Page 1


STERLING and the distinctive Sterling logo are registered trademarks of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Available 2 4 6 8 10 9 7 5 3 1 Published by Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. 387 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016 Text copyright © 2010 The Audrey Hepburn Children’s Fund Copyright © 2010 Sean Hepburn Ferrer and Luca Dotti Please see picture credits on page 190 for image copyright information. Distributed in Canada by Sterling Publishing c/o Canadian Manda Group, 165 Dufferin Street

We dedicate this collection to everyone who helped make Audrey Hepburn the

Toronto, Ontario, Canada M6K 3H6

icon that she is—to her new and old fans, the photographers, the filmmakers, Produced by becker & mayer!, Bellevue, WA www.beckermayer.com

the humanitarians who helped and inspired her, her friends and family, and

Design: Joanna Price

last but not least, the children of the world that she so desired to save.

Editorial: Kristin Mehus-Roe Image Research: Shayna Ian Production Coordinator: Diane Ross Printed in China All rights reserved Sterling ISBN 978-1-4027-7836-0 For information about custom editions, special sales, premium and corporate purchases, please contact Sterling Special Sales Department at 800-805-5489 or specialsales@sterlingpublishing.com. Front cover: Photo by Antony Beauchamp / Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection © Sean Ferrer & Luca Dotti Back cover: Photo by Hans Gerber, courtesy of ETH-Bibliothek Zurich, Image Archive


STERLING and the distinctive Sterling logo are registered trademarks of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Available 2 4 6 8 10 9 7 5 3 1 Published by Sterling Publishing Co., Inc. 387 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016 Text copyright © 2010 The Audrey Hepburn Children’s Fund Copyright © 2010 Sean Hepburn Ferrer and Luca Dotti Please see picture credits on page 190 for image copyright information. Distributed in Canada by Sterling Publishing c/o Canadian Manda Group, 165 Dufferin Street

We dedicate this collection to everyone who helped make Audrey Hepburn the

Toronto, Ontario, Canada M6K 3H6

icon that she is—to her new and old fans, the photographers, the filmmakers, Produced by becker & mayer!, Bellevue, WA www.beckermayer.com

the humanitarians who helped and inspired her, her friends and family, and

Design: Joanna Price

last but not least, the children of the world that she so desired to save.

Editorial: Kristin Mehus-Roe Image Research: Shayna Ian Production Coordinator: Diane Ross Printed in China All rights reserved Sterling ISBN 978-1-4027-7836-0 For information about custom editions, special sales, premium and corporate purchases, please contact Sterling Special Sales Department at 800-805-5489 or specialsales@sterlingpublishing.com. Front cover: Photo by Antony Beauchamp / Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection © Sean Ferrer & Luca Dotti Back cover: Photo by Hans Gerber, courtesy of ETH-Bibliothek Zurich, Image Archive


6

7

Foreword How does one choose the 100 best photographs of one of the most photographed

women of our time? I often wondered, when the time came to take pictures at Christmas, why

grueling personal and professional schedules or, sometimes, even her melancholy. But it was

my mother always preferred to be the one taking the shot and rushed through those including

my brother Luca, a wonderful graphic artist, who made that quarter-of-an-inch adjustment to

her. Now—after years of caring for her image and likeness and poring through literally thou-

our route that sent us miles off course from our original destination—to a much happier one!

sands of images of her—I know. I have come to understand what a photograph meant to her.

To my mother, a photo was not what it may be to one of us—a memento, a way to

refocused it on the story. Each image would tell a story and together they would tell yet

record a moment in time that we will want to relive later on when everyone has scattered.

another. Their beauty would lie in the emotions that they conveyed rather than in their

To her it was hard work. A photo was a conjunction of factors that would immortalize

technical perfection. And why not? Why should photos be treated any other way than a

perfection: the best photographers, designers, lighting, makeup, and hair; the right amount

good book, a film, or a work of art?

of sleep, luck, magic—and her, looking as though all of it was thoroughly enjoyable and

Sometimes little independent films touch our hearts more so than those blockbusters

effortless. It represented as much effort and energy as went into a whole day of shooting a

brimming with stars, just as a man picks up a pen and writes his first book—his only book—

film. In some cases, the photo would be used for the artwork of a film’s poster or become

and captures the imagination of our global consciousness. One man’s mess is another

its iconic link—it would carry all of the weight of months or even years of a film’s creation,

man’s masterpiece.

preparation, production, post-production, and marketing—not to speak of the millions

invested in its creation and distribution.

