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STEPHEN HOANG PORTFOLIO


SUNDBYEN hjornestenen JAPANESE WOODBLOCK PRINTS MUSEUMSLANDSKABET TRANSIT PLUS ZILKER EVENTS CENTER DESERT ART PAVILION OTHER


SUNDBYEN


Fall 2011 / Six Weeks / Ålesund, Norway / JaJa Architects The city of Ålesund, nestled between two spectacular fjords, needed to redefine its southern waterfront, neglected by a shipping industry that no longer operates there. In our winning proposal, JaJa Architects expanded and enhanced the city’s central feature, an ocean inlet around which the city grew. We coined the term harbor-incubator and created a series of harbors with the goal of nurturing the modern growth of Ålesund. I analyzed the historic, topographic, and urban conditions of the city, followed by iterative conceptual models and discussions leading to the harbor-incubator concept. Furthermore, I was responsible for the digital Rhino model we used in renderings, diagrams, and axonometric zoom-ins. Team: Kathrin Gimmel, Jakob Christensen, Jan Tanaka, Sam deBoever, Stephen Hoang, Trine Sommer, Brian Vargo


GREEN HARBOR: An existing harbor, the green harbor is enhanced by vegetation creating a nature-filled escape from urban life.

CULTURE HARBOR: Housing a variety of cultural programs, the culture harbor is an extension of the historic ocean inlet and continues the city’s relationship with the water.

CIVIC HARBOR: The new formal gathering space for the city, the civic harbor connects the city hall with the water and is framed by public programs.


Culture Harbor


Civic Harbor


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Fall 2011 / Two Weeks / Copenhagen, Denmark / JaJa Architects JaJa Architects was asked to revamp a winning project for neighborhood approval, applying design changes based on feedback from Copenhagen citizens. I redrew the plans and sections in AutoCAD, rebuilt the physical model, and re-rendered the perspectives in Rhino with Vray and Photoshop.

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Teknikrum

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Hjørnestenen balancerer på plintens kant, og skaber et 13 overdækket byrum, som er en slags forlængelse af Apollo Plads.


JAPANESE WOODBLOCK PRINTS


Summer 2010 / 4 Weeks / Japan / Seminar by David Heymann In architecture, buildings begin as drawings. Methods of representation are bound to effect the final construction. Japan poses a unique evolution of drawing, transitioning from looser, brush-based utensils that refined the Japanese writing system to western introduced pens and pencils, which favor precision over the gestural. The Japanese Ukiyo-e, the traditional woodblock print, similarly used gestural masses of color introduced layer by layer. How then might traditional architecture in Japan differ from modern architecture? I took photographs of architecture and worked backwards to the woodblock print, looking at how buildings are visualized, how landscapes and urbanscapes are layered, how the natural and artificial interact.

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SANAA Dior Store


MUSEUMSLANDSKABET


Fall 2011 / Six Weeks / Copenhagen, Denmark / JaJa Architects In collaboration with Swiss landscape firm Vogt, I worked as a team member of JaJa Architects to re-envision the museum garden of Denmark’s national gallery, the Statens Museum for Kunst, in Copenhagen, Denmark. An underutilized space, the museum desired a more public and active garden, one that would enhance the institution’s visibility in the city. The museum is located at the corner of a large urban park named Østre Anlæg. Our proposal adopted the picturesque vocabulary of Østre Anlæg and extended it into the museum garden, better unifying the museum and the surrounding park. Within the picturesque landscape, sculptural hollows were designed, creating intimate spaces that could house artwork, events, or casual gatherings. In turn, the new museum garden acts as a framework for future outdoor museum activities, turning an overlooked space into a destination in itself. My involvement in the project started at site analysis, where I took photographs and measurements of the existing conditions. I followed this with a series of Photoshop and AutoCAD iterations, wherein I would communicate with my contact at Vogt on a daily basis. For the final competition entry, I produced the diagrams through Illustrator.


PARK & MUSEUM: Currently, the museum garden and the adjacent park, Østre Anlæg, embody separate design vocabularies, creating an experiential rift.

MUSEUM IN PARK: By translating the picturesque landscape of Østre Anlæg into the museum garden, SMK becomes a destination within a park, unifying the garden and the park.

SCULPTURAL HOLLOWS: Landscape hollows of differing scales punctuate the garden, creating frameworks for activity and specific experiential moments of surprise and enclosure.


TOPOGRAPHY: A circular ridge creates a simply defined hollow that is flexible and comfortable.

SIGHT LINES: The hollows are sunken, allowing unobstructed views of the museum and park.

SOUND: The ridge acts as a sound barrier against surrounding noise, such as nearby traffic.

