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MODULE 4 STEPHANIE ANTONOPOULOS STUDENT NO: 587847

SEMESTER 1/2012

GROUP 8


IDEATION MODULE 4


“THE DETAILS ARE THE VERY SOURCE OF EXPRESSION IN ARCHITECTURE. BUT WE ARE CAUGHT IN A VICE BETWEEN ART AND THE BOTTOM LINE.” ARTHUR ERICKSON


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IDEATION

After attending Henry Segerman’s lecture, an inspirational push occurred in which the sketches created seemed to speak for themselves in representing life on earth.

SUBLE GROWTH, SPROUTING & FINAL WILTING

FLOW AND MOTION

ROOTS CENTRAL TO LIFE

Furthermore, the importance of sketching or scribbling any ideas was highlighted in the reading “Visual Thinking for Design” by Ware, Colin (2008).

FROM SEED TO BLOOM&DEATH

SHARPNESS OF RAPID GROWTH AND BLOOM

Life forms such as flowers grow in various different ways, shapes and forms. This was the concept to be explored. The overall aspect of a flowering plant was one that could be explored in many facets. It is a complex process involving various features of diversity and beauty dependant on the natural elements surrounding it.

SEED TO LIFE - TREE

natural process


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The importance of freehand sketches and ideas became obvious. The softness, harshness and mesmerising beauty of the concept were able to be translated onto paper.

CONCEPT IDEA

BIRD OF PARADISE

Within the first week of the subject, the readings by Phillip Ball allowed a further understanding within the world of design and planning. The idea within the readings, of natural versus synthetic, sparked creativity within the sketches and design.

PEONY FLOWER

the basis and central focus of the semester was to amalgamate the concept of a soft blooming flower and the harshness and beauty of the bird of paradise within the lantern design.

N A TURA L PR O CE S S – TH E B L O O M

I N S P I R A T I O N

IDEATION


IDEATION “The Bahá’í House of Worship in Delhi, India (also known as the Lotus Temple) is an example of the way in which modern architecture can be formed using nature as inspiration. This idea of creating a temple in a distinctive flower-like shape allows the structure to look elegant and captures the attention of many due to its unique construction.” - module 1

“the building captures the light in a unique way and are an abstract to the normal which is the aim of the project. In particular, The National Stadium (better known as The Birds Nest) is an abstraction of reality. It is a design based on an element in the environment around us. The designers have taken the idea of a birds nest and created a lantern- like structure.” - module 1

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Both structures can be related to the central context of the project. These two structures have successfully conveyed their messages through the design, form and lighting. This is the projects aim, however, it is intended to convey a message indirectly. These two structures were often a central focus point for inspiration and also a point of discussion of what not to do. Their elegance and beautiful natural form was an inspiration however the obvious element of nature in design was not as abstract as desired in this project.


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IDEATION

from paper

to plasticine

harsh flow

emphasis on design

final concept

smooth

by sketching over the plant, i was able to better understand the form, flow and sharpness of this plant

The final concept for module one was modelled with plasticine and moulded to fit the idea of the combination of the growth and bloom of a Peony flower with the inspiration of the Bird of Paradise within the design. This relationship between the two was quite beautiful and amazing.

silhouette

design concept


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IDEATION

How do forms and contexts (of use and resources) influence each other? Context overall is a vital component to the project in the way in which it creates a basis for the development and refinement f the project. The natural world was the key context of the subject. The chosen notion or object derived from the natural world was key within the design and was required to be reflected within the lantern created. As exemplified in both the Birds Nest Stadium in Beijing and the House of Worship in Delhi reflect the natural world and al its beauty within the designs. The context of venue and the usage in particular of certain lighting highlights and influences the design as beautiful, natural and unique structural façades. Similarly, the design within the project uses these structures as influence to begin to ponder the direction that will be taken. It allows the relationship between all elements to be considered and understood throughout the process Most importantly, it is VITAL not to over complicate or over think this initial stage as the simplest of ideas, thoughts and sketches are the most effective at relaying a message.