Hepburn Treasures. But it is, yet again, a case of what will emerge between the lines—and in

And she took it just that seriously. As if, she used to say, “her life depended on it”—and

the case of that book what emerged between the documents. In this case, what will emerge

the lives of all of those who had poured large chunks of their lives into its birth. My mother’s

between the images?

photographs were a far cry from our “family snaps.”

When my mother put her career on hold to raise us, her sons, it was also to be a

be replaced by films or television. He believed that what made books the ultimate and

pleasant vacation from the taking of these pictures. She resented the paparazzi in Rome

irreplaceable form of communication and entertainment was the fact that, we the readers,

and often told us that she felt bad that somehow their need—their desire—to capture

created the visuals, the images—the film—in our own minds, just the way we wanted it. In

her might somehow encroach on our private lives. This was indeed a highly sensitive

this case, you will write the story, putting together what you already know about Audrey

perspective but she was probably also projecting her own anguish about it on to us. We

Hepburn with the emotions, the feelings, and the smiles.

simply didn’t care at first, and then we thought of it as kind of fun.

So we present to you 100 graphic words, 100 emotions, 100 feelings, 100 little pieces

of time. Uncluttered by too many explanations—clear and digestible—ready for you to

How interesting that after all these years this huge body of photographic work is still

I thought of those images that my father took, that barely hid the exhaustion of years of

Luca took the pressure off the beauty and perfection aspect of the selection and

I am starting to repeat myself; this is what I said when I wrote the preface to The Audrey

I remember when I was a boy one of my teachers explained why literature would never

one of the pillars of her presence—her legacy—along with her films. It is true that nothing

assimilate directly into your soul. Once you have felt your way through it—a few times—

can replace a photograph; it really does speak more than a thousand words. Without them,

slowly a new image will begin to emerge: a work of art dedicated to her life, her joys, her

she wouldn’t—couldn’t—continue to be regarded as the fashion icon that she still is. And

sorrows, her mischievousness, her laughter. But it will never be final. As you change, it will

the work of Hubert de Givenchy, Edith Head, Valentino, Ralph Lauren, and most importantly

change with you—and stay with you. It is our hope that this book will embrace you and

Cecil Beaton, Hans Gerber, Pierluigi Praturlon, Philippe Halsman, Emil Schulthess, Sam Shaw,

allow you to maintain a connection to this most lovely person—Audrey. Audrey 100 is only

Norman Parkinson, Leo Fuchs, Willy Rizzo, David Seymour, Yousuf Karsh, Douglas Kirkland,

a title—just words. With this collection we want to thank you—she wants to thank you—and

Inge Morath, Marcel Imsand, Ove Wallin, Antony Beauchamp, Howell Conant, Bob Willoughby,

say to you everything that just words cannot express.

Sanford Roth, Betty Press, Marc Shaw, John Engstead, Inge Morath, and John Isaac would be lost forever. How interesting that something that caused her such anguish and stress could have a long-lasting repercussion of such legendary proportions. So here we were with the impossible task of selecting these images. How does one choose the best, and by what standard? And how could we leave images out that still told a story but maybe were not perfect from a technical standpoint, either because of the circumstances, the light, the lack of makeup, the circles under the eyes, the less flattering side? Perhaps these photos were even more valuable than the usual “expected” perfection.

—Sean Hepburn Ferrer


6

7

Foreword How does one choose the 100 best photographs of one of the most photographed

women of our time? I often wondered, when the time came to take pictures at Christmas, why

grueling personal and professional schedules or, sometimes, even her melancholy. But it was

my mother always preferred to be the one taking the shot and rushed through those including

my brother Luca, a wonderful graphic artist, who made that quarter-of-an-inch adjustment to

her. Now—after years of caring for her image and likeness and poring through literally thou-

our route that sent us miles off course from our original destination—to a much happier one!

sands of images of her—I know. I have come to understand what a photograph meant to her.

