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CommonVoice Fall/Winter 2008

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The Sterling College Community Newsletter

A look at what’s inside...

Year in Fund Raising - 3 CommonVoice

Sense of Place - 4

Trustee News - 6

Darby Bradley - 18

Commencement - 20

Alumni News - 22 1


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The CommonVoice is published by Sterling College in Craftsbury Common, Vermont. Editors: Will Wootton Kate Camara Design & Layout: Ethan H. Darling Proofreaders: Micki Martin Barbara Morrow Writers: Will Wootton Kate Camara Photographers: Ethan H. Darling Jay Merrill Kate Camara David Gilligan Kate McGuire Jeremy Brosnahan Contributing Artists & Writers: Selina Perez West Paterson

2008 Incoming Students:

A Wealth of Experience S

terling’s 2008 incoming class is made up of 41 new students (29 first year students and 12

transfer students) from all corners of the continent. A little over a quarter of new students are

Vermont residents. Another 37% hail from the other New England states and an equal number

come from Alaska, Illinois, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Ontario, Canada.

The majority of new students are traditional college age, with three students 23 years or older. The male/female ratio is balanced.

Looking over new students’ applications reveals the wealth of experience they bring. Incoming

students have excelled in sports, clubs, hobbies, volunteer work, and extensive travel. They come with a wide range of interests from canoeing to martial arts, dog sledding to yoga.

Take a look around and listen as you stroll through campus. Classical guitar music sifts through

the morning air and drums punctuate the night. These students are gardeners, musicians, artists, photographers, cooks, fishermen, animal trackers, EMTs, peace activists, and actors. They have

spent countless hours volunteering for worthy organizations and environmental causes. They bring to Sterling worldly and academic experiences from expeditions across the globe.  2

Front Cover Granitic glacial erratic. Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland Photo by David Gilligan Back Cover Geology students “testing” the weight of a huge piece of metamorphic glacial till. Mt. Elmore State Park, VT Photo by David Gilligan

Letters, comments, and submission of articles, poetry, fiction, and photographs are welcome and should be e-mailed to kcamara@sterlingcollege.edu.

Mission Statement The Sterling College community combines structured academic study with experiential challenges and plain hard work to build responsible problem solvers who become stewards of the environment as they pursue productive lives.

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e photo credit: David Gilligan

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Fiscal Year 2008:

The Year in Fund Raising O

ver the course of FY 2008 Sterling raised $304,524 in unrestricted

and restricted funds. A total of 391 individuals and couples

contributed, an increase over last year of 68 and bringing the two year increase in donors to 130.

FY 2007 fund raising totaled $485,812. The $181,000 difference is primarily due to two grants: $100,000 from the Gladys Brooks Foundation and

$135,000 from the Freeman Foundation. The Freeman Foundation’s ten year’s of support for Sterling concluded this year with a final $76,000 grant.

The unrestricted portion of the total raised – those contributions that provide direct operational and scholarship support – came to $200,125, off almost 10 percent from the previous year despite a significant growth

in donors. Some constituencies, however, grew in contributions. Sterling

alumni unrestricted giving jumped from $14,276 in FY 07 to $22,011 last year and added 26 new donors. Sterling parents contributed $15,660, an increase of almost $4,000.

Other groups, trustees, former trustees, and friends of the college all

appeared to give fewer unrestricted gifts in ‘07/’08, but almost all the differences were due to changes in accounting and constituency categories.

ham Foundation in support of Sterling’s first Rural Heritage Institute, a conference combining traditional and experiential academics.

Days before the end of FY ’08 on June 30th the Canaday Charitable

Family Trust awarded Sterling a $65,000 grant to take the initial academic, architectural, and systems design steps in developing a new

24-bed student residence. That effort will begin in the spring with a Special Topics course in sustainable systems.

It is worth noting, too, that in FY ’08 the College learned of another wel-

come source of restricted funds, although it has yet to receive any of the money. The result of a $1.5 million Association of Vermont Independent Colleges (AVIC) proposal to the U.S. Department of Energy is seven $214,000 grants to Vermont’s seven smallest colleges. Well shepherded by Vermont’s newest congressman Peter Welch, the money has to be

matched dollar-for-dollar and used exclusively for energy conservation

measures. That means, in effect, that over the next three years Sterling has the opportunity to spend $321,000 for on-campus energy conservation initiatives.

“All and all FY ’08 was a pretty remarkable year,” said Barbara Morrow, director of development. “Given the ups and downs of development

generally and especially in years where the national economy isn’t at

Restricted contributions – gifts designated to a specific use or area – in-

all helpful, Sterling people came through in support of the College in

from the Jephson Educational Foundation and $3,500 from the Wind-

I think that Sterling deserves.” 

cluded the final $76,805 from the Freeman Foundation, as well as $5,000

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

greater numbers than ever before. And we had a little luck, something

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A Sense of Place:

The Comfort of a Community W

hen you think of a typical college orientation week, canoeing,

Two weeks into the Intensive, Selina Perez of West Paterson, New

come to mind. But at Sterling first-year students do that and more as

comments on Sterling and A Sense of Place. Selina is a Conservation

chainsaws, and visits to local dairy farms don’t immediately

Jersey and Mike McKinney of South Windsor, Connecticut offered their

they dive into college life in the two and a half week intensive course

Ecology Major and Mike is waiting to learn more before his major is

entitled, A Sense of Place.

declared.

A Sense of Place is, literally, designed to give first year and transfer

“I knew I didn’t want to go to a big college,” Selina said. “I wanted to be somewhere I could have a community where I could feel whole—not just part of a crowd. And I knew I didn’t want to be in a city—and Craftsbury is

students a definitive sense of where they have landed. They learn to identify particular trees and plants in surrounding forests and take trips to area artists, dairy farms, and vegetable farmers. They canoe the

definitely not a city!”

local river, learn how to read a map and compass, and equipped with

Mike was sure he was heading to study film after high school. But while

Lowell range, accompanied, but not helped, by a faculty member. All

arrived from an aunt.

naught but a headlamp, small groups night-hike over the top of the

wrestling with what film college to apply to—an article about Sterling

of this alongside classes in artistic expression, shared journal writings,

“I was looking for a sign,” Mike said. “And then this article from Sterling arrived.”

and learning about sustainable community living combines into the three-credit course that is graded—and can either be passed or failed. 4

Photo: Selina Perez and Mike McKinney.

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Mike said that Sterling combined his love of nature with what he called the, “best type of learning…when you’re out there learning hands-on.” The defining moment for Mike was his first night. “There we all were, different groups taking a walk and I could hear people from all groups looking up and saying how beautiful the stars were. I come from a suburban community where everything is judged and everything you do is so you look good for your neighbors. Here—I found a place where people care about what matters.” Selina said. “It feels like a life school. Working gets us ready for the real world. Other colleges sit in classrooms. We have farm chores, kitchen chores, and real work—and we have to learn how to balance it all together.” Bouts of homesickness are inescapable when leaving all that is familiar. But both students say A Sense of Place helped to cushion the wrench from home.

“A Sense of Place gives us the comfort of a community—gives us the comfort of being able to talk to our fellow students.” Selina said. “And once we are a community it’s easier to function. Easier to face whatever happens.” “Where else could you go to the person next door and pour your heart out after only two weeks?” Mike agreed.

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“Sterling’s motto, ‘Working Hands Working Minds,’ says it best,” Mike said. “What we learn here is how to work together on something so much larger than ourselves.”

During A Sense of Place both students agreed Sterling faculty were both instructors and stalwart support systems.

“Every Sterling faculty has a great story,” Mike said. “And even if they’re busy—if you have a question or a concern they stop and make time for you.

I’ve never felt so comfortable going up to a teacher and asking for help. And

after they were done teaching—they would say thank you—to us! I find that amazing.”

Mention of the night-hike brings sighs and acknowledgement of a physical stretch. The quickest of the four groups returned to campus at

2:30am—the last group arrived home at 4:30am. Both students agreed that A Sense of Place was a lot of plain hard work that changed perceptions and preconceived notions.

“I feel like a more productive person,” Selina said. “Like I’ve finally pieced myself together. Because where I come from there wasn’t a sense of community at all. You have your friends but there was no real community.”

“I’ve landed in a place where gratitude and not taking things for granted is the

rule.” Mike said. “We learn to be appreciative of everything.” 

A Student Road Map

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News from the Board of Trustees:

Focus on the Rewards of Service T

he Sterling College board of trustees spent 2007-2008 concentrating

incredibly complex; for instance, at the board level retention can be

issues, especially as they relate to student engagement and success.

development, from student life to admissions. And the same holds true

bers, Mark Schroeder and Bob Rheault, and welcomed a new member,

In general, Sterling’s retention rates are slightly better than the national

on three areas of the College – finance, fund raising, and curricular

Board members also saw the retirement of two long-standing memWendy Koenig.

addressed in some manner by every trustee committee, from plant to for every segment of the College, staff as well as faculty.”

average. “But at such a small place, there is a disproportionate economic

The board followed closely the curricular changes implemented in May

impact when a student decides to transfer, or, more rarely, drop out of

and the ensuing changes in the academic advising system designed

curricular development and advising, and focus on student success.”

’07, when core requirements were reduced from 60 to about 30 credits,

college all together,” Will said. “So our response is to work hard on

to support students in the new curriculum. Their concern focused on

Fund raising and finance, too, play a never-ending role in college trust-

student retention in relation to new curricular paths and programs.

eeship. Pete Chehayl, board treasurer, Comptroller Deb Clark and Will

“Student engagement and success is how I frame issues about reten-

Wootton spent part of the summer working with an outside consultant

tions like Sterling,” said President Will Wootton. “The issues can be

“Until we had such a plan and its spreadsheet and assumptions,

tion. And retention itself is a perennial issue, especially at small institu-

developing a comprehensive business plan for the College.

Photo Back Row Left to Right: Pete Chehayl, David Stoner, Reid Bryant, Greg Leech, Mark Schroeder, Fred Filios, Robert Shelton, John Elder, Ed Nef, Photo Back Row Left to Right: Abigail Faulkner, Ann Guyer, Amy Golodetz, Gail Henry, Linda Friehling, Dick Gaffney, Andrew Harvard, Ross Virginia Missing from photo: David McLean, Kate Clark, Bob Rheault, and Bruno Frohlich.

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Sterling couldn’t look out financially more than 12 months, if that,” said Pete. “Now we have a financial modeling tool that should help our long-term planning tremendously.”

Board members also worked on issues around pricing: Sterling is still the lowest cost institu-

tion among its curricular/economic cohort, and the second least expensive private college in Vermont. In general, the board does not believe that this is where Sterling deserves to be.

Finally, the academic year ‘07/’08 brought fund raising issues and planning to the fore. Ending the year with an operational deficit, not out of the ordinary at Sterling but still unwelcomed,

sped up plans to conduct a major fund raising drive. In late June, about half the board members attended a day-long workshop on fund raising campaigns generally and on how Sterling’s upcoming campaign might be shaped.

“It would be a mistake to think that because Sterling is small, it is simple,” said Chairman of the Board Bob Shelton, who has served on three Baltimore area boards, including many years

at The Maryland Institute College of Art. “The board level issues at Sterling are as knotty and as complex, or more so, than at larger, wealthier institutions. On the other hand, the rewards of service at Sterling are equal or greater, as well.”

Q

Mark Schroeder joined the board in 1997, and then served as treasurer from 2003 until October 2007 when Pete Chehayl took over the position. It was Mark, more than 10 years ago, who

helped then president Jed Williamson put together the loans and other funding the College

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Board of Trustees & Committee Assignments Robert Shelton, J.D. Chair of the Board

Abigail Faulkner ‘84

Vice Chair & Secretary Student Life (Chair), Finance & Development

Pete Chehayl

Treasurer, Finance (Chair), Admissions & Plant

Reid Bryant ‘00

Admissions & Nominations

Kate Clark, J.D. ‘88

Admissions & Nominations

John Elder, PhD Academic & Plant

Fred Filios ‘64

Finance, Academic & Student Life

needed for critical advancements. Mark, from Belvidere, VT where he lives with his wife,

Linda Friehling, MD

posals, alternative financing methods, and multiple meetings, the months-long process ended

Bruno Frohlich, PhD

ago that befriended Sterling at that pivotal point in its economic history.

Dick Gaffney, PhD

Sukey, also led the re-financing of the College two years ago. Involving numerous banks, proabout where Mark predicted, at Union Bank in Morrisville. Union was the same bank ten years

Bob Rheault (Col. Ret.), from Owls Head, ME, joined the board in 2002 and served on numer-

Admissions (Chair), Executive & Student Life Academic & Student Life

Academic (Chair), Executive & Plant

ous committees as well as on the presidential search committee. A renowned combat officer

Amy Golodetz ‘84

psychological wounds using programs and methods based on the work of Kurt Hahn. His

Ann Guyer

in the Vietnam War, Bob has devoted his post war career to helping soldiers recover from devotion to that cause and the grueling six-plus hour drive from Owls Head to Craftsbury Common were motivating factors in resigning.

