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125 World Children Stories The collection PATRICK HEALY Volume II

Š PATRICK HEALY, 2014 Published by Stergiou Limited ISBN: 978-0-9928282-0-2 (Stergiou Limited-Assigned) ISBN: 978-1500192778 (CreateSpace-Assigned) February 2014


COPYRIGHT 125 World Children Stories - Volume II The Collection Retold by © PATRICK HEALY, 2014 Cover image: © Eti Swinford | Dreamstime.com Published by Stergiou Limited, February 2014 ISBN: 978-0-9928282-0-2 (Stergiou Limited-Assigned) ISBN: 978-1500192778 (CreateSpace-Assigned) ePub- ISBN: 978-0-9928282-5-7 Mobi-ISBN: 978-0-9928282-6-4 PDF-ISBN: 978-0-9928282-7-1 Series: 417 World Children Stories Parent ISBN: 978-1-910370-21-6 Available only in eBook format VOLUΜΕ I: 169 Stories Arabian Nights, Filipino Tales, Czech Tales, Grimm’s Fairy Tales ISBN: 978-1-910370-22-3 ePub- ISBN: 978-1-910370-23-0 Mobi-ISBN: 978-1-910370-24-7 PDF-ISBN: 978-1-910370-25-4 VOLUΜΕ II: 125 Stories Indian Tales, Japanese Tales, Native American Myths, Norse Myths, Polish Tales VOLUΜΕ III: 123 stories Romanian Tales, Russian Tales, The Adventure of Odysseus, The Golden Fleece, Turkish Tales ISBN: 978-0-9928282-8-8 ePub- ISBN: 978-0-9928282-9-5 Mobi-ISBN: 978-1-910370-26-1 PDF-ISBN: 978-1-910370-27-8 STERGIOU LIMITED Suite A, 6 Honduras Street, London EC1Y 0TH, United Kingdom Tel.: +44 (0) 20 7504 1325, Fax: +44 (0) 20 76920609 Email: publications@stergioultd.com Web: http://stergioultd.com Copyright and monitoring The intellectual property rights of this book are owned by the Author. The contents of this book are protected by international copyright laws and other intellectual property rights. All products, services and company names and logos mentioned in our book are the trademarks, service marks or trading names of their respective owners, including us. You may not modify, copy, reproduce, republish, upload, post, transmit, sell or distribute, by any means or in any manner, any material or information on or downloaded from our website including but not limited to text, graphics, video, messages, code and/or software without our prior written consent, except where expressly invited to do so, for example, in order to complete any test or questionnaire.


Dedicated

to the children of the world!


Contents Indian tales 1. SIR BUZZ

10

2. THE RAT’S WEDDING 16

3. PRINCE LIONHEART AND HIS THREE FRIENDS 22 4. BOPOLÛCHÎ 34

5. PRINCESS AUBERGINE 37 6. THE BRAVE WEAVER

43

7. THE SON OF SEVEN MOTHERS

48

8. THE TIGER, THE MAN, AND THE JACKAL 9. THE KING OF THE CROCODILES 57

55

10. PRINCESS PEPPERINA 61

11. PEASIE AND BEANSIE 66

12. THE JACKAL AND THE PARTRIDGE

69

13. THE SNAKE-WOMAN AND KING ALI MARDAN 14. THE WONDERFUL RING

76

15. THE JACKAL AND THE PEA-HEN

82

17. THE BARBER’S CLEVER WIFE

85

72

16. THE FARMER AND THE MONEY-LENDER 83 18.THE JACKAL AND THE CROCODILE

19. HOW KING RASALU WAS BORN 94

92

20. HOW RAJA RASALU WENT OUT INTO THE WORLD 96 21. HOW RAJA RASALU’S FRIENDS ABANDONDED HIM 22. HOW RAJA RASALU BECAME A MONK 99

