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COSMETICS UNDERSTANDING ARCHITECTURE & ITS MANY FORMS OF R E P R E S E N TAT I O N

A C O LL E C T IO N O F WO RKS BY ST E P H A N IE A L E XIS TAGE R


A Collection of Works By Stephanie Alexis Tager Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design Degree 2016 - 2017 Syracuse University, School of Architecture Bachelor of Architecture Degree 2011 - 2016


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COSMETICS UNDERSTANDING ARCHITECTURE & ITS MANY FORMS OF R E P R E S E N TAT I O N


D a vid Bo w i e, 1 9 7 2

Z I G G Y PLAYED TH E GU I TAR . . .

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“Ziggy played the guitar...” Or so the song goes. But is that really what Ziggy was up to? In recounting the period during which he assumed the role of Ziggy Stardust, David Bowie recalls spending far more time on his costume, hair, and makeup than on his songwriting and musical composition. Pursuing perhaps the most ruthlessly strategized identity campaign in rock history, Bowie paid overt and calculated attention to the various cosmetic aspects of the character he had created. So seriously did he take this endeavor that he became expert in the theater art of hair and makeup. From this point on, and precisely according to plan, our fragile alien’s career arced dramatically toward international fame. Even more significantly, his cunning swerve through cosmetics and character captured vital territory from popular music’s sister discipline - theater giving rise to a new genre of rock that came to be known as glam. A bit of mascara, a touch of glitter, a “screwdown hairdo,” and the perverse ingenuity of the boy-girl who imagined a different way to put it all together...who knew that the superficiality of cosmetics contained such power? 1 1

Jason Payne. Hair and Makeup. Log 17, guest eds. Mark Gage and Florencia Pita. New York: Anyone Corporation, 2009.


BU T, W H AT I S C OS M ET ICS?

Well, sometimes architecture is entirely a matter of cosmetics, a hypnotic web of visual seducations. Some care must be taken here, for ‘the cosmetic’ is not just another member of the family of decorative architectural appurtenances, collectively known as ornamentation. The field of effects of the cosmetic is quite different from those of its relatives. Ornaments attach as discreet entities to the body like jewelry, reinforcing the structure and integrity of the body as such. Cosmetics are indiscreet, with no relation to the body other than to take it for granted. Cosmetics are erotic camouflage; they relate always and only to the skin. Deeply, intricately material, cosmetics nevertheless exceed materiality to become modern alchemicals as they trans-substantiate skin to image, desirious or disgusting. Where ornaments retain their idenity as entities, cosmetics work as fields, as blush or shadow or highlight, as aura or air. Thinness, adherence and diffuse extent are crucial to the cosmetic effect, which is more visceral than intellectual, more atmospheric than aesthetic. Virtuosity at ornamentation requires balance, proportion, precision; virtuosity at cosmetics requires something else. Something menacing: paranoid control, control gone out of control, schizo-control. 1


1

Jeffrey Kipnis. “The Cunning of Cosmetics.” Herzog & de Meuron: El Croquis 84, Madrid, Spain, 1997.


wha t ’s

INSIDE?


using color to achie ve

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CUTE using line to achie v e

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GLAMOUR usin g collage to achie ve

THE UNCANNY using monochr ome to achie v e

THE SUBLIME

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using c o l o r t o a c hi e v e

C U TE Cuteness coexists in a dynamic relation with the perverse. The failure of the hyperboles of one aesthetic gives rise to the hyperboles of the other, of the child as the vehicle of diabolical powers from the Great Beyond, which have appropriated the tiny, disobedient bodies of our elfish changelings as instruments from their assaults on the stability of family life. Cuteness is not an aesthetic in the ordinary sense of the word, and must by no means be mistaken for the physically appealing, the attractive. In fact, it is more closely linked to the colorful, the quirky, the grotesque, the comical, the obnoxious. The elements of the quirky and the grotesque in cuteness are perfectly deliberate and must be viewed as the explicit intention of objects that elicit from us the complex emotions we feel when we encounter the fat faces and squat, ruddy bodies of creatures like the Trolls, with their pot bellies, pug noses, and teased-up mops of brightly colored hair. The grotesque is cute because the grotesque is pitiable, and pity is the primary emotion of this seductive and manipulative aesthetic that arouses our sympathies by creating anatomical pariahs, like the Cabbage Patch Dolls or even E.T., whose odd proportions and lack of symmetry diverge wildly from the relative balance and uniformity of ordinary bodies. The aesthetic of cuteness creates a class of outcasts and mutations, a ready-made race of lovable, colorful inferiors. 1 1

Daniel Harris. “Cuteness.� Cute, Quaint, Hungry, & Romantic: The Aesthetics of Consumerism. Da Capo Press, 2001. 14


using c o l o r t o a c hi e v e

C U TE p r o jec t :

WO N DER L AN D An Architectu ral In ter pretati on of Chi l d ren’s L i teratu re

Wonderland: An Architectural Inter pretation of Children’s Literature explores the congruence and harmony between children’s literature and children’s learning environments. The project focuses on architecturally realizing the quirky, playful, and canonical spatial qualities found in iconic children’s literature in order to produce learning environments. The product would allow for environments of fantasy and wonder to work together, in order to encourage critical thinking and creativity in places of learning - understanding that architecture can act as an additional teacher.

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Uni versity Syr a cuse Un ivers ity, Sch oo l of Archi tectu re

Ad visor( s) M olly Hunker | SPORT S C ollabo ra tive Top ic T hesis Semester Fa ll 2015 - Sprin g 2 0 1 6 Colla b ora tor(s) Jessica O r daz Garcia

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spati a l q u al i ties found in didactic schools

Didactic schools are designed to take into account children and their play habits. These learning environments are friendly and inviting, encouraging children to have fun kinesthetically and with the built environment. Diagram titles are (from left to right): connected clusters, exposed structure, natural ventilation, visual complexity, edible gardens, dynamic ceilings, natural shading , children’s scale, water collection, natural daylighting , flexible furniture, and adaptable rooms. 18


sp a ti al q u alities found in factor y schools

The public school education system in the United States began as a product of the Industrial Revolution. This new cultural shift in the country then dictated the architectural design of public schools. Diagram titles are (from left to right): low ceilings, limited facilities, compartmentalized planning , unwelcoming entrances, no windows, narrow corridors, poor acoustics, no daylighting , ctrl c - ctrl v construction, one size fits all, deteriorating facilities, and no ventilation. 19


si xteen o f the b est-selling childr en’s books of all time

Wonderland. Oz. A great green room. A forest of Wild Things. Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. Here, there, or anywhere. The places and spaces from these stories are just a few of the many canonical lands that a child may encounter when reading a picture book. Imagine that the place you learn and the setting of your favorite children’s book were one and the same. The product would allow for these environments and atmospheres of wonder and fantasy to work together through an intrinsic abstraction of the stories. By architecturally crafting fictional landscapes, creativity and imagination can be cultivated in spaces of learning.

