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ommencement Graduate & Online

dream up.

Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri Kimball Ballroom, Lela Raney Wood Hall May 10, 2019


Graduate and Online Commencement Friday, May 10, 2019 – 6 p.m. Kimball Ballroom of Lela Raney Wood Hall

Prelude: “Nocturnes”.........................................................by John Field and Frederic Chopin *Procession of Platform Party, Faculty and Degree Candidates Processional: “Pomp and Circumstance”..................................................by Sir Edward Elgar *The National Anthem............Lyrics by Francis Scott Key and music by John Stafford Smith Performed by Mackenna Morrow Welcome.......................................................................... Dianne M. Lynch, Ph.D., President Recognition of the Faculty...................................................................... Leslie Willey, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs Commencement Address.................................................................................. Ken LaZebnik, Founder/Director, Stephens M.F.A. in TV and Screenwriting Program Class Speakers......................................... Angelique Jefferson, Undergraduate Representative . LeeAnne Lowry, Graduate Representative Presentation of Degree Candidates............................................................Leslie Willey, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs . Rob Doyen, Professor of Theatre Charge to Graduating Class.............................................. Dianne M. Lynch, Ph.D., President *Closing: “Stephens Hymn” (lyrics on page 15)............................... by Dorothy Castleman ’29 Led by Aubrey Hicks *Recession of Platform Party, Faculty and Graduates Recessional: “Procession of the Nobles”..................................... by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (Please remain standing until all graduates and faculty have recessed.) *Audience Stands Music Director: Pamela Ellsworth-Smith Pianists: Tom Andes, Pamela Ellsworth-Smith 1


2019 Retiring Faculty Tina Parke-Sutherland, Ph.D., Professor Dr. Tina Parke-Sutherland, a professor of literature, creative writing and women’s studies, has taught at Stephens College for 28 years. She first joined the Stephens faculty in 1991 and took time away to complete a Fulbright Professorship in Finland in 1998. For the last two decades, she has returned to Nordic countries to give lectures and attend conferences. Parke-Sutherland works with a Finnish translating partner to bring literary texts and scholarly books into English from Finnish and serves as an editorial reader for the scholarly journal American Studies in Scandinavia. A published poet, she hopes to write more poetry, fiction and memoir during her retirement. Parke-Sutherland earned a B.A. and an M.A. from Northern Michigan University, an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Alaska, and a Ph.D. in Languages and Literature from the University of Michigan.

2019 Commencement Speaker Ken LaZebnik is best known for his work as a screenwriter, television writer and playwright. With Garrison Keillor, he co-wrote Robert Altman’s last film, A Prairie Home Companion. He also wrote the popular holiday film The Christmas Cottage, starring Peter O’Toole and Marcia Gay Harden. Over the past 25 years, LaZebnik has written primarily for one-hour television, including more than 20 episodes of Touched by An Angel. He has also written for Star Trek: Enterprise, Army Wives, Providence and When Calls the Heart. LaZebnik’s plays have been performed across America. He has written three plays on the subject of autism, including On the Spectrum, which earned him a Steinberg Award from the American Theatre Critics Association. His newest play, Autonomy, premieres this month at the Mixed Blood Theatre in Minneapolis. He wrote for Garrison Keillor’s radio show A Prairie Home Companion for eight seasons and is a writer/producer for Paula Poundstone’s podcast, Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone. LaZebnik is the founder/director of the Stephens College low-residency Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting program. He has also taught television writing and screenwriting at USC’s Stark M.F.A. program; Pepperdine University; the University of California, Riverside; and the Writers Guild of America Veterans Writing Program.