23. HOW RAJA RASALU KILLED THE GIANTS 102

-iV-

98


24. HOW RAJA RASALU JOURNEYED TO THE CITY OF KING SARKAP 25. HOW RAJA RASALU SWUNG THE SEVENTY FAIR MAIDENS

26. HOW RAJA RASALU PLAYED PACHISI WITH KING SARKAP 27. THE KING WHO WAS FRIED

110

28. PRINCE HALF-A-SON 115

104

105 108

29. THE MOTHER AND DAUGHTER WHO WORSHIPPED THE SUN 120 30. THE RUBY PRINCE

123

~.~ japanese tales 1. MY LORD BAG OF RICE 128

2. THE TONGUE-CUT SPARROW

133

4. THE FARMER AND THE BADGER

150

3. THE STORY OF URASHIMA TARO, THE FISHER LAD

140

5. THE ADVENTURES OF KINTARO, THE GOLDEN BOY

155

6. HASE-HIME 162

7. THE STORY OF THE MAN WHO DID NOT WISH TO DIE 8. THE BAMBOO-CUTTER AND THE MOON-CHILD 9. THE MIRROR OF MATSUYAMA

186

10. THE GOBLIN OF ADACHIGAHARA 11. THE WISE MONKEY AND THE BOAR

174

197

201

12. THE HAPPY HUNTER AND THE SKILLFUL FISHERMAN 203 13. THE STORY OF THE OLD MAN WHO -V-

168


MADE WITHERED TREES FLOWER

216

14. THE JELLYFISH AND THE MONKEY 222

15. THE QUARREL OF THE MONKEY AND THE CRAB 16. THE WHITE HARE AND THE CROCODILES 235

229

17. MOMOTARO, OR THE STORY OF THE SON OF A PEACH 18. THE STORY OF PRINCE YAMATO TAKE 251

240

19. THE OGRE OF RASHOMON 261

20. HOW AN OLD MAN LOST HIS CYST 266

21. THE STONES OF FIVE COLORS AND THE EMPRESS JOKWA 271

~.~ native american myths 1. THE GIANT BEAR 279

2. THE SUMMER-MAKER 3. THE SLEEP FAIRIES 4. SHINGEBISS

290

284

287

5. THE QUEER LITTLE ANIMAL 292 6. THE DORMOUSE 294

7. THE WINDMAKER 297 8. MOOWIS

300

9. THE DAUGHTERS OF THE STAR 302 10. KOTO AND THE BIRD 304

11. THE HUMPBACKED MANITOU 307

12. THE TRIBE THAT GREW OUT OF A SHELL 310 13. THE STORY OF THE INDIAN CORN

14. THE MAGICIAN OF LAKE HURON 313

312


15. THE FAIRIES’ CLIFF 315 16. THE STONE CANOE

318

17. THE WHITE FEATHER 320

18. THE LONE LIGHTNING 323

19. THE ENCHANTED MOCCASINS

20. THE FIVE WATER-SPIRITS 328 21.THE CANOE BREAKER 22. THE OLD STUMP 331

324

329

23. THE CLIFF OF SINIKIELT 334 24. THE STRANGE DREAM 336

25. BIG CHIEF’S CONQUEST 26. THE RED SWAN 342

339

27. THE WHISPERING GRASS 345

28.THE LEGEND OF MACKINAC ISLAND

29.THE ADVENTURES OF WESAKCHAK 351 30. A WONDERFUL JOURNEY 31. THE GRAY GOOSE 356

354

32. LITTLE BROTHER RABBIT 359 33. THE BALD-HEADED EAGLES 361

~.~ norse myths 1. FAR AWAY AND LONG AGO

364

2. THE BUILDING OF THE WALL 3. DUNA AND HER APPLES 369 4. SIF’S GOLDEN HAIR

377

365

350


5. HOW BROCK BROUGHT JUDGMENT ON LOKI 381 6. HOW FREYA GAINED HER NECKLACE AND LOST HER LOVED ONE 7. HOW FREY WON GERDA BUT LOST HIS MAGIC SWORD

