Page 1

STEPH CONLAN

SELECTED WORK

2014 -2017


STEPH CONLAN | CIRRICULUM VITAE 2017 EDUCATION 2013-2017 Harvard University | Cambridge, MA Harvard Graduate School of Design, M.Arch I 2016 OMA Research Studio | Rotterdam, Netherlands Harvard Graduate School of Design with Rem Koolhaas 2009-2013

The Ohio State University | Columbus, OH Knowlton School of Architecture, B.S. Arch Magna Cum Laude with Honors Distinction

2012 University of Camerino | Ascoli Piceno & Rome, Italy Knowlton School of Architecture with Pippo Churro

PROFESSIONAL 2016 Machado Silvetti | Boston, MA Architectural Designer, May-Sept. and part-time Sept.-Dec. Denver Art Museum (SD) Pomona College Musuem (CD), RFP’s 2015 Kohn Pederson Fox Associates | New York, NY Architectural Intern, June-August Seaport Residences and Retail in Boston, MA (SD) 2014 Anmahian Winton Architects | Cambridge, MA Architectural Intern, June-August Presentation drawings, RFP/Q’s, Site visits

ACADEMIC 2016 Harvard University | Cambridge, MA Studio Teaching Assistant, Fall 2016 M.Arch I, Core I with Jennifer Bonner 2015 Harvard University | Cambridge, MA Studio Teaching Assistant, Fall 2015 M.Arch I, Core III with Jeffry Burchard 2013 Harvard University | Cambridge MA Teaching Assistant, Fall 2013 Visual Studies with Ewa Harabasz

2


PROJECTS & PUBLICATIONS 2017

Portman’s America and Other Speculations | Lars Muller “Architecture Pizazz” drawings with Jennifer Bonner

2016-Present

FAM Collective Member | Cambridge, MA & New York, NY Berlin Housing Prototype & Pavilion under Dr. Niklas Maak

2016 2016

Super-Space: Experimental Spaces for Temoprary Housing | Plane-Site Housing studies of FAM Collective

2016

Studio Works | Harvard Graduate School of Design The Architectural Double and the Museum City

2015

Platform 8 | Harvard Graduate School of Design Misfits in the Urban Code

Platform 9 | Harvard Graduate School of Design The Architecture Double & OMA Countryside

2013 Digital Archives | Knowlton School of Architecture Collapsed Frames

SKILLS Software

AutoCAD (drafting), Rhinocerous (drafting, 3D, VRay), Sketch-up, Modo, 3Dsmax, VectorWorks, Adobe Suite (Indesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects), Microsoft Office

Miscellaneous

Laser-cutting,3-D printing, hand-sketching, wood shop

REFERENCES Contact information available upon request, stephconlan@gmail.com

Jeffry Burchard Principal, Machado Silvetti & Assistant Professor, Harvard GSD

Jennifer Bonner Director, MALL & Assistant Professor, Harvard GSD Elie Gamburg Director, Kohn Pederson Fox

3


SELECTED WORK 1

THE ARCHITECTURAL DOUBLE

2

CONSTRUCTING WILDERNESS

3

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS

4

ON COPYING

5

MISFITS IN THE URBAN CODE

6

THE DISSOLUTION OF THE TOWER

7

ROUND OBJECTIVE

8

BLOCK PARTY with FAM COLLECTIVE


SITE PLAN


GSD Option Studio Critics: Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee Fall 2015

THE ARCHITECTURAL DOUBLE After visiting Chicago, the studio was asked to design a counterpoint, or double, to the existing Museum of Contemporary Art, designed by Josef Paul Kleihues in 1996. The new builidng was to consist of additional gallery and storage space. This architectural double is constrained by the same contextual and interior framework as the existing MCA, but seeks a new identity within a neutral object. By redeveloping the existing building’s perimeter form, the twin replaces the singular front with a curved extrusion. The museum’s perimeter is in direct conflict with the rigid Chicago city grid and Kleinhue’s original module framework, allowing for a new sequence to unfold on the site. Each level of the museum consists of a grain of walls, dimensioned the same as the original building. The object’s lack of one front forces the grain to switch on every level, remaining axially aligned with the city grid. Even though the walls never shift towards the site’s oblique, they produce a narrative throughout the building that is disconnected from the grid. Public movement is pushed to the periphery as one meanders in and out of galleries. The main stairs remain rigid in location, yet force radial circulation due to their orientation to the grain. The slowness of processions causes a reappearing sequence of spaces and galleries. 7


GRAIN VS PERIMETER WALL


LEVEL -01

GROUND LEVEL

LEVEL 01

LEVEL 02

LEVEL 03

LEVEL 04

9


The main stair intercepts with a wall on each landing, restricting access to the next level. The path of the guest becomes slowed, more similar to a ramp than a stair. On the third floor the stair switches to an object, separating from the grain on an open gallery floor.