To my mother, a photo was not what it may be to one of us—a memento, a way to

refocused it on the story. Each image would tell a story and together they would tell yet

record a moment in time that we will want to relive later on when everyone has scattered.

another. Their beauty would lie in the emotions that they conveyed rather than in their

To her it was hard work. A photo was a conjunction of factors that would immortalize

technical perfection. And why not? Why should photos be treated any other way than a

perfection: the best photographers, designers, lighting, makeup, and hair; the right amount

good book, a film, or a work of art?

of sleep, luck, magic—and her, looking as though all of it was thoroughly enjoyable and

Sometimes little independent films touch our hearts more so than those blockbusters

effortless. It represented as much effort and energy as went into a whole day of shooting a

brimming with stars, just as a man picks up a pen and writes his first book—his only book—

film. In some cases, the photo would be used for the artwork of a film’s poster or become

and captures the imagination of our global consciousness. One man’s mess is another

its iconic link—it would carry all of the weight of months or even years of a film’s creation,

man’s masterpiece.

preparation, production, post-production, and marketing—not to speak of the millions

invested in its creation and distribution.

Hepburn Treasures. But it is, yet again, a case of what will emerge between the lines—and in

And she took it just that seriously. As if, she used to say, “her life depended on it”—and

the case of that book what emerged between the documents. In this case, what will emerge

the lives of all of those who had poured large chunks of their lives into its birth. My mother’s

between the images?

photographs were a far cry from our “family snaps.”

When my mother put her career on hold to raise us, her sons, it was also to be a

be replaced by films or television. He believed that what made books the ultimate and

pleasant vacation from the taking of these pictures. She resented the paparazzi in Rome

irreplaceable form of communication and entertainment was the fact that, we the readers,

and often told us that she felt bad that somehow their need—their desire—to capture

created the visuals, the images—the film—in our own minds, just the way we wanted it. In

her might somehow encroach on our private lives. This was indeed a highly sensitive

this case, you will write the story, putting together what you already know about Audrey

perspective but she was probably also projecting her own anguish about it on to us. We

Hepburn with the emotions, the feelings, and the smiles.

simply didn’t care at first, and then we thought of it as kind of fun.

So we present to you 100 graphic words, 100 emotions, 100 feelings, 100 little pieces

of time. Uncluttered by too many explanations—clear and digestible—ready for you to

How interesting that after all these years this huge body of photographic work is still

I thought of those images that my father took, that barely hid the exhaustion of years of

Luca took the pressure off the beauty and perfection aspect of the selection and

I am starting to repeat myself; this is what I said when I wrote the preface to The Audrey

I remember when I was a boy one of my teachers explained why literature would never

one of the pillars of her presence—her legacy—along with her films. It is true that nothing

assimilate directly into your soul. Once you have felt your way through it—a few times—

can replace a photograph; it really does speak more than a thousand words. Without them,

slowly a new image will begin to emerge: a work of art dedicated to her life, her joys, her

she wouldn’t—couldn’t—continue to be regarded as the fashion icon that she still is. And

sorrows, her mischievousness, her laughter. But it will never be final. As you change, it will

the work of Hubert de Givenchy, Edith Head, Valentino, Ralph Lauren, and most importantly

change with you—and stay with you. It is our hope that this book will embrace you and

Cecil Beaton, Hans Gerber, Pierluigi Praturlon, Philippe Halsman, Emil Schulthess, Sam Shaw,

allow you to maintain a connection to this most lovely person—Audrey. Audrey 100 is only

Norman Parkinson, Leo Fuchs, Willy Rizzo, David Seymour, Yousuf Karsh, Douglas Kirkland,

a title—just words. With this collection we want to thank you—she wants to thank you—and

Inge Morath, Marcel Imsand, Ove Wallin, Antony Beauchamp, Howell Conant, Bob Willoughby,

say to you everything that just words cannot express.