387

391

8. HEIMDALL AND LITTLE HNOSSA 396 9. ODIN LEAVES ASGARD 400

10. ODIN GOES TO MIMIR’S WELL 403 11. ODIN FACES AN EVIL MAN 406

12. ODIN WINS FOR MEN THE MAGIC MEAD

411

14. THOR AND LOKI IN THE GIANTS’ CITY

417

13. ODIN TALKS TO HIS SON VIDAR 416

15. HOW THOR AND LOKI FOOLED THRYM THE GIANT 16. ÆGIR’S FEAST: HOW THOR TRIUMPHED 431 17. THE DWARF’S HOARD, AND THE CURSE THAT IT BROUGHT 438 18. FOREBODING IN ASGARD 446 19. LOKI THE BETRAYER

447

20. LOKI AGAINST THE ÆSIR 453 21. THE VALKYRIE

455

22. THE CHILDREN OF LOKI 23. BALDUR’S DOOM 461

458

24. LOKI’S PUNISHMENT 469 25. SIGURD’S YOUTH

471

26. THE SWORD GRAM AND THE DRAGON FAFNIR 476 27. THE DRAGON’S BLOOD

480

28. THE STORY OF SIGMUND AND SIGNY 485

426


29. THE STORY OF SIGMUND AND SINFIOTLI 491 30. THE VOLSUNG’S VENGEANCE AND THE DEATH OF SINFIOTLI

494

31. BRYNHILD IN THE HOUSE OF FLAME 497

32. SIGURD AT THE HOUSE OF THE NIBELUNGS

33. HOW BRYNHILD WAS WON FOR GUNNAR 502 34. THE DEATH OF SIGURD

500

505

35. THE TWILIGHT OF THE GODS 508

~.~ polish tales 1. THE FROG PRINCESS

512

2. THE LITTLE HOUSE TURNS 517 3. THE WAY HOME

518

4. PRINCESS MIRANDA AND PRINCE HERO 5. THE DRAGON WHO KEPT WATCH 525

519

6. THE EAGLES 527

7. THE WHIRLWIND 531

8. THE GOOD FERRYMAN AND THE WATER NYMPHS 539 9. THE PRINCESS OF THE BRAZEN MOUNTAIN 548 10. THE BEAR IN THE FOREST HUT 553

~.~


125 WORLD CHILDREN STORIES

Indian tales 1. SIR BUZZ

O

nce upon a time a soldier died, leaving a widow and one son. They were dreadfully poor, and at last matters became so bad that they had nothing left in the house to eat.

‘Mother,’ said the son, ‘give me four dollars, and I will go seek my fortune in the wide world.’ ‘Alas!’ answered the mother, ‘and where am I, who haven’t a penny to buy bread, to find four dollars?’ ‘There is that old coat of my father’s,’ replied the boy. ‘Look in the pocket—perhaps there is something there.’ So she looked, and behold! There were six dollars hidden away at the very bottom of the pocket! ‘More than I expected,’ said the boy, laughing.’ See, mother, these two dollars are for you. You can live on that till I return, the rest will pay my way until I find my fortune.’ So he set off to find his fortune, and on the way he saw a tigress, licking her paw, and moaning. He was just about to run away from the terrible creature, when she called to him faintly, saying, ‘Good boy, if you will take out this thorn for me, I shall be forever grateful.’ ‘Not I!’ answered the boy. ‘Why, if I begin to pull it out, and it hurts you, you will kill me with a pat of your paw.’ ‘No, no!’ cried the tigress, ‘I will turn my face to this tree, and when the pain comes I will pat it.’ So the soldier’s son agreed. He pulled out the thorn, and when the pain came the tigress gave the tree such a blow that the trunk split all to pieces. Then she turned towards the soldier’s son, and said gratefully, ‘Take this box as a reward, but do not open it until you have travelled nine miles’.

