Issuu on Google+

Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 13/09/2013 14:01 Page 1

Further Education

14-15

…here


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 10:59 Page 2

2


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 10:59 Page 3

Transformation is the key ingredient. We put the creative aspirations and the support needs of each student at the heart of everything we do. Professor Andrew Brewerton, Principal

4

All about the College

22

Our learning continuum

30

Community engagement

32

Supporting you

38

How to apply

40

Further Education course index

42

Level 3: Extended Diplomas

78

Level 3: A-levels

88

Level 3/4: Foundation Diplomas

92

Creative Apprenticeship Programme

3


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 10:59 Page 4

4


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 5

Forget what you know about school: this is where your journey starts and ideas become reality. Art school teaching cultivates a spirit of adventure. Whatever your age or experience, we’ll give you the confidence and networks to make your mark in the world.

5


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 6

Our A-level students creating public art by wrapping the 8.2 metre stainless steel Sundial on Armada Way, Plymouth, in 180 metres of calico. The project was a tribute to Christo, the famous ‘wrapper’ of the Reichstag in Berlin. They were also testing the notion that familiar landmarks are ‘invisible’ to passers-by until someone covers them up. Holding on to the hem is Vera Jin.

We’ll teach you to plot, print, sew, shape and stretch your thinking, and we’ll help you to design your own future It’s so much more than a classroom exercise. Here the emphasis is on learning by doing and sometimes learning from your mistakes. We’ll give you space to think and make, and time to grow. We promise everyone here – degree students and postgraduates, teachers and technicians, as well as the youngest members of our Young Arts Club – the same attention, respect and encouragement.

all about the College : our creative approach to learning

6


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 7

7


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 8

8


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 9

First-year Extended Diploma students Lauren Hancock (left) and Stacey Paramore silk screen print on to fabric. Almost every textile making and printing process imaginable is here to try – from digital printing to hand weaving and from rug making to embroidery with wire.

Picasso said, ‘We’re all born artists; the challenge is to remain an artist as we grow up.’ We’re with you, Pablo We let our students do most of the talking when we make this prospectus each year. We leave it to them to describe the pleasure of having freedom to experiment alongside experienced specialists, using the latest professional facilities and equipment. We encourage them to describe their journeys so far, and where they think they might go next to take best advantage of what they’ve learned. We hope their stories will let you see how the creative ‘electricity’ permeates our College, and to understand the variety of ways you can plug into it.

all about the College : our creative environment

9


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 10

All of our courses in the arts, design, crafts and media open up a clear pathway to your choice of profession Society depends more and more on people who can think critically and imaginatively, communicate effectively and work productively in teams and groups. And there is renewed interest in vocational training and apprenticeships that make a direct connection between education and careers. The fact is, all sorts of businesses need to be creative, and for that to happen they need to have inventive people like you working for them. The distinctive problem-solving skills you can learn here are vital to virtually every occupation.

all about the College : working towards your future

10


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 11

Sean Dunn and Sam Woods are sailmaker apprentices at the Plymouth base of Babcock International Group, where they’ve been working together making covers and containments for Navy equipment. ‘It’s very varied work,’ Sean says. ‘One day I can be making something for submarines, and the next for a surface ship or a nuclear power plant. We’re training and learning as we go.’ For more about the our creative apprenticeship schemes, see pp 92-5.

11


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 12

Extended Diploma Art and Design student Holly Quartly upcycles fabric for the annual Design to Sell project, when students design and make products. As well as earning sales income, students gain first-hand experience of being independent designer-makers, and skills in team working and financial management.

12


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:00 Page 13

Our young entrepreneurs discover that there’s no obstacle between an art college education and a fulfilling creative career Don’t let anyone try to tell you that art and design students are unemployable – it’s a myth. Good design is actually the only thing that gives UK manufacturing the edge in world markets, and since the 1990s UK creative industries have grown at an impressive rate. Times may be harder now, but as recently as September 2011 the Confederation of British Industry reported that the creative industries sector was expected to employ 1.3 million people by 2013. It shows that the world is coming round to our way of thinking. We’ve always known that great design and moments of true inventiveness happen when artists are in tune with everyday life and sensitive to the widest possible range of influences. It’s one of the reasons why the College has always been so accessible. The difference is that in the new educational climate we are beginning to be able to turn our traditional beliefs into an ambitious vision for further education in the region.

all about the College : learning to be a young entrepreneur

13


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 10/09/2013 11:22 Page 14

At the races together: a flair for design, professionalism and entrepreneurship

Here’s an example of creative spirit in action. Extended Diploma students Billie Cox, Jess Dyer and Alice Smyth set up their own fashion design partnership, Jillie & Co, and have already worked together on a number of commissions. For example, they designed and made an outfit from crisp packets, road tested it at Exeter racecourse and then paraded it on Ladies’ Day at the Cheltenham Festival. To make it all happen, they linked up with the Devon company Burts Chips who have a sponsorship deal with Jockey Club racecourses. Our students routinely get a taste of real-world professionalism. At the annual fashion show they liaise with designers to develop marketing materials, collaborate with student photographers on publicity and documentary shoots, and negotiate with city businesses for hair, make-up and sponsorship. It all requires tenacity and teamwork – ideal preparation for events such as London Fashion Week – and for progression to Higher Education.

all about the College : stepping into the real world

14


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 10/09/2013 11:22 Page 15

Extended Diploma Art and Design Fashion and Textiles students Billie Cox, Jess Dyer and Alice Smyth work together on commissions as Jillie & Co.

15


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 16

16


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 17

On the level – we’re helping to change the cultural landscape of Plymouth

We have our own ‘shop window’ right in the middle of Plymouth and drive partnerships that are transforming the cultural life of the city. Our public gallery was one of the venues for The British Art Show when it made its first visit to the South West, and the following year Sinopticon, an investigation of the historical influence of China on British arts and crafts, exhibited here. In summer 2013 our exhibition programme included the winning selection from the Marmite Prize, an influential competition founded by painters Stephanie Moran and Marcus Cope (nothing to do with the spread!). Also running in 2012/13: photographic exhibitions by star Martin Parr and the late Corinne Day (left), reflections on the history of Plymouth by Ballet Rambert artist-in-residence Abigail Reynolds, textinspired work by Hannah James, and paintings by Chris Appleby.

all about the College : our cultural connections

17


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 18

Here’s what the blue sky future of design education looks like – we’ve built it just for you Some universities are closing their craft-based design courses, and putting all of their eggs in one digital basket. We’re convinced that it’s a mistake to separate old and new technologies, and we’ve invested nearly £8 million in a new art, craft and digital design centre. Our new building puts us at the leading edge of contemporary crafts and design practice in the UK. It features industrystandard technologies in glass, ceramics, textiles, print and metals, as well as digital tools and equipment for high-tech machining and cutting. From September 2013 students will enjoy specialist crafts and digital design facilities including the latest 3D printing, milling and laser cutting for rapid prototyping. You’ll also find communal hubs and display areas to encourage the all-important collaborative spark. All this will be ready for your arrival.

all about the College : investing in your future

18


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 19

The city centre College campus has been transformed in the space of less than a year by the addition of a new art, craft and digital design centre, seen here taking shape.

