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FOD:R PORTFOLIO STEPHANIE GUTTMANN Student Number: 992350 Studio: 20


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Module 1 Page 3

Module 2 Page 8

Module 3 Page 11

Module 4 Page 16


MODULE 1

HOW TO DRAW A CROISSANT Weeks 1 & 2


PHOTO OF SIDE ELEVATION

PHOTO OF FRONT ELEVATION

PHOTOCOPY OF PLAN

PHOTO OF PLAN VIEW


ORTHOGR APHIC DR AWINGS

How to draw a croissant was the first module of the semester for Foundations of Design; Representation. This module aimed to familiarise ow to use and set up photostages in order to capture the croissant. Additionally, this module taught what is orthographic and the difference between each aspect of it, thus creating an understanding of elevations, plans and section cuts. This module also tought the use of basic photoshop skills to adjust the brightness and colour of the photograph of the croissant as well as removing the unwanted background. To answer the question of the modules title, how to draw a croissant, a variety of rendering techniques were explored as well as a variety of media (fine liners and pencils). As seen above, I used line, hatching and shading to render the views of the croissant. Using the technique of lines to render the croissant enabled the croissants shape and form to be represented quickly, highlighting the curves and layers on its visible body. Doing this with black fine-liner enables the lines to stand out and contrast the white ground. The shading technique of hatching, specifically cross hatching is also a quick method to show form and texture. Additionally, by using a series of parallel and perpendicular lines a highly effective way to represent the shape of a croissant is created, thus emphasising both its peaks and ridges. Finally, using the rendering technique of shading with 2B, 4B and 6B pencils represents the form and shape of the croissant emphasising its lighter and darker parts. Shading with pencils creates details of the textures of the croissant and also represents the shadows on the croissant casted by the croissant itself. Overall, this I was able to represent the form and structure of the croissant through these drawing techniques.


SECTION CUTS

Section A

Section B

Section C

Settion cuts are useful when depicting the insides of an element. Therefore, cutting croissant into sections was necessary illustrate the interior elements of the croissant. This enables the layers and hollow areas to be represented that cannot be represented from a plan or elevation view. As the croissant does not maintain the same shape and form throughout its body multiple sections are necessary to represent different parts of the croissant. In this module section A was cut straight down the vertical center of the croissant, section B was cut through the vertical center of the section A cut and parallel to it, and repeating the process again section C was cut through the vertical center of the section B, parallel to cuts A and B. These cuts were then scanned and edited in photoshop to adjust the lighting in order to view all the individual layers withing the croissant. The drawings of the section cuts used the technique of combining hatching and plotting dots to represent depth. Cut lines (outline of the section drawings) are represented with a 0.5 fine-liner Rendering using a combination of hatching and fine dots represented with a 0.1 fine-liner


S E C T I O N C U T S & A XO N O M E T R I C D R A W I N G S

This module tought what an axonometric drawing is and how to constract one. An axonometric drawing is abstract, unlike a perspective all sides are measurable. To create this drawing, the section cut drawings were placed under a neatly constructed grid with each square 10mm x 10mm. Looking at the outline of the section, each point where the outline touches the grid was marked with a cross. To convert this to an axonometric, a similar grid needs to be set up on a 45-degree angle to the plan, the difficult part of this is then to match the cross points to the new abstract graph. Once this is done three times, using the grid as a guide the dots need to be connected into three separate shapes then the shapes connected to show an outline of the axonometric drawing. This part is difficult, and the croissants form is distorted as it is no longer in perspective.