10


SECTION MODEL 1 : 1/8”

SECTION A THROUGH M A I N STA IR 11


ELEVATION STUDY

FINAL ELEVATION

MODEL ELEVATION 1’: 1/8” 12


The singular band of the elevation hides the irregularities of spatial volumes within. Each grain of wall extends past the facade to read the intersection of curve and grid, most notably on the corner.


MUSEUM PARK IMAGERY


GSD Option Studio in Rotterdam Critic: Rem Koolhaas Spring 2016

CONSTRUCTING WILDERNESS A SERIES OF SPECULATIVE PARKS

There are few places of reprieve from the efficiencies and automation of both the city and the rural. “Wilderness” offers the last pockets of refuge from the fast pace dependencies of the metropolis. Park reserves have therefore become culturally-linked with nostalgia—land as a mechanism of escape. The doctrine of the National Park Service (NPS) is inherently filled with contradictory goals: ideas of use and recreation versus selective preservation. Parks are still being created today as canonized commodities, but the criteria remains subjective for why one space is chosen over another. The definition of “wilderness” is changing, and different agendas continue to make their own interpretation of what it means. These reinterpretations are what will determine the fate of the parks. With the tourist being one of the last increasing sectors of human occupation in the countryside, I researched and designed a commentary on the U.S. National Park System, which unfolded into a debate over wilderness. The following five speculative parks were propagandized with distinct agendas and campaigned for at a final exhibition. Each park has generic mission statement, that attempts to understand the broad ranging definition of “wilderness” through the clarification of corresponding footnotes. 15


PERSONAL PARK IMAGERY 16


LAB PARK IMAGERY 17


CITY ISLAND PARK IMAGERY 18


GARDEN PARK IMAGERY 19


MUSEUM PARK IMAGERY 20


Case Study 1

MUSEUM PARK MISSION STATEMENT Scenery has the potential to establish a symbolic identity[1] for burgeoning societies[2]. Allowing citizens access to high elevations[3] with views of the horizon[4] instills an unmatched mystic[5] empathy towards the land[6]. When wilderness is historically and archivally maintained,[7] it inspires while educating on the natural[8] pastime of a place. Thus, visitation produces both cultural[9] and corporate capital[10], supporting infrastructures[11] for future generations’ pleasure grounds.[12] The coming age of hyper-tourism[13] will produce an efficient and high capacity setting for future park tourists. The careful curation of vistas will allow guests to romanticize wilderness without risk of destroying or impeding on the picturesque land.[14] Beginning with monitored entries, a picturesque route will build a panoramic climax, sprinkled with vignettes along the way.[15] In order for land-staring[16] to compete with urban settings in the demanding tourist market,[17] enhancements should be made to ensure user relatability. By altering pristine views with virtual intensifications, visitors can connect to highly saturated and animated landscapes.

MUSEUM PARK IMAGERY 21


PILE-UP CASE STUDY SECTION MODELS


GSD Thesis Advisor: Jeffry Burchard Spring 2017

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS ON COPYING & SHEDS & ICONS

Iconic architecture can be defined as images in the solid, consumed by its exterior reading. These buildings become well-documented and shared, making it simple to search for architectural drawings, and subsequently leading to participation in the discourse. This differs from the generic--buildings lacking presentation drawings, outside of the discipline. Despite the unbelievable access Google maps gives architects to see and understand built space, most building are represented with voided interiors. As a means of experimental control, the thesis mobilizes a tourist agenda to distill a building’s program down to simply viewing an object in its contextual frame. Throwing away the idea of the architectural pilgrimage, existing icons distort into alternative, generic fabrics to give narratives to unfamiliar fields.

23


A TOUR, PEEKABOO MODELS DISTORTED ICONS IN GENERIC SHEDS ACROSS AMERICA 24


25


A TOUR, PEEKABOO MODELS


The unfolded paper models are a series of 12 architectural cross pollinations. They mine Google maps for coincidental moments between site, material, and form, linking what we know between an exterior image of a smaller city in America’s heartland with the documentation of an existing icon from a major coastal city in America.