19


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 20

Ceramic artist Alicia Ongay-Perez worked with crafts students across all levels when she visited the College in the spring of 2013 from the Jan van Eyck Academy in the Netherlands where she has a fellowship supported by the Mondrian Fund. She specialises in inverse forms, slip-casting ceramic objects inside out so that they cease to be functional and enter a more ambiguous world of what she suggests might be called ‘conceptual crafts’.

Introducing our learning continuum – we signpost the routes, you choose the way

We run courses to the highest level and locate them all within a wider ‘learning continuum’ that spans from preschool children to postgraduate research students (see page 22). Our framework is in line with national qualifications, which ensures that the credits you earn here will be recognised and can be built upon afterwards. We’ll support you as individuals, stimulate your curiosity, challenge your preconceptions and urge you to aim higher. At the same time we’ll encourage you to feel you have ownership of whichever course you choose – with a strong say in how it runs and how we meet educational targets.

all about the College : giving you the right qualifications

20


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 21

21


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 10/09/2013 11:16 Page 22

Evenings … weekends … holidays … fourth birthday or fortieth, there’s no time like the present to inspire you Younger or older, we’ll make you feel comfortable in an art school environment and give you early advice about your career path. The relationship begins with the four-year-olds who join in the Saturday morning Outside the Lines sessions with their parents; for others the key is our Saturday Arts Club for nine to 18-yearolds, the inspiration for the Sorrell Foundation’s National Art and Design Saturday Club. Fourteen to 16-year-olds share a masterclass with an artist or designer of the calibre of Antony Gormley or Thomas Heatherwick. They also show their work twice a year at a prestigious London venue. The popularity of our weekend activities has inspired a new Young Arts Club, and an expanded range of activities that includes Perfect Your Portfolio sessions. There’s also Evening Arts Club on week nights, family activities linked to our Gallery, and holiday clubs. Students return year after year to learn new skills, and many choose to continue their study with us.

all about the College : learning for all ages

22


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 10/09/2013 11:16 Page 23

23


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 24

Our Further Education journey planner The colour key shown here is used throughout the prospectus to explain how the study levels connect. The circles containing page numbers direct you to reading about our students’ real experiences. Details of each course start on page 42.

pre-16

Level 3

Plymouth School of Community Engagement Creative Arts Outside the Lines (for children aged 4-8 and their parents) Saturday Arts Club age 9-18 Evening Arts Club age 14-18 National Art and Design Saturday Club age 14-18

BTEC Extended Diplomas (2 years, equivalent to 3 A-levels) Foundation Diploma in Art and Design (1 year) Apprenticeship Programme A-levels (2 years)

Perfect your Portfolio age 15-18

p26 p71

p27 p39

p60

p63 p93

still at school?

24

career change?


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 25

Levels 4-6 employment

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design (1 year)

further training postgraduate study

Foundation Degrees (2 years)

research

BA Honours Degrees (3 years)

e

p95

p89 p81

p85

P27

p67 p94 p51

after GCSEs?

after A-levels?

25


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 26

Stephen Prior and son George Saturday Arts Club

I live in Plymouth and studied the HNC Graphic Design course and completed a degree in Photography. I’m now a successful freelance graphic designer. My partner, Jane, did the Saturday Arts Club as a child and now teaches here, so we knew that it would be really good for George. He’s always been interested in making things and it’s a great thing for a father and son to do together. George finds it very inspiring. He’s learning skills he’d never be able to at school – not at such a young age or having so much fun.

26


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 27

Nick White Extended Diploma > Foundation Degree > BA Top up

Arts Club is part of the rounded life of the College. I know that from having taught Saturday classes and also having been a Student Ambassador. It’s part of what makes the place so unusual and special. I came here to study a National Diploma course, continued on the Extended Diploma, then did a Foundation Degree where you gain more experience in other things. It’s a seamless, supportive environment and we all help each other across courses and year groups. We use the same resources and spaces and there’s a lot of peer interaction. 27


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 28

The Taylor family were among the visitors to the College’s One Zero Nine pop-up shop and drop-in studio, where they were invited to a free portrait photo session, which also gave Extended Diploma Art and Design students insight into family relationships as well as an introduction to the social awareness portrait photographers need to cultivate.

One Zero Nine? It means we take our streetlevel social responsibilities very seriously

Our city centre shop and training centre, One Zero Nine, is a shining example of our involvement in providing communitybased learning. With the European Social Fund’s backing and in partnership with Plymouth’s City Centre Company, One Zero Nine in Cornwall Street is an authentic social enterprise. It offers young people a route into further education, work and apprenticeships and at the same time helps them to cultivate highly practical skills in exhibition and pop-up shop design and management. It all adds up to introducing the entrepreneurial spirit of an art college to everyone. This street-level approach is in line with latest government educational policy on Raising the Participation Age. The change doesn’t mean you have to stay in school! You can choose a learning environment that suits you and choose from a variety of courses or a creative apprenticeship.

all about the College : street-level learning

28


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:01 Page 29

29


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 30

Upholding the place of the arts in society as a source of inspiration in the face of division

The College is promoting the social value of the arts in a variety of ways but nowhere more strikingly than in parts of Plymouth that are gradually being revitalised by redevelopment. In the autumn of 2013 Plymouth School of Creative Arts, a free school project seeded by the College, opens in Millbay, once the city’s transatlantic liner port. And nearby, in Union Street, the College is involved in a scheme to rescue the derelict Palace Theatre as a centre for the emerging community spirit. We also celebrate the civilising power of the arts through a fellowship programme which last year acknowledged a Plymouth charity, Jeremiah’s Journey, that supports bereaved children and their families. It’s been using creative art practice as a source of strength in the face of human suffering and loss since it was set up in 1996. Its four health professional founders include Dr Sheila Cassidy, also the founder and medical director of Plymouth’s St Luke’s Hospice.

all about the College : pleasure in community involvement

30


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 31

Plymouth’s previous Deputy Mayor Chaz Singh is a prominent champion of Black and Minority Ethnic rights in the city, a strong believer in the value of the arts as a lever of social change. Here he’s visiting the college fashion department for a St George’s Day jacket fitting with Extended Diploma students Jacob Jones and Kelsey McConnell.