“Both these long-serving gentlemen informed me they were planning on retiring from the

board at the end of my first year, if not sooner,” said Will Wootton. “And both stayed on an

additional year, which was of great help to me as a new president. I’m sure both Mark and Bob will continue to support Sterling, but certainly we are going to miss their companionship and good humor.”

Q

Sterling’s newest trustee is Wendy Koenig. Wendy earned her undergraduate degree in Foreign Languages at Georgetown University, and a Juris Doctor from Columbus School of

Development & Student Life Development (Chair), Executive & Nominations

Andrew Harvard, J.D.

Academic, Executive & Student Life

Gail Henry

Development & Nominations

Greg Leech ‘86

Admissions & Plant

David McLean, J.D. ‘86

Plant (Chair), Finance, & Development

Law at the Catholic University of America. After stints as a legislative coordinator, an associate

Ed Nef, A.B.

AVIC, the Association of Vermont Independent Colleges.

David Stoner

at an executive search firm, and in a staffing agency, in 2001 Wendy became the president of Representing the 17 private colleges in Vermont – and thus working directly for 17 college

Development & Plant Nominations (Chair), Executive & Academic

presidents – Wendy concentrated on lobbying at both the state and federal level and has con-

Ross Virginia, PhD

tion, infrastructure issues, and financing.

Will Wootton

siderable expertise in higher education policy, including student aid, tax, labor and transportaAfter seven successful years as AVIC’s chief spokesperson, Wendy resigned to take a new

Academic & Student Life President, Ex Officio

position as Federal Relations Director at the University of Vermont.  wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

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Around Campus

The Art of Development

Have Skis, will Travel

Grant from Canada ~ $5,000

From our Development office, Barbara Mor-

Sterling faculty member Adrian Owens is at it

Circumpolar Studies Faculty member Pamela

has been busy sharing her development and

new member of the US Ski Orienteering Team

ies Program Enhancement Grant from the

row, Sterling’s Director of Development,

higher education knowledge with area organizations and institutions. Barbara has been

elected to the statewide Vermont Arts Council

Board of Trustees. She will serve a three-year term as Chair of its Development and Communications Committee. Barbara also recently

participated as a team member for accredita-

tion review at Springfield College in St. Johnsbury, Vermont.  8

again! Not one to sit idle, Adrian was named a

this past June. Adrian was proud to rank third out of the five 2008 recruits to the national

team. Ski Orienteering combines cross-country skiing with map and compass navigation.

Membership on the US Ski Orienteering Team

means Adrian will be racing at the World Cup in early January and at the Ski-O-World Championships in Japan in the first week of March. Road trip anyone? 

Stern was recently awarded a Canadian StudGovernment of Canada. The College will use the $5,000 awarded to support Canadian top-

ics in the spring and fall Speaker Series and to

support class field trips to Canada. The first

field trip will be to Ottawa and will involve students from Stories and Storytelling, Black

River Sketches, and Community Development in the Circumpolar North. 

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Hands on the Lines Reading Draft Horse Manager, Rick Thomas’ recent article in the Spring issue of Small Farmer’s Journal takes you back to a time when life was

simpler and the day’s purpose clear. Entitled “Hands on the Lines,”

Rick writes poetically about taking on the traditions and instincts of his logging and farming lineage.

“I was not born with a pair of team lines in my hands though my an-

cestors certainly were. We come from what was once known as Indian Territory, later to be named Oklahoma…”

“Often, as I tend the farm or work the woods, I feel the presence of

my ancestors as they wrap their seasoned, skilled hands around mine keeping me and the horses safe as we navigate the day’s work…” The sun of my youth appeared today It was an Oklahoma sun

New Faculty - Anja Kade

Red, glowing, through the haze

The Sterling community gives a heartfelt welcome to our newest North-

Maybe I should think about the horses

Fairbanks, Alaska. A German native born in Berlin, Anja brings with

Sweat across my brow

Yes, today they should rest in the shade

Maybe tomorrow we will go to the woods Where our bodies compete

Against timber and deer flies It is not a game, really One hitch at a time

I cannot remember when water tasted so good. The issue of Small Farmer’s Journal is in the Brown Library and well worth a read.

On a similar note Rick took his draft horse talents and shared them with the 2008 Northeast Animal-Power Field Days at the Tunbridge

ern Studies Faculty member Anja Kade. Anja comes to Vermont from her a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and an

M.S. in Ecology from Colorado State University. Anja will share her considerable expertise with students in Ecology, Winter Ecology, Introduction to the North, Tundra and Taiga Ecology Global Field Studies

in Alaska, and Quaternary Studies. Anja’s resume boasts many teach-

ing and research experiences, scholarly publications, and wilderness skills.

Living on campus in our cottage, Anja and husband Eamon share their new home with two dogs. Apparently skunks are a novel sight for the

two canines and Anja and Eamon have had some smelly housemates while they get acclimatized to the Northeast Kingdom wildlife!

Fairgrounds in late September. Giving a presentation entitled: From

In their spare time Anja and her husband enjoy hiking the area moun-

emplify his ancestral legacy. 

and all things alpine. 

Furrow to Facebook: A Modern Teamster’s Tale, Rick continues to ex-

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

tains. An avid skier Anja said she is waiting eagerly for winter, snow,

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Watershed Research Grant ~ $10,000

Campus Technology ‘08

Sterling students studying Watershed Ecosystems Analysis this year will get the added ex-

Pavel Cenkl, Sterling’s Dean of Academics and

perience of working parallel to the efforts of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources.

Ethan Darling, Director of Website and Publications

Sterling College Professor Farley Brown was awarded a $10,000 EPSCoR Streams Project

took their collective intelligence down to Boston

ated to help understand how the Lake Champlain watershed works and to find solutions

2008 conference housed at the Boston Convention

as part of a larger State effort to clean up the waterways.

siastically received Ethan and Pavel’s presentation

grant to support her bioassessment of the Wild Branch River. The Streams Project was cre-

last summer to present at the Campus Technology

to pollution. The Vermont Agency of Natural Resources is also studying the Wild Branch,

and Exhibition Center. Conference attendees enthu-

Housed at the University of Vermont, The EPSCoR Streams Project is a three-year effort to

entitled, “Social Learning & Digital Communities.”

collect year-round data on the streams in the Lake Champlain watershed. Data will be col-

The presentation illustrated the many ways tech-

College.

dents and faculty and how these interactions can be

lected by students and faculty at Sterling, Johnson State College, UVM, and St. Michael’s

“It’s not just an academic exercise,” Farley said of the grant funded project, “this grant

will expose students to a variety of real-world watershed protocols and techniques. Our

data will be posted on the EPSCoR Streams Project website and will be available to other

interested state and local groups. The data will also be used in a larger watershed model-

nology can record interactions between college stu-

used for reflections and community learning opportunities — resulting in a variety of accurate and verbatim accounts of the “college” experience for the benefit of current and future audiences.

ing effort through UVM. The project gives Sterling the opportunity to compare our find-

Weaving poetry, philosophy, semantics, and no

With several years of experience researching a variety of watersheds, including tropical

presentation topics included: Community, Work,

leagues at other Vermont colleges on this important research.

Participation, Pedagogy & Reflection, and Environ-

ings with the Agency of Natural Resources.”

rainforests in Belize, Farley is excited to collaborate with the Streams Project and colTwo Sterling College students hired to assist Farley will gain significant real-world educational experience.

Angie Salonikios ‘10 is hoping her work on the assessment of the Wild Branch River will lead to other EPSCoR grant funded research projects — while Eric Ellison ’11 will aug-

ment his interest in chemical assessments using this project as a stepping stone to future projects.

“This is an exciting project to be connected with,” Eric said in a recent interview. “While working in the Watershed class last year I became really interested in the chemistry part

— and it’s all so inter-related. The bugs we’re finding here have a direct relation to the chemicals present in the stream.”  10

doubt humorous anecdotes, Ethan and Pavel’s Hyper-reflection & Storytelling, Capturing Reality, ment.

It is together — All of us remembering what we have heard together — That created the whole story The long story of the people - Leslie Marmon Silko, Storyteller (1981)

Follow the link below to view a slide show of the presentation and to read more. 

http://sterlingcollege.edu/sldc CommonVoice


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One Cow Revolution Sterling’s Director of Writing Studies and writer, Julia Shipley, won a

Grace Paley fellowship to attend the Poetry Conference and Festival at the Frost Place this past July. In addition to her teaching experiences, Julia has written extensively about farming for local, regional, and national magazines.

The fellowship allowed Julia to attend the week-long conference at Frost’s homestead in Franconia, New Hampshire. Highlights of the re-

treat included studying alongside extraordinary poets, and readings in the evening in Frost’s cow barn.

Speaking of cows… Julia is also faculty in Humanities and Sustainable

Farm Welcomes New Draft Horse

Agriculture and her summer included teaching her One Cow Revo-

lution class as part of Sterling’s 2008 Summer Sustainable Agriculture

The Sterling Farm has had a boost lately in the form of Lincoln, a huge

Semester.

Chauvin of Hyde Park, VT. Raymond’s step-daughter attended the

One Cow Revolution addressed the information and issues related to

and lovely 19-hand chestnut Belgian recently donated by Raymond

Described as, “The bovine equivalent to Sterling’s course, Horse Care,”

Summer Farm program this past summer and he learned first-hand

keeping a single cow and drinking her milk. Apparently co-instructor

that a new draft horse was needed. Lincoln was one of Raymond’s 12

horses and did not fit his immediate needs. In an act of extreme generosity Raymond offered Lincoln to Draft Horse Manager Rick Thomas and the Sterling Community.

Rick said he was, “clearly excited,” with the recent addition to the Ster-

ling farm team. Lincoln began the fall semester working with Rick and

horse partners Rex and Pete in a suite of draft horse classes. Lincoln also shared his considerable strength to provide traction power for faculty and students working the College lands.

Winnie (a two-year old Jersey) was exceedingly patient while students learned the fine art of milking.

Interested students and adult learners participated in lectures and readings based on Julia’s book in progress called, “Living with a Fam-

ily Cow,” as well as a variety of journal articles. Starting each morning at 6:30 AM, the class visited one cow farms where they learned about

cow feeding, hand milking, breeding, and care. The course had classes in everything from cow butchering to the processing of milk into butter, cheese, yogurt, and ice cream. Highlights included a milk-tasting

“We have been so blessed with the benevolence of friends like Raymond

event sampling the delicacies of six different breeds of cows and mak-

machinery,” Rick said in a recent interview. “It’s people like Raymond

Cow” Winnie.

students at the College for many years to come.” 

course in the nation centered on keeping and milking a family cow! 

who have donated large-ticket items such as a horse or horse drawn

ing hand-cranked ice cream from milk generously supplied by “One

who ensure that Sterling continues to provide a unique education to

No doubt all had a wonderful experience at perhaps the only college

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

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A Resounding Success:

Sterling’s First Rural Heritage Institute

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hat do you get when you mix academics with cross-cut saws, local food and music, traditional rural work, and scholars of all genres? A typical Sterling day—unless it happened to be during the College’s first Rural Heritage Institute (RHI). A resounding success, the RHI

Academic Conference and Workshop ran from June 11 to 15th, 2008.

More than 50 educators, scholars, artists, former students, and rural Vermont enthusiasts gathered for a four-day rural heritage exposition. Weaving together academics with local feasts and music, books and poetry, and issues surrounding environmental sustainability, The Rural Heritage Institute dove into the work, traditions, and crafts of rural life in northern New England. Keep your eyes on the Sterling Calendar for the second annual RHI coming in June 2009. 

“RHI was unlike most academic gatherings—we worked hard to balance

“Sterling was the perfect setting to recall and explore Northern New England’s

scholars of cultural studies are separated from the practitioners and the very

tradition of hill farming and the rural lifestyle. What a refresing conference in

seminars with field experiences on farms and in rural communities. Too often, work that is at the heart of their academic subject.” — Pavel Cenkl, faculty

“The RHI at the Sterling Campus in Northern Vermont is a most fitting

rural heritage. The hills of the Kingdom give voice to the rich agricultural today’s crazy world.” — RHI Participant Comment

“It was a privilege to be among such a variety of people, united in their desire

and appropriate and timely gathering of educators and practitioners who are

to live thoughtfully, sustainably, and in healthy rural communities. ... The first

with and between the earth and humans.” — RHI Participant Comment

future.” — RHI Participant Comment

committed to nurturing and sustaining a healthful and responsible relationship

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Rural Heritage Institute set a high standard. I look forward to attending in the

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Summer on the Sterling Farm:

2008 Sustainable Agriculture Semester

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terling’s Sustainable Agriculture Semester (SAS) immerses students into the daily rhythms and realities of small scale farming. Open to

college, high school, and adult learners the course explores ecological management of plants, animals, and land. Students enjoy classroom

instruction merged with hands-on training in this 8-11 credit program.