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Head Marshal Jeffrey Phillips, Ph.D.........................................Associate Professor, School of Health Sciences Faculty Chair

Faculty Marshals Tina Parke-Sutherland, Ph.D. ......................................Professor of English/Creative Writing, School of Creative and Performing Arts Debeshi Majumdar, Ph.D................................. Assistant Professor, School of Health Sciences 2019 Distinguished Teacher of the Year

Deans Gail Humphries Mardirosian, Ph.D. ������������������������������������������������Dean, School of Creative and Performing Arts Monica McMurry, Ph.D. ...................................................... Interim Dean, School of Design Julia Moffitt, Ph.D................................................................ Dean, School of Health Sciences

2019 Commencement Platform Party Members Dianne M. Lynch, Ph.D. ......................................................................................... President Gail Humphries Mardirosian, Ph.D..................................................Dean, School of Creative and Performing Arts Monica McMurry, Ph.D. ...................................................... Interim Dean, School of Design Julia Moffitt, Ph.D................................................................ Dean, School of Health Sciences Ken LaZebnik...................................................................................Commencement Speaker Leslie Willey, Ph.D. .......................................................... Vice President for Academic Affairs

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Pinnacle Honor Society Honor Society for Non-Traditional Undergraduate and Graduate Students Signified by Wearing Red Academic Cords

Graduate Students Miranda Leigh Backes Lorie Ann Bousquet Shelby Paige Dorfman Brieann N. Fountain Ashlyn Blaine Gauta Megan Sloan Gordon Leah Martel Griffin Carrie Michelle McKee Rebecca Elizabeth Nobles-Jackson William Adam Washburne Parker Ilona Ellen Rossman Ho

Undergraduate Students Dawnetta Marie Alexander Angelique Jefferson Sarah Jean Ripperda

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Master’s Degree Candidates (awarded in absentia if unable to be present) (The list of degree candidates is subject to revision and does not constitute the official list of graduates for May 2019. The official list will be made available by the Registrar when all requirements for degree completion have been certified.)

Amy Marie Backer St. Louis, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

Brittony Page Corneillier Keystone, Colorado Master of Education in Counseling

Miranda Leigh Backes Frankenstein, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

Richard Terrell Delancy Fort Lauderdale, Florida Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting

+Lorie Ann Bousquet Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling Peter Browne Los Angeles, California Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting Michael Bradley Burke Columbia, Missouri Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting +Rachel Lucille Chott Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling Grayson Alexandria Coker St. Louis, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

Shelby Paige Dorfman Grayslake, Illinois Master of Education in Counseling Rashaan Elaine Dozier-Escalante Los Angeles, California Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting Alexandra Fernandez Los Angeles, California Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting Brieann N. Fountain Boonville, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling Ashlyn Blaine Gautam Jefferson City, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

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+Jenna Jean Germer Edwardsville, Illinois Master of Education in Counseling

+Gayle Lee Kemper Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

Megan Sloan Gordon Boonville, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

Alason Elizabeth Little Fayetteville, North Carolina Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting

Leah Martel Griffin Centralia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling +Breanna Christine Grotzinger Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling +Meridith Alissa Haley Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling Meredith Maureen Hood St. Louis, Missouri Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting Madelyn Taylor Horn St. Joseph, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling +Shelia Ann Johnson Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling +Mariah Alexis Keathley Joplin, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

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LeeAnne Hecht Lowry Overland Park, Kansas Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting Carrie Michelle McKee Springfield, Illinois Master of Education in Counseling +Chandra Hope Mossine Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling +Allison Paige Neeley Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling Rebecca Elizabeth Nobles-Jackson Lake Dallas, Texas Master of Education in Counseling Kelly Ann Off Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling William Adam Washburne Parker Los Angeles, California Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting


Kris Marie Patterson Summerville, South Carolina Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting

Christine Keyana Twyman Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting

+Chloe Payton Rimer Columbia, Missouri Master of Education in Counseling

Andrew D. Wickwire Spokane, Washington Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting

Ilona Ellen Rossman Ho Seattle, Washington Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting

Cynthia Ellen Zeiden Chicago, Illinois Master of Fine Arts in Television and Screenwriting

+ August 2019 graduates

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Baccalaureate Degree Candidates (awarded in absentia if unable to be present) (The list of degree candidates is subject to revision and does not constitute the official list of graduates for May 2019. The official list will be made available by the Registrar when all requirements for degree completion have been certified.)