Sanford Roth, Betty Press, Marc Shaw, John Engstead, Inge Morath, and John Isaac would be lost forever. How interesting that something that caused her such anguish and stress could have a long-lasting repercussion of such legendary proportions. So here we were with the impossible task of selecting these images. How does one choose the best, and by what standard? And how could we leave images out that still told a story but maybe were not perfect from a technical standpoint, either because of the circumstances, the light, the lack of makeup, the circles under the eyes, the less flattering side? Perhaps these photos were even more valuable than the usual “expected” perfection.

—Sean Hepburn Ferrer


10

Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, circa 1951


10

Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, circa 1951


13

Pages 12–15: Cecil Beaton, 19 63


13

Pages 12–15: Cecil Beaton, 19 63


18

19

Cecil Beaton, 195 4


18

19

Cecil Beaton, 195 4


26

Condé Nast Archive, 19 63 Following pages (28–29): Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, 19 63


26

Condé Nast Archive, 19 63 Following pages (28–29): Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, 19 63


55

Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, 1956


55

Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, 1956


58

Mark Shaw, 195 4

59


58

Mark Shaw, 195 4

59


Mel Ferrer, 1954


Mel Ferrer, 1954


62

Sam Shaw, 1956


62

Sam Shaw, 1956


77

Opposite: Photographer unknown, 19 61; Above: Photographer unknown, 19 61


77

Opposite: Photographer unknown, 19 61; Above: Photographer unknown, 19 61


120

Photographer unknown, circa 1956


120

Photographer unknown, circa 1956


126

Bob Willoughby, circa 1958


126

Bob Willoughby, circa 1958


133

Bob Willoughby, 1958


133

Bob Willoughby, 1958


13 8

Douglas Kirkland, 19 65


13 8

Douglas Kirkland, 19 65


146

Mark Shaw, 1953


146

Mark Shaw, 1953


15 8

Betty Press, 1992


15 8

Betty Press, 1992


168

1 69

10–11: Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, circa 1951

20–21: Hans Gerber, circa 1954

In 1951, director Thorold Dickinson was still holding auditions for the part of Nora in Secret

Taken on Lake Lucerne in Switzerland, Audrey holds the reins of the colorful speedboat

People even as shooting on the film began. One reason that casting was so difficult was

like a rodeo pro. This photo is one in a series taken for the August 1954 issue of Schweizer

that most of the dancers auditioning for Nora’s part were taller than co-stars Valentina

Illustrierte Zeitung (Pictorial Parade), accompanied by a feature article on Audrey. Lake

Cortesa and Serge Reggiani. Upon watching Audrey, Cortesa (seated at the piano in

Lucerne had significant meaning and memories for Audrey. It is here where her civil

this still from the movie) remarked, “I saw at the barre this beautiful little thing, like a

marriage ceremony to Mel took place and where the couple spent precious days sailing

little deer, with this long neck and those big eyes,” and implored Dickinson to hire her.

and relaxing with close friends and family.

Ultimately, Cortesa made sure Audrey got the role by having Audrey remove her shoes for the screen test while she [Valentina] stood on tiptoes to equalize their height.

22–23: Pierluigi Praturlon, 1959 Pierluigi captures Audrey in a moment of serene delight. As one of Italy’s top film set

12–13: Cecil Beaton, 1963

photographers, Pierluigi broke away from the accepted norm of posing stars, opting

When Beaton unveiled his sketchbook of costume designs for My Fair Lady, Audrey

instead to reveal them more authentically. Thus, in many ways, Pierluigi became a master

was delighted and exclaimed, “Oh, it’s more than I thought it could possibly be. It’s too

of the what Luca refers to as, “the surprise of being there.” This Pierluigi moment captures

much!” These photographs, taken by Beaton, are a sampling of the over one thousand he

Audrey on the terrace of her suite at the Hotel Hassler in Rome. The telegram she holds

took of Audrey during the production of My Fair Lady. Beaton conjured up four hundred

conveys the news that she’s been voted Best Actress of 1959 for The Nun’s Story by the

spectacular black and white costumes for the Ascot and ballroom scenes, designs that were

New York Film Critics Circle as reported in Film Daily.

highly detailed and idiosyncratic. Each costume required the actors to pay special attention

to the construction so that their stylized movements would seem lyrical and effortless.

ice cream cone . . . And Pierluigi–the ultimate paparazzo and a wonderful friend.”