The Sterling Farm of gardens, pastures, livestock, and forests is at the center of studies. The solar and wind powered barns and a combination of tractors and draft animals are woven into Core Courses including: Livestock Systems Management, Organic Crop Production and Agricultural

Power Systems. Electives include Literature of the Rural Experience, One Cow Revolution, and Sustainable Resource Management. Check out the SAS blog for an exciting look at photos, video, and commentary from this summer’s program: http://sustainablefarm.blogspot.com/ 

“This spring, our flock was sheared and the fleece will be used primarily

“Agriculture, to me five years ago, was grocery store shelves being restocked at

own wool, the Sterling College farm demonstrates a “closed loop” system as we

can improve the connection between nature and work, to enhance both farm

during the Fiber Arts course taught during the Fall semester. Processing our strive to model the use of sustainable resources.” — Rick Thomas, faculty

“Work on the farm, experiences in the field and pasture, community building,

night. Now, agriculture to me is closing the systems, figuring out how farms systems and surrounding ecosystems.” — Alison McKnight, student

“In addition to the draft horses and tractor, these oxen round-out our ability

and academic challenges work together to show students the symbiotic

to do a multitude of traction tasks on the farm, in the garden, and in the woods.

and community development.” — Mitch Hunt, faculty

utility in the Colleges’ curriculum.” — Rick Thomas, faculty

interconnectedness between farm foods, sustainable and ecological practices,

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

As the team matures, their ability to do more work will increase as will their

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A Year in Giving:

Our Growing List of Contributors

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t is only in the fall edition of Common Voice that we have a moment

Ideally, in Salatin’s world, like Sterling’s, nothing disappears. Students

past year with their gifts to the Annual Fund. It is illuminating to imag-

or perhaps trustees. Those listed here – in all your various categories

to reflect on the hundreds of people who supported Sterling over the

ine the College’s operating budget and calculate what would happen if,

similar to Alan Weisman’s recent book, The World Without Us, Sterling’s

generous friends, parents, and alumni—all of you—were suddenly to

disappear. A college occupied solely by faculty, staff, and students is really only half a college. Without its supporting community, who revive

the campus, exemplify Sterling’s spirit, and constitute the greater number who intimately know and understand what Sterling is—without you, we would be a lonely place, an outpost of higher education.

Instead, I like to think of Joel Salatin, the highly successful environmen-

tal farmer in Michael Pollan’s book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. He is different than most modern farmers. He concentrates on the simplest and

most profound. He is, he says, a “grass farmer.” Growing and carefully

cycle into alumni, parents into friends, friends into, well, closer friends, and associations – are the ever-growing stems and shoots that Sterling counts on every day.

Metaphors describing people who give money to colleges are suppose to involve “valuable” things, like platinum and gold. Or big things, like

mountains or giant thermometers on the front lawns of community centers.

Instead we liken you to grass. But as a college of one hundred students

that focuses on the environment in a hundred different ways it is grass— not gold or measuring sticks—that symbolizes life and renewal.

As we start this new season, thank you for holding us up, keeping us fed, and lending beauty to our green world. 

managing the grasses in his fields, allowing his animals each day to feed off the tops, preserving the stems by moving his herds and flocks

from patch to patch. Without grass Salatin’s Polyface Farm would,

Will Wootton, President

figuratively at least, dry up and blow away.

Donors by Club Membership ~ Giving List Trustees

Reid Bryant Pete Chehayl Kate Clark John Elder Abigail Faulkner Fred Filios Linda Friehling Bruno Frohlich Dick Gaffney Amy Golodetz Ann Guyer Andy Harvard Gail Henry Greg Leech

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Dave McLean Ed Nef Robert Shelton Dave Stoner Ross Virginia Will Wootton

President’s Circle

David Behrend Pete & Liz Chehayl Roger & Marion Christoph George Drew Phil & Elizabeth Edgerton Francis Farwell Abigail Faulkner & Hobie Guion

Kim & Nancy Faulkner Fred Filios Ted & Linda Friehling Richard & Susan Gaffney Ann Guyer Gail Henry Jan Herder Drs. George & Lanie Hill Emily Kunreuther Greg Leech & Amy Golodetz Ed & Liz Nef Bob Rheault Mark & Sukey Schroeder Robert Shelton Ellen Starr & Geoffrey Fitzgerald Dave & Jenny Stoner

Andrew & Elizabeth Szymczak Barth & Elizabeth Vander Els Will & Lulu Wootton Canadian Consulate – Government of Canada Estate of Augusta Dustan Estate of Richard Poole Freeman Foundation Georgiana Ducas Charitable Trust Jephson Educational Trust Johnson & Johnson Matching Gift T.J. Education Fund – Oregon Community Found The Canaday Family Charitable Trust The Windham Foundation Anonymous

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Sterling Club

Stirling Adams Richard & Charlotte Alexander William & Patricia Alley Robert & Elizabeth Almeter Sanj Altan Cliff & Mary El Anderson John & Robin Bagley Daniel Bailey George & Katrina Ballek Elizabeth Barnard Delmer Barrows Jennifer Barton Scott & Chris Bates Scott Bermudes Stark Biddle William Bjornlund Howard & Sylvia Bouve Donald & Kathleen Brigham Dr. & Mrs. Harold Brown Dave Brown Marvin & Linda Brown Carleton & Sue Bryant Reid & Kim Bryant Tena Bunnell Burlington Food Service Brian & Debra Cahill James & Jonatha Castle Virginia Cazort Winston Churchill Deb Clark Kate Clark Mary Anthony Cox Rowell Lee Davidson Davis & Hodgdon Associates Ted Davis-Marsh Denise Devine Ralph Bosworth Dewey & Liz Barratt-Brown Anne Dickinson Matthew Dolski John & Anne Donaghy David Ducharme Timothy & Sonja Dunbar Bruce Dutcher John & Rita Elder J. Edward & Priscilla Eliades Eric & Deidre Ellis Exxon Mobil Foundation Peter Fairbanks Anne Faulkner Charles & Charlotte Faulkner Robert & Elizabeth Fetter Edward & Kathy Finkenstaedt Doug Fischer & Robert Haines Bill & Lynne Fitzhugh Noah & Julie Fleischmann Warner & Patricia Fletcher Laura Ford Bruno Frohlich Alfred & Joan Fuller Carl Gaede Joseph Gaglioti & Jane Hazen Ken & Janet Gibbons Arnold & Ginny Golodetz Peter Gould Clive Gray Philip Gray Scott Grieve

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Daniel Gutshall & Lynnette Kennison Lyman & Beverly Hamilton William & Mary Hamilton Gwyn Harris Johnathan & Karyn Hartland Andy Harvard Jonas Havens Helen Haynes & Charles Watts Rita Hennessey & Sean Palmer Bruce & Doris Hering Ted & Margot Hubbard Kenneth & Janis Hubel Darrell & Elisabeth Hyder Lukas & Susanne Hyder Seth & Sarah James Kenneth & Marcia Johnson Kenneth & Susan Johnson Robert Keir Anne Kelly Melissa Kirkby Fisher Jackson Kytle & Tari Prinster Cynthia Lake Woodger Hilary Laubach Samuel & Bonnie Lesko William Long Bruce & Eleanor Macleod Howard Manosh Carolyn Markson Mark McGrath Craig & Patricia McKay Sylvia McKean Geoffrey & Marjorie McKenna George & Lauren McKnight Dave & Justine McLean Barrie & Margaret McMath Clifton McPherson & Elizabeth Freedman Richard & Evvajean Mintz - In honor of Amy Record Barbara & Mike Morrow John & Lucy Murphy Cindy Nelson Kristie Nelson Kapp & Mark Nelson New York Life Foundation Kimberly Nichols Heiselman John & Melinda Patterson James Peale David & Nancy Perkins Bruce & Mary Pinto Poulos Insurance Carl & Hilary Poulsen Liz Poulsen & John Barlow Marianne Pyott & David Ehle Jane Ramsay - in memory of Christopher Moulton & Sherburn Rammsay Brier Roberts Dr. & Mrs. Albert Romano Richard Rose Joseph & Susan Rothstein Mr. & Mrs. Lewis Russell Jo D. Saffeir Betsy Sawmill Espe Edward & Joan Sayre Mary Semon John & Lois Schieffelin Leon & Beverly Shank Leonard Shaw Herbert & Bonnie Shuer John & Sybil Skinner William & Nancy Sluys Erin Small

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Roger & Betty Smith Richard & Gwen Spencer Donna Spreitzer & Scott Mabury Donald Stedman & Carol Kellogg Marc & Nancy Stretch Richard Suter Joseph Szeliga Charles Termini Barbara Tholin & Charles Wunsch Howard Thomas Robert & Joan Twiss Union Bank Janette VanAkkeren Kathryn Vernay & Arden Zipp David Vickery Ross Virginia John Wagner Rex Walden Joann Webster Richard Webster J.D. Westling Mike & Janet Westling Valerie Wilkins & Dean Bloch Jed & Perry Williamson John Zaber & Farley Brown Anonymous

Expedition Club

Christine Achenbach Lolita Amica & Stuart Langager Stephan Andersson Hannah Arps & Blythe Dyson Lynne Atkins Robert Balivet Jenneke Barton Heather Bauman Helen Beattie & Brendan Buckley Bob & Sandy Benson Susan Bernardy Theodore & Frank Bickart Estate of Alvin Bloch Eric Bolda Bourne’s Inc. Errett & Vanessa Brown Nancy Buckley Maralyn Bullion Rene & Katharina Burdet Martin Burke & Sandy Baird David Burnham Chris Carter & Jessie Smart Wellington & Barbara Carvalho John & Kathleen Cassidy Pavel Cenkl Tanya Childs Robert & Karen Chretien Sarah & Bill Clymer Fay & Charles Cole Jane Conklin James & Enola Couture Ethan Darling Robert & Cheryl Dewees Karen Didricksen John Dodge & Ann Dooley Kevin Dorr Ed & Carol Durfer Christina Erickson Rachel Farrar Richard Fitzgerald

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Sydney Flowers & Christopher Goodwin Paul & Delories Garnish John Gelwicks Louis & Jeanne Gelwicks Dianne Georgantas Megan Gerritsen Elizabeth Gibbons James Goetz Eric Goldwarg Robert & Susan Goodwin David Gusakov & Anne Wallace Virginia Hagen Robert & Lille Hamerschlag Julie Hanneman Erik Hansen Jennifer Hargrave Anna Harper Grace Harper Key & Holly Sellers Douglas Haynes - In memory of Tina Ray Anna Heidorn Wilkins Ashley Heye Thory & Marilyn Heye Helene Hill Lauren Hill Lois Hill Stephen & Joyce Hill Karen Hills Brewster & Alyssa Holmes Don & Mabel Houghton Robert & Holly Houston Ann Ingerson Kathleen Jackson Brandon Jellison John & Cynthia Jenkins Luke & Christina Joanis Ariana Johnson Linda Johnson Richard & Amy Jones Lizette Jung Von Gal John & Susan Monaghan Peter & Sandra Kaynor Daniel & Rachel Kennedy Elizabeth Kepes & Thomas VandeWater Sandra King Warren & Barry King Paige Kitson Tayler Knopf James Koegel & May Boykin Wendy Koenig Peter & Carleen Kunkel Susan Laity - In name of Bill Laity John & Sara Lamb William & Monica Laramee Gale Lawrence Philip Leech Neil Lehrman Richard & Nancy Levine Adam Lewandowski Merle & Ruth Linsenbigler William Lipsett Renee Lorence James & Beverly Lowe Karl & Maggie Mahle Barbara Marquam - In memory of Tina Ray Nan Marshall & James Kangas Randy & Micki Martin Wesley & Elizabeth Martin

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Frank & Mary Ann Mastro Ian McEwen Frank & Joan McGuigan Kim McIntyre MaryAnn McNeil Spogis Dean & Angie Miller John & Jeanette Mitchell Andrew Mollohan & Laurel Greene Michael Montesano - In honor of Steve Young Millicent Moran-Curran Ross & Diane Morgan Joel & Carla Mortensen Martha Moyer & Michael Lenart C. Twiggs Myers Tracy Nabstedt Gary & Stella Neuwirth Theodore O’Leary Doug Page & Amy Hornblas James Paolino John & Elizabeth Paonessa Charles & Lynn Stewart Parker Lucy Parker Anne Pass

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Karl Pass Jennifer Payne Thomas & Karen Perry Jay & Margie Peters Rae Powers & Ian Randall Sarah Price & Stephen Florimbi Matt & Bethlin Proft Lori Pulis Robert & Donna Remy-Powers Edward & Jane Rippe Joel Rockwell David & Lois Rondeau Ronald & Marilyn Rosen Kenneth & Laurel Ross Andrew & Juliet Rosser Daniel Schieffelin Peter Schoen & Leslie Pelch Robert & Jean Schoen Amy Schwartz William Shakespeare Rebecca Sharad Edward & Diann Shope Marion Sikora Bruce & Mary Sloat