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The above image realizes a land where the sixteen best-selling children’s books of all time coexist. The books illustrated are: Green Eggs and Ham, The Little Prince, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Alice in Wonderland, Where the Wild Things Are, The Wizard of Oz, The Secret Garden, Peter Rabbit, The Little Mermaid, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, The Poky Little Puppy, The Cat in the Hat, Thumbelina, Goodnight Moon, The Giving Tree, and Oh, the Places You’ll Go. 21


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sectioning the stories

The following images are detailed sections through Alice in Wonderland, Where the Wild Things Are, and Oh, the Places You’ll Go. The iconic stories of western children’s literature provide rich material for how people (at any age) develop sensitivities to their surroundings, whether realistic or not. Through architecturally analyzing the exposition, rising action, climax, denouement, and resolution of each tale, this project aims to develop formal, material, structural, cosmetic, and atmospheric qualities for an architectural environment of education and wonder.

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a li ce i n w o nderland | lewis car r oll | 1865

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wher e the wi ld thing s ar e | maurice sendak | 1963

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o h, the pl a c es you’ll g o | dr. seuss | 1990

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the abc’s o f childr en’s lear ning envir onments

By analyzing the “architecture” of the plot development of the stories, each story’s spatial qualities are foregrounded and these taxonomies generate a recipe to design a didactic architecture that still rings true to the enchanted plots. These conditions (The ABCs of Children’s Learning Environments) that are pulled from the texts and illustrations are properties that should exist in a learning environment, but for now, solely remain in literature in a more enhanced and fantastical way.

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A B C AROUND & AROUND

Circulation routes that encourage constant movement and neglect dead end corridors

BREEZE IN, BUST OUT

Smooth transitions between public and private spaces

CRISS CROSS

Areas that accomodate multiple necessities and unify several different programs

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the abc’s: d thr oug h o

D G J M

DOWNSIZE, UPSIZE, EVERY SIZE A network of spaces that transform from large to small

GATHER AROUND, GATHER AROUND Spaces constructed for togetherness and group interaction

JUMP IN!

Water play is built in the space, promoting social interaction, physical exercise, and play

MINI ME

Furniture, walls, windows, and doors are scaled down to relate to the proportions of children, providing a sense of control and familiarity

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E H K N

F I L O

ENTER HERE, HANGOUT THERE

FRONT AND CENTER

Creative spaces that hurl us together, fostering interaction and giving people a place to talk, thus allowing the human friction to spark

Exposed structure promotes the observation of parts in motion and parts to whole

HAPPY TUMMY, HAPPY MIND

IS THERE WI-FI HERE?

Edible gardens provide knowledge regarding local foods, plant life, growth, and sustainability through a hands-on relationship

Interaction through technology that goes beyond being an accessory and becomes part a of the environment

KAN WE GO IN THERE?

LET’S TAKE A HIKE

Fantastical and surreal environments, that contain warm and vibrant hues, abstract shapes, nonsensical scenes, and spontaneity... similar to that of a Kandinsky painting

The existing natural environment is used as an extension to enhance the built area

NOW YOU SEE ME...

OUTSIDE IN

A play on materials that link spaces and flows of people through visual complexity

Indoors and outdoors intertwine to create a seamless transition

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the abc’s: p thr oug h z

P R U X

PUT ME TOGETHER, PULL ME APART Didactic furniture, whether big or small, that enables flexibility, depending on one’s needs

READY OR NOT, HERE I COME! Play spaces where jumping, climbing and rolling provide exercise and imaginative development

USE THIS ONE & THIS ONE, NO THAT ONE Assortments of materials and colors that inspire tactile and kinesthetic learning

X MARKS THE SPOT

Rooms have unoccupied centers for specific events and activities

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Q S V Y QUIET!

Tiny niches nestled within spaces for private or one-on-one time

SHAPE SHIFTER

Flexible environments that move, transform, and adjust

VARY CITY

Architecture that is suggestive of a miniature city, with elements such as: the home, the street, the office, the museum, the library, etc

YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE

Natural light is used in most spaces


T W Z THIS WAY, THAT WAY, WHICH WAY Wayfinding circulation that follows a consistent path and sometimes arriving at a Beacon

WHO’S IN CHARGE HERE? Hierarchy is disregarded and importance is dispersed to all spaces and people

ZILLION, MILLION TYPES OF VERMILION Gardens that cultivate several types of plants, flowers and forms of nature

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a speculati ve w onderland

The design of a school affects a child’s social interaction, physical growth, emotional development, and intellectual achievement. The average public school in the United States has yet to advance from its original factory-style architecture. These box-like facilities embody cultural messages, such as: education is standard, methodical, and linear - which is false. Architecture can shape the nature of learning by drawing from the imaginative lands of children’s literature in order to spark the creativity of students.

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w onderland

Wonderland draws from the spatial qualities of picture books’ texts and illustrations as a means for designing a new prototype for public schools to inspire creativity and imagination. Similarly to how the stories were unfolded by identifying the five stages of plot, the architecture is designed by different user group’s five stages. A toddler, a teenager, a parent, and a tourist are just four of the many characters that can emerge in Wonderland’s story.