“A designer can mull over complicated designs for months. Then suddenly the simple, elegant, beautiful solution occurs to him.” - Leo Frankowski


DESIGN MODULE 4


“AT THIS PRESENT TIME, MATTER IS STILL THE BEST WAY TO THINK OF ARCHITECTURE, BUT I’M NOT SO SURE FOR VERY LONG. THE COMPUTER IS RADICALIZING THE WAY WE THINK ABOUT OUR WORLD.” BEN NICHOLSON


DESIGN

Every idea needs to come to life. It is part of the process in which this subject revolves around – the virtual world. The chosen design was to be transferred from a physical form into a digital object. The plasticine model created was now to be created as a lofted surface in rhino. The plasticine model was marked into sections and used to create a loft in Rhino. This in turn created a single NURBS surface

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DESIGN

A smooth surface of the bloom. The major problems did occur within the stage at which the model was created digitally. In a fast paced world like today, computers have become the centre of the virtual world and are often overshadowing or limiting ideas that can be created by a free mind. The initial concept was slightly altered within the program however the idea behind it was clear and evident in the loft. After hours of manipulation of the surface in Rhino, a smooth surface was achieved. This surface created a basis that was to represent the soft flow and ebb of a blooming peony flower and all its beauty. NumerÂŹous functions on rhino were utilised in order to achieve this. Primarily, the manipulation of control points and the use of the smooth command assisted in creating a desirable core and basis for the model.

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DESIGN

INITIAL CONCEPTS

PANELLING The use of panelling explored the depth to which the design could be explored. The paneling function allowed the design itself to come to life. Though experimentation, the desirable appearance was able to be created through trial and error. after days of experimenting with various panels and forms, the decision was made to have two layers with the base as a 2d panelled surface that was to have a 3D panelled design sitting on top. This combination of paneling designs highlighted the idea of the two concepts married as one.

IDEA 1

IDEA 1 – consisted of a impossible to fabricate paneling option IDEA 2 – captured the essence of the entire concept very well. Triangular holes: allow light to escape freely (representing life and beauty) whilst also representing the flow and softness of the peony bloom. Smooth base surface and size: the cycle of a bloom is one that starts off small and gradually and softly blooms to its maximum size and beauty sharp points of 3D paneling: represents the harsh more vibrant bloom of the bird of paradise. IDEA 2 - FINAL BASE AND PANELING Combination of the two: mould together very well to create a coherent flowing design that is both unique and creative in design

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DESIGN

In creating the model, the original idea is embedded yet not directly visible unless pointed out. This was the aim. The idea was to be hidden within the lantern so that apon analysis, this concept could be gradually uncovered.

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DESIGN

HOW DO DIFFERENT KINDS OF MEDIA SUPPORT TECHNICAL DESIGN DEVELOPMENT AND REFINEMENT?

The final design chosen was conveying a specific and particular concept. The idea of a blooming flower is capture within a still model. Every element including the shape, the size, the space and the light that will bring the lantern to life work coherently to portray the concept. In particular, the UNStudio’s Dazzling Dance Palace Theatre for the St. Petersburg Eifman Ballet was similarly conveying an idea of the beauty and softness with the “pierced walls that allow in light in a way that they represent lace.” Although a different idea, this stadium is conveying a particular idea through design and light control with open ‘piercings’ in the walls. Again, the facade of the structure is echoing the same concept. The entirety of the structure itself encapsulates the concept of the delicate lace throughout the design. the flow and smoothness they is conveyed within the project along with the considerstion of light assisting the design can be used to assist the devalopment and refinemnet of the lantern creted.

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“The role of architects may be uncertain, but the role of architecture is not. In order to look forward society may sometimes haveto look back. This it should do inorder to learnfrom previous mistakes and oversights and to preclude similar eventualities in the future. This does not imply historical dependency, as some would assert. The symbiosis of architecture and technology should prevail, engendered by honesty and integrity”. - Ian Murphy ‘The impact of the environment: the shock of the new’, in Ben Farmer and Hentie Louw (eds) Companion to Contemporary Architectural Thought (1993). This quote is a example of what technol¬ogy is capable of in architecture. This in particular allowed for further understanding within the project by looking back at my revious ideas or core central designs. The design itself needed the assistance of advanced technology with the beauty and history of architecture to convey it’s particular idea successfully and properly. Within the process, the modern technologies of today were able to fast track and perfect the design into a digital form whereby it can now be further manipulated and altered looking back in time at the initial ideas and concepts.


