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1. Exposition 26.03.14 19.00-23.00 Factor 44 Bleekhofstraat 44, 2140 Antwerpen

in site

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Mira presented ‘The Fly’ on an iPhone housed by a black swaddle of material hung to look similar to a pair of knickers. She chose to conceal the videos explicit imagery rather then expose it like my contesting intentions. Mira was able to interpret the video from an feministic stand point in which the action of plucking my pubic hair was almost ritualistic in the intention to conform to social expectations placed upon myself through vanity standards cultured through discourse. Concealing the imagery to, through my interpretation, protect its privacy. ‘The Fly’ was not created with these principles of intention but through Mira’s interpretation it has become obvious of how others may perceive the imagery based on the format through which it is presented. The concealment of something often brings about a larger focus of curiosity, which became evident during the presentation; my own concealment became prominent in its effect on myself, and its concentration in my work. As discussed in the text disclosed to Mira I stated how the presentation of this work could be interpreted when adjacent to other imagery. During the curation of ‘In Site’ this was a brought into discussion in terms of the occupation of ‘She disintegrated perfectly, but never reappeared,’ (a renovated version of ‘The Fly’) adjacent to ‘Ectopic Entities’ a work that delved into representations of gender, hair association and the females depiction throughout the media. In order for me as an individual to feel the need to conceal this part of my reality then surely this coincided with how I felt I did not conform to societies mantel of ‘the norm’?


Curation of Work-

Bart Kok presented by Stephanie Hardy / Stephanie Hardy presented by Mira Gryseels Bart’s work embodies nostalgic interpretations from his history and heritage in rural Netherlands, often-featuring generic representations including traditional footwear worn for farming, clogs, in addition to a presentation of the journey between his two existences. His work although can be appreciated aesthetically holds only significance for those with a relation or close knowledge of its history and traditions, for example a considerable number of people who reside in Belgium. Therefore in order for the coherence between his paintings to be realized you have to as an audience stand from a similar perspective as Bart himself. I choose to curate two paintings on opposing walls both visible from the same perspective, a perspective identical to that of Bart’s height of vision, so that when standing from that same viewpoint the two paintings appear as one, they articulate the narration to one another.


Analogue Photography- Pinhole As part of Project Week with Roger Laute.

Project Week provided the opportunity to explore pinhole photography and the diversity of objects that have the capacity to become a camera. Throughout this time I was able to produce two alternative types of camera, one able to produce a negative image directly onto the photographic paper itself, and the other able produce a reel of negatives, created using a matchbox. The matchbox provided the opportunity to almost joust in humour at my conceptual practice. A practice that was influenced from the pinnacle point of plot transformation in Kurt Newman’s ‘The Fly’, the release of the fly from within the matchbox. The matchbox pinhole almost humorously became an attempt to document an experience from the fly’s perspective, an imaginary position formed through fabricated discourse.


She works with video- installation. I see associations with layering, covering, revealing, reality, time, memorie, conceptual art. by conceptual I mean more thinking than doing. It could be really interesting for you to do and experiment more with all your photo and video materials that are there. Or to just have your camera with you and shoot images. The concept ( story ) is fresh and new to me! Really something to go further with. Time calculation: the fly on the little pot, mirrors moving; light movement. Reflecting and projection with mirrors: very interesting because it questions , time, reality and space. Photograph: obscure, conceptual. Film projection of the movie the fly on vulva while plucking pubic hair. Interesting to see that a projection is not beeing projected on a wall, but on a human body part. It makes it obscure, it asks questions to the viewer which is good. It also questions the medium itself( projection and video) Keep in mind the associations that other people have at seeing your work. It is not because you have and ideal meaning in your mind of what your work means, that other people have it as well. So that is something to keep in mind. Also the sound-audio of your video is something interesting to think about. It could be background sounds, music or sounds you make yourself, also important how a viewer would interpretate it. The sketches (drawings,collages) you made I also find interesting. They seemed more like a storyboard. You would think that sketches are more loose and spontanuous but the fact that you place and make them very focused tells alot about your personality, also something cool to work with! - Ellie Calis

