has witnessed some remarkable successes, including but beyond, really, the original collection of Campaign Initiatives. We expanded student capacity first with the purchase and renovation of the Inn on the Common, now Houston House. But the House also provided an unusual teaching space where the College could build its new academic program, Vermont’s Table, which concluded its first summer semester in August.

The energy efficiency renovation of

Hamilton and Jefferson residencies - a $300,000 eight-week adventure in project management and hair-pulling confrontations with building, fire, septic, federal, state and local code requirements—not only added

goal, raising $302,000 unrestricted. Funds restricted to specific projects

four new beds (the Swamp rooms are now history) but turned Sterling’s

and Jefferson renovation, $30,000 from the R.B. Annis Educational Fund

renovation and energy efficiency.

included $100,000 from the Gladys Brooks Foundation for the Hamilton

for science equipment, and the funds for the purchase of the College’s new Kubota tractor.

All this adds up to three years of pretty astounding success, especially in securing monies restricted to projects and initiatives, where our $215,000 Department of Energy matching grant proved very effective

in attracting matching funds. That the now four-year old projections

for unrestricted gifts were too high by five or eight percent indicates a healthy degree of excessive optimism. More rewarding was considerable underestimation of the College’s ability to attract restricted funds.

Originally aiming at raising a total of about $600,000 over four years in restricted project support, Sterling at this moment has raised almost $800,000.

~ One Year to Go…This One ~

most environmentally shaky structures into models of environmental Money also metamorphosed into the College’s new writing center and its electronic infrastructure that reaches across all the academic buildings. The new applications, programs, and faculty training that the writing center will generate for at least two more years has defined the Campaign initiative of strengthening the liberal arts at Sterling across the disciplines. Most significantly, and at the greatest risk, has been Sterling’s development of the year-round program. As complex an endeavor as one would wish, the year-round college has over the past two years been very successful for the College. But there are challenges ahead, certainly. One of the most significant is making up for the sudden elimination of summer Pell grants—federal grants provided to students from families making

In order to reach the Campaign goal of $2.3 million, Sterling has to

under about $40,000. Fifty-five percent of Sterling students qualify for

the new fiscal year, when the Canaday Foundation awarded Sterling

of them used Pell to help pay for their continuous enrollment, bringing

augmenting the Gladys Brooks grant, assured the College of having

will somehow have to find the supporting funds for those students.

raise $660,000 before June 30th. We had a good start on the first day of

Pell funding—a very high percentage for an independent college. Many

$75,000 towards the DOE match for the Ham/Jeff project. Their gift,

$70,000 in tuition last summer. From this point on, however, the College

sufficient funds to complete the ambitious renovation. That leaves $584,000 to be raised this year.

One final note on annual and alumni fund gifts: It is evident at Sterling

and in higher education philanthropy generally that as the national economy weakened over the past three years, annual gifts became proportionally difficult to garner. Still, the $985,000 Sterling’s alumni,

parents, friends, and board members have contributed over the past

~ A Game without End ~ Campaigns end, of course, but nothing is ever finished. Starting new programs means committing to carrying them forward, making them better, and finding them a place (or not) among the College’s sustaining programs. Addressing major campus infrastructure needs—espe-

three years represents about 6 percent of Sterling’s operating budget

cially at Sterling where we specialize in buildings more than 150 years

support - it provides between one quarter and one third of all institu-

can do is to keep rallying the faithful, keep demonstrating the value

for the same period of time. Another way to think about that level of

old—is a game truly without end. In the meantime, the best Sterling

tional scholarships that allow our students to attend. That’s a measure

of Sterling to its own community of friends and alumni, and keep

of success everyone in the Sterling community can appreciate.

In any fund-raising campaign, money has to be one measure, unavoidwwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

the Sustainable Sterling Campaign charging towards its finish and whatever lies just beyond that.  5


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View from North House:

T

What’s Under Your Back Porch?

by Will Wootton

he College has been rebuilding its simple, elegant but rickety

from the late 18th and early 19th Centuries. And Farley Brown, after

of North House was rebuilt in the nick of time last summer. This

the stone, headed down to the Town Clerk’s office to see if any records

porches at a steady clip for a number of years. The front porch

summer the front porch of Kane Hall and the narrow, old back porch

of North House got the same treatment. They are a sideshow to the

huge renovation going on at Hamilton and Jefferson. No costly, mindboggling code issues on porches; no permits, no real deadlines. The

work is being done by crews from the St. Johnsbury correctional facility, supervised teams who do construction jobs for Northeast Kingdom nonprofits. These teams have been the College’s painters and carpenters for four years now, saving the College lots of money and earning a day off a sentence for each day of work, as well as some pay.

On June 21, with the rotted North House back porch ripped out and its

roof propped up with 2 X 10s, one man’s shovel hit a stone that turned into a story about a child without record, who died almost exactly 185 years ago, and about the broken gravestone that the work crew pried up and laid out on the lawn.

Twelve inches wide and 23 ¼ high, chipped, scraped, in three pieces with a lower corner missing, stained with age, and of a mildly elaborate but not perfectly executed font, the soapstone marker reads: Horace Nelson Son of Francis K. & Mary C. Powell, died Sept 8th 1826, Aged 10 months Sleep on sweet babe securely rest No pain nor sorrow shall molest Cleaned of dirt and mud, Horace Nelson’s stone took a position in the President’s office in Mager Hall, on the corner of the table where everyone could get a good look at it.

Especially Dave Linck, who is as close to being Craftsbury’s official historian as the village is likely to get. “Oh, yes. Very nice,” He said

upon seeing the marker. “But who? Who exactly is this?” That rhetorical

question was followed by a not too brief description of various Nelsons

and Powell’s, including one who apparently “accidentally” shot his wife while cleaning his pistol in 1875.

Micki Martin devoted herself to transcribing the epitaph, some letters

almost entirely obscured, and comparing the couplet to similar ones 6

joining Dave Linck and others in another round of story making over of North House or of the Common circa 1826 mentioned Horace Nelson Powell, age 10 months. Dave Linck chose to re-examine a few Craftsbury graveyards.

In the meantime, something else turned up. Bones. One deer leg

bone (everyone agreed) and two funny looking bones, thin walled, five inches long, almost fluted in shape, and with their internal bony filament partially intact.

Is this a graveyard? Is the back of North House an early 19th Century

boneyard? If it were, what then? Would the state anthropologist halt the rebuilding of the porch and initiate a real dig? How great would that be? There was already a blue rain tarp over the site, giving it a

certain air of protection and importance. And there was much interest in probing the next layer down, which appeared to be a circular brick

structure, capped with a slab of slate, and apparently once connected to North House cellar by a length of lead pipe.

It was curious, too, that the known history of North House includes

three generations of morticians, beginning with James Wellington Stevens (d. 1870), then his son Henry, followed by a nephew, Henry

Clapp, whose family owned the house until 1968 when it was sold to Sterling School.

It happens that the current resident of North House is a direct

descendent of patriarch Roger Clapp, of the 17th Century Clapp family

of Dorchester, Massachusetts, and whose gravestone is secure in the

King’s Chapel cemetery in Boston. In any case, by the next morning the circular brick structure turned out to be an old backyard grey water

sink, made with relatively modern brick (Drury brand), with some old slate holding it together, and filled now with dirt and mud.

The headstone itself was receiving a steady flow of curious community members from inside and outside the College. In most cases, this

happened: First they would read the words and then touch them— such an engraved object, laid out, seemed to compel people to lay down their hands flat on it—then everything would stop for just a moment, snagged on Aged 10 Months.

The more we looked, the more details emerged to be incorporated

into the stories and speculations we all assigned to the stone, precisely because there was so little hard information behind such a compelling

artifact and message. For instance, the sweet couplet was apparently a significant challenge for the engraver: three of the 12 words resisted

fitting into the text space, so the engraver added an editorial carrot in CommonVoice


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one case, just like a newspaper editor would, placing the missing letter

Farley Brown discovered nothing in the town records of a Horace

words then ran out of space. Like this:

North House was built is not clear, but Farley’s examination of village

above the word. Then he or she used a hyphen to complete two other

Nelson Powell, or of a child’s death in early fall of 1826. Exactly when

e st Sleep on sweet bab securely re-

documents indicated that the current structure was there by 1850, and

No pain nor sorrow shall mo-

1825, and it could have been the current building, or not. When the

Lest

There are other anomalies: The first two lines—Horace Nelson/Son of Francis—are slightly off-kilter, as if the engraver forgot to start each

letter on the line. And the top of the stone, where a few decorative

that there was certainly some kind of structure on that site as early as back porch was added is also not known, nor is there any evidence indicating whether the porch just rebuilt was original or just one of many over the years.

elements appear, has been removed, sawn off by the appearance of the

Dave Rowell, a local real estate broker, justice of the peace, and live

have made the entire stone exactly 12 X 24 inches.

tells one story that may shed light on how the stone came to lie under

marks. One guess is three-quarters of an inch are missing, that would What do these clues mean? Was this the engraver’s first stone, and

radio performer for 15 minutes a day with the WDEV Radio Rangers, the North House porch, or at least how grave stones sometimes wander.

he made so many errors it was angrily rejected and tossed aside? Or

Dave Rowell’s sister, Margaret, had for years owned the upper half of

and while grieving, and it was unusable. Maybe an illiterate engraver

town’s founder, Samuel became an early governor of Vermont. He died

came along and corrected him and he inserted the correct letters.

born…but the break in the stone occurs there. Town records and history

perhaps it was the father who tried to engrave the stone, inexpertly

Samuel Crafts’ headstone. The son of Ebenezer Crafts, considered the

was following the script of another illiterate person, and then someone

in 1853 at age 85; his wife Eunice in 1828; and their son Samuel was account for the child, however.