14–15: Cecil Beaton, 1963

24: Philippe Halsman, 1955

Here, Audrey models for Beaton in some of the creations actually designed for the extras

Audrey’s ballet training pays off as she jumps hedge high for photographer Philippe

in the movie’s high society scenes. It is a testament to Audrey’s natural grace and beauty

Halsman. In what he coined “jumpology,” Halsman ended many of his celebrity photo

that she looks equally at ease as both an impoverished flower girl and a high society

sessions by asking his subjects to jump. “When you ask a person to jump,” Halsman said,

sophisticate. For his efforts on My Fair Lady, Beaton received two Academy Awards, for

“his attention is mostly directed toward the act of jumping and the mask falls so that the

art direction and costume design.

real person appears . . . they reveal whether they are rigid, fun, or mentally unstable.” Here

“This is where it all started,” Sean says of the Hotel Hassler, “with Greg, Willy, and an

Audrey displays the sheer joy of being airborne. Taken over a six-year period, Halsman’s

17: Cecil Beaton, 1954

collection of 178 jumpers, including Audrey, was published in 1959.

“Composed grace and nostalgia were Mum’s traits,” Luca remarks, qualities Beaton epitomizes in this quietly sensitive portrait of Audrey. Beaton understood what Audrey

25: Emil Schulthess, date unknown

brought to his lens, aptly characterizing her as having, “a waifish, poignant sympathy.”

As a photographer, Emil Schulthess was naturally drawn to science and nature and, in

Taken by Audrey’s “long unvarnished nails,” he chose to feature them in this photo. “She

1957, began publishing photo essays on Africa, Antarctica, the Amazon, China, and the

wears no powder,” he said, “so that her white skin has a bright sheen.” He called Audrey’s

Soviet Union. Wherever he was, his aim was “to display various secrets of nature and to

unique presence, “an almost Oriental sense of the exquisite.”

show the diversity of human life.” Here he seems to capture Audrey mid-thought as she weaves together a delicate chain of clover. Luca calls this photo, “the original recipe that

18–19: Cecil Beaton, 1954

started it all–because there wasn’t one.” Of Schulthess, Sean remarks, “Emil was a gentle

Beaton first met Audrey on July 23, 1953 at her flat on South Audley Street in London.

man and the photographer of nature . . . This photo was taken during the summer in Bür-

Beaton was greeted warmly by Audrey’s mother, Ella Van Heemstra, and, while Audrey

genstock, Switzerland, where I was born.”

finished dressing, was graciously offered hors d’oeurves and a martini. Upon their meeting, Beaton later recalled that, “without any of the preliminaries I felt that she cut

27: Condé Nast Archive, 1963

through to a basic understanding that makes people friends. Nothing had to be explained:

Audrey pedals on the backlot with her Yorkie named Assam of Assam. The inseparable

we liked one another. A chord had been struck and I knew that, next time we met, we

duo was captured here on Audrey’s preferred mode of transportation—her bicycle—

would continue straight from here with no recapitulation of formalities. This was a unique

shuttling between sets. Assam was Audrey’s second Yorkie, given to her in Paris by Mel

occasion.” These two autographed photos were given as a gift of friendship to Audrey

after her beloved Mr. Famous was killed by a car in Los Angeles. “She was ga-ga over all

from Cecil Beaton.

the dogs that she had, and she always had one,” Billy Wilder said.


168

1 69

10–11: Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection, circa 1951

20–21: Hans Gerber, circa 1954

In 1951, director Thorold Dickinson was still holding auditions for the part of Nora in Secret

Taken on Lake Lucerne in Switzerland, Audrey holds the reins of the colorful speedboat

People even as shooting on the film began. One reason that casting was so difficult was

like a rodeo pro. This photo is one in a series taken for the August 1954 issue of Schweizer

that most of the dancers auditioning for Nora’s part were taller than co-stars Valentina

Illustrierte Zeitung (Pictorial Parade), accompanied by a feature article on Audrey. Lake

Cortesa and Serge Reggiani. Upon watching Audrey, Cortesa (seated at the piano in

Lucerne had significant meaning and memories for Audrey. It is here where her civil

this still from the movie) remarked, “I saw at the barre this beautiful little thing, like a

marriage ceremony to Mel took place and where the couple spent precious days sailing

little deer, with this long neck and those big eyes,” and implored Dickinson to hire her.

and relaxing with close friends and family.