Group Tutorial Feedback

Stephanie Hardy Written by Ellie Calis, Mira Gryseels Written by Stephanie Hardy

Mira Gryseel through my understanding investigates through her artistic practice the study of beauties aesthetics from a standpoint away from the artist’s critique, looking in addition at the juxtaposition of her work amongst the ‘White Walls’ of the Gallery to the ‘Kitsch’ home interior. Through the group discussion it was suggested possibly in order for this contrast to be more apparent there would have to be a more prominent reference, for example rather then the simplicity of supplying a backdrop to the work, possibly creating an entire interior, which becomes the embodiment of ‘Kitsch’ or alternatively more exaggerated ‘Gordy’ frames? A lengthy discussion took place in reference to the presentation of the work rather then the individual work’s themselves, viewing the presentation as an installation which then in turn brought into the scrutiny of the backdrop itself. Individuals during the discussion thought possibly it should be deliberated against the use of wallpaper and whether that would have been more suitable, as fabric holds a completely different quality and association and to be aware of what these associations might contribute to the work, positively something which Mira has already brought into question as part of her Extra Muros Exhibition. Further Points: - Sketches displayed as part of the presentation to demonstrate the initial stages of her current practice could be considered to be displayed in a more tangible way for the audience, for example as part of a book, fulfilling Miras appreciation of sketch book quality images. - The work featuring a exquisitely delicate necklace against a ‘Kitsch’ neon backdrop successfully embodies the discussion of beauty in relation to its setting and therefore I believe becomes the focal balance in her following investigations- Stephanie Hardy


Extra Muros Dossier

Stephanie Hardy

B. 23.12.92 Artist Statement and Curriculum Sheffield – London – Antwerp E-Mail: sehardy4u@hotmail.co.uk

Vitae

Statement

Statement

Entropy, the gradual decline of a system to the point of disorder, has been prominent in the theoretical concerns of my practice, concentrating on the inevitability of an equilibriums imbalance and irreversible change in state. This focus has manifested itself in works specific to the balance between the mind, memory and the physical body. My work has often fragmented the correspondence between audio and visual language, a relationship that consequently is unable to serve for its intended purpose, often focusing on the memories ability to retain basic information. Stemming from the literary metaphor of a fragmented unstable mind, subsequent to the paths of my concern, there is a dominant presence of the ‘Mirror’ amongst my practice whether literal or not, shattered or whole. Recently I my practice has gravitated towards self-perception of individual performativity, analyzing my unrevised sexuality as the gendered ‘subject’.

Education

Education

Sint Lucas Antwerpen, Belgium Sint Lucas Antwerpen, Belgium Erasmus Scholarship Bachelor Fine Art Open Studio Erasmus Scholarship Bachelor Fine Art Open Studio

Jan-May 2014 Jan-May 2014

Central Saint Martins- University of the Arts, London UK 2012-2015 Central Saint MartinsUniversity of the Arts, London UK 2012-2015 BA (Hons) Fine Art

BA (Hons) Fine Art Chesterfield College for Art & Design

2011-2012

Chesterfield for Art & Design ABC Diploma College in Art & Design (Distinction) ABC Life Diploma in Art(Passed) & Design (Distinction) ABC Drawing

2011-2012

ABC Print Life Drawing ABC Making (Passed) (Passed) ABC Print Making (Passed)

Exhibitions

Exhibitions

‘In Site’- Factor 44, Antwerp BE

April 2014

‘In Between Site’- Factor 44, Antwerp BE Art Pavilion, London UK April March 2014 2013 ‘In States’Mile End ‘In Between States’- Mile End Art Pavilion, London UK March 2013 ‘XD MMXIII’- Mile End Art Pavilion, London UK February 2013 ‘XD MMXIII’- Mile End Art Pavilion, London UK February 2013 ‘XD’- The The Annexe, Annexe, 34 34 Elthorne Elthorne Road, ‘XD’Road, London LondonUK UK ‘End of Year Show’- Chesterfield College of Art, UK ‘End of Year Show’- Chesterfield College of Art, UK