OCCUPY: The hollow creates a natural place for activities, inviting visitors to linger and stay.

EVENT: A sublime container for events and art, the hollow acts as an outdoor room, framing activity.


TRANSIT PLUS


Spring 2012 / Six Weeks / Austin, TX / Studio by Clay Shortall Public transit in America has long suffered from an inability to be flexible and efficient, qualities embodied by automobile culture. In a rethinking of public transit, the system embraces technological innovation and thinking. Modeled after cloud-based networks, Transit Plus aims to create a system of constantly fluctuating vehicles and stations, foregoing static, stationary infrastructure. At the same time, the utilization of social networks creates a possibility to create social connectivity in addition to physical connectivity. In a semester focused on thinking and testing, I explored the use of technology to create architectural conditions. With the coding program Processing, I tested the abilities of the computer to suggest optimal parameters for the transit experience. It is only the beginning, but a transit network optimized for the American lifestyle is possible with the adoption of smart technology.

HOW WE TRAVEL: In the past, getting from point A to point B was simple and linear. Over time, this path evolved as infrastructures became more complex and hierarchical. Today, information utilizing digital technology travels through networks. Paths, therefore, are no longer isolated and linear, but interconnected, flexible, and amorphous.


STATION & SIGN: Inspired by digital networks, where locations are no longer physical, singlular, or static, a proposal for a transitory station with a static sign. As a result, the station is identified by its physical location even as it separates itself from its signage. SIGN & STATION: Conversely, transitory signs and static stations require station identification through external signage. As a result, the presence and movement of signs activates a station, providing it with a recognizable identity. TRANSITORY NETWORK: With both the station and the sign detached from a single physical location, each seeks the other. Thereby, the path reacts to the location and movement of identifiers as stations shift to accommodate signage.


PERSONALIZED ROUTE: A rider inputs his or her most frequented locations. This creates a personalized route, a line of best fit, between the noted locations.

SOCIAL ROUTE: The locations friends, family, or coworkers are added, resulting in an altered route. The result is a route determined by real life social networks.

CUSTOMIZED NETWORK: Each rider has multiple routes. These routes create a customized network that is more targeted, comfortable, and efficient.


VEHICLES: Transit Plus incorporates the personal comfort of a car and the efficiency of a bus or train by utilizing a mid-sized vehicle.

SOCIAL NETWORKS: Transit Plus utilizes existing location-based technology already incorporated into a variety of social networks.

MOBILE: Smartphones act as the identifiers, or signs, of the system, allowing the rider to determine the form of the transit network, not the other way around.


ZILKER EVENTS CENTER


Located at the end of a hidden, single-lane, dirt road, the Zilker Clubhouse sits secluded amongst towering oaks with a breathtaking view of downtown Austin. A current favorite for wedding receptions, my task was to enhance the program of the little clubhouse and propose a new structure that could house a variety of special events. Concerts, conventions, parties, plays, and of course, weddings. The project was driven by three contextual conditions. To the east, there is a view of downtown; to the northwest, there is a residential neighborhood; to the southwest, there is vehicular entry. As a result, a double layered, semi-permeable barrier was established, separating the conflicting conditions and maximizing their relationships to the building. The two event spaces are connected with a courtyard anchored by two heritage trees, the metaphorical hinge around which the building centers. In addition to aesthetic and programmatic concerns, I produced drawings detailing the construction of the building, incorporating engineering concerns into the architecture.

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Spring 2010 / Twelve Weeks / Austin, TX / Studio John Blood


CONTEXT: The site, anchored by two heritage oak trees, is framed by three conditions. A residential neighborhood to the northwest, vehicular entry to the southwest, and downtown to the east.

WALL: A wall running north-south separates the site conditions, shielding vehicular entry and the residential neighborhood from the oaks and downtown.

EVENT SPACES: The two primary event spaces are place on either side of the oaks, thereby creating a central courtyard and optimizing views towards downtown.


Structural Plan

Detailed Wall Section


DESERT ART PAVILION


Fall 2009 / Eight Weeks / Marfa, TX / Studio by Jack Sanders Artist Alyce Santoro needed a structure to complement and house her funnel art for the Trans-Pecos Festival of Music & Love in Marfa, Texas. With the artist, my team designed and built a double layer net of recycled rope and paper tubes. Constructed in Austin and installed in Marfa, the project was an exercise in low-cost, transportable architecture. During the day, the pavilion swayed and bobbed in the wind, casting a complex and deceptive shadow onto the ground. At night, a lighting system embedded within the paper tubes allowed the pavilion and the funnels to glow. All the while, the porosity of the net structure complemented the desert environment of Marfa, providing enough substance to create an enclosure, but retaining a visceral connection to the natural elements. Team: Stephen Hoang, Melissa Jones, Constance Rosado, Martin Sicotte


CANOPY: A tensile canopy was conceived utilizing the strength provided by the artist’s wind funnel structures.