31


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 32

32


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 33

The future depends on you, so, whatever it takes, we’re here to help

We know that choosing an educational pathway calls for weightier decision-making and much greater personal commitment than it used to. So providing you with all-round learning support and expert confidential advice are important parts of the educational package. Plymouth College of Art has a dedicated ‘student hub’ where our Student Support Team provides advice and guidance in a range of areas, including careers and student funding. We also have a Learning Support Team, located in our ‘study zone’, on hand to help with a variety of study resources.

supporting you : student guidance

33


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 34

Plymouth is the gateway to the South West. Cornwall is just across the Sound, Dartmoor is a few minutes drive and the beautiful beaches and scenery of the South Hams are on the doorstep. There are frequent local services to Newton Abbot, Torbay, North Cornwall and North Devon and the city is served by a main First Great Western rail link to London Paddington and by Cross Country trains north to the Midlands and Scotland.

We’re worth the journey – and we may be able to help you with travel costs

Our Further Education students travel in from across the region to be part of the College community – from as far away as Barnstaple in the north, Truro in the south and Torbay in the east.

we are here

Remember, we may be able to help with your travel costs, and other sources of financial help may be worth investigating. You can apply for a Residential Bursary if you have moved to Plymouth to study because your daily journey to attend college would take longer than two hours (one hour each way) by public transport. Barnstaple Bideford

Exeter

Totnes

Plymouth Truro

supporting you : travel help

34

Torquay Paignton


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 35

Making the future affordable may be easier than you think

We provide financial assistance through a range of support funds, including the 16-19 Bursary, Discretionary Learner Support for those over 19, and the Residential Bursary. We can also help with travel, accommodation costs, materials and trip costs. If you’re a parent returning to education you may be eligible for additional funding for childcare. If you’re under 19 when the course starts, and a permanent resident in the UK, you’ll not be charged tuition fees. If you’re 19 and over and getting Job Seeker’s Allowance your fees may also be waived. If you’re aged 24 or over, you can apply for a loan to cover all or part of your tuition fees, but do it straight away because help is limited. You won’t have to repay the loan until you’re working and earning over £21,000 a year. If our website doesn’t answer your questions, email infoservices@pca.ac.uk, phone 01752 203434 – or drop in and see us.

supporting you : financial help for all ages

35


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 36

Dan Wheatley, lecturer in Extended Diploma in Art and Design, works with Joshua Sylvester.

36


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 37

Not quite sure which route to pick? Ask us for an advisory interview

You can apply online for any of the courses described in this prospectus by visiting www.plymouthart.ac.uk, where you’ll find a wealth of information about all aspects of College life. Most interviews take place between February and June, but you can apply at any time of the year. Please talk to us first. We’ll be happy to arrange an informal advisory interview to help you to decide your direction and plan your journey. Just call or email.

supporting you : booking an advisory interview

37


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 38

Extended Diplomas or A-levels – which route is better for you?

We offer nine Extended Diploma courses as a pathway into Higher Education and towards a career in the arts, crafts and media. Our parallel A-level programme is based on a choice of at least two creative subjects – Fine Art, Photography, Graphic Communication or Textiles – with an academic choice – Critical and Contextual Studies, English Literature or Media Studies. You’ll want to weigh up the differences between A-levels and the Extended Diploma route. One view is that A-levels are more academic and provide a broader range of study; an Extended Diploma, which is the equivalent of three A-levels, is a good alternative if your sights are already set on a specific art, design or media specialism. During your Further Education course you will develop your transferable professional and academic skills, including problem-solving and English and Maths skills in preparation for Higher Education and employment. A-level students set on a career in art and design may sometimes be advised to complete a Foundation Diploma in Art and Design before applying for a BA (Hons) programme. Either way, we’re more interested in you as an individual than we are in any classroom categories, so please ask for an advisory interview if you’re not sure which route to choose.

38

See pages 42-77 for Extended Diploma course details and pages 78-87 for our A-level programme.


Aug27FE-1_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:02 Page 39

Cameron Williamson Extended Diploma Graphic Design & Illustration

I started doing sixth form but dropped out, unsure of what I wanted to study. I spent a couple of years unemployed, but I’d carried on drawing so decided to study Illustration. I’m going on to study BA (Hons) Illustration here. It’s about what you bring to it. I was always worried that I might fail after dropping out of school but I relaxed in the first week of being here.

39


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:08 Page 40

Plotting your course

Level 2+3

Level 3

Level 3

Creative Apprenticeship Programme p 92

BTEC Extended Diploma in Art and Design p 42

A-levels introduction p 78

BTEC Extended Diploma in Design Crafts p 46 BTEC Extended Diploma in Game Arts and 3D Animation p 50 BTEC Extended Diploma in Creative Media Production (Television and Film) p 54 BTEC Extended Diploma in Fashion p 58 BTEC Extended Diploma in Textiles p 62 BTEC Extended Diploma in Graphic Design and Illustration p 66 BTEC Extended Diploma in Photography p 70 BTEC Extended Diploma 3D, Architecture, Interiors and Product p 74

40

A-level Critical and Contextual Studies p 80 A-level Fine Art p 82 A-level Photography p 82 A-level Graphic Communication p 84 A-level Textile Design p 84 A-level Media Studies p 86 A-level English Literature p 86 Foundation Diploma in Art and Design p 88


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:08 Page 41

Level 4 Foundation Diploma in Art and Design p 88 The Foundation Diploma in Art and Design appears in two places here because the course has a flexible structure. It is made up of seven units. The first four units are assessed at Level 3; units 5 and 6 can be assessed at either Level 3 or Level 4, and the seventh is Level 4 only. Your qualification will depend on your performance in relation to the last three units.

41


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 42

This course gives talented, adventurous young artists and designers the chance to escape the limits of classroom teaching and develop their arts practice inside a dynamic, professionally equipped art college alongside expert makers. We’ll give you free rein across our fine art studios and workshops and guide your experiments in drawing, painting and printmaking, photography, sculpture, 3D, graphics, textiles and fashion, and introduce a range of digital processes. The course provides a practical introduction to materials, techniques and processes to develop your learning and communication skills as well as your understanding of contemporary creative thinking.

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

Sessions range from vital foundation life class exercises to the exploration of digital observation, recording and making methods. Investment in your personal and professional development includes portfolio building and the design of promotional campaigns, contact with visiting artists and gallery trips.

Tweeny Van Mierlo, Course leader

We’re interested in you as an individual – in what kind of person and artist you are. We’re not interested in cloning! We’re looking for longing and determination to belong to the creative world.

BTEC Extended Diploma

Art and Design 42

Many of our students choose creative undergraduate programmes at Plymouth College of Art – from Fine Art to Photography, from Game Arts to Film. Others go straight into employment or apprenticeships in the creative sector. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 43

Emily Harris Extended Diploma Art and Design I was at community college and was going to stay on for sixth form but I saw the prospectus and came to an Open Evening. I loved the student work I saw and realised that a specialist art and design college was best for me. You have to move on from school. There are so many more facilities here. I came here to find out what I wanted to do next, and I now know that illustration is my direction. My work’s about endangered animals and how humans destroy their environments.