December 2012 December 2012 June 2012 June 2012

Community Projects

Community Projects

‘Plot Exchange’- Here in Archway, Archway London UK ‘Plot Exchange’- Here in Archway, Archway London UK


Intentions

Outside the Walls

Extra Muros encourages students in their final year of (BA) Fine Art as individuals or as part of a collaborative vision to present their practice in a space that is outside of the institution in which they are based, an alternative to the white walled Showroom. The assignment presents the opportunity to consider the site with equal diligence as the practice itself, a site that could further cultivate the context for which the work was intended. If the opportunity had arisen our intentions would have been to present our practice, Rose Leahy and I, in an external space that transpires within the societal and cultural bounds as an enacted utopic ‘space’ of already established ‘sites’, a Heterotopic location. Heterotopias exist however in reality outside on the public bounds as an inverse or neutralization of the principles they were constructed to portray. Our focus was on ‘sites’ that prior to there condition could have been


‘Heterotopias of Deviation’ or ‘Heterotopias of Illusion’, places that accommodate the uncustomary intrinsic mentalities of individuals whose concentrated behavior is outside the boundaries of acceptance e.g. places of incarceration or brothels. The practice we proposed to unveil encompassed these principles; ‘She disintegrated perfectly, but never reappeared’ provides a cloak of visionary spectacle to create an arena that exposes behavior, although common in their intentions of utopic faultlessness, not widely made accessible to an audience. ‘Ectopic Entities’ is the formation of a site in which the biological artifact has the ability to diversify its function at a non-physiological site, co-existing however with the original artifact at its correct anatomical location, consequential in the formation of a heterotopia.

in site

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1. Exposition 26.03.14 19.00-23.00 Factor 44 Bleekhofstraat 44, 2140 Antwerpen

1. Exposition 26.03.14 19.00-23.00 Factor 44 Bleekhofstraat 44, 2140 Antwerpen

in site

1

Jed Fielder Stephanie Hardy Rose Leahy

Jed Fielder Stephanie Hardy Rose Leahy

in site

Exposition 26.03.14 19.00-23.00 Factor 44 Bleekhofstraat 44, 2140 Antwerpen

in site

1

Exposition 26.03.14 19.00-23.00 Factor 44 Bleekhofstraat 44, 2140 Antwerpen Jed Fielder Stephanie Hardy Rose Leahy


1. Exposition 26.03.14 19.00-23.00 Factor 44 Bleekhofstraat 44, 2140 Antwerpen

in site

1

Jed Fielder Stephanie Hardy Rose Leahy


in site1 Through the collaboration of three artists, all of which choose a different directionality in their practice, we made the decision to produce ‘In Site1’, the blending of three entities, ‘Site’, ‘Sight’ and ‘Cite’. ‘Site’ became the prominent focus of the three primarily based on the exhibition consisting of site-specific artwork along with the collective standpoint of being in a site culturally different from our own, all of which were in reference to Extra Muros’ intention to encourage the presentation of our work within an alterative context. This theme continued in the aesthetical and conceptual decision in the promotion of the exhibition, in the production of three posters, all of which consisted of three varying designs of the tripod motif each drawn separately by the artists. The collaboration came about through aesthetic similarity in the production of the ‘object’ alongside comparative materiality. Although not all work corresponded conceptually there were contextual threads throughout including the performativity of gender evident between Ecoptic Entities (2014) and She disintegrated perfectly, but never reappeared (2014), along side the comparative manipulation of projection light in Veil (2014) and Surface Pleasure (2014). In Site1 was a nocturne event only available to audiences during the evening of 26th March (2014). Due to their being no natural light available during this time, we were presented with the opportunity to pay specific attention to the arrangement of the lighting with just as equal integrity to the space. The exhibition consisted of various different types of lighting, each chosen with an alternative purpose. In correspondence to the exhibitions intention; the joining of three entities, lights that were each designed for a specific application, were brought together in conjunction to the individual artists requirements. Lighting such as projections, construction lights, desk lamps and theatrical lighting each divided the space to create opposing atmospheres within the site. When in discussion to the curatorial decisions with lighting of the exhibition, issues that needed to be considered included the affect that the lighting of one work could have on another. It was evident through experimentation that different lighting choices could dramatically alter the ambience of the exhibition through the difference in their brightness and colour. Each work in turn was chosen through the creation of a narrative, a narrative aided by the graduation of lighting, which subconsciously designated the audience’s path. The exhibition commenced from within a dramatic instillation lit solely by the use of a beamer, chosen for its immersive qualities situating the audience immediately within an artwork. It was our intention that through the immediate captivation of an audience within a narrative, this would then lead onto the wider narrative of the exhibition as a whole, where the other spot lit artworks might become props or cues towards an overarching theme. The dim entrance was in contrast to the final room encountered by the audience, which focused on the presence rather then the absence of light. It was important that the conclusion to exhibition encompassed a collection of each aspect featured throughout the exhibition as a whole.