Nominees for Graduation With Honors Summa Cum Laude

(Cumulative GPA of 3.90 to 4.00)

Angelique Jefferson

With Honors

(Cumulative GPA of 3.70 or above for undergraduate students completing 36-59 hours at Stephens College)

Sarah Jean Ripperda

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Baccalaureate Degree Candidates Dawnetta Marie Alexander Joplin, Missouri Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Angelique Jefferson Overland Park, Kansas Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Amber Lynn Clouse Kingman, Kansas Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Sarah Diane Maize Kirksville, Missouri Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Tanina Drame Cincinnati, Ohio Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Aveline Miller Dubuque, Iowa Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Stacy Lynn Fuller Waterbury, Connecticut Certificate in Health Information Administration

Bridget Ann Nixon Tulare, California Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Megan Elizabeth Guarnieri Elkton, Maryland Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Jennifer S. Raines Hughesville, Missouri Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

+Susan Michelle Harris Cabot, Arkansas Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

De'Janee Alexandria Register Macon, Georgia Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Shawneese Chantel Henderson North Little Rock, Arkansas Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Sarah Jean Ripperda Arkansas City, Kansas Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

Gabriela Hernandez Orange Cove, California Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

+Gala Adair Scott-Walker Phoenix, Arizona Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

+Lisa K. Hollibaugh Kimberly, Idaho Bachelor of Science in Health Information Administration

+ August 2019 graduates

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Board of Trustees Gayle Flannery Bentsen ’67 Sara Herrnstadt Crosby ’76 The Honorable Ann K. Covington George Ann Stokes Harding ’58 Sara Jane Johnson ’56 Nikki Krawitz Teresa Rouse Maledy ’78 Jane Hobson Marcus ’78 Angeleigha “Angel” Mendez ’14 M. Anne Murphy ’78 Anita K. Parran ’73 Christy Hanahan Powell ’68 Tom Richards Vicki Russell Susan Brawley Schmidt ’67 Dylan Shelofsky ’13 Valerie Shaw ’00 Jim Sinek Mark Taylor ’73 Silissa Uriarte Smith ’98 Ellen Vollrath ’86 Henry “Hank” J. Waters, III

Trustee Emeriti Dale Creach Gretchen Bush Kimball ’57 Ann Wrobleski ’73

Faculty Emeriti Michael Bowling, Ph.D. Judith Clark, Ph.D. Mary Alice (Patti) Doyle Alan Havig, Ph.D. James Whitehill, Ph.D.

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The Mace The mace is an instrument that has evolved through the centuries from a weapon used for protection to a symbol of authority. The mace can be traced back to the Middle Ages when it was used by bodyguards of kings and other high officials. At the time, the wood mace was generally clad in metal and was an effective tool in battle. By the 15th century the mace had become a symbol of sovereignty. History confirms that by the end of the 16th century maces were widely used by officials of English cities and towns. A continuing transformation in symbolism has brought it to the current times where it is used most often as a ceremonial symbol in academic processions.

About Academic Regalia In the 12th and 13th centuries, when universities were taking form, they were under the jurisdiction of the church. Most of those studying were clerks in holy orders or monks, and some were priests. They wore habit or cloak, to which was attached a cowl or hood which could be pulled over the head or thrown back according to weather conditions. Academic costume, as such, seems to have originated at Oxford and Cambridge universities in England in the 1300s. As the British universities passed from the control of the ecclesiastics, the costumes took on brighter colors, the dress or convocation robes for the doctors, for example, being of scarlet cloth. The idea of a well-defined system for American colleges and universities arose about 1893. An intercollegiate commission was formed in 1893 to draft a uniform code for caps, gowns and hoods for various degrees. The scheme included identification of the sources of degrees by use of college colors in the hoods. Today’s academic costumes may be described as follows: Gowns for the bachelor’s degree are fashioned from “worsted stuff” with semi-stiff yoke, long pleated front panels, and intricate shirring across the shoulders and back. The bachelor’s gown is distinguished by its long, pointed sleeves. The master’s gown has the same yoke effect but is often designed to be worn open. It has a very long sleeve, oblong in shape. Gowns for the doctor’s degree have velvet panels around the neck and down the front edges. The velvet trimming may be either black or the color distinctive of the discipline to which the degree refers. All material referred to in the preceding paragraphs has been subject to modification with the passing of time. In America the hood is the most outstanding feature of the academic costume. Originally it seems to have had three uses: as a head covering, as a shoulder cape or, when hanging from the shoulder, as a bag in which alms could be collected. The entire garment, cape and hood proper, was allowed to fall back producing approximately the effect which we see today.