43


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 44

44


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 45

45


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 46

The College is leading a resurgence of interest in the design crafts – glass, metal, textiles and ceramics. This exciting twoyear course, which embraces traditional and contemporary approaches as well as the important need for sustainability, will give you a place among the new generation of ambitious professional makers. During a highly experimental first year we will stretch your imagination and critical thinking with projects that explore the principles of developmental drawing, interaction with clients, the interpretation of briefs, and the qualities of different materials – from metals to the bits and bytes of digital media. During the second year, to increase your professional competence, we’ll give you a taste of the history of design, and guide you through some of the commercial issues craftspeople and designers have to deal with. All of this will be consolidated through a live business project called ‘Design to Sell’ to give you authentic business experience using our industry-standard workshops – all to prepare you for a secure future in the crafts industry.

Tweeny Van Mierlo, Course leader

This course requires strong self-motivation. You’ll be challenged, but always constructively, and we’ll give you lots of transferable skills – including how to make money out in the world.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Art and Design

Design Crafts 46

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

Our students go on to enrol on one of our BA (Hons) Degree courses in Contemporary Crafts (Jewellery and Silversmithing, Ceramics, Glass) and Fine Art or to study at other colleges and universities in the UK and beyond. Some take their new found skills straight into the workplace in careers including: architecture, interior design, spatial design, contemporary crafts, media, photography, textiles, fashion and journalism. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 47

Jess Perrit Extended Diploma Art and Design > BA Contemporary Crafts I started to do art with psychology and law A-levels at sixth form college, but moved here. It’s not the usual pupil–teacher relationship. It’s friendlier, but you still get loads done. I made maquettes in lots of materials and found it was beautiful to be able to see through something as delicate as glass. I’m making spatulas and spoons using lampwork and sandcasting. Next, I plan to study BA (Hons) Contemporary Crafts here, specialising in jewellery and glass. It’s a unique course.

47


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 48

An ethos of mutual care and respect applies right across our studio and teaching. Extended Diploma students are seen here with Tweeny Van Mierlo’s teaching team.

48


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 49

49


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 50

This course will accelerate your progress towards a career in the highly technical and fast changing world of interactive media and game arts by giving you access to expert tuition and all of the facilities of a dedicated design and development suite. We will give you a solid grounding in art and design processes and ideas before guiding you through a range of digital skills including technical and creative image manipulation, website design, 3D computer modelling, and the evolution of mobile technology for handheld devices and apps. You’ll gain insight into programming and the principles of interactive media authoring, as well as the fundamentals of communications science – how people interact with computer games. A big advantage of the Plymouth College of Art programme is the opportunity you’ll have to work closely with other art, design and media disciplines. Although you’ll develop the skills needed for a job at entry level in a software house, a high proportion of our students go on to study in Higher Education. A third do digital graphic design, others specialise in animation, character and concept design or scripting – all available as BA (Hons) programmes here. We’re involved in Extended Play, the South West’s network for professionals developing new media and interactive business ideas.

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

You may decide that you would like to go on to do a BA (Hons) Degree in Animation, Design for Games or Graphics and Illustration. Alternatively, you may choose to enrol on a course at another college or university or take your new skills straight into the workplace. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.

Martial Bugliolo, Course leader

We constantly review and adjust the curriculum to make sure our students keep up to date with market demands in this rapidly changing industry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Art and Design

Game Arts and 3D Animation 50


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 51

Jason Duckworth Extended Diploma Interactive Media and Game Arts I want to work in the game design industry. This course allows me to focus on my artistic skills and gives me a taste of all the other professional aspects of the business. The social aspect of working with tutors is very important to me. I tried other sixth form and foundation courses but I hated both! They treated me like a child and they lacked structure. Here I’m treated like an adult and given all the resources I need to develop. I’m going on to study BA (Hons) Design for Games here. I wouldn’t learn as much anywhere else. I’ve found I’m quite good at ideas generation and leading a team. The course has helped me to develop these skills. I didn’t know I had it in me! 51


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 52

52


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 13/09/2013 13:41 Page 53

Jodie Sargison Extended Diploma Interactive Media and Game Arts I did work experience in a graphic design studio and decided to train in a related area. This course has opened more doors. I’m planning to go on to study for a BA (Hons) in Design for Games next, and to work in the industry. I’ve learned animation, web design, used media such as Flash and Java scripting – and developed a vast range of skills. It’s not just about Game Design though. I’ve learned the Adobe software programmes, drawing and concept art. Each lecturer brings specialist skills and offers really good support. They even altered the timetable to make it easier for us to get here – we’re important!

53


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 54

Even if you have never picked up a video camera before, if your sights are set on becoming a film maker, director, producer, animator or broadcaster, this course will let you take a big step towards your career. You’ll spend two years in one of the region’s best equipped teaching departments and we’ll help you explore the spectrum of skills associated with creative media production. We will give you the confidence to plan, develop and produce dynamic and thought provoking film, video and animation, and, in doing so, encourage you to work closely with other art, design and media disciplines. Sessions cover music video production, documentary, single camera drama, animation production (stop motion and 3D), soundtracks, scriptwriting and story development. Technical skills also include lighting, editing and camera work, and we teach critical and theoretical understanding, planning and organisational skills. Our strong links with industry, for example with the BBC, Plymouth City Council, the national media company TwoFour and Raindance Film Festival, mean that there will be many career avenues open to you. We also work closely with the people who are steering Plymouth’s developing cultural identity and other national and international initiatives. Our busy visiting lecturer programme includes practising artists, film makers and animators.

Tim Dickinson, Course leader

On our course we teach skills, but in the context of creativity, so we encourage experimentation and risk taking. We want you to develop an entrepreneurial approach and to become independent, versatile professionals in a fast-moving industry.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Creative Media Production

Television and Film 54

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

You may decide that you would like to go on to do a BA (Hons) Degree. We offer a variety of higher education courses including Photography, Film and Animation. Alternatively, you may choose to enrol on a course at another college or university or take your new skills straight into the workplace. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:09 Page 55

Caitlin Pyne Extended Diploma Creative Media Production It’s been great so far. Everyday is a challenge, but a fun challenge. I went to an all girls school and it was definitely a change coming here, but it’s a good thing – you learn to communicate with more people. Teaching is excellent. You get the right amount of support but are taught to be independent. It’s the perfect balance. And I can use kit I could only have dreamed about getting my hands on at school. If a more practical, hands-on learning experience is better for you, you just have to go for it. Do what’s best for you!

55


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 56

56


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 57

Extended Diploma Television and Film students are given a detailed introduction to the College’s specialist studio equipment by course leader Tim Dickinson (in the white shirt). Getting to grips with track and dolly is Corina Roissetter.