in site

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Veil (2014 ) Stephanie Hardy Film, projector, mirrors

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Ectopic Entity 10 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

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Diptera V (2014) Stephanie Hardy Analogue photograph, mirror

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Documentation Compression (2014) Jed Fielder 20 inkjet prints on A4 paper, found nails, tripod

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Diptera XIII (2013/14) Stephanie Hardy Analogue photographs, mirror

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Super Hydefinition Surfaces (2014) Jed Fielder Polystyrene, graphite, note book pages

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Rockystyrene (2014) Jed Fielder Found rock, polystyrene, two way mirrored perspex, bulldog clip

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Cropped Mantle Piece (2014) Jed Fielder Folded A0 paper, clear parcel tape

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Ectopic Entity 15 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

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Analogue surveyor (2014) Jed Fielder Masking tape, tin, cardboard, duct tape, black paper

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Ectopic Entity 14 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

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Untitled (2014) Jed Fielder Inkjet paper, masking tape

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Ectopic Entity 16 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

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Translocation (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

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Ectopic Entity 9 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

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Untitled (2013) Stephanie Hardy Analogue photo, mirror

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Ectopic Entity 6 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

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Diptera XXIII (2014) Stephanie Hardy Analogue photographs

Calibration Projection (2014) Jed Fielder Inkjet print on acetate, masking tape, overhead projector

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She disintegrated perfectly, but never reappeared. (2014) Stephanie Hardy Film, projection

Surface Pleasure (2014) Jed Fielder Crumpled A0 paper, Sharpie marker

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Ectopic Entity 3 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

Photography Object (2014) Jed Fielder Pin hole exposures on Harman direct photo positive paper

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Ectopic Entity 4 (2014) Rose Leahy Human hair, latex

Photography Object (negative) (2014) Jed Fielder Pin hole exposures on photographic paper


First Floor

Ground floor

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Bar

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Diptera V

(2014)- Analogue Photograph, Mirror and Torch Head

Factor 44 proposed the chance during ‘In Site1’ to present work in reference to the architectural features occupying the space. ‘Diptera V’ is a double exposed analogue photograph situated above visible distance on the fireplace mantle that defines the entrance to the exhibition only observable by the precise placement of an octagonal mirror. The photographs content was created through the optical deception of precision lighting against semi reflective Perspex allowing both the reflection of the subject and the image behind to remain perceptible. ‘Diptera’ deriving from Entomology refers to a large order of insects that encompasses the two-winged or true flies. The subject in context, in this case the Fly, is placed upon a podium due to its clarity in comparison to the background, revealing an image from which the subject originated. It was of my intent that the image was only observable by the method of a mirror, a fictitious moment that clarifies absolute reality of the audience, as in order for it to be perceived it has to pass through a virtual point from within the mirror. The mirror generates a placeless place, an arena in which the fly’s trajectory from its discursive foundation only articulates itself when in context to the rest of image, comparatively to its associative links generated by memory. The mirror reflection simultaneously depicts the tiers our memory creates during a period of time, tying them in associative bows in the cabinet of our history.