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Theresa Snow Paul Spagnoli Elizabeth St. John Charles Steinbrecher Michelle Stevens David Stevenson John & Jody Stoddard Rebecca Tatel Rev. & Mrs. Arnold Taylor Thomas & Kristin Taylor John & Henrietta Thomas Ben & Bev Thurber Elizabeth Titus Putnam Asa Twombly Neil & Barbara Ulman Christopher Urban & Robin Shalline Richard & Elizabeth Vanden Heuvel Kathy & Doug VanGorder Christine Vogel Petra Vogel Philip Warren Andrew Webster & Maggie Leasure Frank & Jean White George & Mitzi White

Timmee Whitmore Patricia Wild S. Donald & Sandra Kay Williams Nate & Jessica Wilson Jaime Winans Cupit Mary Witherbee John Witherspoon Kyle & Sarah Witty Benjamin & Elizabeth Woodall Brian & Cortney Wright Constance Young Steve Young Jennifer Youngman Anonymous

Timmee Whitmore ‘90 Richard Fitzgerald ‘92 Susan & John Monaghan ‘92 Howard Thomas ‘92 Hannah Arps ‘93 & Blythe Dyson Kyle & Sarah Witty ‘93 Jennifer Hargrave ‘94 Lolita Amica ‘94 & Stuart Langager Renee Lorence ‘95 Christine Vogel ‘95 Cortney & Brian Wright ‘95 Rae Powers ‘96 & Ian Randall Karl Pass ‘96 Chris Carter ‘97 & Jessie Smart ‘04 Karen Hills ‘97 Marion Sikora ‘97 John & Jody Stoddard ‘97 Jessica (Vernay) ‘97 & Nate Wilson ‘00 Millicent Moran-Curran ‘98 Laurel Greene ‘00 & Andrew Mollohan ‘06 Brandon Jellison ‘00 Melissa Kirkby Fisher ‘00 Wesley Martin ‘00 & Elizabeth (Kunkel) Martin ‘02 Erin Small ‘00 Jaime Winans Cupit ‘00 Matthew Dolski ‘01 Sydney Flowers ‘01 & Christopher Goodwin ‘07 Sarah & Seth James ‘01 Theresa Snow ‘01 Heather Bauman ‘02 Anna Heidorn Wilkins ‘02 Paige Kitson ‘02 Adam Lewandowski ‘02 Asa Twombly ‘02 Brewster & Alyssa Holmes ‘03 Anna Harper ‘04 Ashley Heye ‘04 Maggie Leasure ‘04

& Andrew Webster ‘06 Kim McIntyre ‘04 Luke & Christina Joanis ‘05 Ian McEwen ‘06 Daniel Schieffelin ‘06 J.D. Westling ‘06 Ariana Johnson ‘07 Tayler Knopf ‘07 Lucy Parker ‘07

To inform, to inspire, and to indicate the breadth and depth of the Sterling’s philanthropic community we’ve added giving clubs to the associative lists of annual donors. • Expedition Club ~ $1 - $99 • Sterling Club ~ $100 - $999 • President’s Circle ~ $1,000 or >

Donors by Category ~ Giving List Alumni

Joel Rockwell ‘59 Stirling Adams ‘60 Margorie & Geoffrey McKenna ‘60 Theodore O’Leary ‘61 James & Jonatha Castle ‘62 Sonja & Timothy Dunbar ‘62 Peter Fairbanks ‘63 Robert Balivet ‘64 Daniel Gutshall ‘64 & Lynnette Kennison Rex Walden ‘66 George Drew ‘67 Jonas Havens ‘67 Bruce & Mary Pinto ‘67 John Witherspoon ‘67 Ann Dooley & John Dodge ‘68 Tracy Nabstedt ‘68 Bruce Dutcher ‘69 John Wagner ‘69 Scott Grieve ‘71 William Long ‘71 James Koegel ‘71 & May Boykin William Shakespeare ‘72 William & Nancy Sluys ‘75 Elizabeth St. John ‘75 Jennifer Youngman ‘75 Carl Gaede ‘76 Karl & Maggie Mahle ‘76 Stella & Gary Neuwirth ‘77 Hilary Laubach ‘78 MaryAnn McNeil Spogis ‘78 Scott Bermudes ‘80 Kristie Nelson Kapp ‘80 & Mark Nelson Matt & Bethlin Proft ‘80 Benjamin & Elizabeth Woodall ‘80 Roger & Marion Christoph ‘81 Clifton McPherson ‘81 & Elizabeth Freedman Edward & Kathy Finkenstaedt ‘81

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John Gelwicks ‘81 James Goetz ‘81 Holly & Robert Houston ‘81 Kimberly Nichols Heiselman ‘81 Donna Spreitzer ‘81 & Scott Mabury Rita Hennessey ‘81 & Sean Palmer Kristin & Thomas Taylor ‘81 Dean Bloch ‘81 & Valerie Wilkins George & Katrina Ballek ‘82 Helen Haynes & Charles Watts ‘82 Barbara Tholin ‘82 & Charles Wunsch Nan Marshall ‘82 & James Kangas Kenneth & Marcia Johnson ‘82 Sandra & Peter Kaynor ‘82 Jo D. Saffeir ‘82 Errett & Vanessa Brown ‘83 Lauren Hill ‘83 David & Lois Rondeau ‘83 Amy Schwartz ‘83 Sarah Price ‘83 & Stephen Florimbi Richard Webster ‘83 Eric & Deidre Ellis ‘84 Amy Golodetz ‘84 & Greg Leech ‘86 Julie Hanneman ‘84 John Zaber ‘85 & Farley Brown ‘85 Sarah & Bill Clymer ‘85 Helene Hill ‘85 Lori Pulis ‘85 David Stevenson ‘85 David Vickery ‘85 Peter Schoen ‘86 & Leslie Pelch Jeanette & John Mitchell ‘86 Marianne Pyott ‘87 & David Ehle Lynne Atkins ‘88 Susanne & Lukas Hyder ‘88 Andrew & Juliet Rosser ‘88 Rebecca Tatel ‘88 Johnathan & Karyn Hartland ‘89 Mitzi & George White ‘89 Jennifer Barton ‘90 Daniel & Rachel Kennedy ‘90

Parents & Family

Robert & Elizabeth Almeter Cliff & Mary El Anderson Stephan Andersson John & Robin Bagley Elizabeth Barnard Scott & Chris Bates Susan Bernardy Howard & Sylvia Bouve Nancy Buckley Maralyn Bullion Tena Bunnell Rene & Katharina Burdet Brian & Debra Cahill Wellington & Barbara Carvalho John & Kathleen Cassidy Virginia Cazort Tanya Childs Robert & Karen Chretien Fay & Charles Cole Jane Conklin James & Enola Couture Lee Davidson Ted Davis-Marsh Denise Devine Anne Dickinson Karen Didricksen John & Anne Donaghy Kevin Dorr J. Edward & Priscilla Eliades

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Richard Rose Kenneth & Laurel Ross Joseph & Susan Rothstein John & Lois Schieffelin Robert & Jean Schoen Mary Semon Leon & Beverly Shank Leonard Shaw Edward & Diann Shope Herbert & Bonnie Shuer John & Sybil Skinner Richard & Gwen Spencer Donald Stedman & Carol Kellogg Charles Steinbrecher Michelle Stevens Marc & Nancy Stretch Richard Suter Joseph Szeliga Andrew & Elizabeth Szymczak Rev. & Mrs. Arnold Taylor John & Henrietta Thomas Richard & Elizabeth Vanden Heuvel Barth & Elizabeth Vander Els Kathy & Doug VanGorder Kathryn Vernay & Arden Zipp Philip Warren Joann Webster Mike & Janet Westling Frank & Jean White Patricia Wild S. Donald & Sandra Kay Williams

Business

Bourne’s Inc. Burlington Food Service Davis & Hodgdon Associates Poulos Insurance Union Bank Johnson & Johnson Matching Gift Canadian Consulate–Govt. of Canada

CNS Alumni & Friends Sanj Altan Daniel Bailey Ralph Bosworth Dewey & Liz Barratt-Brown David Burnham Anne Faulkner Doug Fischer & Robert Haines Bill & Lynne Fitzhugh Megan Gerritsen Eric Goldwarg Linda Johnson Warren & Barry King Michael Montesano - In honor of Steve Young Ellen Starr & Geoffrey Fitzgerald Christopher Urban & Robin Shalline

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Employees

Pavel Cenkl Deb Clark Ethan Darling Erik Hansen Gwyn Harris Micki & Randy Martin Barbara & Mike Morrow Jennifer Payne Petra Vogel Steve Young

Former Trustee

William & Patricia Alley David Behrend ‘60 Donald & Kathleen Brigham Marvin & Linda Brown Carleton & Sue Bryant Phil & Elizabeth Edgerton Kim & Nancy Faulkner Julie & Noah Fleischmann ‘85 Lyman & Beverly Hamilton Drs. George & Lanie Hill Jackson Kytle & Tari Prinster Liz Poulsen ‘85 & John Barlow Paul Spagnoli Jed & Perry Williamson Mary Witherbee

Foundations

Exxon Mobil Foundation Freeman Foundation Jephson Educational Trust New York Life Foundation T.J. Education Fund-OR Comm. Found. The Canaday Family Charitable Trust The Windham Foundation

Friends

Christine Achenbach Richard & Charlotte Alexander Delmer Barrows Jenneke Barton Helen Beattie & Brendan Buckley Bob & Sandy Benson Theodore & Frank Bickart Stark Biddle William Bjornlund Estate of Alvin Bloch Eric Bolda Dave Brown Dr. & Mrs. Harold Brown Martin Burke & Sandy Baird Winston Churchill Mary Anthony Cox Rowell Robert & Cheryl Dewees David Ducharme Ed & Carol Durfer

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Christina Erickson Rachel Farrar Francis Farwell Charles & Charlotte Faulkner Warner & Patricia Fletcher Alfred & Joan Fuller Ken & Janet Gibbons Peter Gould Clive Gray Philip Gray Virginia Hagen Robert & Lille Hamerschlag Douglas Haynes - In memory of Tina Ray Jan Herder Don & Mabel Houghton Ann Ingerson Elizabeth Kepes & Thomas VandeWater Wendy Koenig Emily Kunreuther William & Monica Laramee Gale Lawrence Neil Lehrman William Lipsett Bruce & Eleanor Macleod Howard Manosh Barbara Marquam - In memory of Tina Ray Mark McGrath Frank & Joan McGuigan Sylvia McKean Ross & Diane Morgan Joel & Carla Mortensen John & Lucy Murphy C. Twiggs Myers Doug Page & Amy Hornblas John & Melinda Patterson James Peale Ronald & Marilyn Rosen Mr. & Mrs. Lewis Russell Betsy Sawmill Espe Edward & Joan Sayre Rebecca Sharad Bruce & Mary Sloat Roger & Betty Smith Charles Termini Ben & Bev Thurber Elizabeth Titus Putnam Robert & Joan Twiss Neil & Barbara Ulman Janette VanAkkeren Constance Young Anonymous

Bequests

Estate of Richard Poole Georgiana Ducas Charitable Trust Estate of Augusta Dustan  photo credit: David Gilligan

Robert & Elizabeth Fetter Laura Ford Joseph Gaglioti & Jane Hazen Paul & Delories Garnish Louis & Jeanne Gelwicks Dianne Georgantas Elizabeth Gibbons Arnold & Ginny Golodetz Robert & Susan Goodwin David Gusakov & Anne Wallace William & Mary Hamilton Grace Harper Key & Holly Sellers Bruce & Doris Hering Thory & Marilyn Heye Lois Hill Stephen & Joyce Hill Ted & Margot Hubbard Kenneth & Janis Hubel Darrell & Elisabeth Hyder Kathleen Jackson John & Cynthia Jenkins Kenneth & Susan Johnson Richard & Amy Jones Lizette Jung Von Gal Robert Keir Anne Kelly Sandra King Peter & Carleen Kunkel Susan Laity - In name of Bill Laity Cynthia Lake Woodger John & Sara Lamb Philip Leech Samuel & Bonnie Lesko Richard & Nancy Levine Merle & Ruth Linsenbigler James & Beverly Lowe Carolyn Markson Frank & Mary Ann Mastro Craig & Patricia McKay George & Lauren McKnight Barrie & Margaret McMath Dean & Angie Miller Richard & Evvajean Mintz - In honor of Amy Record Martha Moyer & Michael Lenart Cindy Nelson James Paolino John & Elizabeth Paonessa Charles & Lynn Stewart Parker Anne Pass David & Nancy Perkins Thomas & Karen Perry Jay & Margie Peters Carl & Hilary Poulsen Jane Ramsay- in memory of Christopher Moulton & Sherburn Rammsay Robert & Donna Remy-Powers Edward & Jane Rippe Brier Roberts Dr. & Mrs. Albert Romano

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The Trustees’ 2nd Annual Environmental Leadership Award:

Darby Bradley D

arby Bradley, who over the past 30 years played a key role in pre-

president from 1990 until 2007. Since 1977, VLT has conserved over 650

Sterling College’s Trustees’ Award for Environmental Leadership at the

The Burlington Free Press recognized Darby as the Vermonter of the

serving more than 650 working farms in Vermont, has received

College’s annual President’s Circle dinner.

working farms and 485,000 acres of land, or 8% of Vermont. In 1999, Year for his key role in Vermont Land Trust’s accomplishments. He re-

The award, given for the first time last year to Elizabeth Titus Putnam,

mains an active VLT player through his new role as Special Assistant

vidual’s long-time commitment to the environment and sustainability.