57


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 13/09/2013 13:43 Page 58

If your passion is fashion design and making, this course will give you the perfect opportunity to discover new possibilities and skills. You need to be open-minded, keen to experiment and determined to reach your goals. Our lecturers are industry professionals and our studios and workshops are equipped to meet their expert requirements. They’ll help you to develop your business and enterprise skills and provide you with opportunities to design, make and sell wonderful creations. In the first year you will learn vital foundation skills and techniques, such as pattern cutting and garment production, fashion illustration, textile and fabric techniques, presentation and styling. You’ll also build a portfolio on your improving historical and contextual insights. In the second year you will have an opportunity to pursue your individual interests more deeply. This could involve design, making a collection, exploring textiles for garments, styling and promotion and illustration – all to enable you to develop a unique style. By the time you graduate you will have assembled a portfolio of high quality work relevant to your chosen career and progression routes. Both Diploma years include live projects with industry and involvement in events such as the annual fashion show. Along the way, you will visit exhibitions and take part in workshops with established artists and designers.

Julia Stean, Course leader

We’re good at supporting students as individuals. We’ll develop your curiosity and build your aspirations. We like to let you dip a toe in, and come back for more. And we’ll give you a sense of ownership of the course.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Art and Design

Fashion 58

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

Successful students may progress to BA (Hons) Fashion, BA (Hons) Printed Textile Design and Surface Pattern, BA (Hons) Costume Production and Associated Crafts or BA (Hons) Fashion Media and Marketing at Plymouth College of Art, or gain entry to degree level courses at other colleges and universities. Alternatively, you may choose to look for employment. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 59

Jacob Jones Extended Diploma Fashion I’ve learned a lot this year – and to look at things differently. I’ve made this little black dress which came out of research done by visiting a forest, but not by developing something obvious. I like all parts of fashion but making is definitely one of my favourite bits. I was at high school in Cheshire before my family moved here. We have a very good relationship with the tutors. They’re very helpful and there are great resources.

59


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 60

Lewis Jones Extended Diploma Fashion The friends I’ve made started the course at the same time. I’ve got more in common with them. They’re more like-minded. There’s no way I wanted to stay on at school. I’m enjoying every minute of it here. I love the busy-ness, I couldn’t wait to get started. Contextual studies helps me see how a designer can get inspiration from different things, and that kind of historical research is really useful. I’m really happy. I can’t imagine doing anything else, and I can come in on extra days to use the facilities.

60


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 61

In their second year, Extended Diploma Fashion students Lewis Jones, Alisa Vaseghi and Emily Colley have set up their own ‘upcycling’ enterprise called Acid Youth. They buy clothes and materials from charity shops and restyle and sell them online and at markets. They are wearing some examples of their remodelled denim garments here. Lewis continues to make adventurous use of the College’s facilities – after screenprinting and dyeing he’s moved on to laser cutting.

61


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 13/09/2013 13:44 Page 62

This new specialism in textiles will enable you to direct your passion into experiments with surface design, printing, inventing new materials and adapting old ones. You need to be open-minded, keen to experiment and determined to reach your goals. Our lecturers are industry professionals and our studios and workshops are equipped to meet expert requirements. They will help you to develop your business and enterprise skills, and provide you with opportunities to design, make and sell wonderful creations. In the first year you will learn about printed, knitted and embroidered textiles, fabric manipulation techniques, the generation of ideas for textile and surface pattern, and presentation methods. You will work in groups with specialist fashion students to exchange ideas and expertise. In the second year you will be able to pursue your individual interests more deeply. This could involve design, making a collection, exploring textiles for garments, styling, promotion and illustration – all to enable you to develop a unique style. By the time you graduate you will have assembled a professional portfolio of high quality work relevant to your chosen career progression. Both Diploma years include live projects with industry, and involvement in events such as the annual fashion show. Along the way you will visit exhibitions and take part in workshops with established artists and designers.

Julia Stean, Course leader

We’ll encourage you to build your skills base by experimenting with new techniques. We want you to get the most out of your time with us, so we’ll make sure you have access to the highest quality tutors, technicians and equipment.

BTEC Extended Diploma in Art and Design

Textiles 62

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

Successful students may progress to the BA (Hons) Fashion, BA (Hons) Printed Textile Design and Surface Pattern, BA (Hons) Costume Production and Associated Crafts, BA (Hons) Fashion Media and Marketing or BA (Hons) Contemporary Crafts at Plymouth College of Art, or gain entry to degree level courses at other colleges and universities. Alternatively, you may choose to look for employment. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 63

Emma-Louise Thompson Extended Diploma Fashion and Textiles I used to come to Saturday Arts Club here when I was 13 and it opened my eyes to genres and media I’d no access to at school. I gained a Bronze Art Award and was a ‘buddy’ for an Arts Club friend. I did my GCSEs in partnership with the College as I didn’t like the school environment. I’ve learned a lot already about sewing, designing, even life drawing and pattern cutting. I’m enjoying fashion promotion and marketing, too. The work I’m doing is based on an art movement – the Bauhaus – and a target market – Oasis. We’ve done several trips to research retail environments and concepts, for example in Exeter and London. It also helps us to get to know one another and we really get on well. 63


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 64

64


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:10 Page 65

65


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 13/09/2013 13:46 Page 66

This diverse and challenging course puts young graphic designers and illustrators in contact with all of the facilities, processes and influences they are likely to encounter in their professional careers. We’ll guide the development of your drawing and graphic skills, encourage you to experiment with materials and techniques, and teach you to generate ideas and concepts and communicate them well to specific audiences. You’ll also have lectures on and undertake personal research into the history of design, typography, advertising and illustration. Sessions cover illustration for typographical and illustrative posters, CD and DVD cover design, packaging design, including labels and stamp design, book cover design, magazine spreads, corporate identities, brochure design, photography, websites, advertising, type design, animation and book illustration. Students also work on live assignments with external clients. The work produced reflects some of the many career paths available within graphic design. We’ll help you to choose the right direction when you reach the end of the course.

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

Successful students may progress to the BA (Hons) Graphic Design, BA (Hons) Illustration, BA (Hons) Printed Textile Design and Surface Pattern, BA (Hons) Fashion, BA (Hons) Games Design and BA (Hons) Contemporary Crafts at Plymouth College of Art. Alternatively, you may choose to look for employment. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.

Steven Forsyth, Course leader

Helping students settle into the right work ethic is really important. Whenever the time comes, we want you to go into a job with the right level of skills and knowledge to keep it.