The ambiguous image behind the semi permeable Perspex is taken from a series of analogue photographs, one of which is featured in ‘Untitled’. In this particular series of images the subject, the fly, is transitioned from a two-dimensional projected image generated from three-dimensional footage into a fabricated discursive context created through my performative ‘reality’. The three-dimensional footage is a scene from Kurt Newmans (1958) ‘The Fly’, the pinnacle point when the fly emerges from a matchbox into predetermined sequence of events invovling the professor.


Diptera XIII

(2014)- Analogue Photographs and Mirror

‘Diptera XIII’, ‘Diptera V’ and ‘Diptera XXIII’ are all taken from the same analogue photography series and resultantly articulate almost identical properties conducted in a distinct approach. ‘Diptera XIII’ comprises of two analogue photographs positioned a considerable distance from one another, the first revealed to an audience when stood from the viewing perspective of the second image. The second image, in terms of its trajectory from the audience’s point of arrival situated above ‘Rockstyrene’, revolves the audience to an orientation in which the first image is noticeable, a position not immediately obvious from the spectators’ entrance. The second photograph is sporadically illuminated as the intensity of projected light, deflected from a strategically installed mirror fluctuates. Due to the irregularity of lighting the knowledge of the second photographs position may not be made evident to all who attended ‘in site1’. The documentation above captures this particular moment from the point I envisioned it to be perceived, leading the spectator by curiosity back through the installation to inspect the image they overlooked. The photograph mounted on the edge of the chimneybreast corresponding to ‘Diptera V’ used inconstant lighting against semi reflective Perspex to construct an intangible illusion consisting of multiple reflections and a withdrawing background. This incomprehensible background through close inspection is revealed to be the image from which the second image was unveiled.


Veil

(2014)- Film, Projector, Mirrors

‘Veil’ is the unique staging of a projection guided by the meticulous placement of mirrors. Situated as the initial encounter of ‘In Site1’, the audiences were consumed by an immediately immersive lucid atmosphere. The video work revealed through projection is the ambiguous narration of one subject’s transition from association to a point of significance within a cultivated discourse. The transitionally vague imagery was generated through the manipulation of light through semi-transparent reflective Perspex, similarly to its conclusive display. Throughout the relatively short video the cloak of comprehension repeatedly falls away to reveal the image it conceals. ‘Veil’ utilizes the projectors principal properties as a technique of sporadically revealing other works situated in the space, revealed through mirrors lying in the crevices. Broken mirrors metaphorically have been used throughout my practice as a illustration of the minds deterioration, a dominant influence through the witnessing of my grandfather subjection to Dementia. ‘Veil’ is the first piece that does not involve a mirror that is fragmented.


She disintegrated perfectly, but never


“In order to transcend culture our projected self has to act as a looking glass, rather then a mirror, of a social conventions, revealing a reality without morality and ethics.”

reappeared

(2014)- Film, Projection

‘She disintegrated perfectly, but never reappeared’ is the restyling of a previous work ‘The Fly’. ‘The Fly’ is a video projection inspired by Oscar Wilde’s ‘A Picture of Dorian Gray’, during which an individuals superimposition of memories become translucent to reveal their true reality. Throughout the duration of the video I systematically participate in a compulsive ritual specific to moments of stress and anxiety, during which there is a projection onto the female genital featuring the concluding scene to Kurt Neumann’s (1958) ‘The Fly’. The objective of the piece was not the ‘notion of shock’ but instead an experimentation in my own abilities to reveal or hint at the concealment of my reality. ‘The Fly’ is part of a larger volume of ongoing practice, which investigates theories of association and the ‘Encyclopedic Palace’.