Ultimately, Cortesa made sure Audrey got the role by having Audrey remove her shoes for the screen test while she [Valentina] stood on tiptoes to equalize their height.

22–23: Pierluigi Praturlon, 1959 Pierluigi captures Audrey in a moment of serene delight. As one of Italy’s top film set

12–13: Cecil Beaton, 1963

photographers, Pierluigi broke away from the accepted norm of posing stars, opting

When Beaton unveiled his sketchbook of costume designs for My Fair Lady, Audrey

instead to reveal them more authentically. Thus, in many ways, Pierluigi became a master

was delighted and exclaimed, “Oh, it’s more than I thought it could possibly be. It’s too

of the what Luca refers to as, “the surprise of being there.” This Pierluigi moment captures

much!” These photographs, taken by Beaton, are a sampling of the over one thousand he

Audrey on the terrace of her suite at the Hotel Hassler in Rome. The telegram she holds

took of Audrey during the production of My Fair Lady. Beaton conjured up four hundred

conveys the news that she’s been voted Best Actress of 1959 for The Nun’s Story by the

spectacular black and white costumes for the Ascot and ballroom scenes, designs that were

New York Film Critics Circle as reported in Film Daily.

highly detailed and idiosyncratic. Each costume required the actors to pay special attention

to the construction so that their stylized movements would seem lyrical and effortless.

ice cream cone . . . And Pierluigi–the ultimate paparazzo and a wonderful friend.”

14–15: Cecil Beaton, 1963

24: Philippe Halsman, 1955

Here, Audrey models for Beaton in some of the creations actually designed for the extras

Audrey’s ballet training pays off as she jumps hedge high for photographer Philippe

in the movie’s high society scenes. It is a testament to Audrey’s natural grace and beauty

Halsman. In what he coined “jumpology,” Halsman ended many of his celebrity photo

that she looks equally at ease as both an impoverished flower girl and a high society

sessions by asking his subjects to jump. “When you ask a person to jump,” Halsman said,

sophisticate. For his efforts on My Fair Lady, Beaton received two Academy Awards, for

“his attention is mostly directed toward the act of jumping and the mask falls so that the

art direction and costume design.

real person appears . . . they reveal whether they are rigid, fun, or mentally unstable.” Here

“This is where it all started,” Sean says of the Hotel Hassler, “with Greg, Willy, and an

Audrey displays the sheer joy of being airborne. Taken over a six-year period, Halsman’s

17: Cecil Beaton, 1954

collection of 178 jumpers, including Audrey, was published in 1959.

“Composed grace and nostalgia were Mum’s traits,” Luca remarks, qualities Beaton epitomizes in this quietly sensitive portrait of Audrey. Beaton understood what Audrey

25: Emil Schulthess, date unknown

brought to his lens, aptly characterizing her as having, “a waifish, poignant sympathy.”

As a photographer, Emil Schulthess was naturally drawn to science and nature and, in

Taken by Audrey’s “long unvarnished nails,” he chose to feature them in this photo. “She

1957, began publishing photo essays on Africa, Antarctica, the Amazon, China, and the

wears no powder,” he said, “so that her white skin has a bright sheen.” He called Audrey’s

Soviet Union. Wherever he was, his aim was “to display various secrets of nature and to

unique presence, “an almost Oriental sense of the exquisite.”

show the diversity of human life.” Here he seems to capture Audrey mid-thought as she weaves together a delicate chain of clover. Luca calls this photo, “the original recipe that

18–19: Cecil Beaton, 1954

started it all–because there wasn’t one.” Of Schulthess, Sean remarks, “Emil was a gentle

Beaton first met Audrey on July 23, 1953 at her flat on South Audley Street in London.

man and the photographer of nature . . . This photo was taken during the summer in Bür-

Beaton was greeted warmly by Audrey’s mother, Ella Van Heemstra, and, while Audrey

genstock, Switzerland, where I was born.”

finished dressing, was graciously offered hors d’oeurves and a martini. Upon their meeting, Beaton later recalled that, “without any of the preliminaries I felt that she cut