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b

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level 8 268’ 0”

level 7 226’ 0”

level 6 189’ 0”

level 5 154’ 0”

level 4 114’ 0”

level 3 91’ 0”

level 2 72’ 0”

level 1 53’ 0”


level 6 189’ 0”

level 5 154’ 0”

level 4 114’ 0”

level 3 91’ 0”

level 2 72’ 0”

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w onderland

A narrative and sequence driven architecture can redesign and redefine the way a learning environment communicates itself, and do so in the most eccentric way - through realizing the fantastical, dreamy, and imaginative discoveries of these makebelieve worlds found in children’s literature.

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2

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level 8 268’ 0”

level 7 226’ 0”

level 6 189’ 0”

level 5 154’ 0”

level 4 114’ 0”

level 3 91’ 0”

level 2 72’ 0”

level 1 53’ 0”


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usin g l i n e t o a c hi e v e

GL AM OUR Glamour is a constant and fitful quality in architectural design and consumer spaces, arising out of an environment that mixes human and nonhuman so as to produce captivation. In using the term “glamour,” I am aware of a certain awkardness of the expression. But I need a term that both operates in the everyday and as both an economic and an imaginative force, as a spell that is both erudite and occult but that can also encompass the nineteenth-century meaning of “a deceptive or bewitching beauty or charm” - as well as its current usage, which denotes the spell cast by unobtainable realities. And glamour does this. Glamour does not conjure up awe. It operates on a human scale, in the everyday, inviting just enough familiarity to engage the imagination, a glimpse of another life, utopia as a tactile presence. Glamour is about that special excitement and attractiveness that characterizes some objects and people. It is a form of secular magic, conjured up by the commercial sphere. So glamour is selling. It is manipulation. It is seduction. It is a certain form of deception. But it is something more too. It is meticulous selection and control. Through the use of “the line,” it becomes possible to construct environments of glamour, and subsequently exude glamour because every single detail becomes meticulously calculated, designed, and visible. 1

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Nigel Thrift. “Understanding the Material Practices of Glamour.” The Affect Theory Reader. Duke University Press. Durham and London, 2010. 54


usin g l i n e t o a c hi e v e

GL AM OUR p r o jec t :

AUGM EN TATI ON N otati ng D ance

Augmentation: Notating Dance examines the dancing human body within the architecture, exploring the relationships that are created when a dancer inhabits his/her stage space. The human body in relation to architecture has always been represented as a sole entity. This project deals with the space that the body occupies, the audience space, and the stage space, generating a Laban Cube that emphasizes systems, envelopes, and spaces.

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Uni versity Colum bia Un ivers ity, Gradu ate Sch ool of A rchi tectu re, Pl anni ng & Pres er vati on

Ad visor( s) M a r ia na Ibanez | Ib an ezK im Top ic T he Power s of N Semester Sum m er 20 1 6 Colla b ora tor(s) Va nessa Ar riag ada Yuha o Z hen g

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the human body in ar chitectur e

Augmentation: Notating Dance began by observing the different ways the human body has been portrayed in architecture throughout time, starting with the Vitruvian Man by Leonardo Da Vinci. Da Vinci put the Vitruvian Man at the center, the epitome of the universe. Then, there were the Greeks who used the proportions of the body for their plans and layouts, and as a means of determining the orders (for example: the base of a column is the foot, the shaft is the body, and the capital is the head). Luca Pacioli illustrated the perfect human head with the golden ratio. And the Modular Man, by Le Corbusier, who wanted to compare and observe the relationships between the Metric System and the Imperial System.

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HISTORY OF THE HUMAN BODY IN ARCHITEC TURE

GGreek R E E K Order O R D EsR S ( 1 (1 S Ts t C E N T UyR B.C.) Y B.C.) Centur

LUC L uAcaP APaCciI O o lLi I D I V I Div N A i nP aR O PrPoOp oR rTtiI O o nNeE(1( 510590) 9 )

AADdO SING o lLfF ZZeiEsI ing T HTEh eP RPr OoPpOo Rr ti T IoO S O F THE nsN of the H U M A N B O DY ( 1 94 3 )

H u m a n B o d y (1 9 4 3 )

F R AFrancesco N C E S C O Di DI G Gi Ior OgRi o GIO T R A Trattati T T A T I D Di I A Arami R A M I Ttettu E T T rUaR(1476) A ( 1 4 76 )

Leonardo LEO N A R D O Da D A VVi nci INCI V I TVi R UtrVuv I Ai an N M A N(1490) (1490) Man

D I ED Gi eg O oD D E eS SAaGg rRed E DoO M E DMI D OM edAi dS a D s EDLelR Ro mAa nNoO(1(512562) 6 )

CTa A taN n eo P I E TPi R etr O oC A EO T E RTer Z Oz o( 1 ( 1555544 )

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EERrNn S s tT NNaA u fUerF tE R T PRO L Fg u IG R E9 4(31) 9 4 3 ) PrPoOp oR rTtiI O o nNaA l Fi r eU(1

LL Ee CCoOr bR uBsUier SIER MMOoDd U N9 4( 1 u lLaAr RM aMnA(1 5 )9 4 5 )


dance taxonomies

Through analyzing dance notation drawings and diagrams, it is evident that certain notation illustrations represent gestures and movements, others are abstracted representations of the human figure, and others are more technically and mathematically calculated. Dance is comprised of four elements: Body, Space, Energy, and Time. Through observing Capoeira, Salsa, and Ballet - three very different dances - a manual of dance taxonomies was devised by abstractly representing positions, movements, and body parts.

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D A N C E TA X O N O M I E S

Constant

CONSTANT

Righ t & Left Hand

RIGHT & LEFT HAND

Re pea t

REPEAT

Ha nd s Hor i z onta l

HANDS HORIZONTAL

Pa u s e

PAUSE

One Hand Up

ONE HAND UP

Re p ea t Two T i m es

REPEAT TWO TIMES

Two H a n d s U p

TWO HANDS UP

Re p eat T hr ee T imes

REPEAT THREE TIMES

Two Hands Down

TWO HANDS DOWN

Arched Hand

R i g ht & L ef t Feet

Fo o t i n A i r

B o th Feet i n A i r

K ick ing Foot

ARCHED HAND

LEFT & RIGHT FEET

FEET IN AIR

BOTH FEET IN AIR

KICKING FOOT

E xtended Foot

Foot Hi gh i n A i r

EXTENDED FOOT

FOOT HIGH IN AIR

S hi mmy

Tur n

SHIMMY

TURN

R a i s ed Fo o t

Q u i ck S te p

Walk ing

RAISED FOOT

QUICK STEP

Tu r n a n d S h i m my

Ju m p

Shor t Pau s e

TURN AND SHIMMY

JUMP

SHORT PAUSE

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WALKING


dance notations

These notations, produced from the dance taxonomies manual, are diagrams of the first thirty seconds of each dance: Capoeria, Salsa, and Ballet. The method devised translates the actual dance into these measures of notations, where the drawings become an abstraction of the body without the literal representation of the body; the measures focus on the behavior rather than the form of the human. After illustrating these diagrams, it became interesting to compare them and see how the notation itself was able to reveal various behaviors between these three very different dances.