UMBRELLAS: Following the original design, a double layer net was constructed to support a canopy of umbrellas.

NET: The umbrellas were discarded in favor of the straightforwardness and simplicity of the net.


OTHER


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Paper Art Museum / Fall 2010

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With partner Debbie Cerón, I studied the construction system of Shigeru Ban’s Paper Art Museum and built a physical model of the museum’s operable façade. 1 Fulcrum 2 100/300/40 mm Glass fibre reinforced cellular element 100/50/2 mm Aluminium RHS frame 3 600/400/12/40 mm Steel I-beam 4 50/50/1.6 mm Aluminium SHS 5 Toothed driving wheel 6 Roller runner 7 Guide track 8 100/50/3.2 RHS extension member 9 PTFE-coated glass fibre fabric 10 20 mm Cherry parquet 11 Sliding door 12 15 mm Marble paving slabs 13 Driving shaft


Scale: 5/32” = 1’- 0” North >>

Key Recessed Compact Florescent Lumens: 600 Day: Off Pendant Tungsten Halogen Lumens: 750 Day: Dimmed 25% Pendant Tungsten Halogen Lumens: 600 Day: Dimmed 25% Recessed Tungsten Halogen Lumens: 900 Day: Dimmed 40% Recessed Tungsten Halogen Directional Lumens: 900 Day: Dimmed 40% Wall Sconce Halogen Lumens: 600 Day: Dimmed 25%

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Mebane Lighting Design / Fall 2009 I was tasked with re-designing the lighting for the UTSOA’s Mebane Gallery. The current condition was flooded with fluorescent lighting, creating an overly bright space that failed to highlight exhibition items. By reducing ambient lighting and focusing on accent lighting, the new design places the viewer in shadow, letting artwork and models take center stage. Renderings were produced in SketchUp with Kerkythea. Gallery / Night At night, the art takes precedence. For the flat sculptures hung on the southern wall, directional lights have been adjusted to give each individual piece its own halo.


Photography Summer 2010 - Winter 2011 These are a collection of photographs from my experiences studying and interning abroad. I was interested in how architecture interacted with the human experience, whether it be urban layering, reflection, movement, or view. Top Row: Moriyama House / Tokyo Boulevard de la Chapelle / Paris Pompidou Centre / Paris Rolex Learning Center / Lausanne Bottom Row: 21st Century Museum / Kanazawa La Tourette / Lyon Royal Danish Playhouse / Copenhagen MFO Park / Zurich


CV

EDUCATION

6112 Roxbury Lane, Austin, TX 78739 stephenhoang@utexas.edu / 512.431.7812 www.cargocollective.com/stephenhoang

The University of Texas at Austin

Bachelor of Architecture with Highest Honors / August 2012 Bachelor of Arts in Plan II Honors with Highest Honors / August 2012 GPA 3.95 of 4.00

Ecole SupÊrieure d’Architecture Paris-Belleville

Architecture Studio / August - December 2011 I collaborated with French students to redevelop an under-utilized space beneath the Paris Metro while studying French architectural history.

Japan Maymester at Kyoto & Tokyo

Aesthetics / May - June 2011 I studied the unique aesthetic culture of Japan, both traditional and modern, while analyzing the relationship between drawing and building.

American Institute of Roman Culture

Historical Preservation / May - June 2009 I studied the role of ancient ruins in a modern metropolis from an historical preservation and restoration point of view.


EXPERIENCE

SKILLS

JaJa Architects / Copenhagen, Denmark

Applications

Intern / June 2011 - January 2012 As part of a small team, I researched, conceptualized, developed, and presented designs entered into international competitions.

Garry Brown Campaign / Austin, TX

Media Intern / August 2013 - Present I produce print and digital advertising for a county-wide political campaign, as well as address the issues of citizens in outreach and canvassing efforts.

Freelance Designer / Austin, TX

Designer / June 2013 - Present I produced drawings and renderings for local clients and competed in a variety of architecture design competitions.

Daily Texan Newspaper / Austin, TX

Editorial Writer / May 2006 - December 2006 I wrote fact-checked editorials on a weekly basis concerning university policies, local events, and national politics.

AutoCAD / Revit / Rhino 3D / SketchUp InDesign / Illustrator / Photoshop

Programming

HTML / CSS / Javascript / Processing

Model Making

Woodworking / Laser Cutter / CNC Router / 3D Printing

Languages

English / Vietnamese / French

Stephen Hoang: Portfolio  
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