Everyone made up a story, or at least a story

fragment, like the stone itself. It seemed as important

During a long drought around 1998, Margaret

think about children and death and times so remote

- the old Spaulding property just up the hill from

Rowell wanted to find a new spring above her cabin

as touching the stone, closing some loop in how we

as to be hardly imaginable even with the aid of

Craftsbury village. Competing dousers identified

found objects.

two spots; the first didn’t work out. The second did,

But even if every story is as legitimate as the next one,

sort of. “After a bit of digging,” Margaret said, “he

Where is the child buried? Not in any of the nearby

Crafts. It was in remarkable shape, but broken off at

headstone down in the village set all by itself in a

Some years later, Dave and Margaret were talking

if the stone was rejected, where’s its replacement?

found the actual headstone of Samuel and Eunice

cemeteries, said Dave Linck. He knows of a child’s

the bottom.”

backyard. And he knows of two children whose

about how her half gravestone was white marble

deaths are reported in town records, but whose

when they noticed they were standing on top of a

burial sites are lost. It would have helped had Dave

piece of white marble in the dooryard. It had been

Linck been able to find Horace Nelson Powell’s

there for many years, part of a stone walkway.

parents or grandparents. Instead, in the cemetery

Dave flipped it over and it turned out to be the

on Cemetery Road, Dave identified a person he

missing portion of the Crafts stone, which is four

believes was the child’s younger brother, born in

or five times larger than the baby Powell’s stone.

1828 and who lived a long life and was buried in 1905. It was this man who shot his wife.

The Crafts marble monument (C. 1905) sits in the

main cemetery on the Common. The speculation is the more formal

Then, after comparing the bones discovered near the headstone to the

and elaborate monument replaced the original stone, and it found itself

consulting with his anthropologist brother, Dave reported that these

years or more.

articulated human skeleton owned by Craftsbury Academy, and after

on the Spaulding property in pieces that may have been apart for 100

were not human bones. No one was disappointed at this news.

But for our stone one story really is as good as another. Take your pick.

Still and all, none of this explains or even suggests an idea of how the

To me, at North House with its new porches front and back, covering

who uncovered the pieces reported the largest piece, practically the

meaning in discovering a life long disappeared and unimagined. No

stone came to be buried under the North House porch. The workers

up for generations whatever else might lie buried under them, there is

entire stone that would have stood above ground, was about four feet

paper work. No memory. No family bible hinting at this short-lived

from the back door, buried a foot or 18 inches deep, engraved side down, and at a slight pitch, maybe 10 degrees. wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

pioneer. Just an ill-carved stone, misused, dug up, displayed, but testimony, still, to a life returned to place and to imagination. 

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Stories We Like:

Students Find Pleasing Seats

A

small group of students has just wrapped up a new culinary program at Sterling College that had them spending time in the

kitchen and in the barn.

by Tommy Gardner, Hardwick Gazette

visits to farms, restaurants, a brewery, food processing centers and the

like; and Whole Farm Thinking, in which it all came together in a ‘working hands, working minds’ manner at Sterling’s on-campus farms.

The two month program, Vermont’s Table, was offered as a way to in-

Tim Patterson, the director of advancement at Sterling College, pointed

system, which has brought so much regional, national and even inter-

hers “the reverse of the Vermont brain drain.” Instead of Vermonters

troduce students to Northeast Vermont’s much-touted sustainable food national attention to the area. And since this is Sterling, with its motto of ‘Working Hands, Working Minds,’ students had to roll up their sleeves as much as they had to sharpen their pencils.

to Vande Voorde’s decision to stay in Vermont, and called stories like

leaving the state seeking other jobs, Patterson said the rise of local food movement as job creator can keep more Vermonters sticking around and also bring people from more urban areas. Patterson said Sterling

Naturally the group wrapped up their last day of classes last week with

College officials expected more adult learners to be attracted to Ver-

of localvorism and community supported entrepreneurism. As she

were in their early 20s, some still in school at other colleges.

said she liked the experience so much she’s decided to make Craftsbury

demic pursuit,” he said, pointing out one student had been taking food

a meal at Claire’s restaurant, an establishment founded on principles

mont’s Table, but he was surprised that the students who attended

sipped on local beer and supped on local food, Danielle Vande Voorde

“I think it speaks to the new trend of food systems as a legitimate aca-

her home.

studies at New York University, which is rather limited in what it can

“I was looking for something to do after graduation,” Vande Voorde, a

offer in practical terms. “In New York, it’s all academic work, and she

tween Houston and London, and finishing up with a degree in health

Each of the Vermont’s Table students was required to keep a blog of

to do a mixture of things. Working with food. Working to get good food

her blog posts, Sueli Shaw, a cognitive studies major at Vassar College,

recent Skidmore College grad, said. Splitting her childhood years be-

got to come out here and get the hands-on component.”

and exercise science from the Saratoga institution, she said, “I wanted

his or her experiences bopping around from farm to kitchen. In one of

to people.”

wrote about the “interconnectedness” among the various food and

Vande Voorde and her summer classmates took five classes as part of

beverage-makers, the farmers and processors, and even the different

Products, which covered both meat and dairy as well as vegetarian

“By working together, their businesses become more viable and deep-

written works from Thoreau to Michael Pollan; Seminar in Food Entre-

greater system they are working so hard to revive and maintain.” 

the Vermont’s Table program: Farm-Scale Production of Value-Added

classrooms.

meals; The Literature of Food from Farm to Table, including a range of

ly rooted,” Shaw observed. “They become a more integral part of the

preneurism, concentrating on talking with agri-business owners about

the business side of food; Field Study in Vermont Food Systems, with 8

Reprinted from the Hardwick Gazette with permission.

CommonVoice


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Gleaning:

Why Vermont Works G

leaning with the Vermont Food Bank this morning brought my experience of the Vermont food system full circle. On the first day

of the Vermont’s Table program, we visited High Mowing and learned

how the seed company works with other businesses in Hardwick to

create a sustainable and profitable business community. Today, on the

last field-trip of the semester, we learned how High Mowing (and other Vermont farms) partner with the Food Bank to create a prosperous living community.

At first, I wondered why more food banks in other states don’t have a gleaning program. And then it hit me: gleaning only works because of

Vermont’s unique landscape. Vermont is home to many small farms, run by farmers who use good practices and want to give back to their

community. The Vermont Food Bank system is small enough that it is able to form personal connections to many farms, organize a gleaning

program on a farm-to-farm, week-to-week basis, and distribute the

produce efficiently. Lastly, Vermont is home to many caring, willing, and able people—people who would rather do good work than sit at wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

by Alexis Zimba-Kirby home in front of the TV all day. The personal relationships that exist between farms, community mem-

bers, and other businesses are key to a successful gleaning program, and key to a prosperous community. With the examples I have seen in this class, I can help form these relationships in other communities in the future. 

Alexis Zimba-Kirby spent five weeks in Craftsbury as a participant

in the inaugural session of Vermont’s Table, Sterling’s new academic program in farm-to-table food systems. She wrote this post after

the final field-trip of the semester, a journey to the trial gardens of High Mowing Seeds, where students gleaned vegetables for the Vermont Foodbank.

A native of Iowa, Alexis is currently studying abroad in Paris. She will graduate from New York University next year with a double major in Food Studies and French.

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Photo by Christopher Marshall

Faculty Profile:

Jill Fineis, Dean of Students F

or Jill Fineis, sharing outdoor adventures with Sterling students is a way to foster a stronger campus community. As dean of students and

faculty in Outdoor Education and Leadership, Jill combines mountain climbing, classroom teaching, and individual advising to help students

build confidence and realize their dreams. Common Voice caught up with Jill to discuss how her passion for adventure informs her role as a professional educator.

Q: How do you balance your work as Dean of Students with your

teaching responsibilities as a professor of Outdoor Education and Leadership? 

are pushed out of their comfort zones; the goal being to produce cognitive dissonance, an opportunity for learning to occur. When

As soon as I arrived at Sterling, I started planning adventure courses

students step outside of their comfort zones they have an opportu-

spring, I would run or ski a few days a week with students, and this

not sure where the path leads. Mardy Murie, the famous conserva-

mile traverse of the Presidential Range in one day, for a total of 9,000

and eventually enough light is shed so that you can see to the next

and looking for ways to lead students into the mountains. In the

nity to enter a world where they rarely go; a world in which they’re

summer I led a weekend activity where 14 students completed a 20

tionist and a personal hero of mine, once said, “You take one step,

feet in elevation gain.

step.”.

