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Roberts, Jr. 2 civil war in the mid 1600’s. It also has significant democratic roots based off the creation of the Magna Carta; in line with these roots there is currently a free and fair election system. The executive branch of a parliamentary system consists of the Prime Minister (PM) and the cabinet. The PM of Britain, David Cameron is of particular interest as he leads the first coalition government since the Second World War. He spearheads the executive branch, but he has a very strong Cabinet of Ministers at his side to advise him in nuanced aspects of British domestic and foreign policy. Britain follows a strict parliamentary top-down system in which the monarch is the head of state, the PM has the second most power as head of the government, the PMs’ cabinet is next after that, followed by the bureaucracy, and finally general parliament. Britain’s consolidated power in parliament allows the ruling party or coalition to push through the party platform quite easily in contrary to the presidential systems balance of powers making it much more effective during times of crisis. Parliament in both forms of the House of Commons and the House of Lords votes along party (or in recent memory coalition) lines that it is astounding that this country has remained politically stable since the end of the Second World War; regardless of such Britain has persisted on an even political keel not to mention its’ rather innocent record of human rights and social justice issues. Britain endures as the world’s sixth largest economy by GDP1 and many assert that this is due to the inherent steadiness in the entire British system. Britain’s GDP ranking is just one notch higher than more populous Brazil2. The Federative Republic of Brazil is a burgeoning presidential system democracy consisting of a strong executive branch, a feeble legislative branch consisting of two houses, and corrupt judiciary. Moving Brazil forward is the strong executive branch, and a growing economy. Detriments to this democracy include the observable lack of political parties, and the generally 1

World Bank Data asserts that Britain has a GDP of 2.435 Trillion dollars, the average rate of growth (1961-2012) is 2.40%, the average rate of growth (1994-2012) is 2.36% 2 World Bank Data asserts that Brazil has a GDP of 2.252 Trillion dollars

Political power parity  

My second test of POS 241: Comparative Politics You can tell a lot about a country by its executives, legislatures, political parties, ele...

Political power parity  

My second test of POS 241: Comparative Politics You can tell a lot about a country by its executives, legislatures, political parties, ele...

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