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CAPOEIRA SOLO PERFORMANCE D A N C E R : A N D R E A C AT O Z Z I

D A N C E N O TAT I O N S

HEAD

6’0”

SHOULDER

4’6”

WA I S T

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SALSA

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DANCER: LUCIA JIMENEZ

A GG IiNnGga

G ATtIiVA NN Eega va

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AUu A

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B An Na AN Ba nEeiI RrAa

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KNEE

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DANCER: HEE SEO

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SA A Q U Eu e SSaAlLsa AR Ar aB EbSesq

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S A SSpin PIN SSaAlLsa

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T E MpPsS LL E Ve Ev e Tem

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ARABESQUE Arabesque

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HEAD

ca p o ei r a so lo p er f o r man ce d a n c er : a n d r ea ca tozz i

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GINGA Ginga

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sa lsa so lo p er f o r man ce d a n cer : lu ci a ji men ez

WA I S T

KNEE

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SShines HINES

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bal let the n u tcr a cker dan cer : hee seo

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BBour O U R Rr ee EE 64


6’0”

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DANCER: LUCIA JIMENEZ N G AT VA NEega tiIva

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AU Au

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BBananeira ANANEIRA

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DANCER: HEE SEO BBody O DY RRoll OLL

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S ASalsa L S A AArabesque RABESQUE

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SSalsa A L S A SSpin PIN

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AArabesque RABESQUE 65

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dan ce notations within space

The following drawings place the notations in the respective spaces that each were performed in - relating back to the four elements of dance: Body, Space, Energy, and Time. The elevation represents the body within the space, performed linearly. Projected in plan is the distance that the body has traveled. And, in short section is the calculated kinetic energy of that body. Unlike Da Vinci and Paciloi, who focused solely on the body, Augmentation: Notating Dance focuses on the space that the body occupies, the audience space, and the stage space - a Laban Cube that explores systems, envelopes, and spaces.

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C A P O E I R A : S Ocapoeira LO PERFORMANCE solo perfor mance dancer : andr ea catozz i

H O USE AUD I E N CE

E L E VAT I O N

N EG ATIVA

G IN G A

MOVEMENT

AU

S E C T I ON

B A NA NE I R A

KIN E TIC EN ER G Y

HEAD

P OTEN TIAL EN ER G Y

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S H O U L DE R WA I S T KN E E F O OT

KIN E TIC EN ER G Y

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S TAGE R I GH T S TAGE L E F T

VE LOC I T Y | M P S

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D : 1 8 . 2 8 M E T E RS T: 6 0 S E CON D S

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S TAGE R I GH T S TAGE L E F T

(1. KIN E TIC EN ER G Y )

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S TAGE R I GH T

VE LOC I T Y = D / T

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VE LOC I T Y = 1 8 . 2 8 M E T E RS / 6 0 S E CON D S VE LOC I T Y = . 3 0 M P S

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S TAGE L E F T

D O W NS TAGE

K I N E T I C E N E R G Y | J OU L E S (2. KIN E TIC EN ER G Y )

VE LOC I T Y = . 3 0 M E T E RS K I N E T I C E N E R G Y = ( 1 / 2 ) ( 5 0 KG ) ( V ) K I N E T I C E N E R G Y = ( 1 / 2 ) ( 5 0 KG ) ( . 3 0 2 ) K I N E T I C E N E R G Y = 2 . 2 5 J OU L E S

D I S P L AC E M E N T |

(3. KIN E TIC EN ER G Y )

VE LOC I T Y = . 3 0 M P S | K I N E T I C E N E R G Y = 2 . 2 5 J OU L E S D I S P L AC E M E N T = ( . 5 ) ( V + V 0 ) ( 6 0 ) D I S P L AC E M E N T = ( . 5 ) ( 0 + 2 . 2 5 ) ( 6 0 ) DX = 9

HOUSE AU D IENC E

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S A L S A : S O L Osalsa PERFORMANCE solo perfor mance dancer : lucia j imenez

H OUSE AUD I E N C E

E LE VAT I O N

B ODY R OL L

SHINES

S AL S A A R A BESQUE

SA L SA SPIN

SEC TIO N

M OVEM ENT

KI NE TI C E NE R GY

HEAD

POTE NTI A L E NE R GY

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S H O U LD E R WA I S T KNEE F O OT

KI NE TI C E NE R GY

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- 13 m

0

+13 m

DISPL ACEMEN T

VELO CIT Y | MPS

(1. KI NE TI C E NE R GY )

D: 27.4 ME TERS T: 60 S ECO N DS VELO CIT Y = D/T VELO CIT Y = 27.4 ME TERS / 60 S ECO N DS VELO CIT Y = .45 MPS

P LA N

DISTANCE

S TAGE R I GH T S TAGE L E F T S TAGE R I GH T S TAGE L E F T

15’ 5’

S TAGE L E F T

3’

K IN E TIC EN ER G Y | JO UL ES (2. KI NE TI C E NE R GY )

5’ 5’

S TAGE R I GH T

5’

VELO CIT Y = .45 ME TERS K IN E TIC EN ER G Y = (1/2)(50 KG )( V )

17’

K IN E TIC EN ER G Y = (1/2)(50 KG )(.45 2 )

S TAGE R I GH T

K IN E TIC EN ER G Y = 5.1 JO UL ES

S TAGE L E F T

DOWNSTAGE

DISPL ACEMEN T |

(3. KI NE TI C E NE R GY )