Making connections with students outside of the traditional academic environment enables me to better navigate on-campus chal-

lenges. When I spend quality time with students outside of the work day, I have less to “deal” with as a Dean.

Q: What sorts of values do you try to instill in students through outdoor adventures?

My hope is that a student’s self concept increases and is strengthened by outdoor challenges so that they become more willing to

follow their passions and dreams, and not be hindered by socially-

constructed perceptions of capability. I want my students to realize

that they are capable of so much more than they might imagine. A climber ascends the features of a mountain in steps that make up se-

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In effective outdoor education (and really all education) students

Q:  What’s new in the world of Outdoor Education at Sterling? What are some upcoming opportunities? There are two new courses in the works. Currently, I am creating a new and improved model for the backcountry ski course, which would take us to Idaho, where students could travel from yurt to yurt, learn avalanche curriculum, practice safe winter travel techniques, become more familiar with map and compass, and ski some amazing powder. We are also working towards an Outdoor Education Semester course where students would be fully immersed in a 12-credit course over ten weeks. This semester model is standard in most OEL programs and we would like to offer one at Sterling.

ries of moves, which are sometimes determined by lengths of rope,

Other courses coming up this year include Rock-Climbing; Group

thing of an oxymoron, and that we really just climb small features,

Climbing; the ever-popular whitewater canoeing course; and a

they can do just about anything.

dition Skills and Tundra and Taiga Ecology. 

or pitches. If students realize that “climbing a mountain” is some-

Process for Outdoor Leaders; Challenge Course Practicum; Ice-

one step at a time, they soon realize that with enough persistence,

5-week field course in Alaska that combines Arctic and Alpine Expe-

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Shannon Maes

Internship Program:

Loon Conservation in Vermont

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by Tim Patterson

oons are doing well in Vermont, and are now seasonal residents of

“Over half of the VLRP’s work is outreach to landowners and boaters

haunting cry of the loon is not uncommon in Craftsbury, a big change

biggest lessons this summer was learning to respect the vast range of

many lakes and ponds in the Northeast Kingdom. These days, the

from a generation ago when loons were a rare sight in New England.

In 1983 only seven loon pairs attempted to nest in the entire state of

Vermont. In 2011, the loon population grew to 71 nesting pairs, and

many single loons visited Craftsbury, sometimes gathering in large groups on the Hosmer Ponds.

The success of loon conservation in Vermont is due in large part to the

hard work of citizen naturalists like Craftsbury resident Eric Hanson,

who serves as a biologist for the Vermont Center for Ecostudies, and is deeply involved with the Vermont Loon Recovery Project (VLRP).

Last summer Eric enjoyed help from Shannon Maes, a third-year Sterling student from Denver, Colorado. Shannon is majoring in Conservation Ecology, and came to Sterling to focus on environmental stewardship.

and coordinating volunteers,” Eric continued. “I think one of Shannon’s public opinion. Long-term conservation of loons requires the help of the general public, not just a specific conservation action.”

For Shannon, working with loons was an opportunity, in her words,

“to experience the practical side of wildlife management, ecosystem conservation, and outreach.” Like Eric, Shannon also noted the importance of considering human communities when working towards environmental conservation.

“In the future I plan to work in conservation either directly with wildlife or possibly for a land trust,” she said. “However, the depth and

breadth of my studies at Sterling have forced me to contemplate not only the preservation of nature, but also the notion of ecological living,

and to realize how interconnected human lives and livelihoods are to

“Craftsbury held mystery and excitement for me because it offered

the health and persistence of our global ecosystem.”

that was different from the one I grew up in,” explained Shannon. “A

come, as long as people like Eric and Shannon continue to help them

immersion in a culture of land-based subsistence and self sufficiency

Loons will grace Craftsbury in the summer season for many years to

Sterling education provided a unique opportunity to learn real skills;

thrive. However, although the big picture of loon recovery in Vermont

where else can you learn everything you need to know about using an

ax, making a canoe paddle, or packing all the right stuff for a monthlong backcountry trip?”

Eric mentored Shannon in all aspects of loon conservation in Vermont,

from building nest rafts to community outreach. Although loons have recovered in Vermont, Shannon’s work was part of a sustained effort by

the VLRP. “Loon habitat and people’s recreational areas almost entirely

overlap,” explained Eric. “Loons still need our help on busy lakes and ponds.”

Eric praised Shannon’s willingness to traverse northern Vermont to

monitor loons and help the birds thrive alongside human communities. “Shannon now knows the Northeast Kingdom from Groton to Averill better than most Vermonters,” he said. wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

is encouraging, the success stories of wildlife conservation are often balanced by failures both large and small.

“Shannon had the opportunity to experience the joys and sorrows

of working closely with a wild animal,” said Eric. “She found failed

nests and loon families with lost chicks, but she also discovered newly hatched chicks on their parents’ backs and helped catch and handle two loons in trouble, one caught in fishing line and the other stuck on a

pond too small to fly from. Those two loons thank her, and so do I.”  To watch a video of Eric and Shannon rescuing a loon from a stormwater pond in Williston, visit The Vermont Loon Blog or go directly to the video via the web address http://bit.ly/noDMZY.

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Reflection:

What’s Not to be Leads to Poetry I

by Jody Stoddard, ‘10

thought I knew what I would do in graduate school. When I applied

hats in themselves are of course utterly practical for most of the year

a preliminary study plan, which I had carefully crafted to intertwine

overtaxed undergraduates. Beyond the applied techniques of carding,

to Goddard’s Individualized Master of Arts program, I submitted

with my professional work. I assumed that if I were going to set out to

master something, I might as well master the skills that would let me do my work even better.

in northern Vermont, and knitting is cheap and portable therapy for spinning, and needlework, the class connects to broader, sometimes far-ranging ideas: cultural and environmental impacts of raising wool, design and manufacture of clothing, and the sense-of-place metaphors

It seemed so sensible, written out in the application: “I want to use this

inherent in using one’s own labor to summon a hat from local materials.

want to look at elements of the study of place, elements of universal

have developed a course on papermaking and bookbinding. This fall

IMA program of study to explore the pedagogy of place-based arts. I

In that same spirit of liberal arts, my colleague Leland Peterson and I

design, and elements of folk arts or traditional skills of rural living, and

we will lead students through the steps of gathering plants around

learn to synthesize the three into hands-on environmental humanities courses.” I thought of this work as approaching the arts from a resourcemanagement perspective.

campus, making the fibers into paper, and stitching those leaves into

bound volumes containing the students’ own place-related text and

illustrations. I had looked forward, here on the brink of the semester, to

My work already follows this direction. Among other duties at Sterling,

enfolding this whole process into my graduate program.

raw sheep’s wool from the College farm into wearable knitted hats. The

in fact I already am doing the sorts of things I had proposed to study,

I teach a course called Fiber Arts. One requirement is that students turn

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It was not to be. My well-laid plans began to fail when I learned that if

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then my study plan is no plan at all. It is simply a job description. I

cannot receive credit for merely performing the duties of my job, so where does that leave my graduate work, then?

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Another example, this time not of how a physical place appears to me, but of how I feel in a place on the cusp of change. The melancholy in these selections must have ached in the hearts of their long-dead poets,

A complete overhaul at this juncture, my second semester, is hardly

possible. Instead, I will make a lateral move into another environmental humanities territory: poetry, and its role in defining one’s sense of place.

Poetry is a different sort of place-art, not like the artisanal skills or handicrafts I commonly think of as linked to region. Poetry is language

but still it is fresh and familiar to me as I contemplate my dairy farm and its uncertain future:

My sad thoughts tease me

asking their own names. ~ Rabinandrath Tagore

art, word art, not born of the same necessities as culinary or textile arts but somehow every bit as essential, and place-poetry in particular is an

deer horns

art of echoes and mirrors that invites its readers to feel what its authors experienced.

developing their first branch:

My favorite poets are those who write compelling and complete works

our separation ~ Basho

of deceptively few words—quick-reading poems that I can absorb during odd breaks in life’s action, but then mull over for days. Concise

poets have the knack of re-patterning everyday language into durable

didn’t mean to think of it

messages that cross barriers of geography, occupation, gender, and time. It’s magical, really.

still I thought of it

Here’s one way poetry from another place and time connects me to my

own present. The following poems, each quoted in entirety, are by some

rain coming down ~ Santoka

in relation to controversial industrial wind projects that presently

And finally, I find comfort in knowing that I’m not the only scholar

of the poets I’m currently studying. I can’t help but think of their words threaten the landscape near Craftsbury, my home. The hills here are modest, largely unnamed on maps, and perhaps dearer to the sparse

population of this region than to the officers of international energy corporations who simply fly over. The hills are and are not what these poems are about:

frequently stuck in place. Many before me have compulsively meddled and muddled with language, imploring words and thoughts to find union:

devoid of talent,

yes, it’s spring—

I wish only to sleep:

through nameless hills,

raucous warblers ~ Basho

a faint haze ~ Matsuo Basho

O troupe of little vagrants of the world,

the deeper I go

leave your footprints in my words. ~ Tagore

the deeper I go green mountains ~ Taneda Santoka

Heaven doesn’t kill me

a clean patch of ground after it rains an ancient pine half covered with moss such scenes appear before us all but how we use them isn’t the same

~ Stonehouse

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

it makes me write poems ~ Santoka Poems. Place-poems. Poems created from lived learning, poems spanning time and distance, poems whose what-has-been stories inform my here-and-now experience of finding my own words, my own way, and my own place. Yes, I think I can find a master’s somewhere in here.  13


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Around Campus

A Presidential Traverse

Residence Hall Renovations

Sterling students and faculty completed an epic traverse of the Presidential Range in New Hampshire, hiking over 20 miles in a single July day. The hike was organized by Jill Fineis, Dean of Students and Professor of Outdoor Education and Leadership.