10


PATRICK HEALY

So the soldier’s son thanked the tigress, and set off with the box to find his fortune. Now when he had gone five miles, he felt certain that the box weighed more than it had at first, and every step he took it seemed to grow heavier and heavier. He tried to struggle on—­ though it was all he could do to carry the box—until he had gone about eight miles and a quarter, when his patience gave way. ‘I believe that tigress was a witch, and is playing tricks on me,’ he cried, ‘but I will stand this nonsense no longer. Lie there, you wretched old box!—heaven knows what is in you, and I don’t care.’ He flung the box down on the ground: it burst open, and out stepped a little old man. He was only one foot high, but his beard was a foot and a quarter long, and trailed on the ground. The little dwarf immediately began to stamp about and scold the boy for letting the box down so violently. ‘Goodness!’ said the soldier’s son, scarcely able to restrain a smile at the ridiculous little figure, ‘ you are heavy for your size, old gentleman! And what may your name be?’ ‘Sir Buzz!’ snapped the one-foot tall dwarf, still stamping about in a great rage. ‘Goodness!’ said the soldier’s son once more, ‘if you are all the box contained, I am glad I didn’t trouble to carry it farther.’ ‘That’s not polite,’ snarled the dwarf; ‘perhaps if you had carried it the full nine miles you might have found something better; but that’s neither here nor there. I’m good enough for you, at any rate, and will serve you faithfully according to my mistress’s orders.’ ‘Serve me!—then I wish to goodness you’d serve me with some dinner, for I am mighty hungry! Here are four dollars to pay for it.’ No sooner had the soldier’s son said this and given the money, than with a whiz, boom, bing, like a big bee, Sir Buzz flew through the air to a confectioner’s shop in the nearest town. There he stood, the one-foot tall dwarf, with the foot and a quarter long beard trailing on the ground, and cried in such a loud a voice, ‘Ho ho! Sir Confectioner, bring me sweets!’ The confectioner looked round the shop, and out of the door, and down the street, but could see no one, for tiny Sir Buzz was quite hidden by the counter. Then the dwarf called out louder still, ‘Ho ho! Sir Confectioner, bring me sweets!’ And when the confectioner looked in vain for his customer, Sir Buzz grew angry, and ran and pinched him on the legs, and kicked him on the foot, saying, ‘stupid man! Do you mean to say you can’t see me? Why, 11


125 WORLD CHILDREN STORIES

I was standing by the counter all the time!’ The confectioner apologized humbly, and hurried away to bring out his best sweets for his irritable little customer. Then Sir Buzz chose about a hundred pounds of them, and said, ‘Quick, tie them up in something and give them to me. I’ll carry them home.’ ‘They will be a heavy weight, sir,’ smiled the confectioner. ‘What business is that of yours, I should like to know?’ snapped Sir Buzz. ‘Just you do as you’re told, and here is your money.’ He jingled the four dollars in his pocket. ‘As you please, sir,’ replied the man cheerfully, as he tied up the sweets into a huge bundle and placed it on the little dwarf’s outstretched hand, fully expecting him to sink under the weight. However with a boom, bing, he whizzed off with the money still in his pocket. He stopped at a grocers shop, and, standing behind a basket of flour, called out at the top of his voice, ‘Ho, ho! Sir Grocer, bring me flour!’ When the grocer looked round the shop, and out of the window, and down the street, without seeing anybody, the one-foot tall dwarf, with his beard trailing on the ground, cried again louder than before, ‘Ho ho! Sir Grocer, bring me flour!’ Then on receiving no answer, he flew into a violent rage, and ran and bit the unfortunate grocer on the leg, pinched him, and kicked him, saying, ‘stupid man! Don’t pretend you couldn’t see me! Why, I was standing close beside you behind that basket!’ So the grocer apologized humbly for his mistake, and asked Sir Buzz how much flour he wanted. ‘Two hundred pounds,’ replied the dwarf, ‘two hundred pounds, neither more nor less. Tie it up in a bundle, and I’ll take it with me.’ ‘Does sir have a cart with him?’ said the chandler, ‘for two hundred pounds is a heavy load.’ ‘What’s that to you?’ shrieked Sir Buzz, stamping his foot, ‘isn’t it enough if I pay for it?’ And then he jingled the money in his pocket again. So the grocer tied up the flour in a bundle, and placed it in the dwarf’s outstretched hand, fully expecting it would crush him, when, with a whiz! Sir Buzz flew off, with the money still in his pocket. Boom, bing, boom!