A TOUR, UNROLLED PAPER MODELS 27


UNROLLED PAPER MODEL 28


CASE STUDY 1

SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM & 233 GENESEE ST UTICA, NY 13501 The copied Guggenheim began with a scan—a series of manipulations on the planar form were studied before knowing anything about its container. Through tests, a movement was developed to double the central spiral, overtaking other parts of the building. The result was an intensified atrium--the original rhythm from floor to floor changes as the ramp lengthens and twists in new directions. The distorted plan demanded an exterior shed that conveys the twoness of the atriums. A bank in Utica, with an attached parking garage marks two different centers from the exterior. The dome aligns with the original atrium that is less distorted, while the parking lot squeezes around the squiggly, leftover spiral.

GUGGENHEIM SCAN 29


SECTION MODEL 1:250

30


SECTION A

A

PLAN + 25’ 31


SECTION MODEL 1:250

EAST ATRIUM WITH SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM OVERLAY 32


33


UNROLLED PAPER MODEL 34


CASE STUDY 2

SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY & 203 15TH ST HUNTINGTON, WV 25701 By using the Seattle Public Library as a second case study, the thesis tests the extents to how a copied, iconic building can be fitted into an unassuming, generic shed. The diagrammatic parti behind the Seattle Public Library is unwound in order to reframe how the skin of the building functions. The original plans are copied and stuffed inside a long linear bar, typical of the industrial warehouses along the Ohio River in West Virginia.

SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY SCAN 35


SECTION MODEL 1:250

SECTION A, B, & C

PLAN + 25’

36


SECTION MODEL 1:250

37


SECTION MODEL 1:250 38


LOWER LEVEL WITH OVERLAY OF SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY 39


COPY OF THE PARTHENON


GSD Thesis Prep Advisor: Jeffry Burchard Spring 2017

ON COPYING

There are numerous ways to physically copy something—using a stencil or a mold, tracing it or scanning it, taking a photo of it. The literalness of using the copy machine or photocopier was not lost on me. It prides itself on exactness, as a foolproof system that perfectly hands you back what you gave it. But if you present something (The Readymade) other than what it expects, exploration occurs. Ignoring this is an opportunity in the misreading of something other than an 8.5”x11”. Through experimentation, the practically outdated machine allows more than the flattening of an object into obscurity or a simply distortion of its proportions. Unlike the instantaneous documentation of faster technology (such as the high resolution cameras on our phones) the copier re-engages with an aspect of manipulatable time. An original can be controlled to distort, shift, double, drag, and turn, creating something else entirely. No version is created equal despite the fact that each is produced through “copying.” Each has something of its own. It is separated from both the others and its original context, always. 41


COPIES OF THE PARTHENON

42


43


FACADE & ROOF STUDIES


GSD Core 2 Critic: Jeffry Burchard Spring 2014

ROUND OBJECTIVE BA R

BEN D

PI NCH

CRU M PL E

The five week project places a rare books library in Fenway park, forcing the building to be seen in the round. Starting with a bar scheme modeled after the proportions of the demolished Cincinnati library, the front and back entries bend together to create new fronts, disrupting an originally implied interior organization. As axial progressions fight for dominance, the big roof crumples together to take on the planar inconsistencies. The stable canopy marks facades that appear when approaching from different locations, continually reestablishing hierarchal entrances as one moves around the building. The resultant project has as a lack of sidedness - snapping into place along the perimeter.

45


PL A N GROU N D LEV EL 46


PL A N LEV EL 2 47


SOU THE AST PICT U R E W I N DOW

SOU TH W E ST EN TRY

49


SITE PLAN 1 : 2000

SITE PLAN : 30 BLOCKS


GSD Core 4 Critic: Max Kuo with Kathryn Sonnabend, David Hamm and Tian Xuezhu Spring 2015

MISFITS IN THE URBAN CODE The speculative housing project is located in the meeting of large-scale transportation infrastructure with the city grid of New York. The vertical allocation of transit systems and the inhabitable built form has created a sectional stratification in the city, which we dismantled by establishing a new ground plane along the coastline. In this ground plane, which sets a datum at the height of the current industrial fabric of the waterfront, we construct and channel new hierarchies within the logic of the city. Through sectional and planometric manipulation, we can utilize existing modes of transit to pull people to this new civic arenas. Instead of eradicating industrial space, we see the potential in these constraints to produce new organizational and programmatic relationships. The same grid that organizes the dense city in the center of Manhattan continues through to the water with new generative capacities. Though similar in form, it has adapted to accommodate new relationships centered around the pedestrian. This new grid, and the shifting ground plane, inform both parts of the city—the utilitarian and the pedestrian—with spatial hierarchies, shifts in typology, and the introduction of new paths of circulation. By allowing industrial and commercial space to conform to the paths of circulation they necessitate, residential programs become the mediating force that stitches together the city’s disparate social grounds. 51


The Manhattan grid contains within it a number of deviations and inconsistencies. These moments, or misfits, demonstrate how the grid behaves in response to the demands of circulation, sectional changes, and the insertion of civic infrastructure. An idea of circuitry, connecting nodes of transit, developed to recenter and temporarily displace different user groups.