VELO CIT Y = .45 MPS | K IN E TIC EN ER G Y = 5.1 JO UL ES DIS PL ACEMEN T = (.5)( V + V 0 )(60) DIS PL ACEMEN T = (.5)(0 + 5.1)(60) D X = 13

HOU SE AU DI ENCE

68


B A L L E T : T H ballet E NUTCRACKER the nutcracker dancer : hee seo

E L E VAT ION

BOUREE

H IGH A R A B E S Q U E

TEMPS LEVE

A R A B E S QU E

MOVEMENT

SEC TION

H O USE AUD I E NCE

KINE TIC E NE R GY

HE AD

POTE NTIAL E NE R GY

3.24 JOULES (1 KG M 2 S 2 )

SHOUL DE R WAIST KNEE F OOT

KINE TIC E NE R GY

-11m

0

+11m

DISPLACEMENT

OR CHE ST R A P IT 00

02

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20

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OR CHESTR A PIT

60

P L AN

D I S TA N C E

STAGE RIGHT

8’

3’

3’

3’

3’

3’

3’

3’

4’ 6”

STAGE L E F T STAGE RIGHT

1’

STAGE L E F T

2’

2’

2’

2’

2’ VELOCIT Y | MPS

STAGE RIGHT

( 1. KINE TIC E NE R GY )

15’ 10’

STAGE L E F T

D: 21.9 ME TERS T: 60 SECONDS STAGE RIGHT

VELOCIT Y = D/ T

STAGE L E F T

VELOCIT Y = 21.9 ME TERS / 60 SECONDS VELOCIT Y = .36 MPS

OR CHE ST R A P IT

DOWNS TAGE

KINE TIC ENER GY | JOULES ( 2. KINE TIC E NE R GY )

VELOCIT Y = .36 ME TERS KINE TIC ENER GY = (1/ 2)(50 KG)( V ) KINE TIC ENER GY = (1/ 2)(50 KG)(.36 2 ) KINE TIC ENER GY = 3.24 JOULES

DISPLACEMENT |

( 3. KINE TIC E NE R GY )

VELOCIT Y = .36 MPS | KINE TIC ENER GY = 3.24 JOULES DISPLACEMENT = (.5)( V + V 0 )(60) DISPLACEMENT = (.5)(0 + 3.24)(60) D X = 10

HOU S E AU DIENC E

69


the l aban cube, deconstr ucted

LABAN CUBE: DECONSTRUCTED

The Laban Cube centers around the human. Choreographers use this approach to focus solely on the human body - but Augmentation operates in the space that the body occupies by augmenting this reality through a deconstruction, a reconstruction, and an explosion of the cube. 70


the laban cube, exploded

LABAN CUBE: DECONSTRUCTED

71


A R C H I T E C T U R A L S T R AT E G Y

OVER

UNDER

INTEGRATED

PLAN

ELEVATION

OCCUPIED SPACE

VERTICES

HYPERBOLIC FORM

INTERSECTION

The architectural strategy looks back on the initial three dances and the way those relationships inhabit the architecture that they are performed in. This study determined that dance can exist above, below, or set within. 72


A R C H I T E C T U R A L S T R AT E G Y

The vertices of the surface area generate a hyperbolic form that help investigate the way that the ground plane interacts with this infinite set of points generated by a parabola, where spaces can be inverted, or at times, above, and sometimes set within. 73


74


75


76


77


78


79


41’

10

RECIT HALL END STAGE AUDIENCE CAPACITY: ~100 SEATS WITH PENTHOUSE LOFT AND MECHANICAL AND STORAGE SPACES BELOW

end stag e theater

SCALE : 1/8” = 1’- 0”

80

2’


sm all perfor mance j ew el

81


PERFORMANCE FIGURE : SMALL

70 ’

24

PROSCENIUM THEATER WITH FRAMED BACKDROP AUDIENCE CAPACITY: ~300 SEATS ADJACENT BAR SECTION WITH SEATING ACOUSTIC DROP CEILING SCALE : 1/8” = 1’- 0”

pr oscenium stag e theater

82

6’


PERFORMANCE FIGURE : SMALL

sm all perfor mance j ew el

83


PERFORMANCE FIGURE : MEDIUM

63’

23

ROMAN AMPHITHEATER WITH ELEVATING STAGE AUDIENCE CAPACITY: ~250 SEATS ACCOMPANIED ORCHESTRA SECTION WITH LOCKERS, REHEARSAL, AND MECHANICAL SPACES SCALE : 1/8” = 1’- 0”

ar ena theater

84

6’


medium perfor mance j ew el

85


PERFORMANCE FIGURE : MEDIUM

1 26 ’

14

8’

SEMI- COVERED GREEK THEATER AUDIENCE CAPACITY: ~200 SEATS WITH OPEN LOUNGE SEATING AND ACOUSTIC PANELS SCALE : 1/8” = 1’- 0”

outdoor amphitheater

86


PERFORMANCE FIGURE : MEDIUM

medium perfor mance j ew el

87


PERFORMANCE FIGURE : LARGE

150’

33

SHOEBOX CONCERT HALL THEATER AUDIENCE CAPACITY: ~750 SEATS EACH THEATER WITHIN A THEATER MULTI-LEVELED HIGH VOLUME CHANGING SET STAGE SCALE : 1/8” = 1’- 0”

do uble pr oscenium theater

88

6’


l ar g e perfor mance j ew el

89


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ARCHITECTURAL PERSPECTIVE

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0

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8

16

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using c o l l a ge t o a c hi e v e

THE U N C AN N Y Let us add something of a general nature, which is, strictly speaking, already contained in animism and the supernnuated workings of our mental apparatus - but seems to call for special emphasis. This is the fact that an uncanny effect often arises when the boundary between fantasy and reality is blurred, when we are faced with the reality of something that we have until now considered imaginary, when a symbol takes on the full function and significance of what it symbolizes, and so forth. This is at the root of much that is uncanny about magical practices. The infantile element about this, which also dominates the mental life of neurotics, is the excessive stress that is laid on physical reality. The world of a fairy tale, for example, abandons the basis of reality right from the start and openly commits itself to the acceptance of animistic beliefs. Here it is impossible for wish-fulfilments, the existence of secret powers, the omnipotence of thoughts, the animation of the inanimate - all of which are commonplace in the fairy tale - to produce an uncanny effect, for, as we have seen, a sense of the uncanny can only arise if there is a conflict of judgement as to whether what has been surmounted and merits no further credence may not, after all, be possible in real life. 1