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The shape and size of the American hood marks the college degree of the wearer and, under the system established by the Intercollegiate Code, anyone attending an academic function in this country who is familiar with the code can readily distinguish at a glance the bachelors, masters and doctors, and at the same time, recognize the university or college from which each degree was obtained. The outside of the hood is bordered with velvet or velveteen of the proper width, colored to indicate the degree. The reading of the degree, not the department in which the major work was done, governs the proper color of the border. Thus a degree conferred as a bachelor of science in engineering requires the gold yellow of science, whereas the bachelor of engineering degree requires the orange border of engineering. The colored lining of the inside of the hood is of the official color or colors of the institution conferring the degree. Below is a partial list of academic degree colors as registered with the Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume. These are colors of the outside border of the hood. Arts, English, Letters, Humanities..................................................................................White Business Administration, Commercial Science.................................................................Drab Communication, Humanics, Journalism........................................................... Dark Crimson Counseling & Guidance, Education, Pedagogy....................................................... Light Blue Dramatic Arts, Fine Arts, Architecture.......................................................................... Brown Health & Rehabilitation, Physical Science.............................................................. Sage Green Interior Design............................................................................................................ Bilberry Jurisprudence, Laws...................................................................................................... Purple Mathematics, Physics, Science............................................................................. Science Gold Music...............................................................................................................................Pink Philosophy...............................................................................................................Dark Blue Psychology.......................................................................................................................Gold Science.............................................................................................................. Golden Yellow Social Science................................................................................................................ Citron

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The Mission of Stephens College Learn. Grow. Lead. Vision

Inspired by its tradition as an undergraduate women’s college, Stephens College engages lifelong learners in an educational experience characterized by intellectual rigor, creative expression, and professional practice, supported by accomplished faculty, talented staff, and engaged alumnae/ alumni. Graduates of Stephens College are educated in the liberal arts, informed by diverse perspectives, and committed to lives of leadership, integrity and service.

Values

Stephens College is committed to its Ten Ideals as core values that inspire and enrich our lives: Respect for our own dignity and the dignity of others, embodied in a sense of social justice Courage and persistence Independence, autonomy and self-sufficiency Support for others through the willingness to take and give criticism, acceptance and love Sensitivity to the uniqueness and fragility of the natural world of which we are part Responsibility for the consequences of our choices Belief in our changing selves and in our right to change Creativity in the spiritual and aesthetic dimensions of life Intelligence that is informed and cultivated, critical yet tolerant Leadership which empowers others

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Stephens Hymn

Verse 2 Treasuring memories ever dear, Singing your praise for everyone to hear, Living Ideals for all the world to see that dear, dear old Stephens, we hail to thee!

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Stephens College Home to bold women with bright dreams since 1833.

Profile for Stephens College

May 2019 Stephens College Graduate & Online Commencement Program  

May 2019 Stephens College Graduate & Online Commencement Program for Friday, May 10, 2019, at 6 p.m., Kimball Ballroom, Lela Raney Wood Hall...

May 2019 Stephens College Graduate & Online Commencement Program  

May 2019 Stephens College Graduate & Online Commencement Program for Friday, May 10, 2019, at 6 p.m., Kimball Ballroom, Lela Raney Wood Hall...

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