27: Condé Nast Archive, 1963

through to a basic understanding that makes people friends. Nothing had to be explained:

Audrey pedals on the backlot with her Yorkie named Assam of Assam. The inseparable

we liked one another. A chord had been struck and I knew that, next time we met, we

duo was captured here on Audrey’s preferred mode of transportation—her bicycle—

would continue straight from here with no recapitulation of formalities. This was a unique

shuttling between sets. Assam was Audrey’s second Yorkie, given to her in Paris by Mel

occasion.” These two autographed photos were given as a gift of friendship to Audrey

after her beloved Mr. Famous was killed by a car in Los Angeles. “She was ga-ga over all

from Cecil Beaton.

the dogs that she had, and she always had one,” Billy Wilder said.


PICTURE CREDITS Front Cover: Photo by Antony Beauchamp / Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection © Sean Ferrer & Luca Dotti Back cover: Photo by Hans Gerber, courtesy of ETH-Bibliothek Zurich, Image Archive 10–11, 54–55: Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection © Sean Ferrer & Luca Dotti 12–13, 18–19: Courtesy of the Cecil Beaton Studio Archive at Sotheby’s 26–27: Condé Nast Archive / Corbis 58–59: Mark Shaw / mptvimages.com 60–61: Photos by Mel Ferrer, Audrey Hepburn Estate Collection © Sean Ferrer & Luca Dotti 62–63: Photo by Sam Shaw © Sam Shaw, Inc., licensed by Shaw Family Archives, Ltd. 76–77: © Sunset Boulevard / Corbis 121: mptvimages.com 126–27, 132–33: © Bob Willoughby / mptvimages.com 139: © Douglas Kirkland / Corbis 146–47 © 2007 Mark Shaw / mptvimages.com 158–59: © UNICEF / NYHQ1992-1170 / Betty Press


Loved by countless adoring fans—and the camera—Audrey Hepburn was an actress, icon, and humanitarian whose elegance will never go out of style. This luxe compilation features 100 of the most compelling and iconic photographs ever taken of the glamorous star— timeless images by such greats as Sir Cecil Beaton, Douglas Kirkland, Norman Parkinson, and Philippe Halsman, sure to be cherished by any Hepburn admirer. Also includes a fine art ready-to-frame 9 x 11-inch removable print of Audrey by Leo Fuchs, and a lovingly written foreword by Sean Hepburn Ferrer, Audrey’s eldest son. Ellen (Erwin) Fontana: Executive director of the Audrey Hepburn Children’s Fund. Publications: Co-authored The Audrey Hepburn Treasures (New York Times extended bestseller for hardcover nonfiction). Fontana is also a film and television producer and a screenwriter. She co-wrote the six-hour Australian television mini-series of Cloudstreet, currently in production. Sean Hepburn Ferrer: Son of Audrey Hepburn. He wrote Audrey, An Elegant Spirit: A Son Remembers. He is the cofounder and chairman of the Audrey Hepburn Children’s Fund and has worked in motion picture development, production, post-production, and marketing for the past 32 years. Sean serves as Executive Producer on the six-hour Australian television mini-series of Cloudstreet, currently in production. ELLEN (Erwin) FONTANA (writer) and SEAN HEPBURN FERRER have excellent sales for their previous books, The Audrey Hepburn Treasures and Audrey Hepburn, An Elegant Spirit: A Son Remembers, both of which were New York Times best sellers. • National publicity • Features and reviews in celebrity, women’s, and general interest magazines • Newspaper coverage in style and book review sections • Online coverage and blog tour • Buzz marketing campaign • E-blads available

Biography November 2010 $40.00 ($52.00 Canada) Hardcover 10 x 12; 192 pages (Full Color) Sterling ISBN 978-1-4027-7836-0

Reviewers are reminded that changes may be made in this uncorrected proof before books are printed. If any material from the book is to be quoted in a review, the quotation should be checked against the final bound book. Dates, prices, and manufacturing details are subject to change or cancellation without notice.

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Audrey 100  

Loved by countless adoring fans—and the camera—Audrey Hepburn was an actress, icon, and humanitarian whose elegance will never go out of sty...

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