1

Sigmund Freud. “The Uncanny.� Trans. The Penguin Group. New York, New York, 2003. 106


using c o l l a ge t o a c hi e v e

THE U N C AN N Y p r o jec t :

WEWO R K & WEL I VE A Cri ti ci s m

WeWork & WeLive: A Criticism explores the possibilities of new relationships between living, working, and the city environment. Through investigating the history of working and living culture, it was discovered that up until the Industrial Revolution, it was predominantly universal that the word “house” referred to a place where one lived and worked. Due to the Industrial Revolution’s rise in machinery, technology, and infrastructure, living and working split. However, with the rise of WeWork and WeLive, millenials now want to live and work in the same place.

108


Uni versity Colum bia Un ivers ity, Gradu ate Sch ool of A rchi tectu re, Pl anni ng & Pres er vati on

Ad visor( s) N a hyun Hwan g & David Moo n | N HD M Top ic Inter im U rbanis m Semester Fa ll 2016 Colla b ora tor(s) Kig Pr a sa n s iri Veeras u n tho r n

109


w ew o r k and w eli ve at 110 wall str eet

WeWork and WeLive is one of the more contemporary situations of working and living. The office spaces and the living spaces are fully furnished, decorated, and set up with cable and internet upon movein. Everything is prepared for the user to move right in. The project aims to be critical towards this company. The company is said to design and rent out coworking and coliving spaces for startups and young twenty-something-year olds. WeWork and WeLive lure and promote themselves with an emerging class and demographic for entrepreneurs, startups, and freelancers.

110


WeLive

rk’s shared apartment and living spaces in downtown an (Wall Street).

111


cr i ti quing w ew ork and w eli ve

The building located on 110 Wall Street is compartmentalized in design. The top half is the living portion, and the bottom half is the working portion. With separate elevator shafts, there is no communication between the two parts. It functions as this isolated sphere, bounded from the public. Similar to Robert Owen’s New Harmony, enclosed within this WeWork “utopia” are residential, working, community, and leisure spaces. One of the main reasons WeWork and WeLive is so successful is because a large population of millenials do not want to commute or live in the suburbs. So, this world where you can live and work simultaneously becomes appealing.

114


115


the skill w orkers

WeWork and WeLive became interesting because it was observed that it can only cater to one type of worker people who need nothing more than a desk, chair, and computer. This project focuses on expanding this similar working and living model, but to other types of workers. What about people that need more room and supplies than just a desk and a computer? A similar type of model could be expanded to skill workers - people whose resources for working include large spaces, studios, kitchens, storefronts, laboratories, markets, trading spaces, collaborative units, etc.

118


119


i n ter vening in r ed hook, br ookly n

Red Hook, Brooklyn was chosen for the site of this living and working exploration. First, Red Hook has a history that traces back to living, working, and manufacturing; only now, it is becoming abandoned because manufacturing has relocated to New Jersey. And second, Red Hook has also become this forgotten piece of land, disconnected from the rest of the city and transportation. The project addresses temporality in the sense that Red Hook itself is temporal because of the issues it faces with flooding and rising water levels. The neighborhood is in an interim stage, where it wants to be developed and has potential, but problems with water hinder it from growing. The project introduces a set of different nodes and interventions throughout Red Hook, occupying the water, coast, vacant plots, and abandoned buildings of the area. The public nodes contrast the existing WeWork and WeLive model, which currently is introverted and engages with the city in only a private manner.

120


121


i nter vention: the basin

The existing basin is occupied by collaborative units and studio spaces that hover above the water.

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i n ter vention: the housing units

The existing housing units are elevated to create a porous local storefront. These current public housing units are built on land that would get flooded immediately. In an effort to prevent damage, the storefront on the first floor becomes a permeable structure, that would allow for pop up markets to occur - increasing foot traffic as well as giving the residents job opportunities.

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i n ter vention: the of fice spaces

Office spaces are constructed, hovering above the land in order to withstand the flood.

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i n ter vention: the leisur e element

A floating pool and walkway become a leisure element that is able to rise with the changing water levels.

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i n ter vention: the stadium

An existing, unused, and abandoned stadium is renovated into artist studios and workshop spaces.

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i n ter ven ti o n : the g r een house and super market

This greenhouse and supermarket act as an extension to the local supermarket in Red Hook, Fairway, which is currently located on a high flood zone.

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i n ter vention: the g rain ter minal

The abandoned Grain Terminal is renovated to become a transportation hub for Red Hook, containing a ferry terminal, a light rail connecting to the subway, and bike rentals.

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i n ter vention: the water laboratories

Water Laborartories are designed for scientists, researchers, hydrologists, atmospheric researchers, marine scientists people who need to conduct on-site research specific to water, animals, weather, and flooding. The structure is lightweight and porous, and has the ability to float with the changing water levels.

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151


152


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i n ter vention: the ele vated walkway

This elevated walkway currently allows for a secondary form of circulation between the nodes. However, when the flood rises, it becomes the primary form of circulation for the interventions - and it also acts as a power source to feed to the nodes if needed.

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155


156


157


the n o des of r ed hook, br ookly n

Each of the project’s nodes in Red Hook deal with a different set of mechanisms of the city and typology. Each has its own distinct set of characteristics and lifestyles, providing different classifications of working and living. Each node can be seen as its own island, with its own inherent program and typology. However, when the water level rises throughout time, it will reinforce the connection between each zone, making them appear as interconnected islands. These interventions act as a second layer on top of the existing city. As the existing Red Hook slowly gets washed away by the flood, the islands provide a framework for the future neighborhood of Red Hook. It allows for the option to keep building on top as the water rises - and with the constant change in water levels, the program and occupancy change and adapt to the new city, engaging with new territories and environmental realities.