After a difficult summer of destruction and construction management,

“Students knew that this hike would be extremely challenging,” said Jill, who was impressed by how many students signed up for the adventure. “Not all of the students had experience hiking in the alpine zone, but everyone stuck together, made it through in one piece, and learned a lot by stepping outside of their comfort zones.”

old residence halls have become the most energy efficient structures

An unexpected highlight of the hike occurred when Pavel Cenkl, Dean of Academics, jogged up to the group. Pavel was in the midst of his own—running—traverse of the mountain range. 

safety measures. The $300,000 project was funded by the Gladys

the environmental renovations of Hamilton and Jefferson were completed not quite on time for the arrival of new students. The delay was brief, however, and the renovations are now complete. The

on campus, with new windows, entry-ways, solar water heaters, and AllSun tracker solar panels.

Student living conditions are dramatically improved, as the renovated buildings are clean, dry, and up to code with the most modern fire

Brooks Foundation, the Canaday Family Charitable Trust, and the U.S. Department of Energy. 

Environmental Education As a final project, students enrolled in the spring semester course Elementary School Outreach created curriculum for the entire Craftsbury Elementary School. The theme was nature and culture in Vermont. Students set up a series of classes for the youngsters. The classroom stations included the Sterling Sugar House, where John Shaw, ’13, and Jess Palin, ’11, provided a puppet show and pancakes with syrup, and the Sterling Barn, where Erica Tenner, ’12, shared her knowledge of working with horses. Allyson Makuch, ’14, presented a class in the hoop house, entertaining the students with a game before taste-testing the greens, while Kevin Cannon, ’12, and Michael Glenn, ’12, introduced natural Vermont products like slate and wood. Richie Perello, ’13, engaged the youngsters with a fun and educational ornithology class on bird-nest design and construction.  14

Wildbranch Writing Workshop Sterling partnered with Orion Magazine to host the 24th annual Wildbranch Writing Workshop, which attracted participants from all across the country. Dave Brown, who organized Wildbranch, thought this year’s workshop attracted an especially diverse group of students who applied themselves to environmental writing with diligence and enthusiasm.  CommonVoice


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Dreaming of Powder

Ultimate Frisbee Showdown

Alumna Cody Sayers, ‘10, returned to Sterling to share photographs

Faculty and staff took on an all-star team of students for an Ultimate

Mountains of Vermont and the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

buoyed by wisdom, experience, and the tenacious defense of Vice-

and stories about her backcountry skiing experiences in the Green Cody is now working in East Charleston, Vermont for the Northwoods Stewardship Center, a job that allows her plenty of time to play in the

mountains. The slide-show was introduced by Pavel Cenkl, Dean of Academics, who appeared knee-deep in powder in many of Cody’s photos. 

Frisbee showdown in July. The faculty jumped out to an early lead, President Ned Houston. The students launched a comeback, though,

using quick passes and end runs to move within one point of the faculty total. If the game had continued, the students might have emerged

victorious, but faculty made sure the end came promptly at 5:30 so that no one would be late to dinner. The final score was 8 -7. 

From Afghanistan to Craftsbury

Tree Plantings

In April a young woman named Adelah Sohail visited Craftsbury to

Sterling student Raymond Micklon, ’13, helped local nursery owner

Academy about her experiences growing up in Bamiyan Province,

red maples in front of Mager Hall and a hop hornbeam by Merlin

speak to an audience of students from Sterling College and Craftsbury Afghanistan.

“When I came to the United States, I was shocked to see all the freedoms,

security, and opportunities,” said Ms. Sohail. “Hopefully there will be

peace in Afghanistan soon so people can enjoy our rich culture and work on rebuilding our country.” 

Stuart LaPoint plant trees around the Common, including three Hall. According to Dave Linck, Craftsbury’s resident historian, the new plantings replace trees that were cut down many years ago.

Dave produced old photos of Mager Hall—aka Johnson House and Carpenter House—that show the building shaded by stately trees. The tree plantings were funded by a Local Communities grant through the Craftsbury Forestry Committee. 

Fiber Arts Display

The Great Goat Roadtrip of 2011

The Old Stone House Museum, in Brownington, VT contains 21 rooms

What happens when 12 Sterling students and 12 Sterling goats travel

of exhibits that focus on daily life in northern Vermont in the 19th

century. The museum’s newest exhibit features traditional fiber arts produced by Sterling students. Students spun and carded the wool

using traditional methods as part of the Fiber Arts curriculum, under

the watchful eye of Jody Stoddard, ‘10. Wool was collected locally from the milking flock at Bonnieview Farm. Natural dyes were used to

give the wool color, including a beautiful pale orange coreopsis from

Sterling’s herb garden and onionskins saved from the Sterling kitchen. Lichen, marigold, and black walnut also came from Craftsbury.  wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

together to New York City?

For Louise Calderwood’s Animal Science class, the results of the Great Goat Roadtrip included a spontaneous goat barbeque on 235th Street, six pages of goat related publicity in the Burlington Free Press, a visit to

a live market in the Bronx, and a profound lesson in the economics of small-scale agriculture.

For the full story, visit burlingtonfreepress.com and search for the article “A Hard Lesson in Sustainability” by reporter Melissa Pasanen.  15


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The Year in Giving T

here is always a moment at the end of a fiscal year, the final day, when I wish

so after all those individual Sterling envelopes carrying your gifts you can see your compa-

the fund-raising year would go on, just so

triots, your colleagues in support of Sterling.

we could make that one extra step. Then I

It makes a nice group. Thank you, from every-

realize you – everyone on these pages, at least – already have taken that extra step, and then some. So we are done, over with it. And all that remains is to thank everyone, en masse,

the next morning it all starts again, at zero, and you’ve got no place to go but up. Thank you all. 

one on campus. We can all thank each other, in fact, because that’s the wonderful nature of an annual fund: we’re all in it together. Best of all, on that final day, you realize that beginning

Will Wootton, President

Donors by Club Membership ~ Giving List Trustees

Marian Burros Pete Chehayl Kate Clark Catherine Donnelly John Elder Rian Fried Linda Friehling Amy Golodetz Ann Guyer Thaddeus Guldbrandsen Christina Hayward Gail Henry Wendy Koenig Jon Larsen Greg Leech David McLean Penny Schmitt Robert Shelton David Stoner Will Wootton

Ed & Liz Nef John & Melinda Patterson Doris Payette Elizabeth Poulsen & John Barlow Robert Rheault & Susan St. John Penny Schmitt Mark & Sukey Schroeder Robert Shelton Ellen Starr & Geoffrey Fitzgerald Dave & Jenny Stoner Leonard Sussman Barth & Elizabeth Vander Els Nate & Jessica Wilson Will & Lulu Wootton Charlevoix County Community Foundation Davis Educational Foundation Gladys Brooks Foundation R.B. Annis Educational Foundation The Margaret A. Cargill Foundation The Windham Foundation Vermont Community Foundation Anonymous

President’s Circle

Sterling Club

Joan Bok Marvin & Linda Brown Pete & Liz Chehayl Marion Christoph Deborah Clark & Harvey Dunbar Kim Clark Richard Dreissigacker & Judy Geer Dr. George Drew Abigail Faulker & Hobie Guion Nancy & Kim Faulkner John Frey Rian Fried & Rachel Hexter Fried Elizabeth Gill Amy Golodetz & Greg Leech Arnold & Virginia Golodetz Gail Henry Daniel & Tina Kopp Jon Larsen Howard Manosh

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Stirling Adams Richard & Charlotte Alexander William & Patricia Alley Caroline Alves Edward & Mona Ames Cliff & Mary Ellen Anderson Mary Azarian Elizabeth Barnard Jennifer Barton Lucy Beck - In memory of Robert Stoltz Scott Bermudes Stanley Berry Theodore & Fran Bickart - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart Stark Biddle & Jane Walczykowski Dean Bloch & Valerie Wilkins Ralph Bosworth Dewey & Liz Barrett-Brown

Lucille Brink F. Donald & Kathleen Brigham Dave Brown William Brown - In memory of Laurie M. Brown Carleton & Susan Bryant Brian Bucks & Karen Pence - In honor of Robert Shelton Nate Budington Tena Bunnell Marian Burros John Cassidy Pavel Cenkl Kate Clark Lee Davidson Richard & Hong-Nhung Lu Detwiler Carol Dickson Scott & Cathy Donnelly Timothy & Sonja Dunbar Bruce & Nancy Dutcher John & Rita Elder Eric & Deidre Ellis Christina Erickson - In memory of K. Stephen Williams - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart - In memory of Tina Ray - In memory of Stuart Jackson Anne Faulkner Charles & Charlotte Faulkner Robert & Elizabeth Fetter Sally Fisher - In memory of Bill Waters Patricia Fletcher Joseph Foster Mrs. Joan Fuller Richad & Susan Gaffney Jennifer Jordan Gear Kenneth & Janet Gibbons Robert & Jean Gilpin Robert & Susan Goodwin Peter Gould Clive Gray Phil Gray Thaddeus & Melissa Guldbrandsen