SITE MODEL 1 : 2000 52


HUDSON YARDS CIRCUIT

COMMUTER CIRCUIT

CIVIC CIRCUIT

LINCOLN TUNNEL CIRCUIT

BUS CIRCUIT

RESIDENTIAL CIRCUIT 53


HOUSING UNIT BRIDGING CIRCUIT AND EXISTING STREET LEVEL

HOUSING UNIT SIDEDNESS OF STREET AND PARK FACES 54


SIX BLOCK PLAN 1 : 500

41ST STREET

39TH STREET

HOUSING SITE PLAN SIX BLOCKS

55


CONCEPT COLLAGE


GSD Core 3 Critic: Inaki Abalos Fall 2015

MASS VS SLAB THE DISSOLUTION OF THE TOWER

Westward expansion in the early 19th century created a condition of site-less mimicry in the downtown core of Phoenix - devoid of existing vernacular building practices. The notion of verticality became tied with the repetitive core and slab construct of the Eastern United States. The result: privacy usurping ideals of public interaction and overlap. This condition has led to the disembodiment of the individual. In reaction, the project attempts at dissociating verticality from the notion of the typical tower - resulting in fragmentation of typologies producing new interactions and forms between adjacent programs. The studio focused on a series of phases that continued to overlay on one another. Starting with climatic conditions (orientation, thermal mass, wind direction) a general massing was formed. A variation in plan of hotels type and unit dimensions, panelization of a modular facade, and the separation of entry became smaller investigations forming the essence of the whole. 57


This dispersal of programmatic elements throughout the hotel brought to light questions of mass and material. Throughout the project, the climatic characteristics of Phoenix effected shading, apertures, and circulation. The building interiorized itself with shifting courtyards.

58


MATERIAL MASSING MODEL 1: 1/32”

MASSING MODEL 1: 1/32” 59


WEST SIDE ELEVATION 60


SECTION A 61


62


LEVEL 33 : GYM

TYP HOTEL LEVEL

LEVEL 6 : HOTEL & SPA 63


AXON OF AGGREGATED UNITS PARTIAL PLAN CUT THROUGH FIRST & SECOND FLOORS


Exhibted at Y-Table-Talk “A home is a ______“ With Giancarlo Montano & FAM collective December 2016 - Berlin

BLOCK PARTY

Under the direction of Dr. Niklas Maak, eight designers were commissioned to rethink communal housing for the city of Berlin. The group of graduates and students from the Harvard GSD formed a collective from Boston and New York, now known as FAM, which will result in a pavilion prototype in the Spring of 2018. Due to the influx of refugees, the current housing shortage in Germany demands flexibility for new cultures and families to coexist with one another. The collective started with individual design iterations that have been paired down and combined since June 2016. Five concepts were exhibited in December 2016 at DAZ (Deutsch Architektur Zentrum), allowing for public reaction and feedback. The work will eventually be edited down to one design with the eight members as the single author. The following project, Block Party, was designed with Gianocarlo Montano (of Machado Silvetti) and presented as one of the five projects. The scheme focuses on the left-overs. Often with module housing, the punchline is about the unit or block. Block Party leaks communal space between the various combination of modules which displaces and multplies the front doors to each unit. This allows for varied family types to combine and share space how they see fit. We reconfigured the traditional galley kitchen into a central through-way, or alley, allowing public markets to expand out on the ground floor, opening up the block. 65


PLAN GROUND LEVEL 66


PLAN LEVEL ONE 67


SECTION A COUMMUNAL LIVING

SECTION B KITCHEN ALLEY 68


VARIOUS MODULE TYPES AND LIVING SCENARIOS

VARIOUS MODULE TYPES AND LIVING SCENARIOS

MODULES 69

PES AND LIVING SCENARIOS VARIOUS MODULE TYPES AND LIVING SCENARIOS


A HOME IS A ______. EXHIBITION 70


A HOME IS A ______. EXHIBITION

S. Conlan - Selected Work - Harvard GSD  
S. Conlan - Selected Work - Harvard GSD  
Advertisement