BTEC Extended Diploma

Graphic Design and Illustration 66


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 67

Jennicka Sapigao Extended Diploma Graphic Design and Illustration I’d done a course in fine art in the Philippiness before I came to the UK. I completed a First Diploma here and then applied to study graphics. The course has a homely feel to it. Coming from a fine art background I lean more to illustration but I really want to improve my graphic design, partly because it’s useful as a career, also because I know less about it and I’m curious. I’m going on to study BA (Hons) Graphics and Media at LCC in London. I like Plymouth but I’ve been here for three years now. My current project is on the theme of journey, and I’ve created Tarot Cards to interpret the idea of journey as something unpredictable. I’m putting it all together as a book. 67


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 68

Project work by Extended Diploma in Graphic Design and Illustration student Jennicka Sapigao dealing with the harm done to girls and women by the cultural practice of genital mutilation.

68


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 69

A paperwork called Silly Sentence by Extended Diploma in Graphic Design and Illustration student Emily Lynch.

69


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 70

This exciting and diverse photographic course will enable you to develop your creative skills inside one of the region's bestresourced photography facilities. It gives you access to professionally specified studios, specialist digital imaging suites, a range of different camera formats, chemical darkrooms and top class digital printing equipment. The first year will introduce you to the core methods and concepts through a range of challenging assignments covering studio photography, advertising, music photography, questions of identity and culture, and specialist location techniques with an environmental theme. All of these projects are supported by an enriching contextual program that explores the ideas behind the imagery. The second year has a professional focus with an emphasis on preparation for higher education or working professionally in the creative industries. The range of assignments includes a commissioned architectural brief, experimental techniques and the chance to specialise in commercial fashion, event or portrait photography. The year ends with a major project for which students write their own negotiated assignment.

Chris Smith and Tobie Loates, Joint Course leaders

Commercial assignments are mixed with more experimental and creative projects. We give our students the skills to be employed as assistants or to set up their own businesses, but most go on to higher education here or elsewhere.

BTEC Extended Diploma

Photography 70

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, such as Design Technology, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

Students may progress to a variety of Higher Education courses at Plymouth College of Art, for example a Foundation Degree in Commercial Photography, BA (Hons) in Photography or BA (Hons) Fashion Media and Marketing, or gain entry to degree level courses at other colleges and universities. Alternatively, the course gives students transferable skills. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 71

Daniel Richards Extended Diploma Photography I did a Foundation Diploma here after school. Friends of mine had come here and everything I heard about it attracted me. The Diploma included photography and I found out how long-exposure images were made. I started to make my own long-exposure photographs of water moving. Now I’m particularly interested in portraiture. I was taking family portraits at the College’s pop-up shop and took one of my best friend’s dad in a studio setting. I was very pleased with it and I call it ‘The Author’ because I made him look like a writer. I really enjoyed the process of capturing the essence of the person. When I finish here I’m going to Bristol to study for BA (Hons) Photography, then maybe I’ll become a portraitist. 71


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 72

Media and photography facilities include broadcast quality video and audio edit suites and three photographic studios with lighting rigs, one (shown here) equipped with an infinity cove. Photo: Isabel Redwood Hanson.

72


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 73

73


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 74

This adventurous new course will give you all the skills you need to shape, test and realise your ideas in readiness for a range of careers in architecture, interior design, product design, furniture or automotive design, exhibition design, and model making. You will have the benefit of high levels of expertise and design industry-standard equipment. You will be guided by a specialist team of lecturers, supported by technicians highly skilled in three dimensional fabrication and digital platforms such as 3D Studio Max and Photoshop. There are no formal examinations. Instead live projects made possible by our industrial partnerships with designers and manufacturers, and visits to professional studios and trade fairs, will steer your professional development. Progression into Higher Education and employment is a central objective. In the first year you’ll experiment across a wide variety of media and materials, driving forward your ideas and expanding your critical thinking. In the second year you’ll develop specialist skills in live business enterprise projects. Here you will design, make and sell your own products, gaining invaluable professional experience in the process .

Entry requirements

We normally offer places to students who have at least four GCSEs at grade A* to C, preferably with one in a creative subject, and who show commitment and enthusiasm for art and design through examples of creative work. Applicants over the age of 19 may have the entry requirements waived at interview based on examples of their work. The qualification

For completing the two-year course and successfully passing all units you will achieve a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma – equivalent to three full A-levels, or a maximum of 420 UCAS points. What next?

Students may progress to a variety of Higher Education courses at Plymouth College of Art, for example a BA (Hons) in Contemporary Crafts, or gain entry to degree level courses at other colleges and universities. Alternatively, the course gives students transferable skills. In addition to the ongoing advice, guidance and support you’ll receive from your course team, the College has a specialist careers service that will help you make important decisions.

Your practical studies will be supported by research into how trends and global markets influence design, historical influences, intellectual property, copyright and plagiarism, supporting you to make important decisions about your chosen practice and career path.

BTEC Extended Diploma

3D, Architecture, Interiors and Product 74


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 75

Laser cutting and other forms of digital fabrication are being used by students working across the whole range of Plymouth College of Art courses, and Fab Lab equipment will be an important feature of our new ÂŁ7.7 million art, craft and digital design centre.

75


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:11 Page 76

76


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 77

Digital Fabrication (Fab Lab) facilities and techniques go hand in hand with traditional materials and skills. Here a crafts student has been clamping up components for a furniture project inspired by animal locomotion.

77


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 78

Studying A-levels at Plymouth College of Art offers you the chance to be part of one of the best creative environments in the South West. You’ll use top class facilities and equipment guided by experienced teachers and successful artists and designers. As an A-level student here, just as if you were studying here for a degree, you will be a member of an innovative and supportive, creative and professional community. Be inspired by learning through hands-on practical work, experimenting and exploring new approaches and techniques. It is important to us that you blossom as an individual. You will be encouraged to develop your own ideas, and your personal viewpoint will always be respected. The atmosphere and energy here are infectious. Our students tell us how motivating and exciting they find Plymouth College of Art and they recognise how A-level courses here demand a very different experimental, hands-on approach from their previous learning experience. Here you will study a minimum of three subjects – including two creative and one academic choice. The creative portfolio includes Fine Art, Photography, Textile Design and Graphic Communication; the academic subjects are Critical and Contextual Studies, English Literature and Media Studies. Our Further Education provision had an 88% success rate in 2011/12. Gaining A-levels with us will guarantee you an undergraduate place here at the end of two years.

Entry requirements

A-levels are accredited by OCR (Oxford, Cambridge and RSA Examination Board). Entry requirements are: a minimum of 5 GCSE’s at grade C or above which must include English Language at grade C or above and a grade C in Art or another creative subject. If English Literature is selected as an option, a C grade or above is required at GCSE in this subject. You will be invited for an interview to discuss your interests and future ambitions and to show us a portfolio of your creative work. The programme

In the first year you will work towards the AS-level qualification. This is 40% of your final A2 grade. You will work through a series of projects to develop your skills and creativity in your coursework on which you will be assessed along with the externally set controlled creative assignments and academic exams. A grade C or above at AS-level will assure progression to the second year. A2-level study entails creative personal projects and 3,000 words written related study for each creative subject. In addition there will be externally set controlled creative assignments. The academic subjects will continue your study by projects, discussion and written work exploring themes that extend your understanding of core texts, culminating in academic exams. What next?