Ann Guyer Virginia Hagen William & Mary Hamilton Ronald & Catherine Haselnus Bruce & Doris Hering Drs. George & Lanie Hill Ted Hobart Steve & Wendy Hofmann Ned & Susan Houston Theodore & Margot Hubbard Adam Hubel Kenneth & Janis Hubel Lukas & Susanne Hyder Brandon Jellison Kenneth & Susan Johnson - In honor of Greg Johnson Thomas Johnson & Ina Smith Thomas & Marty Keck Anne Kelly Melissa Kirkby Fisher - In honor of Ned Houston Paige Kitson Wendy Koenig Peter & Carleen Kunkel Jackson Kytle Brian & Dorothy Landsberg - In honor of Robert Shelton Hilary Laubach Neil Lehrman Samuel & Bonnie Lesko Richard & Nancy Levine James Lovinsky Christine Mabardy-Higgins - In honor of Ethan Higgins - In memory of Sobhy E. Mabardy Frank & Mary Ann Mastro C. Austin & Elizabeth McDonnell Sylvia McKean Lauren McKnight Barrie & Margaret McMath Clifton McPherson & Elizabeth Freedman John Miller Tony & Dorothy Morse Natalie Moses & Douglas Klaucke

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C. Twiggs Myers - In memory of Doug Field Kristie Nelson Kapp Kimberly Nichols Heiselman Nancy O’Neill David & Susan Payne James Peale Daniel & Mary Pence - In honor of Robert Shelton Ken Pick Bruce & Mary Pinto Carl & Hilary Poulsen Franz Reichsman Leon Robinette Richard Rose Geoffrey Rossano & Joan Baldwin Joseph & Susan Rothstein Mr. & Mrs. Lewis Russell JoD Saffeir James Sandison Bettina Sawhill Espe Herbert Schaumburg - In honor of Kristin Schaumburg John & Lois Schieffelin Daniel Schlichtmann Robert & Jean Schoen Emily Seifert Mary Semon Frank & Carolyn Sepe Leonard Shaw Dr. James D. Shelton - In honor of Robert Shelton Dr. & Mrs. Herbert Shuer Erin Small Roger Smith Theresa Snow Richard & Gwendolyn Spencer - In memory of Jennifer H. Spencer Joseph Szeliga Scott & Colleen Taliaferro Mike Tessler Nick & Roberta Tessler Howard Thomas Sheldon & Camilla Thompson - In honor of Cindy & Paul Ingvoldstad Henry Tottenham Robert & Joan Twiss Kathryn Vernay & Arden Zipp David Vickery Rex Walden Philip Warren William Waters Charles Watts & Helen Haynes Llyd Wells Jean White Mary White Jed & Perry Williamson Mrs. Philip Wootton Julie Wormser John Zaber & Farley Brown Caledonia Spirits, Inc. Concept II Craftsbury Ladies Union Exxon Mobil Foundation Norfolk Southern Foundation Stevens Institute - In memory of Stuart Jackson The Oregon Community Foundation Anonymous - In memory of K. Stephen Williams

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Jonathan Albright Sarah & Simon Alexander Diana Allen Elise Andrea Hannah Arps & Blythe Dyson Lynn Atkins Daniel Joseph Bailey III Robert Balivet Mark Baudendistel & Ann Makley Jenneke Barton John Bennett Jessica Berry Judy & Bill Bevans Lynne Birdsall & Ryk Loske - In memory of Stuart Jackson Ariana (Johnson) Bourassa Caleb Butler & Erica Young Reid & Kim Bryant Maralyn Bullion - In honor of Jared Fitzpatrick Sarah Carson Brian Carter & Leah Keller Wellington & Barbara Carvalho Tanya Childs - In honor of Alexandra (Sasha) Childs Julie & Silas Clark Paul Clifford Jennifer Cohun Fay Cole Michelle Connair Emily Cromwell Millicent & Stuart Curran Ted Davis-Marsh - In honor of Cassandra Jones Sarah Deck Robert Dewees & Cheryl Publicover Dewees Matthew Dolski Adele Edgerton Peter Edling Daniel Einstein & Miriam Grunes J. Edward & Priscilla Eliades - In memory of Cheryl Eliades Chester Elliott Judy Elson & Nicholas Patch John Elwell & Kathy Stark Bruce & Joan Erickson Rachel Farrar Monty & Cheryl Fischer Sydney Flowers Brian & Susan Flynn Carl Gaede Joseph Gaglioti & Jane Hazen William & Sandra Garcia Jeanne Gelwicks John Gelwicks Stephanie George Elizabeth Gibbons Eric Goldwarg Tommy Greenwell Julie Hanneman Erik Hansen Todd Hardie Catherine Harris Sue Heilman - In honor of Hannah Andersson John & Dorothy Herzog Ashley Heye

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Susan Highley & Alan Tate Robert A. Houston Sally Hughey - In memory of Margaret Field Rosemary Hunter Gordon & Marian Inskeep Christina & Luke Joanis - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart Gregory Johnson Kenneth Johnson Cassandra Dawn Jones Laura Keir Paul & Patricia Killigrew Sandra King - In honor of Michael Anchel Holly Klump James Koegel & May Boykin Chris Kuhnel Aura Labarre & Greg Montgomery Susan Laity - In honor of William Laity William & Monica Laramee Philip Leech Merrill Leffler & Ann Slayton Alyssa Lovell Mrs. Beverly Lowe - In honor of Jennifer Lowe Karin Lubeck Paul & Tina Mandeville Carolyn Markson Nan Marshall & James Kangas Randy & Michele Martin Wesley & Elizabeth Martin Ian & Tayler McEwen Kim McIntyre Robert & Diana Miller Ross & Diane Morgan Michael & Barbara Morrow Martha Moyer & Michael Lenart - In honor of Keith Doerfler Jeanne Muise Dianna Noyes Anne Obelnicki Ned Olmsted Derek & Ruth Owen James Paolino Anne Pass Alexandra Passas Tim Patterson Jennifer Payne & Woody Belt Thomas & Karen Perry Leland Peterson Claire Reilly Robert & Donna Remy-Powers Marijke Riddering Norman Rioux Brier Roberts Matthew & Anna Roberts - In honor of Ned Houston Ronald Rosen Andrew & Juliet Rosser Mary Anthony Cox Rowell Suzanne & Jeff Sampson - In memory of Stevie Ray Vaughan Andre Sandison Kristin Schaumburg Kevin & Kimberly Scheimreif Peter Schoen & Leslie Pelch Amy Schwartz Julie Sherman

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Edward & Diann Shope - In honor of Scott Shope Bruce & Mary Sloat Ann Spearing - In honor of Ned Houston Reverend Jay Sprout Joseph Stafford Charles Steinbrecher John & Jody Stoddard - In memory of Polly Russell Horace & Shirley Strong James & Emily Sullivan Anita Sutherland Greg Sutherland - In honor of Ned Houston Jay Swainbank Dana Szegedy Rev. Arnold & Lilian Taylor - In honor of Tom Taylor David & Marjorie Tetzloff Ben & Beverly Thurber Susan Ticehurst Sheila Traynor George & Sara Troutman Neil & Barbara Ulman Douglas Van Gorder Frederick van L. Maas Richard & Elizabeth Vanden Heuvel Anne Wallace - In honor of Nate Wallace-Gusakov & Amelia Gardner Nate Wallace-Gusakov & Amelia Gardner Michael & Janet Westling - In honor of J.D. Westling Patricia Wild Anna Wilkins Cheryl Williams - In memory of K. Stephen Williams S. Donald & Sandra Williams - In honor of Shawn & Jen Williams Mary Witherbee Benjamin & Elizabeth Woodall - In honor of the Class of 1980 Brian & Cortney Wright A. Joseph Wyse Constance Young Jennifer Youngman Kurt & Tracy Zschau Aetna Foundation, Inc. UBS Financial Services Anonymous - In memory of K. Stephen Williams To inform, to inspire, and to indicate the breadth and depth of Sterling’s philanthropic community we’ve added giving clubs to the associative lists of annual donors. • Expedition Club ~ $1 - $99 • Sterling Club ~ $100 - $999 • President’s Circle ~ $1,000 or >

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Donors by Category ~ Giving List Alumni