160


161


using m o n o c hr o m e t o a c hi e v e

THE S UBL I M E The sublime and the beautiful - the stirring of each is pleasant, but in different ways. The sight of a mountain whose snowcovered peak rises above the clouds and the description of a raging storm both arouse enjoyment but with horror; on the other hand, the sight of flower-strewn meadows, valleys with winding brooks and covered with grazing flocks, the description of Elysium, or Homer’s portrayal of the girdle of Venus, also occasion a pleasant sensation but one that is joyous and smiling. Tall oaks and lonely shadows in a sacred grove are sublime; flower beds, low hedges and trees trimmed in figures are beautiful. Night is sublime, day is beautiful. Temperaments that possess a feeling for the sublime are drawn gradually, by the quiet stillness of a summer evening as the shimmering light of the stars breaks through the brown shadows of night and the lonely moon rises into view, into high feelings of friendship, of disdain for the world, of eternity. The sublime moves, the beautiful charms. Feelings of sublime are sometimes accompanied with a certain dread, or melancholy; in some cases merely with quiet wonder; and instill others with a beauty completely pervading a sublime plan. 1

1

Immanuel Kant. “Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime.” Trans. John T. Goldthwait. University of California Press, 1961, 2003. 164


using m o n o c hr o m e t o a c hi e v e

THE S UBL I M E p r o jec t :

GHO S T R I DER S Gho s t Towns of the A m eri can S ou thwes t

Ghost Riders: Ghost Towns of the American Southwest examines the potential interaction between Land Art Sites and Ghosts Towns of the region - dead or dying villages and towns that contain substantial architectural remains and very few residents. A town becomes a ghost town when the economic means that once supported it have failed. Despite this decline in activity, however, many of these places still contain the necessary physical infrastructures to support tourist acivity. The project proposes that these towns be subsequently redeveloped to serve as interpretive points for nearby Land Art sites.

166


Uni versity Colum bia Un ivers ity, Gradu ate Sch ool of A rchi tectu re, Pl anni ng & Pres er vati on

Ad visor( s) Julia n Rose & Gar rett Ricciardi | f or m l es s f i nd er Top ic L a nd Ar t an d Nation al Park s Semester Spr ing 2017 Colla b ora tor(s) N ichola s K azmiers k i

167


gho st to wns and their railr oad histor y

In this extremely remote region of the United States, much of the first economic activity was the result of the development of the rail system, for transportation of both people and natural resources. Booms came when rails were constructed, with towns popping up all along these arteries of transport. Busts occurred when the rails became inactive, or a town’s station was deemed obsolete and subsequently bypassed.

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169


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171


Map Legend Ghost Riders Rail Arter y Ghost Town Land Art Site 50

10 25


Ghost Riders Network Southwest Regional Plan


a ghost town r eg ional netw ork

Ghost Riders proposes the development of a regional network of these railroad ghost towns, which could serve as anchor points for land art. Six sister ghost towns were identified, each sharing a similar railroad history and each accompanying a nearby land art site. The six ghost towns are: Concho, Arizona, Ash Springs, Nevada, Valentine, Texas, Ophir, Utah, Austin, Nevada, and Montello, Nevada.

174


Established in 1879

Current Population: 38

Concho, Arizona 2 Hours and 26 Minutes (137 miles) fr om James Tur r ell’s Roden Crater

175


Established in 1860

Current Population: 48

Ash Springs, Nevada 1 Hour 57 Minutes (94.7 miles) fr om Michael Heizer’s Double Negative

176


Established in 1882

Current Population: 98

Valentine, Texas 37 minutes (35.8 miles) fr om Marfa, Texas

177


Established in 1850

Current Population: 07

Ophir, Utah 50 Minutes (21.8 miles) fr om Robert Smithson Spiral Jetty

178


Established in 1862

Current Population: 92

Austin, Nevada 2 Hours 22 Minutes (109 miles) fr om Michael Heizer’s City

179


montello, ne vada

Montello, Nevada was chosen as the ghost town to develop for the Ghost Riders project. Located thirty miles from Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels, Montello, Nevada once contained a water refilling station for steam locomotives, but was bypassed with the development of diesel-fueled cars.

180


Established in 1904

Current Population: 84

Montello, Nevada 37 Minutes (30.2 miles) fr om Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels

181


mo ntello’s local businesses

Ghost Riders proposes bringing back activity to the towns, but in a novel, architectural way, to create interventions that would attract visitors and encourage new economic activity - establishing the towns as an anchor point and visitors hubs for the land art. By mapping out the currently operating businesses in Montello (as well as the abandoned structures), it became evident that the town has a functioning post office, gas station, mini mart, construction company, two saloons, and a motel.

182


(e)

(c) (c)

(c)

(a) (c) (c) (a) (6) (e)

(e)

(c) (5)

(e) (a)

(a)

(c)

(7)

(c)

(2)

(b) (a)

(e)

(3)

(4) (a)

(d)

(b) (a)

(a) (c)

(1)

Local Businesses

Derelict Structures

(1) United States Post Office

(a) Mobile Home

(2) Montello Gas and Grocer y

(b) Shed

(3) The Utah Construction Company

(c) Quonset Hut

(4) The Saddle Sore Bar and Grill

(d) Gas Station

(5) Cowboy Bar Cafe

(e) Ruins

(6) The Pilot Motel (7) Montello, Nevada Elementar y

183


montello, ne vada

Montello, Nevada’s highest population was 800 in 1904. But it now has a population of 84, and quickly decreasing - however, its very few inhabitants are determined to not let the town die. In 2015, some even went as far to stage a demonstration calling for the development of an international airport in the town. All the while, an active freight rail line runs along main street, and Sun Tunnels, a significant place of art pilgrimage, is nearby.