Darby graduated from Dartmouth in 1967 and the University of

founder of the Student Conservation Association, recognizes an indi-

for Donor and Government Relations.

“Vermont is a place where we live close to nature,” Darby, who resides

Washington Law School in 1972. While in private practice in Seattle,

with a good idea and a willingness to commit the time can make a dif-

interest toward the negotiation rather than the litigation side of law. He

only to give their students a grounding in the science of the environ-

the Vermont Natural Resources Council. He was also one of the original

health of human and natural communities.”

focusing on forest policy issues, and served as Chair of the Vermont

in Calais, said in an interview. “It is also a place where an individual

he participated in an environmental mediation case that swayed his

ference in their community. Sterling College is in a perfect position not

returned to New England in 1974 to become the Assistant Director for

ment, but to learn how to work for social change that will sustain the

members of the Vermont Forest Resources Advisory Council (FRAC),

Darby’s involvement with the Vermont Land Trust has spanned more than three decades. In 1977, he drafted the organization’s initial legal documents. He became general counsel in 1981, and served as VLT’s 18

Environmental Board, which administers Act 250.

The Sterling community is proud to honor Darby and his countless environmental achievements. 

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Alumni Survey 2008:

Sterling Surveys B.A. Alumni This summer, we conducted a survey of our Bachelor of Arts alumni.

We also asked about the academic rigor inherent in their Sterling work:

equaling sixty-four percent of all B.A. alumni. That’s a high response

perience, the vast majority of alumni saw the academic experience as

A whopping sixty-four percent of ninety reachable alumni responded,

rate, demonstrating that Sterling alumni care about and want to communicate with their college.

Quick Glance Facts From Alumni

too rigorous? Not rigorous enough? Over the traditional four-year ex-

“rigorous” and most felt that level of rigor increase as they entered their senior year. From A Sense of Place to Bounder to the Student Applied

Research Project (SARP); sixty percent supported the importance Sterling’s experiential focus to their education.

76 % of Sterling grads surveyed said that Sterling’s curriculum

Sterling’s Experiential Elements received a Very High rating

on their own businesses, thirty-eight percent are in business or indus-

60% of Sterling grads continued to provide work service after

Most found work within 6 months of graduating, and seventy-two per-

graduation.

cent said their current job is related to their major.

78% of Sterling grads surveyed were ensconced in full-time

Fourteen percent have earned a Masters’ degree and another ten per-

71% of grads surveyed were happy with the type of work they

Nearly every single respondent said that the Sterling College mission

The Sterling Mission Statement continued to hold true in the

had the perfect amount of structure. from 60% of surveyed grads.

employment within 1 to 6 months of graduation. were currently employed in.

life of 62% of grads surveyed.

Sterling alumni are entrepreneurial. Twenty-four percent are working

try, and about thirty-two percent are in education or government work.

cent are on their way.

still resonates in their lives today - only two felt otherwise. Many pointed out how they use the values and stewardship skills they learned here

in their everyday life and work. Sterling can be particularly heartened

Over seventy-eight percent of respondents rated their overall Sterling

to hear that about sixty percent of these B.A. alumni continue to pro-

thirds noted the structure was “about right” for their needs.

organizations. 

academic experience as “excellent” or “very good,” and just over two-

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vide service to their community in some way, either to individuals or

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Sterling Commencement Ceremony:

8th Baccalaureate Commencement

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terling’s symbiotic relationship with nature was in full evidence on May 17 as a sparkling spring day shone over Sterling’s 8th

Baccalaureate commencement. With the familiar backdrop of cows and

horses in the upper pasture, flanked by the sugar house and the western hills, the back lawn of the Brown Library presented an unparal-

leled scene of northern Vermont. Bread & Puppet flags declaring Shine, Simple, Listen, and Hallelujah ruffled in the gentle breeze — a welcome

relief under an almost too-hot sun. The celebratory bagpipes heralded in the procession of graduating students, professors, staff members,

“I am especially honored to have been asked by Sterling to speak today,” Tom began, “because Sterling is, manifestly, a Vermont college with Vermont values and a Vermont-based world view.” He professed a reluctance to offer advice, stating that advice from an elder to the young, “is usually a recipe for foolishness, and is boring as well…” Instead he asked the graduates to do something, not for him, “but for this beautiful suffering planet that we live on.” He urged everyone to keep humanities alive, “in your minds and hearts as well,”

and trustees. Family, friends, and community members gathered to

Sharing a tale from a past teacher, the late Francis Colburn, artist-in-

life journey.

think seriously about the future:

witness the newest Sterling seniors crossing into the next stage of their

residence at the University of Vermont, Tom Slayton asked students to

Commencement Speaker Tom Slayton, a well known Vermont Public

“My teacher Francis would ask us, ‘To what kind of wagon have you

honorary Doctorate of Human Letters from Sterling President Will

What do you really believe in? I wouldn’t dream of boring you with my

book, Searching for Thoreau:

wagons to. Finding them for yourselves is part of the lifelong project I

Radio commentator and the Vermont Life editor emeritus received his

hitched your star?’ In other words, what are the ideas that drive your life?

Wootton. In awarding the degree, Will spoke of Tom Slayton’s new

particular stars, nor would I want to suggest stars for you to hitch your

“Your book is reflective of the Sterling curriculum, combining scholar-

mentioned earlier. But unless you choose big ideas, bright stars of the first

and canoe at the ready. You lead us up and down and over Thoreau’s now

boring circles. And the big ideas live in the arts, and in the humanities…

streams – well marked but different – still into the heart of nature…”

the work you will do. Keep your axes sharp!”

ship and reflection with boots on the ground, compass in hand, backpack

order of magnitude, your life may go around in some pretty small, pretty

ancient off-trail New England and then take us along today’s trails and

Thank you for the work you have done to get to this day. Thank you for

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The rising hills, the slopes

Before the student speakers and the awarding of degrees, Dean of

Academics Pavel Cenkl took to the lectern for a special announcement,

of statistics

the naming of Sterling’s first Professor Emeritus:

lie before us,

“Four years ago the Sterling College community looked across the Black

the steep climb

River and saw a kindred spirit in the Center for Northern Studies in

of everything, going up,

neighboring Wolcott, and entered into a relationship with an institution,

up, as we all

a community, and an individual – in Steve Young. One of the founders

of the Center for Northern Studies in 1971, Steve Young has shepherded

go down.

grated field programs through more than 30 years of devoted, engaged

In the next century

the Center’s unique curriculum of intensive classroom work and inte-

or the one beyond that,

students.”

they say,

It was Steve who established Circumpolar Studies as Sterling’s newest

are valleys, pastures,

major, unique in undergraduate education in the U.S. Although Steve

we can meet there in peace

could not attend the ceremony due to illness, he has now recovered and

can finally pursue retirement along with all the rights and privileges of

if we make it.

his new status.

To climb these coming crests

“We will miss Steve,” Pavel concluded, “but with the hope that he will

one word to you, to

continue to be part of the community of students and colleagues here

you and your children:

at Sterling.”

Graduating senior Julie Almeter, a Sustainable Agriculture major from

stay together

Norwich, NY, spoke next about the closeness of the Sterling commu-

learn the flowers

nity:

go light 

“…The energy of every individual propels this community. We’ve challenged one other. We’ve guided each other through moral, physical, and emotional expeditions. Through it, we have experienced a shared compassion unlike any other. We care for each other not because we are class-

mates, or even friends, but we care for each other because we are each thoughtful individuals who reach out when it’s needed. What an insightful bunch! It is a rare and beautiful gift to learn with people who posses

a burning desire for that which brings purpose to life…It took the seed of your inspiration to place us squarely on own paths. As graduates, we are

ready to spread…to re-grow…redefine and define again what it means to learn.”

Julie was followed by a remarkably short but rousing speech by classmate Will Skinner, a Conservation Ecology major from Warwick, NY: “My hope for the future…does not come from the failing economy of this

great nation. It does not come from the sickly rivers that pour warm water into our already dying fisheries, nor is it this nation’s reliance upon

greedy, power hungry men. My hope instead comes from within…It

comes from knowing all of the native plant species by sight in winter. It

comes from knowing that I can do my part however miniscule it may be. It comes from the ethics that this place has brought to me.”

With the bagpipe sounding the recessional, the seniors paraded out, but only as far as the waiting faculty and the crowd of parents, siblings, and friends in the bright late afternoon.

If anything lingered as the commencement party dispersed, it was the

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The following students & graduates walked in the 2008 graduation ceremony: Julie Elizabeth Almeter

Crystal Hoyt

Johanna Burdet

Troy W. Janusz

Anthony Dalisio

Patrick N. Mule

Patrick Dougherty

Beth Mullen

Jake Evans

Rob Shea

Kathy J. Fournier

William A. Skinner

Jennifer Rivera Goldstein

Susan A. Swift

Sustainable Agriculture Norwich, NY

Sustainable Agriculture Cornville, ME Circumpolar Studies Williamstown, MI

Conservation Ecology Rochester, VT

Outdoor Education & Leadership Pelham, NY

Conservation Ecology Island Pond, VT

Outdoor Education & Leadership Port Townsend, WA

Outdoor Education & Leadership West Ossipee, NH Circumpolar Studies Golf, IL Wildlife Ecology & Management Westbrook, CT Sustainable Agriculture Acton, MA Outdoor Education & Leadership South Glastonbury, CT

Conservation Ecology Warwick, NY

Human Ecology Bar Harbor, ME

poem Tom Slayton shared, Gary Snyder’s For the Children... wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

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Alumni News 2000s

Johanna Burdet, ’08, started out the summer by hiking the Appalachian Trail for a month. “I hiked from the MA/VT border south to Duncannon, PA covering about 500 miles. I then flew to British Columbia, where I am currently WWOOFing (Willing Workers on Organic Farms). If you are not familiar with this program you should check it out on WWOOF. org There are many farms to choose from, and the deal is, you work about 4-6 hours a day, 5-6 days a week in exchange for room and board. I am doing it to broaden my farming experiences and to work on farms that have endeavors I have no experience with. Right now I am milking goats and making cheese, next week I’m off to the desert to pick fruit. I’ll be doing this until December. I am currently applying for “real jobs” but will fully enjoy travelling life until I land a job I really want.” Eric Socha, ’07, writes, “I’m working maintenance at Rowe Camp and Conference Center while living here as a member of the community and wholesomely enjoying the application of my skills. In September (08) I will be fulfilling a goal of a solo journey to India and the Himalayas.” Kacie Breault, ’07, is working and residing at Seeds of Solidarity Farm and Education Center in Orange, MA. “My official title is Farm Apprentice, as well as the garden manager for the teen education program called SOL (Seeds of Leadership) garden. The farm and education programs here are flourishing and I’m happy to be a part of such an inspirational organization in my hometown. As for my extra curricular activities, I have joined The Pioneer Valley Roller Derby team under skater name: Chickadee Struction. What is Roller Derby you ask? Well... it is the most ridiculously fun sport on eight wheels. That’s right! Roller skates! For those of you that have watched old school roller derby bouts, I’m not bashing lady’s heads in with chairs. The sport has changed and we play a much cleaner game, but it is still full contact. For more info about the game and the way it’s played I’d suggest that you Wikipedia roller derby; for more about Pioneer Valley Roller Derby check out our website www.pioneervalleyrollerderby.com Come watch us skate!” “Thank you, Sterling, for all that you are!” writes Ariana Johnson, ‘07 from New Hampshire. Tommy Greenwell, ’06, told us in August that