Sarah Carson ‘10 Greg Johnson ‘10 Laura Keir ‘10 John & Jody Stoddard ‘10 - In memory of Polly Russell Chester Elliott ‘09 Greg Sutherland ‘09 - In honor of Ned Houston Mike Tessler ‘09 Julie ‘08 & Silas Clark ‘07 Tommy Greenwell ‘08 Ariana (Johnson) Bourassa ‘07 Stephanie George ‘07 Tayler ‘07 & Ian McEwen ‘06 Nate Wallace-Gusakov ‘06 & Amelia Gardner ‘06 Michelle Connair ‘06 Peter Edling ‘06 Caleb Butler ‘05 & Erica Young ‘04 Anna ‘05 & Matthew Roberts ‘04 - In honor of Ned Houston Luke & Christina Joanis ‘05 - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart Chris Kuhnel ‘05 Dana Szegedy ‘05 Ashley Heye ‘04 Paige Kitson ‘04 Kim McIntyre ‘04 Sarah Deck ‘03 Jennifer Cohun ‘02 Elizabeth ‘02 & Wesley Martin ‘00 Anna Wilkins ‘02 Matthew Dolski ‘01 Sydney Flowers ‘01 Theresa Snow ‘01 Melissa Kirkby Fisher ‘00 - In honor of Ned Houston Brandon Jellison ‘00 Marijke Riddering ‘00 Erin Small ‘00 Jessica ‘00 & Nate Wilson ‘97 Emily Seifert ‘99 Millicent & Stuart Curran ‘98 Simon & Sarah Alexander ‘97 Jessica Berry ‘97 John Bennett ‘96 Holly Klump ‘96 Greg Montgomery & Aura LaBarre ‘95 Brian & Cortney Wright ‘95 Sandra & William Garcia ‘94 Cassandra Dawn Jones ‘94 Blythe Dyson & Hannah Arps ‘93 Claire Reilly ‘93 Howard Thomas ‘93 Kurt & Tracy Zschau ‘93 Kristin Schaumburg ‘92 Jennifer Barton ‘90 Alyssa Lovell ‘90 Jonathan Albright ‘89 Lynn Atkins ‘88 Ted Hobart ‘88 Susanne & Lukas Hyder ‘88 Andrew & Juliet Rosser ‘88 Leslie Pelch & Peter Schoen ‘86

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Adam Hubel ‘86 Andre Sandison ‘86 Frederick van L. Maas ‘86 Julie Wormser ‘86 Nicholas Patch & Judy Elson ‘85 David Vickery ‘85 John Zaber ‘85 & Farley Brown ‘85 Deidre & Eric Ellis ‘84 Julie Hanneman ‘84 Alan Tate & Susan Highley ‘83 Amy Schwartz ‘83 Julie Sherman ‘83 James & Emily Sullivan ‘83 Kenneth Johnson ‘82 James Kangas & Nan Marshall ‘82 JoD Saffeir ‘82 Sheila Traynor ‘82 Helen Haynes & Charles Watts ‘82 Elizabeth Freedman & Clifton McPherson ‘81 Valerie Wilkins & Dean Bloch ‘81 Diana Allen ‘81 Marion Christoph ‘81 John Gelwicks ‘81 Robert A. Houston ‘81 Karin Lubeck ‘81 Kimberly Nichols Heiselman ‘81 Suzanne & Jeff Sampson ‘81 - In memory of Stevie Ray Vaughan Scott Bermudes ‘80 Kristie Nelson Kapp ‘80 Benjamin & Elizabeth Woodall ‘80 - In honor of the Class of 1980 Ann Makley & Mark Baudendistel ‘78 Caroline Alves ‘78 Thomas & Mary Keck ‘78 Hilary Laubach ‘78 Tina & Paul Mandeville ‘78 Alexandra Passas ‘77 Miriam Grunes & Daniel Einstein ‘76 Carl Gaede ‘76 Steve & Wendy Hofmann ‘76 Nate Budington ‘75 Jennifer Youngman ‘75 May Boykin & James Koegel ‘71 Stanley Berry ‘71 Nancy & Bruce Dutcher ‘69 Dr. George Drew ‘67 Mary & Bruce Pinto ‘67 Rex Walden ‘66 Robert Balivet ‘64 Sonja & Timothy Dunbar ‘62 Stirling Adams ‘60 Anonymous - In memory of K. Stephen Williams

Parents & Family

Cliff & Mary Ellen Anderson Elizabeth Barnard Lucy Beck - In memory of Robert Stoltz William Brown - In memory of Laurie M. Brown Maralyn Bullion - In honor of Jared Fitzpatrick

Tena Bunnell Wellington & Barbara Carvalho John Cassidy Tanya Childs - In honor of Alexandra (Sasha) Childs Kim Clark Paul Clifford Fay Cole Lee Davidson Ted Davis-Marsh - In honor of Cassandra Jones Richard & Hong-Nhung Lu Detwiler J. Edward & Priscilla Eliades - In memory of Cheryl Eliades Robert & Elizabeth Fetter Joseph Foster Joseph Gaglioti & Jane Hazen Jeanne Gelwicks Elizabeth Gibbons Elizabeth Gill Arnold & Virginia Golodetz Robert & Susan Goodwin William & Mary Hamilton Catherine Harris Ronald & Catherine Haselnus Sue Heilman - In honor of Hannah Andersson Bruce & Doris Hering Theodore & Margot Hubbard Kenneth & Janis Hubel Rosemary Hunter Gordon & Marian Inskeep Kenneth & Susan Johnson - In honor of Greg Johnson Anne Kelly Paul & Patricia Killigrew Sandra King - In honor of Michael Anchel Daniel & Tina Kopp Peter & Carleen Kunkel Susan Laity - In honor of William Laity Philip Leech Saumel & Bonnie Lesko Richard & Nancy Levine Mrs. Beverly Lowe - In honor of Jennifer Lowe Christine Mabardy-Higgins - In honor of Ethan Higgins - In memory of Sobhy E. Mabardy Carolyn Markson Frank & Mary Ann Mastro Lauren McKnight Barrie & Margaret McMath Natalie Moses & Douglas Klaucke Martha Moyer & Michael Lenart - In honor of Keith Doerfler Jeanne Muise Nancy O’Neill Derek & Ruth Owen James Paolino Anne Pass Thomas & Karen Perry Ken Pick Carl & Hilary Poulsen Robert & Donna Remy-Powers

Brier Roberts Richard Rose Geoffrey Rossano & Joan Baldwin Joseph & Susan Rothstein Herbert Schaumburg - In honor of Kristin Schaumburg Kevin & Kimberly Scheimreif John & Lois Schieffelin Daniel Schlichtmann Robert & Jean Schoen Mary Semon Leonard Shaw Edward & Diann Shope - In honor of Scott Shope Dr. & Mrs. Herbert Shuer Richard & Gwendolyn Spencer - In memory of Jennifer H. Spencer Reverend Jay Sprout Charles Steinbrecher Anita Sutherland Joseph Szeliga Scott & Colleen Taliaferro Rev. Arnold & Lilian Taylor - In honor of Thomas Taylor Nick & Roberta Tessler David & Margorie Tetzloff Sheldon & Camilla Thompson - In honor of Cindy & Paul Ingvoldstad Susan Ticehurst Sara & George Troutman Douglas Van Gorder Richard & Elizabeth Vanden Heuvel Barth & Elizabeth Vander Els Kathryn Vernay & Arden Zipp - In honor of Jessica & Nate Wilson Anne Wallace - In honor of Nate Wallace-Gusakov & Amelia Gardner Philip Warren William Waters Michael & Janet Westling - In honor of J.D. Westling Jean White Patricia Wild S. Donald & Sandra Williams - In honor of Shawn & Jen Williams

Business

Caledonia Spirits, Inc. Concept II Stevens Institute - In memory of Stuart Jackson UBS Financial Services

CNS Alumni & Friends

Richard & Charlotte Alexander Daniel Joseph Bailey III Ralph Bosworth Dewey & Liz Barrett-Brown Anne Faulkner Eric Goldwarg Frank & Carolyn Sepe Ellen Starr & Geoffrey Fitzgerald

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Employees

Lynne Birdsall & Ryk Loske - In memory of Stuart Jackson Pavel Cenkl Deborah Clark & Harvey Dunbar Carol Dickson Ned & Susan Houston James Lovinsky Randy & Michele Martin Anne Obelnicki Tim Patterson Jennifer Payne & Woody Belt Leland Peterson John & Jody Stoddard ‘10 - In memory of Polly Russell John Zaber ‘85 & Farley Brown ‘85

Former Trustee

William & Patricia Alley F. Donald & Kathleen Brigham Marvin & Linda Brown Susan & Carleton Bryant Kim ‘99 & Reid Bryant ‘00 Abigail Faulkner ‘84 & Hobie Guion Nancy & Kim Faulkner Richad & Susan Gaffney Jennifer Jordan Gear ‘76 Drs. George & Lanie Hill Jackson Kytle Elizabeth Poulsen ‘85 & John Barlow Robert Rheault & Susan St. John Mark & Sukey Schroeder Jed & Perry Williamson Mary Witherbee

Foundations

Aetna Foundation, Inc. Charlevoix County Community Foundation Davis Educational Foundation

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Exxon Mobil Foundation Gladys Brooks Foundation Maine Community Foundation Norfolk Southern Foundation R.B. Annis Educational Foundation St. Croix Valley Foundation The Guide Foundation The Margaret A. Cargill Foundation The Oregon Community Foundation The Windham Foundation Vermont Community Foundation