MODULE 2

FLATNESS VS PROJECTION Weeks 3 - 5


Module two taught how to represent two elevation views into and axonometric drawing. To construct an axonometric drawing from an elevation, the elevations must be places at a 45 degree andgle and projected upwards. I completed this by overlaying tracing paper on top of printous of the elevations. As it is a 200mm x 200mm space, the elevations to not depict the depth of each element and their spacial relation to each other, this was up to imagination in relation to a ‘mario world’ and coliding and mixing the two elevations together. Projecting the elements from both the front and back elevations into an Axonometric drawing took precision. Moreover, it was challenging to fit all the aspects in view of the elevation, on the Axonometric. Thus, it was necessary to not make all the hills circular but rather the shape was reflected into a prism like shape The elevations ‘collided’ in the centre of the world, blurring the boundaries of which elevation the aspect was projected from, therefore creating a new unique world.


O U T L I N E O F A XO N O M E T R I C D R A W I N G

In this module I also had to design the rest of an Axonometric Mario World (within the hidden space of the elevation, the gaps, above and below the elevations) As two of the ‘mountains’ extended past the image of the elevations, the opportunity to create a new world above appeared, imagining what could be above the elevation.


F I N A L A XO N O M E T R I C D R A W I N G Once some of the drawings were completed I scanned it into Adobe Phtoshop, made the background white and reprinted it on A1 paper, before adding more tracing paper to further add extra details. Once theses drawings were complete I scanned the various tracing papers into Adobe Illustrator and traced over the linesusing the pen tool. Then I set up a colour palette/scheme, with every chosen colour having 2 or 3 varying tones for easy use when it comes to shading and created a light source coming from the back right view and use the varying colours to highlight this. Darkest colours at the front for example. Additionally I added a grass techture to further create a sense of depth. To ensure there is a harmonious balance the foreground and back I added waterfalls connecting the top and bottom of the worlds vertically. Overall, this module taught about representing depth. Depth is created with the techniques of contouring, meaning using gradients and slight alterations of colour to depict form and body to an object. Nonetheless, depth can also be represented using colour and texture, the tone (darkness) of a colour can represent distance making an object appear closer of further away. In this design, gradients were used for shadow or to represent a curved surface. Colour was also used to represent depth with darker colours facing away from the imaginary light source, and the darker colours representing distance.


MODULE 3

PATTERN VS SURFACE Weeks 6 - 8


This module tought through the use of the program Rhino about developable surfaces. Developable surfaces are straight lines used to simplify construction, mapped onto a plane without distortion. Triangles are developable and were used to digitally and then physically build a curved surface. Using seven smaller modules in varied shapes each folded from triangles to then create the larger piece. This module also tought attractor points and curves, which I incorporated into my design inorder to visually breakup the rigid 10 x 10 modular grid.


PHOTOGRAPHS

The module took a long time to build and put together, as some of the smaller modules requred to be devided in half causing over 100 indiviuals modules needing to be built before gluing together with PVA. I then captured these photos with a at home set up photostage and took 209 photographs of my design. When photographing I tried to cature the different peaks within the module and the shadows casted from them onto other pyramids. Afterwards a selections of these were chosen to be adjusted with the levels, brightness and contrast in Adobe Phtotoshop.


MODULE 4

HOW TO DRAW A CROISSANT Weeks 9 - 12


This Module sought to interpret a text about a city and translate that into a design based off Melbourne University’s old quad. I pulled out some sections of the passage to investigate further. Interesting language that can be further explored “The city’s life flows calmly like the motion of the celestial bodies and it acquires the inevitability of phenomena not subject to human caprice” “unchanging heaven, cogs in a meticulous clockwork.” “best to remain motionless in time” “our city and sky correspond so perfectly” and “City and sky never remain the same” “self- confidence” “prudence”


PERSPECTIVES

On the left are a variety of perspectives from the building design.


PERSPECTIVES


PERSPECTIVES

Above depicts the construction process to edit the perspectives, useing a variety of textures and layers in Adobe Illustrator

Top: Perspective 1

Bellow: Perspective 2


F I N A L I S O M E T R I C W I T H N O TAT I O N S


FOD:R PORTFOLIO STEPHANIE GUTTMANN Student Number: 992350 Studio: 20

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