Kathryn Vosper, A-level Programme leader

We encourage our A-level students to develop their ideas and bring their own individuality to creative work and academic study. Our courses provide a very practical, challenging and exciting opportunity to kick-start a creative career.

A-levels 78

Many of our students progress to creative undergraduate programmes at Plymouth College of Art (from Fine Art to Photography, from Game Arts to Film) or to other colleges and universities. Others go straight into employment. Each Alevel you achieve at Grade A is equivalent to 120 UCAS points. On completion of your A-levels, if you receive Grades A-C you will gain between 320 and 480 points.


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 79

79


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 80

Critical and Contextual Studies Critical insight into modern and contemporary art movements is an essential aspect of study for all emerging artists and designers. This A-level will guide you not only through the history of art from 1850 but also its context and the connections with the cultural, political and social themes of the time, such as industrialisation, effects of war and revolution, consumerism, feminism, ownership of the art object and role of the art gallery. You will be supported in your studies and your structured personal investigation by a programme of exhibition and museum visits and the advice of specialist staff.

Options

A-levels 80


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 81

Ella Lafferty-Ryan English Lit./Photography/Fine Art/Graphic Design I was born in Australia and went to a Steiner School there before I came to England. When I was in school for Years 10 and 11, some of the things I did I just found irrelevant. Here it's not focused so much on meeting curriculum expectations. It's an ideal creative space. I doubt I would ever have found that at any school. They just don't have the facilities. It sounds cheesy but I'm more at home here. There’s a wider variety of people. You can fit in more. It reminds me more of the Steiner school ethos because you have a better relationship with teachers. I've just had such good conversations with teachers here. 81


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 82

Fine Art We will introduce you to a range of artistic practices and techniques with plenty of opportunity to experiment across a range of contemporary media in areas that include drawing, painting, printmaking and alternative/mixed media. Drawing, experimentation and the acquisition of skills are fundamental areas of study that will underpin all of your creative work. You’ll explore traditional and non-traditional approaches from classical drawing skills to action drawing and process-led art. Studying the work of contemporary and modern artists will be pivotal in the development of your creative ideas and a body of work that reflects your personal interests. Photography This fast-paced course plots a logical journey from the origins of photography through to contemporary processes. You will be introduced to a range of skills including building your own cameras (Melissa, right, is holding a fully-functioning pinhole camera she’s made) with a darkroom printing studio portrait work and digital technologies. You will be encouraged to develop your technical skills alongside your theoretical work and creative thinking. You will research photographers and their influences at the same time as you reflect on your intentions and develop your own innovative approach.

Options

A-levels 82


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 83

Melissa Earl Fine Art/Photography/Textiles/English Literature I was planning to go on to school sixth form. But then I had an interview here and saw how good the facilities were, so I made a last minute decision. My parents understand the potential of studying in a specialist place. I’m doing a lot of printing at the moment. I’m in college four days a week and it’s open in the evenings too. I can borrow all the equipment I need – film, for example, that I’d never have had at school. The teachers are very helpful and they listen. School was more restricting in that way.

83


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 84

Graphic Communication The course explores opportunities in graphic communication and illustration to develop digitally rendered, commercial finished products based on traditional hand drawn techniques. You’ll explore typography, packaging, logos and posters as starting points for your own portfolio of work. The skill set you acquire in the process will enable you to handle live briefs, commercial opportunities and competitions. You will have access to all of the College’s resources and studios to help you to tailor the course work to your specific interests and areas of expertise. Textile Design Our textiles option covers everything from screen and digital printing to wallpaper design, dyeing, pattern cutting and sewing, and ranges widely across fashion and interior design. You will be able to develop skills in hand and machine sewing and in traditional crafts such as knitting and weaving, alongside digital printing and laser cutting. Experienced teaching and industry specialist staff will guide you, help you to pinpoint your strengths and prepare you for higher education or employment.

Options

A-levels 84


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 85

Liam Jenner Fine Art/Photography/Graphics/English Literature I’ve learned so much in the last nine months - more than just studying for A-levels. I’ve learned life skills and refined the skills I already had. I have been given a lot of advice and support and have become much more confident. I’d like to continue at the College, maybe to study Commercial Photography at FD or BA (Hons) level. I’ve particularly enjoyed studying photography. It’s made me see that I can portray things from a different perspective. I have been recently working on macro photography and also taking part in some fashion shoots. I did GCSEs at school and then came here because I wanted to study at a specialist art college and I knew that the resources would be much better. My parents were very supportive. 85


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 86

English Literature You’ll study texts from different genres, crossing poetry, prose and drama, and spanning the centuries from the fourteenth to the twenty-first. You will work in an atmosphere of creative and imaginative adventure where your skills of artistic expression will be invaluable. English Literature allows you to explore history, psychology, sociology, linguistics and politics, and to develop skills in communication, analysis, critical thinking and perseverance that are attractive to employers and universities alike. We work together in a mutually supportive environment where everyone's opinions are valued and respected. Media Studies This course integrates theoretical and practical approaches and will encourage you to be creative and to explore a range of media and technologies, paper-based and hand-made, as well as digital. You’ll consider key media ideas that relate to language, representation, audiences and institutions. Your Investigations into new and social media will connect contemporary and historical contexts and cover film, music, newspapers, radio, magazines and video games as well as everything online.

Options

A-levels 86

86


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 87

Josie-Leigh Webb Fine Art/Photography/Textiles/English Literature I did my GCSEs at Saltash and used to pass the College on the bus every day and thought that I’d like to be there. After A-levels I’d like to do a photography degree and then eventually teach in Higher Education, taking the study of photography to postgraduate level. I’m enjoying studying for my A-levels here. There’s much more freedom than at school. We’re treated as adults and encouraged to feel on a more equal footing with the staff. I feel comfortable here.

87


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:12 Page 88

This intensive one-year course will inspire you to learn through discovery, experimentation and exploration. It will give you the freedom to try out new ideas and introduce you to a range of media, materials, resources and equipment. We will help you to become creative, confident, independent and successful – and prepare you for progression to BA (Hons) or a Foundation Degree programme. We will encourage you to work outside your comfort zone and to develop an individual approach to problem-solving, and we will give you the confidence to discuss your work in formal and informal, large and small group situations. This course strikes a balance between taught sessions and your personal learning and development. During the first part you will experience a variety of disciplines, making it easier for you to choose the right pathway and eventually the perfect Higher Education programme. The second part is about narrowing the field of your inquiry and selecting a way forward, for example in fine art, design, contemporary crafts, visual communication, fashion and textiles or lens-based media. Part Three is an externally-assessed unit. It is the culmination of the creative skills developed during the course and becomes your end of year show.