“‘The Fly’ work was shocking in its subtlety with work left for the audience to do in order to understand what they were watching” - Anne Eggebert It was following this feedback that the decision was made by myself to reproduce the video installation, breaking down the cloak of concealment to bare its true intentions. Comparatively to ‘The Fly’ although the changes made were only subtle, the quality of cinematic imagery and comprehension of narrative were distinctly more sophisticated in their level of clarity in ‘She disintegrated perfectly, but never reappeared’. Throughout the collection of work featured ‘In Site1’ it has been my objective in the unconventional use of the projector and its properties. I aspired to construct an environment that was collectively dominant and uncomfortable in its physical capacity. Projected on a large scale upon the ceiling initiated the viewer to strain their neck to remove all peripheral vision and become fully immersed in the repetitively unpleasant setting. This engagement was aided by the tension generated by the concluding scenes theatrical plot, holding the attention of onlookers long enough to subject them the simultaneously distressing performance of self-refinement.


‘Diptera XXIII’ concludes this series’ contribution to ‘in site1’ employing techniques produced during a curational exercise involving the presentation of another students practice. ‘Diptera XXIII’ features two analogue photographs of dissimilar dimensions both observable from the audience’s most obvious route through the exhibition. When stood from a particular viewpoint in the space, both images join to form one entity that stimulates a narration between them. ‘Diptera XXIII’ communicates by the physical distance placed between both images and the photographs portrayal of depth amongst the still life objects themselves, the transition of a subjects’ status away from its derivation, the furthermost plane.

Diptera XXIII

(2014)- Analogue Photographs


Untitled

(2013) Analogue Photograph, Mirror

‘Untitled’ featured in the concluding space of the exhibition, re-explored the properties of projected light and its capacity to illuminate other works purely by the alignment of a mirror. This particular installation uses light already established within the space, curated without this specific intention, to expose a work placed on the opposing wall. ‘Untitled’ consists of one discreetly placed mirror that redirects the residue of light cast from an overhead projector essential in the construction of ‘Surface Pleasure’ ensuring not to impose or interact with the work in question.


Reflections from ‘in site1’-

(Images following an exhibition at f44(sic) on 2nd May (2014) by Harry Heirmans) Evidentially in the construction of ‘in site1’ there was a difference in the curational techniques from two particular perspectives of the concluding vision. These differing stand points unified into discussions that gave an opportunity to consider the alternative ways to the predetermined established rules of exhibition curation. This primarily originated from the re-articulation of the space from a site proposed to house wall installations to a dominantly object based exhibition. Having the audience’s attention being articulated to the objects rather then the dominant vacant walls encouraged the unconventional manipulation of light to suggest that smaller spotlighted works were occupying a vaster space. In reflection the feedback we received following the exhibition highlighted how we may have sidetracked the focus from the walls of the space with an over compensation of objects. In retrospect this was the catalyst to the discussions surrounding the manipulations of an audiences route around the works and whether this should be our consideration or theirs. We spoke of the curator’s role in the jurisdiction of an audience’s participation in the experience of work and the extent to which this power should be present. In conclusion to this is was the specific work itself that designated the necessity of this curatorial need; having sections of the site where the audience were not given the opportunity to diverse from a designated path and others partitions of the space through which they curated themselves around works viewable from a wider perspective.


Works that were presented in ‘in site1’ were a combination of pre existing works and those created in response to the site itself, some conceived in spaces already occupied by other site specific practice. For all artists involved we were confronted with our view in the definition between interaction and authorship of work. At what point does the artist feel their work has to be defined from the work of others when works physically intermingle? We discussed the theoretical compromise that could emerge from the morphing of two separate concepts, but decided rather then the creation of a conversation of two works because of its possible interest that this was not necessary unless one was able to layer, compliment and serve to enrich the other. This was evident when both works were misconceived as being from the same artists, as for this to be assumed there must have been a cohesive narrative between the two stemming from the same conceptual nucleus. This relationship was demonstrated by the ‘Ectopic Entity’ series along side ‘She disintegrated perfectly, but never reappeared’ in their shared investigations into gender performativity.


In Site Exhibition Program