Friends

Edward & Mona Ames Elise Andrea Mary Azarian Jenneke Barton Bill & Judy Bevans Theodore & Fran Bickart - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart Stark Biddle & Jane Walczykowski Joan Bok Lucille Brink Dave Brown Brian Bucks & Karen Pence - In honor of Robert Shelton Brian Carter & Leah Keller Craftsbury Ladies Union Emily Cromwell Robert Dewees & Cheryl Publicover Dewees Richard Dreissigacker & Judy Geer Adele Edgerton John Elwell & Kathy Stark Bruce & Joan Erickson Christina Erickson - In memory of K. Stephen Williams - In memory of K. Jeffrey Bickart - In memory of Tina Ray - In memory of Stuart Jackson

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Rachel Farrar Charles & Charlotte Faulkner Monty & Cheryl Fischer Sally Fisher - In memory of Bill Waters Patricia Fletcher Brian & Susan Flynn Mrs. Joan Fuller Kenneth & Janet Gibbons Robert & Jean Gilpin Peter Gould Phil Gray Clive Gray Virginia Hagen Erik Hansen John & Dorothy Herzog Sally Hughey - In memory of Margaret Field Thomas Johnson & Ina Smith Brian & Dorothy Landsberg - In honor of Robert Shelton William & Monica Laramee Merrill Leffler & Ann Slayton Neil Lehrman Howard Manosh C. Austin & Elizabeth McDonnell Sylvia McKean Robert & Diana Miller John Miller Ross & Diane Morgan Michael & Barbara Morrow Tony & Dorothy Morse C. Twiggs Myers - In memory of Doug Field Dianna Noyes Ned Olmsted John & Melinda Patterson Doris Payette David & Susan Payne James Peale Daniel & Mary Pence

Sterling Society The Sterling Society, begun many years

Planned gifts, too, provide the Sterling

ago but not much spoken about of late,

community a special opportunity to reflect

seeks to honor those individuals who,

on how deeply the College influences the

over their lives used their wills or other

lives of people, whether they came to know

financial vehicles to support Sterling after

Sterling as a student, parent, board member

their deaths. Such gifts are of tremendous

or, as sometimes happens and has at

value to the College. As a means of financial

Sterling, as a distant admirer who respects

support, such thoughtfulness often results

the practice and ethos of the College and

in a contribution larger than those made in

chooses to demonstrate that in a planned

the donor’s lifetime. Sometimes, as in the

gift.

case of former trustee Georgiana Ducas for

A Society member is simply an individual

instance, a charitable trust was created that

who has informed the College of his or her

will provide significant annual support for

intentions. An Honored Member is one

many years.

whose gift has been received. 

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- In honor of Robert Shelton Franz Reichsman Norman Rioux Leon Robinette Ronald Rosen Mary Anthony Cox Rowell Mr.& Mrs. Lewis Russell James Sandison Bettina Sawhill Espe Frank & Carolyn Sepe Dr. James D. Shelton - In honor of Robert Shelton Bruce & Mary Sloat Roger Smith Ann Spearing - In honor of Ned Houston Joseph Stafford Horace & Shirley Strong Leonard Sussman Jay Swainbank Ben & Beverly Thurber Henry Tottenham Robert & Joan Twiss Neil & Barbara Ulman Llyd Wells Mary White Cheryl Williams - In memory of K. Stephen Williams Mrs. Philip Wootton A. Joseph Wyse Constance Young Anonymous

Bequests Laura Evans Ford Estate Trust Georgiana Ducas Charitable Trust

Honored Members Georgiana Ducas

Augusta Crafts Dustan Laura Evans Ford Elva Hudtwalker

Margaret F.L McKnight Richard G. Poole

Members

Dr. George and Dr. Helene Hill Jackson Kytle, PhD Doris Payette

Col. Robert Rheault, Ret. Mark Schroeder

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Alumni Profile:

Notes from the FARM Institute

by Julie Olsen, ‘07

Julie Olsen, ‘07 is the Farm Manager at The FARM Institute, a non-profit working and teaching farm on Martha’s Vineyard. As Farm Manager, Julie’s

job includes raising animals, teaching children, balancing budgets and managing staff. Over the course of her Sterling career, Julie learned the importance of team-work, adaptability, and using mistakes as learning opportunities—all lessons she applies in her current role.

I

am responsible for the care, management and health of all animals at the FARM Institute - 50 sheep, 40 cows, 28 pigs, 300 layers, 1,800 meat

birds, 150 turkeys, six goats, three guinea hens, two ducks and a goose. I manage two farmhands and do everything from setting up electric

fencing to processing chickens, building shelters, haying, vaccinating, worming, feeding, mucking, composting, castrating, breeding, and birthing.

Along with help from my great staff, I’m also responsible for the animals once they become meat. I schedule and transport animals to slaughter, fill out cut sheets and manage inventory. Last year, I organized a

meat CSA, which always sells out. I work with local restaurants and customers to get the cuts they want, and make sure the livestock are generating revenue.

participate in chicken processing, watch animals give birth, and handle lots of manure. We explain to all visitors and program participants that we are a working farm, and that we are raising animals for food. Sharing what we do with the community is a definite highlight of this job. Being on Martha’s Vineyard, we get quite a few city slickers who don’t know a ram from an ox, along with lots of children who have never seen a pig, and have no idea where an egg comes from. I thoroughly enjoy educating these folks about the origins of their food, and I try to send everyone home with the assignment of finding a farm to support in their area. The value of a teaching farm is that you get to make mistakes and learn from them under the guidance of someone who has seen it all before.

Because the FARM Institute is a teaching farm, it’s also my job to

This was true at Sterling, and the FARM Institute is set up in very much

We do not sugar-coat anything here at the farm, and children can

share the learning process with children. 

incorporate the workings of the farm into our educational programs.

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the same way. I’m given a lot of freedom to learn from mistakes, and

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Letter to the Editor:

Help Protect the Lowell Range September 28th, 2011

Dear Friends, Last week I had two wonderful evenings here in the Northeast Kingdom with Gordy Stuart, ‘68, and Lyman Foss, ‘68, as they reminisced about their years at the Sterling School. Talk of the Winter Bounder Trip segued to the work I am involved in today trying to preserve the

integrity of the Lowell Mountain Range. Gordy encouraged me to reach

out to Sterling alums who shared this Northeast Kingdom harshness

and wonder through the winter expedition in this superb outdoor classroom. The early Winter Bounder trips set the foundation for use

of the Lowell Mountain Range from 1971 to the present for hundreds of students who realized, as their lives moved forward, that they could accomplish goals they wouldn’t have thought possible. Sterling has always been involved with the ecology and conservation of this area. The early prep school bridged to the college program of today.

Now there is a huge new challenge and one that I feel strongly that I

the destruction, and there are better alternatives. This is a clear case of a corporation reaching for the federal subsidies now available. Green Mountain Power (a Canadian owned company) has publicly said they would not have undertaken this project without these subsidies. There has been incredible research and work to stop this project, which is just the beginning of a long chain of similar installations down the ridgelines of Vermont. To oppose all this has taken a great deal of private money to provide testimony from expert witnesses and lawyers. Our case is now before the Supreme Court of Vermont. Without hesitation, and with the encouragement of Gordy and others who have benefited from challenges presented in this amazing ecological classroom, I urge you to get involved before the ridges are totally destroyed. The project has begun and time is running out.

want to bring to your attention.

My heartfelt thanks in advance for your help in protecting our heritage.

The Lowell Ridgeline is about to be blasted to allow twenty-one 460

Most Sincerely,

thousand years of ecological balance will be destroyed...the watershed,

Margaret Ramsdell

project which will produce negligible results and be obsolete in 40 years

Supporter of the Ridge Protectors’ Albany/Craftsbury Fund

ridgelines combined would not generate enough electricity to justify

Craftsbury Common, Vermont 05827 

foot industrial wind turbines to be built over a 3.5 mile stretch. Ten wildlife, recreation, solitude, a classroom unlike any other...all for a

Member of the Sterling Community, 1962 - 1984

or less. Experts have testified that wind power on all of New England’s

414 Wylie Hill Road

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Alumni News 2000s Matt Dolski ’01 writes “Started my own handyman business in 2010. Things are going well. Family is great. Getting ready for the summer. Hope all is well up there. Peace and Love.” Anna (Heidorn) Wilkins ‘02 – “Bought a house in Stow, MA (the land of apple orchards). Our daughter just turned one in May marking a year of transitions. Just started a new job with the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust. I’m always looking for volunteers and interns -- keep us in mind.” wilkins.llct@ lincolnconservation.org Robin (Austin) Brooks ‘04 writes “I’ve been exploring the bounty of Alaska the last couple of years! I’m working at the University of Alaska as the Student Success Coordinator. Fairbanks, Alaska has been a beautiful place to live. I’ve been clearing land and getting ready to build a cabin on a remote piece of land in my spare moments. The long daylight hours of summer have been balanced with the long darkness of winter. What an amazing place!” Michael Seamans ’05 writes “I am currently a staff photojournalist for Maine Today Media at the Morning Sentinel in Waterville, Maine. I just returned from a 3 week trip to Sierra Leone, West Africa with author/journalist Greg Campbell (author of the book Blood Diamonds which inspired the movie starring Leonardo DiCaprio). We were looking at the conflict diamond trade 10 years after the end of their bloody civil war. We also reported on child labor and health care in this very troubled third-world country.” Ryan Woods ’07 wrote on August 23rd that he and Kaynesha Craig were (finally) getting married this weekend! Julie Olson ’07 writes “I am the farm manager at The FARM Institute on Martha’s Vineyard. It’s a 160 acre non profit teaching farm with an ocean view. I