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he was, “wrapping up another summer at Camp Mowglis, running the trip program and so much more. It’s been a great summer! Will be here through the fall when not vacationing in Las Vegas and Mexico. Considering returning to school to get a teaching certificate. Plan to meet up with some Sterling people in October from my student years. Contact him at gordog@gmail.com Nate Wallace-Gusakov, ’06, says that “Amelia, Abigail (10 months in October) and I have started Full Belly Farm here in Lincoln, VT, and of course we’re still as nuts as ever. Amelia is running a kids day camp in the summer, and I’m building houses, sugaring, driving teams, and still playing music. (My band will be at the Music Box, Craftsbury, on Jan. 10.) Finally trimming the horses’ hooves on my own, too! We’re at 2344 Quaker St., Lincoln 05443--would love to hear from friends!” Ian McEwen, ’06, wrote to us from Denali National Park, Alaska…something about wishing he’d known more about plumbing in the middle of a winter deep freeze. He’s doing fine, however. Andrew Webster, ’06, and Margaret Leasure, ‘04 are living in the Finger Lakes, upstate New York. “We got married in September (07) in Craftsbury and are expecting a baby in July (08). Come visit!” Andrew Mollahan, ‘06 writes that he, “continues to work in the outfitting, instructing, and guiding field for several companies,” and is attending Shenandoah University studying for an M.B.A. He and Laurel Greene, ‘00, “miss Vermont.” Christina,’05, and Zachary,’04, Hayward write: “We have had a busy summer getting closer to finishing our house and homestead in Middlesex (Hunger’s End Farm). Zak is a production supervisor at Highland Sugarworks and Christina is farming and drawing/illustrating. Our daughter Kaelyn turned three, and Gregory turned one in August. Shorty the horse and his 2 other horse friends are doing well and we are training our dogs to play frisbee. We are enjoying the benefits of the sunshine and rain falling upon the garden. Thanks so much for keeping us all informed; can’t wait to hear what everyone is up to.” Christina (Roth) Joanis, ’05, is living on the farm her husband runs, in Vershire, VT. “We’re establishing pasture and thinking about what we want to build besides a barn. In the meantime, we still live at Cedar Circle Farm in Thetford, VT. Also, I am teaching 2nd

grade in Lebanon, NH. I love my school; we have a school vegetable garden and we even had a semester-long project with NH Fish and Game learning about wild species of plants and animals. I hope everyone else is doing well, too!” “Greetings from the wild west of Wyoming!” writes Robin (Austin) Brooks, ‘04. “I’ve been part of the faculty at the Teton Science Schools here in Jackson for the last three years and beginning my fourth. It is fifty-week graduate program for environmental education. What a wonderful place to teach, live and play. I’ve been enjoying my time here but I sure do miss the green of Vermont. Brooks@tetonscience.org Anna Harper, ’04, writes that she and Matt Roberts, ‘04 “are still happy and healthy living here in Stowe, VT! We have spent our winters skiing 150 days/season and loving it! This is truly where our outdoor passion lies. Matt and I continue to train for the next ski season. We hike to find the best new backcountry lines this summer as well road/mountain bike everyday to keep us in shape! Recently I have been to Lake Placid to time splits for all the top ten pro triathletes, (men and women) for the Ironman Lake Placid event this past week. I have been working for Zoot Sports at these events taking care of all the sponsored athletes and selling triathlon clothing, shoes, and the brand! We hope to make it up to Craftsbury to celebrate the life of our beloved mentor and friend George Gardner, without whom I would be a very different person today!” Monique Bedard, ’04, says, “I am currently living in Southeast Georgia and drive a school bus. Every day is a challenge and I am living life to the fullest.” mbnh31782@hotmail.com Dana Szegedy ’03, travelled by horseback out west to raise money for Heifer International. Her blog, http://www.communequest.blogspot.com/, tells about her trip in detail, and has a lot of great pictures. Alyssa (Remy-Powers) Holmes, ’03, wrote from Brattleboro, VT: “We are living in the wonderful house we just built. Working to grow more food and medicine this year. Many fun projects going! I’m very focused on raising and putting up food this year-got some pigs, and am growing more and more herbs to make medicine. A lot of great homesteading projects going on, first summer in new house and it’s wonderful. Almost ready for a Sterling intern to come down and help out! All my love to everyone.

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My e-mail is harvest264@yahoo.com I’d love to hear from people--get back in touch! Adam Lewandowski ‘02, and his wife, Gretchen are expecting a baby in December! “I’m enjoying life in Lake Tahoe, looking forward to being a dad, and hoping to make it back to Vermont for a visit.” Mike Seamans, ‘02, was right in the center of it all on opening night of the Democratic National Convention in Denver, as photographer for the Coloradoan newspaper. Says his friend, Jay Merrill, ‘02, “Who would’ve guessed 10 years ago that he would be doing such great work! He kept calling me all night long with updates on who he just rubbed elbows with....it was pretty funny.” http://flickr.com/ photos/seamansmichael Mike also photographed the Obama acceptance speech at Invesco Field at Mile High Stadium. Asa Twombley, 02, writes from central Vermont, “I am working to get my massage and energy medicine practice started. For the past two years I have immersed myself in the ancient teachings of the medicine men and women of the Americas, and spending time in Peru and training with master healers. My background in massage therapy gave me the physical understanding I needed to begin working at the energetic level, where ‘dis-ease’ begins before manifesting in the physical body. In this system, all disease is a result of an imbalance in our electromagnetic field, created by past trauma that was not able to be processed at the time it occurred. It is my belief that in order to create balance on this planet, we have to create balance in ourselves first, as we are simply a reflection of all that is. Sterling helped me learn about sustainable living; now I am learning about sustainable being. Thank you Sterling! Hello to everyone. “ acersaccharum@gmail.com

Melissa Hooke, ’00 Married Paul on May 24th at her parent’s farm in Grafton VT.

Melissa Hooke, ’00, married Paul on May 24th at her parent’s farm in Grafton VT. “We own a house on 6 wooded acres just south of Tallahassee FL. Paul is busy working on building a barn and we’re renovating our house. We live in an area that has fantastic flat water kayaking and next to the national forest so there’s lots of room to play. We’re the happy parents of a cat and dog (both rescues) and we work for the State of Florida. I’m in library construction grants for the State Library and Paul is a botanist with Florida Natural Areas Inventory. You can reach me at clucky1@hotmail.com ”

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J’mae Shemroske, ’01, writes, “I am working as the Outdoor Education Specialist in a middle school in NY state. I just had my first child in May, a girl full of smiles! We named her Estrella; she was born in water at home. My partner and I joined our first farmer’s market this summer and had a blast selling our organic produce. Life is wholesome, healthy and happy.” amayhawk@yahoo.com Theresa Snow, ’01, and Jen O’Donnell, ’05, received an E-Chievment Award as the founders of Salvation Farms, from the national radio show E Town. Theresa sent a big thank you to “the entire staff, faculty, and student body past and present for all of their sincere love and support! I couldn’t have done this without mother Sterling.” The thriving nonprofit that Theresa and Jen founded – Salvation Farms – is now part of the statewide nonprofit Vermont Food Banks, and both staff and organizations are growing by leaps and bounds. Brandon Jellison, ’00, and Erin Small, ’00, spent five days with guides on Mount Rainer in September. “Then in October, I’m marrying Ugne Aleknaite in a small ceremony on Nantucket Island, and then back to Aspen in mid-December.”

1990s

Sarah Morin Alexander ‘97, lives in rural Maine as a stay-at-home mom of two, with a third girl due in December. “Love Maine summers (almost as nice as VT) and use my ‘spare time’ to garden, can, knit, and quilt. Hope all my Sterling classmates are well.“ plainandtall66@hotmail.com Karen Hills,‘97, writes, “In 2007 I received a master’s degree from University of Vermont in plant and soil science. I now live in Saint Albans and work full time for UVM Extension as a research technician. I get to work on a variety of projects that allow me to do random and diverse things like demonstrating aggregate stability in healthy soil by using a simulated rain-maker (not that we need one this summer), emasculating wheat plants, identifying and talking about plant diseases such as ‘loose smut’ and teaching farmers to use Excel spreadsheets to write nutrient management plans. I always love to connect with friends from Sterling.” Fellow alums can contact Karen at her UVM email kmhills@uvm.edu Holly Klump, ’96, is in southern NH, “working as I.L.L. Coordinator at a small academic library. I also have a little business on the side making handspun yarn. The boy and I are buying a house, which is pretty exciting. I cannot wait to plant a garden in my very own yard! I would love to hear from you!” misshawklet@gmail.com “I am doing great!” says Jessica Naylor, ’96. “I am still working as a substance abuse counselor in area high schools and spending my summers guiding sea kayak trips and teaching sailing lessons at Old Quarry Ocean Adventures in Stonington, Maine. To combat the recent inflation of gas prices I have taken to riding my new motorcycle, which I greatly enjoy! Overall, I am smiling often and enjoying the ride. Best wishes to everyone at Sterling College.” Jessica@odrc84.org Rae Powers, ’96, reports, “We are expecting our first baby in December, a little Christmas present! Still

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happily living in England... any other Sterling folk over here? Would love to catch up with class of ‘96.” raepowers@gmail.com Brian and Courtney Wright, ’95, were at Sterling for Grassroots Year, and then transferred to Warren Wilson College. Brian is a National Board Certified chemistry teacher and a Master Teacher for ASM international. “I teach material science camps to other teachers during the summer. I have also been awarded a Fulbright Teacher Exchange to teach in Turkey for a year, at the TED College Foundation School, Ankara.” Courtney is the president of a medium sized business. She will be joining Brian and their three children, Lacey, Maren, and Aeden, in Turkey. Renee Lorence, ’95, graduated form the University of Iowa with a master’s degree in urban and regional planning this past May 2008. She works for the Red Wing Housing and Redevelopment Authority in Red Wing, MN as the community development coordinator. “Hiking, bicycling, and weaving in my free time and still learning new plants with the bluff and prairie ecosystems in the area.” Aura LaBarre,’95, says, “My family and I have recently moved to Durham, NC. With a new baby son, Eliot, and 3 1/2 year-old daughter, Iana, we’re busy getting used to living in this hot southern city. Luckily, we are finding many wonderful community connections in our new, friendly neighborhood.” auralabarre@hotmail.com

David Stolpe, ’94 w/ith family.

David Stolpe, ’94, writes, “My wife, Rachel, and I travelled to China in April ’08, where we picked up our beautiful adopted daughter, Elizabeth Rose Stolpe. Sam, her 6 year old brother, loved the trip to China, especially the Great Wall, and the even greater food. He loves his long awaited sister and dotes on her constantly. Rachel and I are happy that the two and a half year journey of adoption is now complete. It was worth every tear, every penny and every heartache; “Little Bird” or “Elizabitsy” as we call her, is wonderful. Currently I am principal at an alternative school in Milwaukee, serving 90 students who have been expelled by the public schools, or assigned to my program by the court system. It sounds bad, but the kids are just that – kids - and they are great. For the last 2 years we have been working on developing an adventure based education and therapy component to the program. I am also about half way through a doctoral and principal licensure program at Marquette University, focusing mainly on social and racial justice reform in education.” dstolpe@stcharlesinc.org

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Chris, ‘94 and Jessica Carter, ’04, are in Central Virginia restoring a 1890s farmhouse and expecting their first child in September (08). “We’re very excited and very busy. We’d love to hear from any old friends.” jessiemaybe@gmail.com Lolita (Himebaugh) Amica, ’94, writes that she is a “stay-at-home mom” of two little girls, Ila and Laurel. “I am still living in Montreal, Quebec,” says Randy Fairhold, ’94, “and am married to a wonderful woman, Elaine, whom I met in Montreal while she attended McGill University. We have been married for 12 great years. We have 2 beautiful girls: Courtney 10 years old and Caitlyn 8 years old. We recently rescued a Bernese Mountain Dog and adopted him into the family – his name is Farley – he is 3 years old and is one big teddy bear. I own my own business with my brother and sister (ROI Resources Inc.). We sell Command and Control Room consoles (furniture) for mission critical space (NASA, Police, Fire and EMS Stations, Military, Hydro Power Generation plants, Air Traffic Control Towers). We just bought a house in Newport, VT where we spend most of our free time. Life is good! I find myself on many occasions reflecting on my Sterling experience and how it has impacted my life in such a positive way.” Rfairholm@roiresources.ca Cassandra (Davis-Marsh) Jones, ’94, teaches Pilates and is enjoying time with her baby boy. Doug, ‘93, and Lee Lakin sent us photos of daughter Maeve from summer 08. “She is crawling and teething. Both Lee and I are well....” Sarah Witty, ‘93, graduated as a registered nurse in May 2008, and then travelled to Tennessee with her son Nick for Destination Imagination for Global Finals. Sean McCann, ’93, has “two kids (Conor, 8 and Mairead, 6) and my lovely wife Noel of almost 10 years. I am living in Jericho, VT and work as an accounting clerk for Clark’s Truck Center in Jericho (very nice commute and thinking green). The family and I spend our vacations in the White Mountains and on the coast of Maine. All is well otherwise. We are just very busy and involved with raising our children and couldn’t be happier.” seanm0570@yahoo.com From Asheville, NC comes news of Stephen Elsen, ‘93. “I have a wonderful family: Colleen, wife of 11 years, and sons Liam (7) and Brogan (2). I am in welding school full time, becoming the best welder I can be. I’ve been in the wood and metalworking trades since Sterling. I am constantly pushing my own boundaries, trying to live a courageous and fun life. I recently finished and am using my own design of engine powered bicycle. A design is forming for an engine powered bicycle cargo trailer. The premise behind this is a 50cc 4-stroke engine driving 400lbs of bicycle, trailer, rider, and cargo up any hill (slowly) and 35 mph on the flat that can be hitched to any full size bike in less than five minutes, and get at least 150 mpg. I attended an Asheville arts and music festival in August, in a 2 piece bikini putting on an impromptu 3 hour performance raising awareness and eliciting thousands of extreme responses. Next weekend is a homemade rafting event on the French Broad River. My raft is bamboo and old foam complete with a person powered, heavy