Entry requirements

We offer places to students who have a GCSE profile of at least 5 A*-C grades and a combination of AS and A-level qualifications. We also welcome applications from mature students who may not have the qualification profile but who have other experience and knowledge. Portfolio requirements

All applicants need to show a portfolio of creative work that reflects their passion, enthusiasm and commitment for art, design and media. This course has a flexible structure and offers a qualification at Level 3 as well as 4. It is made up of seven units. The first four are assessed at Level 3; units 5 and 6 can be assessed at either Level 3 or Level 4, and the seventh is Level 4 only. Your qualification will depend on your performance in relation to the last three units. Validated by University of the Arts, London Awarding Body What next?

Many of our students progress to creative undergraduate programmes at Plymouth College of Art (from Fine Art to Photography, from Game Arts to Film) or to other colleges and universities. Others go straight into employment or apprenticeships in the creative sector.

Helen Markes, Programme leader

We’ll provide you with an exciting, challenging environment where you can cultivate your intellectual curiosity and creative thinking.

Level 3 and 4

Foundation Diploma in Art and Design 88


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:13 Page 89

Ruby Revell I was studying AS-level first year, but my college was far away and I wasn’t enjoying it. A different way of thinking is encouraged here. There’s a huge amount of contextual studies and the facilities are really good. There’s no way I would have had access to a laser cutter or to ceramics at school. You can arrange to use anything. Different tutors have different opinions and it’s been interesting to get varied feedback. I’m working to a deadline for the end of year project and I’m going on to study Fine Art at Central St Martins next year as I really wanted to be in London. I can see a huge development in my work over the year. 89


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:13 Page 90

90


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:13 Page 91

Work by Sophie Taschner-Baldwin and Zoe Spry Examples of unexpected thinking and adventurous making from the 2013 Foundation Diploma show: Sophie Taschner-Baldwin invented an imaginary interplanetary substance, Proteg-1 (left), by experimenting with the 'chemistry' of boiled fruit sweets. ‘I enjoy turning any material into something that looks unearthly and bizarre,’ she says. Zoe Spry set snails loose on fabric to investigate qualities of erosion and decay. ‘I began my project by responding to the visual and organic aesthetics of my family's dairy farm after finding a decaying work coat. I became intrigued by how creatures eat away at fabrics, leaving the most delicate and detailed organic marks.’ 91


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:13 Page 92

Intermediate and Advanced Level Apprenticeships are increasingly looked upon as a great way for students to get the training they need for the world of work, while providing a reliable avenue to further learning and development. As a creative apprentice you will be guaranteed a wage and get tailored training at Level 2 or Level 3, that relates directly to your job role. In other words, you will gain qualifications while working and earning. Many of our apprentices see it as an alternative to university, and apprenticeship graduates go on to full-time employment or Higher Education. We continue to work closely with employers to develop fit for purpose and sustainable training, taking into account the needs and qualities of the creative industries. Our apprenticeships last 12 to 18 months and are offered in print, design, creative and digital media, photo-imaging, cultural heritage, community arts, fashion and textiles and ceramics manufacturing. They are cost effective from the employer’s point of view. With funding available to support the cost of training and delivery models that support distance learning, employers can train an apprentice in the skills their business needs.

Rebecca Moore, Apprenticeship officer

Getting into the creative industries is tough, even for graduates, so this is a great opportunity for a 16-year-old to get a foothold and gain skills and work experience while being paid.

Creative Apprenticeship Programme 92


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:13 Page 93

Ellie Staddon Usfor Design and Print, Newquay I’ve been working in a hotel to get money and I started on the programme in September, hoping to do an apprenticeship in design. I was interviewed by Usfor Design and Print in Newquay as they were looking for an apprentice, and I found this course online. I work 40 hours a week and spend one day a month in college. What I learn here adds to what I learn in the workplace – which has more to do with health and safety, manual handling, risk assessments, and generally learning about the work routine – from quoting to artwork to production and customer service. I’ll be on the scheme for 18 months and I get one-to-one support from my tutor. 93


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:13 Page 94

The College has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick for its advanced apprenticeships in creative and digital media and photo imaging. Apprenticeship Manager Rebecca Moore says: ‘our strong links within the creative industry mean we can offer students fantastic opportunities to gain on-the-job experience, valuable business skills and confidence’. As well as with the international award winning media agency Twofour, the College has close working links with photographic concept store, Bang Wallop, based in Salcombe, who employ a photo imaging apprentice, and with Prime Delux, an independent skatestore based in Plymouth who have created a skatepark in the city and employ a creative and digital media apprentice. Babcock International Group’s Industrial Skills Manager Chris Allen is a strong supporter of the College scheme. He says: ‘It has worked for us because it’s flexible enough to accommodate what is a fairly unique set of skills for our sailmaker apprentices. The development of the Advanced Apprenticeship (Level 3 pathway) is particularly welcome as it now aligns the sailmakers with the other Advanced Engineering apprentices in our business. The apprenticeship allows the candidates to develop their skills in a safe work-based environment at a pace that is relevant to their ability. Their knowledge and skill are also developed by the College so there is potential in the arrangement for introducing new ideas into the work place which could improve manufacturing methods and materials. Above all, though, I think that the apprentices appreciate that this is an investment in them and that helps develop a sense of pride and achievement, which can only have a positive impact on our business.’

Creative Apprenticeship Programme 94


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 08/09/2013 11:13 Page 95

Sam Woods Apprentice Sailmaker, Babcock International Group I started doing A-levels, but I was losing motivation. I knew about the company because my brother worked here, so I came to an Open Day and decided to apply. It’s a complete change from A-levels, but I’m more of a practical person and the trade interested me. There’s no guarantee of a job, but everything I’m learning could be applicable in other places. We go into college one or two days a week depending on the stage we’re at. We learn different approaches to sewing, cutting and materials and can put different ways of doing things into practice at work. It’s taught me what it’s like to have a full-time job, and it’s satisfying to earn your own money! 95


Aug27FE-2_Layout 1 13/09/2013 13:52 Page 96

Plymouth College of Art Tavistock Place Plymouth PL4 8AT +44 (0)1752 203 434 enquiries@pca.ac.uk www.plymouthart.ac.uk @plymouthart

/PlymouthCollegeOfArt

Printed in Plymouth by Pepper Communications Prospectus designed by Julie Depledge and Kevin Mount (studio@kevinmount.co.uk). Photographs of students talking about the College were taken by Kate Mount during the 2013 summer term.

make it


PCA FE Prospectus 2014-15