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Wedding photo of Stephen Lester and Sara Turnbull, both class of 2011.

encourage Sterling students to visit! All our animals just won blue ribbons at the county fair! I still hold my Sterling family Kacie Breault, Princess MacLean, Kelsie Sinnock and Liza Sprout very close to my heart and thank Sterling for bringing me to them.” Will Skinner ‘08 writes “I am running a farm to table restaurant, growing watermelons and working for the USDA/NRCS. That is what I am doing these days.” Julie (Almeter) Clark ’08 writes that she is sewing away in Bristol, VT. She’s busy mending torn and tattered garments for clients and creating fresh new clothes from reclaimed t-shirts under her new business name ‘Selvage Yard’. Reclaim remade. Brandon Hill ’09 writes “I’m currently on a bicycle trip through the Pacific Northwest to develop a small project - www.wiseroutes.org. My partner and I raised over $3,200 on Kickstarter to fund our trip and to develop a short book as a narrative of the experience as well as a tool kit for students interested in self-designed education while bicycling. So far we’ve met with authors, activists, travelers and program directors of initiatives like One World Now, Youth Venture, Carpe Diem Education, the Purple Thistle Center, P2P University and more... It’s been an incredible experience to hear from so many influential voices and discuss education both systemically and personally. We’re curious to find how different people define success and where they “thrive”. Check out our website,www.wiseroutes.org - for blogging and what not. I keep up with lots of folks from Sterling and in the last few months have seen Anika Klem, Robert Pougnier, Jack Powell, Will Skinner and Matt Hawley.” Monica Kopp ’10 writes “I’ve been working with the Colorado Natural Heritage Program this summer as a field technician on two botany and ecology projects. I started out conducting field work for a vegetation mapping project in Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area in Montana and Wyoming.

We collected environmental data in close to 300 plots throughout the park in addition to recording percent cover and every vascular plant species within each 400 square meter plot. I did this until August when I moved on to another (perhaps more fun and interesting) project with CNHP setting up alpine vegetation monitoring plots in Yellowstone National Park according to the GLORIA protocol, which is a global initiative to monitor climate change in alpine environments around the world. I used my background in field ecology, botany, and geology from Sterling to identify plant species and environmental factors and am working to add identification of grasses, sedges, and rushes to that knowledge base. I got to spend time in one of the most remote regions of Yellowstone National Park, in the North Absaroka Mountains on the eastern boundary of the park. We worked eight to ten days at a time camping in the backcountry and got to see hundreds of beautiful wildflowers and added several new rare species to the national park’s plant list. In addition, the sites we installed on four peaks will continue to be monitored every 5-10 years, contributing to an important global study on how alpine environments are being affected by climate change,” Stephen Lester ’11 and Sara Turnbull ’11 were married August 27th. Only a few months after graduating from Sterling, Stephen and Sara already have a dairy goat farm and a B&B in their hometown of Bloomfield, NY. Jessica Palin ’11 writes “I’m living in Jonesboro, Maine. Goats and blueberries have been my life since graduation. Milking goats twice a day and making the best goat cheese in Maine! Meanwhile raking and processing too many blueberries to even count. Loving coastal views and running into random Sterling folk! Living like a true DownEaster.... getting used to fog and eating lobsters like a pro now!”

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1990s Jeff Pirog ’95 writes “Still living and working in Yosemite National Park for the Fire/Rescue Helicopter. Very happy to report the news of our first baby daughter Sophie of nine months, as she fills our lives with complete happiness. Not a day goes by that I would forget those wonderful years in Craftsbury. Miss you all.” John Bennett ’96 writes “I am currently living in Mammoth Lakes, CA after many years spent in Vermont. As assistant manger at Sierra Manors condominiums, I work outside everyday moving snow in the winter and planting grass seed in the summer. I still get to snowboard nearly 100 days per season. I fondly remember timbersports with Adrian Owens whenever I pickup an ax, boxsaw or chainsaw.” Rae Gaa Powers ’96 writes from England “We are so happy to announce the birth of our baby boy Charlie! Charles Powers Randall was born on his due date June 23rd at 2:40 in the afternoon at the Royal Sussex Hospital here in Brighton England. He weighed a good 7 lbs 11 oz. Mom and baby came home 8 hours after delivery as we were both happy and healthy. Today is day two of being a family of four, all hands on deck to make this ship sail! Ian has been an amazing support...cooking, cleaning, Alex entertainment, fetching me pillows and food! Alex has been so sweet with his little brother, always wanting to give him a kiss. I, of course, am in love with all of my boys! Also, in case you didn’t know, we moved from our seaside flat to a “real” house a few months ago. Our new address is 31 Norway St, Portslade, East Sussex, BN41 1GN. Not fishing for packages... just thought this would be a good time to send out that news too!” Sarah (Morin) Alexander ’97 writes “life in central Maine is great with my husband of 11 years and our three daughters, Emma, Lucy and Vera.”

1980s

Diana Allen ’81 writes “My third booklet for Woodland Health Publishing “Kombucha” was published in March. Perhaps Sterling Kombucha could be the next local industry to blossom in Craftsbury (just a thought!)?” Lynn Atkins ‘88 is working for the Weston Forest and Trail Association and having a blast maintaining the trail system. Ted Hobart ’88 writes that he ran the first annual Mad Marathon in Waitsfield, VT as part of an ongoing fundraiser in memory of fellow Sterling alum and his friend, Lollie Winans.

1970s Nancy Sluys ‘75 wrote and posted a picture to the Sterling Facebook page showing her and fellow Sterling College Grassroots classmates Ed Thayer, Rebecca Currier-Long, Annie Gaillard, Margie Brache, and Fred Littell who gathered this summer for a small mini-reunion! 

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In Memoriam Laura Evans Ford, 65

Thomas H. Taylor, MD, 49

Laura Evans Ford died April 12, 2011

Tom Taylor, who attended the Sterling

AZ. A life-long resident of Grosse

when the Honda van he was driving

at a medical center outside of Phoenix, Pointe, MI, Laura Ford also loved her

winter home in Wickenburg, Arizona, where she actively pursued her dream of living the western lifestyle in the Sonoran

Desert.

An

accomplished

horsewoman and collector of western

art, back in Michigan she devoted much of her energy to exploring the nooks and crannies of the North

Channel and Canadian shoreline in her

yacht, Galatea. Active in supporting memberships, including the Detroit Zoological Society, the Detroit Institute

of Arts, and on the board of Michigan

Planned Parenthood, Laura Ford also confronted great tragedy in her life.

A long time Sterling Annual Fund contributor, in her will Laura Ford

made a generous bequest to Sterling, and thus became an honored member of

the

College’s

small

planned

giving society. Her gift, although not specifically mentioning its origins, was in honor of her only child, daughter

Laura Salisbury Winans, known as “Lollie.”

Lollie attended Sterling for one year,

1989-1990, when the College first

experimented with conducting three semesters

in

a

12-month

period.

However, in June of 1995 Lollie and

her companion Julia Williams were murdered as they began a south-tonorth trek on the Appalachian Trail.

In 2001, Darrell David Rice confessed and was sentenced under hate crime provisions. At the time of her death

Lollie was nearing completion of her degree at Unity College, in Maine. 

Institute in 1980-81, died instantly was struck head-on by a driver who

may have fallen asleep. Tom’s wife Kris and their young boys, Jamie and Ben, were injured and briefly hospitalized.

Tom and his family had recently moved to the Upper Valley area in order for Tom to begin his fourth year of at

specialized

Dartmouth

Center.

endoscopy Hitchcock

training

Medical

In June, he had completed

his fellowship in Gastroenterology

at Georgetown University Hospital. He was a University of Vermont and Georgetown

University

Medicine graduate, as well.

School

of

Tom was once featured on National Public Radio because of the nontraditional pathway he took to medical

school, which must have included his year in Sterling’s Grassroots Program.

Tom also spent a year as a Sterling employee, working in President Bob Cowan’s office in the early eighties.

Horace Strong and Ross Morgan, both original Grassroots Project faculty from

Craftsbury, spent an afternoon and evening with Tom’s family and the

seven alumni who had driven or flown to Hanover to help and support Tom’s wife and children after the accident. “We were deeply impressed by the

Sterling ties that bind,” Ross said.

“When Tom and his classmates arrived in October 1980, I had been at Sterling

only a month. For me, they were the

greatest group of young people I’ve ever known, full of idealism, willing to

get the most out of life. His loss is very, very deeply felt.” 

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P.O. Box 72 Craftsbury Common, VT 05827

CommonVoice

Fall/Winter 2011

Showdown at the Barn.

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CommonVoice


CommonVoice: Fall/Winter 2011