12


PATRICK HEALY

The soldier’s son was just wondering what had become of his one-foot tall servant, when, with a whir the little fellow arrived beside him, and wiping his face with his handkerchief, as if he were dreadfully hot and tired. He said thoughtfully, ‘Now I do hope I’ve brought enough, but you men have such terrible appetites!’ ‘More than enough, I should say,’ laughed the boy, looking at the huge bundles. Then Sir Buzz cooked the cakes, and the soldier’s son ate three of them and a handful of sweets; but the one-foot tall dwarf gobbled up all the rest, saying at each mouthful, ‘You men have such terrible appetites—such terrible appetites!’ After that, the soldier’s son and his servant Sir Buzz travelled ever so far, until they came to the King’s city. Now the King had a daughter called Princess Blossom, who was so lovely, and tender, and slim, and fair, that she only weighed five flowers. Every morning she was weighed in golden scales, and the scale always turned when the fifth flower was put in, neither less nor more. Now it so happened that the soldier’s son by chance caught a glimpse of the lovely, tender, slim, and fair Princess Blossom, and, of course, he fell desperately in love with her. He would neither sleep nor eat his dinner, and did nothing all day long but say to his faithful dwarf, ‘Oh, dearest Sir Buzz! Oh, kind Sir Buzz!—carry me to the Princess Blossom, so that I may see and speak to her.’ ‘Carry you!’ snapped the little fellow scornfully, ‘that’s a likely story! Why, you’re ten times as big as I am. You should carry me!‘ Nevertheless, when the soldier’s son begged and prayed, growing pale and pining away with thinking of the Princess Blossom, Sir Buzz, who had a kind heart, was moved, and told the boy sit on his hand. Then with a tremendous boom, bing, boom, they whizzed away and were in the palace in a second. Being night time, the Princess was asleep. Nevertheless the booming woke her and she was quite frightened to see a handsome young man kneeling beside her. She began of course to scream, but stopped at once when the soldier’s son with the greatest politeness, and in the most elegant of language, begged her not to be alarmed. After that they talked together about everything, while Sir Buzz stood at the door and kept guard. Now when the dawn was just breaking, the soldier’s son and Princess Blossom, wearied of

13


125 WORLD CHILDREN STORIES

talking, fell asleep. Sir Buzz, being a faithful servant, said to himself, ‘Now what is to be done? If my master remains here asleep, someone will discover him, and he will be killed as sure as my name is Buzz; but if I wake him he will refuse to go.’ So straightaway he put his hand under the bed, and bing, boom, carried it into a large garden outside the town. There he set it down in the shade of the biggest tree, and pulling up the next biggest one by the roots, threw it over his shoulder, and marched up and down keeping guard. Before long the whole town was in a commotion, because the Princess Blossom had been carried off, and everyone turned out to look for her. After some time the one-eyed Chief Constable came to the garden gate. ‘What do you want here?’ cried Sir Buzz, threatening him with the tree. The Chief Constable with his one eye could see nothing except the branches, but he replied, ‘I want the Princess Blossom!’ ‘I’ll blossom you! Get out of my garden, will you?’ shrieked the one-foot tall dwarf, with his one and quarter foot long beard trailing on the ground. With that he beat the Constable’s pony so hard with the tree that it bolted away, nearly throwing its rider. The poor man went straight to the King, saying, ‘Your Majesty! Your Majesty’s daughter, the Princess Blossom, is in your Majesty’s garden, just outside the town, and there is a tree there which fights terribly.’ The King summoned all his horses and men, and going to the garden tried to get in; but Sir Buzz behind the tree stopped them all, for half were injured, and the rest ran away. The noise of the battle, however, woke the young couple, and as they were now convinced they could no longer exist apart, they decided to run away together. So when the fight was over, the soldier’s son, the Princess Blossom, and Sir Buzz set out to see the world. Now the soldier’s son was so enchanted with his good luck in winning the Princess, that he said to Sir Buzz, ‘My fortune is made already, so I shan’t want you anymore, and you can go back to your mistress.’ ‘Pooh!’ said Sir Buzz. ‘Young people always think so. However, have it your own way, only take this hair from my beard, and if you should get into trouble, just burn it in the fire.

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125 world children stories -Vol. 2 (preview)  

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