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duty, extremely powerful wooden water cannon.” Stephenelsen936@msn.com John Monaghan, ’92, was accepted into the Antioch University New England’s Master’s program in organizational leadership and management. “I’m still a NH State Trooper...11 years to go. My wife Susan recently graduated from Plymouth University’s with an M Ed. in math and is certified to teach 7-12 mathematics in NH. Susan is working as a lake host at Lake Tarleton checking boats for exotic/invasive plants before they hit the water. Our kids Eve (10) and Matthew (6) are well and enjoyed the NH summer. We took a nice overnight Canoe camping trip on Lake Tarleton in Piermont, NH. That’s all from our neck of the woods. And many, many thanks to Ned Houston who wrote one of my recommendation letters to get into the university, THANK YOU NED!” “I am living just over the hill from Sterling on a beautiful dairy farm in West Glover,” says Tara Young, ‘92. “I am staying home right now with my two wonderful little girls, Zoe (5 years old), and Maia (19 months old). I have been trying to keep up with old Sterling alumni, but I have lost track of one really good friend, David Thomas. If anyone knows how to contact him, please let me know. My email address is judson72@care2.com I hope that the classes of 1990-1992 are able to come together soon for a reunion, because I would love to see as many alumni as possible. Life in Vermont is still ‘back to basics,’ and I am enjoying the lifestyle very much.” Laura (Howard) Leduc,’92, is living in Arlington, MA. “I am married to Craig Leduc of Colchester, VT and mother to Tessa, a delightful 2 year old daughter. I am in my last year of residency in anesthesia at Mass General Hospital.” John Shoemaker, ’91, reports that “my partner, Zaidee Bliss, and I are planning to get married next year. Last year we bought a small farm in Easton, NY and are busy settling in for the long haul. I’d also like to let people know that I have a CD of original songs which people can check out at my website: www. astronomicalleap.com Good luck to all the Sterling community in the coming year! John Shoemaker – ‘Rooter Class of 1991 (has it really been that long?... wow!)” Stephens Harper, ‘90, is a ranger for the U.S. Park Service in Alaska, according to his family. Rachael (Healy) Kennedy, ‘90, is working at a greenhouse and as a Waldorf school teacher where her children, Caleb and Susan attend. She says she “went to Timmee Whitmore’s,’90, wedding in the fall and danced our socks off. Congrats to Timmee and Gary. True to Timmee form is was quite a party.” Alyssa Lovell, ’90, is living in western MA, doing a lot of gardening, dancing, and studying for an MFA in Poetry while working as an Occupational Therapist and doing developmental work with kids. Stay in touch at alyalove@gmail.com

1980s

Lynn Atkins, ‘88, wrote in May to say she’s, “enjoying the spring explosion of growth and scheming about ways to change society to live within ecological cycles.”

Jon Albright, ’89 Jon’s children at the lake.

Jon Albright, ’89, gave us a quick sketch of what’s up: “I’m still living in the Methow Valley of Northern Washington state (aka: Paradise). Still married to the same great woman (Ashley) and have two fabulous daughters (Wyatt, 4 and Leki, 2) who are so much fun. The biggest news is that we are building our first house ourselves. After many years of renting we finally are on track to be in our own place next spring. I’m doing nearly all the building and that is fun and challenging and at times frustrating, too. This spring before starting the house we put in a huge garden and it produced despite the neglect due to the house building. Life is good but I do miss the New England landscape and friends and family back east. This is a great place to visit if anyone is passing through, but come willing to swing a hammer this season.” albright_jon@yahoo.com Lukas Hyder, ’88, writes “for the last 8 years I have been working at the White Memorial Foundation (a 4,000 acre private forest, nature center, etc), in Litchfield/Morris, CT. I am the forester/assistant superintendent and am responsible for the maintenance of the property, trails, timber harvests, etc. After work I am busy woodworking, riding a road bike, and working in the garden. I have been married for 12 years to Susanne. We are planning a trip this fall to her native Switzerland to visit family and friends.” Lukas@whitememorialcc.org John Russell, ’88, writes “I am on the board of Directors of the Boston Natural Areas Network, which has just become an independent arm of the Trustees of the Reservations, in Massachusetts. Closer to home, I am on the steering committee for The Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord Rivers Watershed. Even closer to home, I am one of the retail managers for my uncle’s store, Russell’s Garden Center. I manage many people in the gift, toy, Christmas, bird and garden shops and am a resident diagnostician. If you have a bug, a disease, or a garden problem of any kind, you talk to me. I caught myself the other day getting excited about a slime mold that someone had brought in. Our garden center is almost organic, but not quite. We have found that if we put the organic substitution next to what customers are looking for and we get that minute window of opportunity,

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we can sell the organic instead. I am married to a wonderful woman, Allison, and we have a daughter who was 5 on August 26th. Her name is Caledonia McLeod Russell. My passions include old school paintball, paintball in general, gardening and reading.” Martha Napolitan Cownap ,’86, writes, “For 18 years I have lived in Camphill Village, Kimberton Hills, an intentional community in Pennsylvania where I work with disabled adults and manage a biodynamic orchard. But now my husband Ben and our 3 children (Francis, Clara, and Diggory) are moving to Springfield, Massachusetts to help take care of my parents. Any Sterling grads living in Western Massachusetts, who have kids who are 8 or 10 years old? If so, maybe we can get together for a picnic. My email is cownapfamily@aol.com Anne Bernheim Campbell, ’85, and Ben Campbell, ’87, would love to re-connect with other Sterling people. “Ben and I are quite busy with two chapters of kids. Chapter one involves Ian, 14 and Addy 12. Chapter two involves Emma 6 and Olivia 3. I am a stay-at-home mom with some signs of early memory loss. I think I need to take up doing crossword puzzles. Ben is still self-employed as a forester and people are calling him like crazy for wood! We live in Starksboro and would love to hear from folks and have visitors.” annecam@gmavt.com Matt Kelson, ’83, visited campus in August. He is “retiring” from his work at an auto dealer in Florida. Matt spoke glowingly of how Sterling made a difference to him. “I learned how to work hard and that all work is good. Plus, I learned that I’m not better than anyone else…and that made all the difference to my life after I left Sterling. It’s a great place.” Matt returned home to Florida but plans to visit again with his family. Gary Miner,’ 85, Jody and Steve live in Corinth VT. “I am working for the forest service as a timber sale contract administrator on the Green Mountain National Forest. I retired from the Vermont National Guard with 21 years of service and enjoy my little 10 acre farm and home. We are focusing of self subsistence by growing our own vegetables and raising our own meat. We try and do a week of camping each summer, which is tough with the animals and work. I am in hopes of getting to Craftsbury to visit with Farley and John. I also would like to spend some time with Ross.” smokey@tops-tele.com Tom Shamrell, ’83, and his wife Edith relocated to Washington DC area, after 2 years in Portland, Oregon and 7 years in Paris, France. “We await the ultimate bounder experience: parenthood. Our daughter is due late August, and we are excited. I’m making ends meet via a business development job with a CH2M Hill, an engineering firm.” tshamrell@ yahoo.com Jeff Levine,’82, “I was in Prudhoe Bay (AK) last February, and I’m leaving for two weeks up there again (end of September). I hope it’s warmer than when this was taken (-35F). It shows highs in the 40’s during the day in the forecast, so I’m optimistic. Hope you are enjoying your stint at Sterling, lord knows I did. Tell everyone I said hello, if they even remember me.” Barbara Tholin, ’82, writes, “After nearly twenty years in Minneapolis, I have now settled in northwest

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Lower Michigan, where my husband was raised. Looking back, it seems I have been drawn to a life on the forty-fifth parallel! While I miss the butter and cheeses of Vermont and Minnesota, I am quickly becoming a connoisseur of all things cherry, especially pie. Recently, Charlie and I became publishers of a local food magazine called Edible Grande Traverse, a member of the Edible Communities family of publications. We have a son in second grade and live in Traverse City. I’d love to hear from anyone living in the area, or just passing through!” “Nice to see Sterling is keeping up with us wayward ‘rooters,” says Jeff Levine, ‘82. “I’ve been in Fairbanks for 13 years now. After many years in construction, I got a job working for the state in the division of weights & measures. There are two of us who cover the northern region, which is basically everything more than a couple hours drive from Anchorage. I’ve been in Valdez, Manley Hot Springs, and Barrow, all in one week! They said ‘you have to like to travel’ in the interview, and they meant it. I really enjoy working for the state of Alaska and would recommend it to anyone.” Although he only checks his email occasionally, you can contact him at saunas@mosquitonet.com From Kenya comes news of Elizabeth Goodwin, ’82. “My husband and our three children continue to spend our summers in Naro Moru, Kenya, working as the directors of Batian’s View Experiential Education Centre. This is the former NOLS branch that my husband and I took over in 2003. During our children’s school year, we live in Tucson, AZ. My children attend Castlehill Country Day School and St. Gregory College Preparatory School, where my husband is dean of students. We administer Batian’s View from Tucson during this time, with some travel back and forth. I also work as a gender consultant for a project in Kenya. So, all this and three children means life is quite busy!! We welcome news at GoodwinRoberts@msn.com and, if anyone would like to know more about our program in Kenya, the website is www.batiansview.com ” Ken Johnson, ’82, is “still happily married and working as a restoration ecologist/biologist west of Chicago. I’ve always had fond memories of Sterling, students, faculty and the region.” Nan Marshall, ’82, says, “My husband Jim, 3-yearold son Ethan, and I are trying to move from the Milwaukee area out to rural southwestern Wisconsin, buy some land, and build a passive solar house. We hope to be able to grow a portion of our food and become more self-sufficient. Before Ethan was born, I was pursuing sustainable interior design. Since his birth I’ve focused more on our living a healthier and more sustainable life. I’ve learned how to cook and am even learning how to can. We’ve been looking for land for a year now, in an area with the largest concentration of organic farms in the U.S. and a high concentration of progressive people. There are also a lot of conventional farmers and Amish as well. The mix of people in the area is making for exciting times in a small town. We’re also trying to figure out how to support ourselves. There’s a saying, ’Viroqua is a beautiful town – bring your own job.’ Throughout the years we’ve tried make what we enjoy fit into mainstream living. It just hasn’t worked. I’m not sure why we tried for so long. Perhaps it’s just what people do. But, particularly now that we have Ethan,

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we are ready to try to fight to find a way to live a life that suits us better and has more meaning for us. I often think of my days at Sterling and the lessons I learned there. I wish that I had been able to stay in better contact with people from the school; it’s difficult to pursue my ideals surrounded by people who thought that everything I discussed sounded peculiar. I’ve recently found people who are of a similar mind and I enjoy swimming with the fish again. I wish that Sterling had a week-long program where people could get back together and refresh themselves in positive and natural surroundings.” tuamotu@wi.rr.com

Marion Christoph, ’81 with family.