184


Established in 1904

Current Population: 84

Montello, Nevada 37 Minutes (30.2 miles) fr om Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels

(2)

(4) (3)

(1)

(5)

10’

Interventions in Montello, Nevada (1) Gas Station to Chop Shop (2) Mobile Home and Shed to Outdoor Theater (3) Quonset Huts to Green House Nurser y (4) Mud Brick Ruins Preserved under Shelter (5) Mobile Homes to Commerce Space


r a i l r o a d histor y and train ty polog ies

Initially, the project was attracted to the existing rail infrastructure for its historic significance to the ghost towns - but in further researching the system, Ghost Riders became interested in the architecture of the freight cars themselves, and specifically how this system exhibits a number of differing designs and structural systems to house the train’s varying programs. As these trains pass through Montello, they become transient architectures and temporary landscape fixtures. But, what would it mean to bring back permanent rail activity to the town, in a more physical sense? The trains used are (from left to right): the box car, the auto car, the centerbeam, the flat car, the hopper car, the coil car, the refrigerated boxcar, and the gondola car.

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187


rail car components

The project considers the possibility of reusing some of the train systems themselves - but doing so at the unit scale. The freight car structures are deconstructed and abstracted down into components in order to create new architecture. The Rail Car Components illustrates the project’s inventory of various train car deconstructions down into the level of their components, in order to see what are the architectural elements the ghost towns are working with: posts, studs, heavier structural elements such as beams, structural panels, and steel wires, just to name a few.

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Rail Car Components Inventor y of Dissected Parts

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(6)

(5)

189


(6)

(5)

(7)

(8)

(9)

(10)

(11)

Components Legend

(12)

190

(1) Studs, Posts, Columns

(7) Oil Tank

(2) Beams, Structural Panel, Steel Cable

(8) Hopper Container

(3) Welded Structural Ribs

(9) Gondola Shell

(4) Hardware - Rails, Wheels, Locks

(10) Boxcar

(5) Cladding- Wood, Corrugated Siding

(11) Flatcar Platform

(6) Track Doors

(12) Centerbeam Truss


191


a gho st to wn’s ty pical der elict str uctur es

The diagrams illustrate and catalogue what are some of the typical and common abandoned architectural structures found in most ghost towns - derelict gas stations, mobile homes, supply sheds, quonset huts, and mudbrick ruins.

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193


i n ter vention: the chop shop

Accordingly, the first intervention of Ghost Riders in Montello, Nevada is to construct a turnout rail portion from the existing line into the abandoned gas station of the town, treating the building as the “Chop Shop,� or Disassembly Warehouse. The idea is that decommissioned rail cars will be dropped off at this turnout, and then towed into the town for their disassembly into more basic architectural elements. The Chop Shop is a standard industrial typology, built out of repeating trusses from the centerbeam train cars. The building includes: a warehouse, seating to observe the deconstruction of the trains, office spaces, and a visitor’s center.

194


Montello, Nevada | Estab.1904

Current Population: 84

The Chop Shop Gas Station to Disassembly War ehouse

195


10’

196


197


i n ter ven ti o n: the outdoor perfor mance space

The second intervention is the Outdoor Performance Space, a program that draws visitors by hosting musical and theatrical performances. Select insertions have been made into the existing layout of a mobile home and a storage shed, creating a stage rebuilt from a flatcar deck, bleachers from the disassembled parts of the home, and a back of house in the existing shed.

198


Montello, Nevada | Estab.1904

Current Population: 84

Outdoor Performance Space Mobile Home and Shed to Theater

199


Outdoor Performance Space Mobile Home and Shed to Theater

10’

200


10’

201


i n ter ven ti o n: the g r een house and nurser y

The third intervention is a community Green House, Plant Nursery, and Mushroom Farm built throughout a stripped and reconfigured row of abandoned quonset huts. The cladding has been stripped of the existing structures, and the varying shapes of welded metal train ribs from the train cars are inserted amongst and in between the spaces, creating green house and pergola areas. This results in a barrel vault form of varying rhythms.

202


Montello, Nevada | Estab.1904

Current Population: 84

Green House & Nursery Quonset Huts to Gr een House, Nurser y, and Mushr oom Far m

203


10’

204


10’

205


i n ter ven ti on: the r uin dome pr eser vation

The fourth intervention is the Ruin Dome Hut, a program of preservation and historical interpretation of the ghost town itself. Ghost Riders was inspired by the National Park Service’s preservation initiatives, in which a sheltering structure is built over an existing architectural artifact. By using wood framing elements and the metal panels from boxcars, protective geodesic domes are used to selectively preserve and call attention to bits of Montello’s architectural hertiage, which is quickly disintegrating. Here, a set of three domes have been installed over the footings of decaying adobe brick structures.

206


Montello, Nevada | Estab.1904

Current Population: 84

Ruin Dome Mud Bricks Pr eser ved Under Shelter

207


Ruin Dome Mud Bricks Pr eser ved Under Shelter

208 10’


10’

209


i n t er vention: the market

The final intervention is the Market, a space of commerce for the surrounding region, where tourists may shop for local goods, such as food produced in the green house, or train artifacts disassembled in the Chop Shop. This intervention was performed on a row of four abandoned mobile homes that sit along the main road. The structures are first towed and repositioned next to one another, and their walls pinned together with the help of inserted steel columns made from angles of train cars. Roof sections are then tied to structural steel cables, and the ridge beam is removed, creating a new butterfly roof structural unit. The result is an arcaded space divided by the stripped wood stud walls of the homes.

210


Montello, Nevada | Estab.1904

Current Population: 84

Market Mobile Homes to Commerce Space

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1

212


10’

213


g host riders

As a final remark, these interventions are only five of the many architectural interactions the project sees being developed between ghost towns and train cars. It is envisioned that many more of these interventions could take place throughout Montello, and as well as throughout the other five towns of the Ghost Riders network.

214


Structur

Train Compo -Ste -Ste -Cor

215


Photographs of Ghost Towns taken by Stephanie Tager during the Studio Kinne Trip to the Southwest, Spring 2017 216


217


Photographs of Ghost Towns taken by Stephanie Tager during the Studio Kinne Trip to the Southwest, Spring 2017 218


219


Photographs of Ghost Towns taken by Stephanie Tager during the Studio Kinne Trip to the Southwest, Spring 2017 220


221


A Collection of Works By Stephanie Alexis Tager Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design Degree 2016 - 2017 Syracuse University, School of Architecture Bachelor of Architecture Degree 2011 - 2016

Stephanie Tager | Portfolio  

Syracuse University SOA + Columbia University GSAPP

Stephanie Tager | Portfolio  

Syracuse University SOA + Columbia University GSAPP

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