Marion Christoph, ’81, writes, “My oldest, Henry has graduated high school and is accepted to the Naval Academy foundation program. He will do a post-grad year at Kent School in Connecticut, then enter as a plebe the following year. My next son, Thomas is going to spend his junior year in Beijing, China in the School Year Abroad program. He will live with a Chinese host family and go to school with 60 other students in the program. He will also travel in the country quite a bit. That leaves a huge gap in our family, but I will soon be quite busy at the start of another home-school year. My next three are in 8th, 7th, and 3rd grades, then there’s my baby, who is four. I look forward to another year of learning with them. My husband is quite busy with his startup triple A baseball team based in Grand Prairie, Texas. I had a great year in the garden and enjoyed putting up some veggies for the winter. The past few years we have had an egg business which has been profitable and satisfying. We still put up hundreds of pounds of honey every year as well.” Jeff Sampson, ’81, says, “Suzanne and I are going strong after 25 years together, our kids are grown and out of the house already. We are fortunate to be the stewards of an amazing piece of land in a mountainous central Vermont area dominated by the Green Mountain National Forest and Breadloaf Wilderness, with a deep pond, lovely stream, and a log home. We are busy with creative pursuits including stained and kiln-fired art glass, textiles, writing, photography, and gardening. I’m studying guitar with a master jazz musician and have a bunch of new songs, just loving life in general. Would enjoy hearing from Sterling friends.” jeffsampson@hughes.net Urmila Joi Sandhu, ’81 and ’85, writes, “I’m in Mendocino County, California working a job with the National Health Service Corps until 2010. I get to the Bay Area as often as possible, anyone there? If so, write!” ujsandhu@yahoo.com

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Donna Spreitzer ’81, gives her update: “Had a fun visit with Dave McMath and his daughter who were passing through Toronto on their way to a bagpipe and drumming workshop nearby. They got to visit our 250 acre farm and it was great to get Dave’s forestry advice about our many trees. I’ll have to pull out my Grassroots notes since at one time I actually knew something about trees and forestry! Life is good up here. I’m still director of a neighbourhood daycare and we (husband Scott and daughter Scotia) get up to our farm most weekends. We love visitors so don’t be shy about emailing or dropping in if you’re coming by Toronto.” dspreitzer@aol.com “Dana Miller, ‘81, is doing great!” writes her family from Massachusetts. “Kathy and I live in suburban Philadelphia,” writes Ed Finkenstaedt, ‘81. The three kids have become good paddlers and they make an annual trek along the Northern Forest Trail each summer. Rodney Walter,’80, lives in the township of Clyde, WI and “has been married to Melody Walker 208 months and counting. Melody works for the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture supervising people who track insect pests of agricultural crops and I work for the Wisconsin Chapter of The Nature Conservancy--supervising people who buy land or conservation easements for nature preserves and also buying large working forest easements to prevent development of industrial forestland. I enjoy tropical fish spawning/keeping, reef aquarium, motorcycle travel (4,000 miles to Edmonton, Alberta last June), and bog gardening. We live with two dogs, Australian shepherds Winston and Cardamom. Rarely (every few years) see Janet Armstrong Gamble from Grassroots 1980.

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We have plenty of room and several acres of land for campers. We have a pool, patio/grilling area, bonfire area, yard games... we think it could be a great place for alumni to reunite with friends and classmates. Anyone who’s interested may contact me at my email address and I can start planning early. Sound like fun?! A tentative time would be the July 4th holiday weekend.” Lew Trumble, ’78, writes: “After 25 years in the horse business, I am starting a new job. I will be working for Penn State University in the College of Ag Science. My actual job is program associate for the 4-H horse program. I will be helping to expand their educational programs and projects. It will be nice to have the security of a regular paycheck and benefits after being self- employed all these years. I’d be thrilled to hear from any Grassrooters from 1977-78. Hope you all are doing well!!” lewtrumble@ aol.com Jennifer Youngman, ‘75, works for two environmental nonprofits in Washington State: Rare Plant Care & Conservation and Homewaters Project, in addition to calling contra-dances and designing puzzles for children’s magazines.

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accumulated rental properties over the years. A cancer survivor for almost 5 years now, looking forward to retirement and touring the country in our home on wheels.” Lyman Foss ‘68 writes, “The 40! intervening years since our Sterling graduation have been full for me. Full of school, travel, adventure, the sporting life, marriage, 32 years in Vermont, 2 kids, 10 years International Sales for Orvis, museum development, auction school and a secondary career in fund raising for non-profits at auction, divorce, 10 years of bachelorhood, remarriage (complete with 3 great kids), another secondary career as indentured servant to my wife’s interior design business, an assortment of one-wheel-drive vehicles (read: motorcycles), the education of the kids, the loss of parents, the marriage of my daughter to an Italian and her life in Italy, my son’s college graduation, hiring and relocation, my other daughter’s schooling and employment in South Africa; just to mention a few of the highlights! I am looking forward to our Reunion with anticipation and to reconnecting with old friends. I get the feeling that we’re about to celebrate another Sterling milestone event: “time travel” comes to mind! See you in October.” Rex (Bus) Walden, ’66, retired as Art Department Chairman of Valley Regional High School in Deep River, Connecticut in spring 2002. He is now trying to do what he taught students to do for the past 31 years. He is painting full time and maintains a studio with his wife Wendy, a jewelry designer. If you would like to get a taste of his work, please visit his website: www.rexwalden.com

1970s

Diana (Kezele) Kurtz, ’79, writes “I married Brian Kurtz; our son Cole is attending college in California. When I met Brian he had just opened a specialty auto building and parts business dealing and wholesaling parts for 30s Fords. It has been a very successful business and enabled me to work on a big dream of mine. For the last eight years I’ve been building a small farm on which I’ve raised our food, organically. Last year I grew enough for our family and sold the surplus to a local health food store. At that time I was a beekeeper and bred llamas for their perfect, inexpensive natural fertilizer and for their fiber which I sent away for processing into clothing items, chickens for meat and eggs, turkeys for meat, cattle for beef. I even milked one family cow and made my own butter, cheese, etc. Then, because I also manage three rental properties we own, I downsized as I extensively renovated one of the homes. There just wasn’t enough time in the day for little ‘ol me to keep up. As of today, Soggy Bottom Farm consists of a relatively small garden, chickens for eggs and llamas for the same reasons as before but I actually have time to spend with them --which makes them more like exotic pets than livestock. I’m loving this! I’ve gone back to school several times and we’ve managed to build quite the resort style home, at which we’ve thought of hosting a Grassroots Project 30-Year Reunion. We’d do it if there’s enough interest or even if only one alumnus shows an interest.

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John Dodge, ’68, writes that he has been living in W. Newbury, MA for the past 16 years with his wife, Ann Dooley, and their two children. “Chris is a junior at Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, and Katie is a sophomore lacrosse player at Emerson College.” John and Ann are enjoying the empty nest at their vacation home on the Kennebec River in Bath, ME. John has been a journalist and editor for 32 years after getting his master’s in journalism from BU in 1977. He was editor of PC Week for 16 years, a business/technology weekly columnist for the Wall Street Journal from 1999-2002, and the Boston Globe from 1995-99. He is presently editorin-chief of Design News, a magazine and web site for design engineers. He also drove a cab in Boston for several years in the early and mid-seventies. He is looking forward to seeing his classmates after too long a hiatus! Lance Abbott, ’69, will attend the reunion in October with his wife Aletha and looks forward to seeing familiar faces. “Living in CT, married 30 years with a daughter who is married and living in NH, and a son living in Colorado. Have been a building contractor in Litchfield, CT for 25 years, and have

John Richard Asbury, ‘66, didn’t make it to the 50th Sterling Reunion, but sent news: “I am the father of 20 children and grandfather of four, live in the Sierra Mazateca in a rugged and remote area in the northeastern part of the state of Oaxaca, Mexico right outside Huautla de Jimenez. I run a medicinal mushroom company known as the Emperor’s Tea Mix Co. We grow and extract medicinal mushrooms. Our web site is www.hongomex.net I have studied Mazatec shamanism with now deceased wise ones who were in their 90’s when I got here in 1991, and have been living here for 18 years and am now a shaman in my own right. I would certainly welcome news from any Sterling classmates that still remember or have an interest in me or my work. Wishing you every blessing from above.” agua_de_estrella@ hotmail.com Jim Castle, ’62, married in 1968 and has three kids, girl, boy, and girl. “Two are married, each giving us a grandchild. Live in Mystic Connecticut and have been in the same house since 1971. Have been in various ends of the convenience store and gasoline business in New England and New York for the past 40+ years. I have no intention of retiring at this point because I don’t want to get to know myself any better than I already do. For sports I play tennis, hate golf, and do a bit of fishing. This is beginning to sound like I’m writing it for one of those dating websites so I’ll see you at the reunion!” John Buck, ’59, is retired and living in Arden, NC, near Asheville. “Have lived here for 35 years with my wife of 48 years, Susan. We have three children and 6 grandchildren (two in college). We like to hike and bike as well as take trips with Elderhostel.”

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In Memoriam

The Sterling College community is sad to report on the passing of faculty, friends, and alumni. We extend heartfelt condolences to their family members.

Ted Hine, ’63

In 1966, Ted Hine, ’63, went to the University of Colorado (Boulder) where, when not dealing with academia, he experienced his “15 minutes of fame” as the lead guitarist in a regionally known rock band which had a record on the local charts and traveled extensively around the state. “In spite of this rather significant distraction I graduated with a BS degree in Business Administration. I then missed the excitement in Vietnam due to eyesight which didn’t come up to military standards. After working for a Colorado backpacking and ski equipment manufacturer, my brother Greg and I started a company in Boulder which manufactured and nationally distributed high-end backpacks (the Hine/Snowbridge brand - which made it to the top of the world’s highest mountains) to retail specialty shops, bicycle packs (Kirtland) which were literally pedaled around the world, and camera packs (Atan), the packs of choice for White House and National Geographic Society photographers and which flew on the Space Shuttle. When pack products couldn’t be cost effectively manufactured in this country any longer (80s) and BabyBoomers weren’t buying packs in the quantities they had previously, I moved on to other endeavors. In the 1990’s I conceptualized, designed, patented, and test marketed a high tech computerized advertising delivery system for supermarkets known as the Town Square Kiosk. I went back to school substantially full time for a couple of years and learned programming, networks, web site design, and other things ‘digital.’ I’ve spent considerable time tracing and getting to know my ancestors and find genealogical research to be exceedingly addictive. Always the entrepreneur, I’m currently researching several business opportunities combining computer technology with genealogy. On the volunteer front I expanded much energy in the 80’s and 90’s to help keep WWII aircraft flying and spent 10 years on board the Colorado unit of the Confederate Air Force (an all volunteer flying museum recently renamed the Commemorative Air Force). I was a co-founder of our local tennis association, served 9 years on its board, and am a past president. For almost 33 years I’ve lived in the same home in Louisville, CO (a formerly isolated small town which today is, for all intents and purposes, a suburb of Boulder). I’ve so far successfully managed to avoid marriage. My health remains good and I spent 24 days on the ski slopes last winter and have so far played on 3 league tennis teams this summer. I’ve only visited the North East a handful of times since the late 1960s. I’m looking forward to visiting the Common for the first time in 45 years for the October reunion. tedhines@sprynet.com I was performing early 1960’s instrumentals (mostly learned while at Sterling) at a ski club social event....... only my second formal “public performance” since the late1960s.

wwww.sterlingcollege.edu • 800.648.3591

Jonathan Holmes LePeyre, ’64, died July 13, 2008 at the Connecticut Hospice Hospital in Branford after a long and valiant fight against cancer. Jon worked as a history teacher at Kelly Junior High School, was self employed for many years, and most recently worked as a Counselor at Reliance House in Norwich. Jonathan is survived by his beloved daughter, Carrie LePeyre of Chicago, IL, his sister, Jane Peterson of Groton, MA and his brother, Stanton LaPierre of Stonington, CT. E. Warner Bacon,’69, passed away this summer of brain cancer. His sister, Kitty Bacon Koch, noted that Sterling was an important part of his life. George Gardner, a former Sterling faculty member, died the evening of Saturday, July 19th while solo climbing a route on Wyoming’s Grand Teton. George, 58, was found early Sunday morning by his climbing companions after he didn’t return from climbing the Lower Exum Ridge Route. A dinner celebrating his life was held on Sunday, July 20th in Ridgway, Colorado with over 150 people attending. A prayer gathering to remember and say thanks to George was held on Monday, July 21 at Dennis Weaver Memorial Park in Ridgeway. Sterling’s vice president, teacher, and climbing instructor Ned Houston reflects: For me personally, George was at once a very close friend and my primary climbing partner for several years. George reintroduced to me a world of adventure I thought had been lost to my years of developing, administrating, and teaching. I think he did the same for many others. He led me on many unbelievable adventures. Together we climbed the world-renowned ice routes on Lake Willoughby and out in the Rockies. He led me on rock climbs in the Tetons,

up eastern mountains including Cannon face in Franconia Notch, and desert towers in Utah. With his inspirational encouragement, I ventured up the Ama Dablam in 2001, a 22,500’ peak in Nepal — surely one of the great adventures of my life. George and his family came to Sterling in the Fall of 1997. He taught a class called “Brain Gyms” as part of the Sense of Place that year. He worked closely with me in my capacity as Dean of the College focusing on students and student issues. In 1998-99, George ran Sterling’s Learning Readiness Program. In the fall of 1999, the Gardners moved back to Colorado, and George directed and instructed the Sterling West semester in Ouray. In 2000-2001, George and I led our first long program in the Himalayas in Nepal. The next year, we re-designed our travel to go to Sikkim due to Nepal’s unstable political climate. In 2003 we led students on an extraordinary program trekking 16,600’ into Sikkim’s rarely visited Kangchendzonga base camp. It would be a disservice to George not to mention the countless hours he spent with students outside of the classroom. This ranged from weekly ice climbing session up Mt. Pisgah above Lake Willoughby, to working on the climbing gym, to healthy ways to get out and interact — including a weekly Friday night bowling event in Morrisville. He worked tirelessly to help students make progress, enjoy life, and feel positive about themselves and each other. George’s contribution to Sterling and our students was huge with a legacy still active in our international programs. He had a personal impact on many of us inside and outside the classroom — and he will be profoundly missed. 

George Gardner

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Fall/Winter 2008

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Common Voice: Fall/Winter 2008