FABRICATION MODULE 4


“ARCHITECTURE IS A VISUAL ART, AND THE BUILDINGS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES.” JULIA MORGAN


FABRICATION BASE

MODEL

Unfolding

PANELING

When it was time to unfold the model, the overall shape of the model was very easy to manage. Although initially it was difficult to group individual faces in an efficient way, therefore, the process was time consuming and tedious. After using the spine as the major piece and splitting the rest of the model into sections, the pieces were labelled appropriately and coloured to match the model. The creation of a tiny prototype revealed that without the use of the spine section, the model proved to be unstable. It was also discovered that the shorter and wider the pieces are, the more strength was provided.

11 In regards to the unfolding of the panelling, this proved to be a bit more challenging. After experimentation, it was found that each segment (squares with 3 spikes) could be split into two sections labelled ‘a’ and ‘b’. Furthermore, all pieces were to be separate to one another so they could be easily attached to the core or base of the model. To assist with assembly of the model, each piece was labelled with a number and tabbed appropriately before submission into FabLab. I also labelled the original Rhino file with each of the strips having a distinctive colour which corresponded to the colour within the model (as pictured to the left)


FABRICATION

12 final FabLab file


FABRICATION DIFFICULTIES

prodotype “There are several reasons why models should be part of every design process. Perhaps the most important one is the understanding to be gained by seeing form in physical space.”

MISSING TABS

THICKER CARD TOO HARD TO WORK WITH - MINIMAL FLEXIBITLITY

-- Criss B. Mills, author of “Designing with Models”

TESTING, PROBLEMS AND ERRORS My prototype aimed to test out the overall structural features of the model and the type of card that was most suitable for the design. As quoted by Criss B. Mills, the process of creating a model is an important and vital step in assessing and understanding the design. This process allowed the initial concept and final design to come together as one in a coherent way.

MISSING SECTION

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FABRICATION IVORY CARD

first model The first model created was sent to the FabLab in order to be cut by the card cutter on ivory card. The main visual appeal of the model was to be the spikes however the model seemed too busy and crowded and was overshadowing the softness that needed to be highlighted within the design. The triangular cut-outs and lighting worked well in order to open the space and translate the idea of the flow and softness of a bloom within the model to bring the design to life.

BATTERY PACK HIDDEN SMOOTH FINISH PANELS BENT WELL

the spine itself is to be the central to the concept and needed to be blocked off with no holes however the spikes also needed to add depth and harshness to the design so to create the concept of the bird of paradise blooming in all its beauty. Furthermore, the tabs were sized similarly which created an even pattern of spines and space within the model when the light shone through the model highlighting the structure and form of a growing and blooming flower.

NEW PANEL DRAWN ONTO 13A

MODEL WITH SPIKE SPINE RUNNING FROM TOP TO BOTTOM - TOO BUSY


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FABRICATION

final model rebuild

design “This is my ride down the middle between harsh and gentle, between pushing too hard and going too easy, between staying cool and overheating, spinning away on my fixed gear machine. I’m still not acclimated to the heat, still feel the dessication as a little more discomfort than I wish, still feel the hot air going in and out of my lungs in not the best form that I can achieve, but it looks like this week will be a good training ground, with commutes home hitting 109°F before Friday. Better wear shorts, I guess.” - John Romeo Alpha in “That Harsh and Gentle Ride”

The final model was quite similar to the previous model with minor justifications in order to solve various problems and design errors. Like John Romeo Alpha’s bike journey, my model takes on a harsh yet gentle journey on which the two elements create a “good training ground” as they can often marry together quite well. The design changes undertaken in order to create a successful design was to minimise the harshness of the bird of paradise by removing the spiked panels from the spine. In turn, emphasis was then placed on the softness of the peony bloom whilst still keeping the spine as the central focus by blocking out the holes and creating a solid smooth surface with two lots of bursts of spiked panelled areas.


FABRICATION

final model lighting

‘Space has always been the spiritual dimension of architecture. It is not the physical statement of the structure so much as what it contains that moves us.” - Arthur Erickson The design was truly brought to life by the light. In the end, what’s a lantern with no light? The light emitted from the lantern was bright and vibrant. Depicting life on earth and a beautiful bloom requires a bright light. The shadows created are a complex system of picturesque shapes and forms depicting the complexity of a blooming flower in all facets.

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FABRICATION HOW DO DIFFERENT KINDS OF FABRICATION TECHNOLOGIES MAKE POSSIBLE, AS WELL AS CONSTRAIN, WHAT CAN BE CONSTRUCTED? Within a virtual world, certain elements of construction are limited and others limitless. The main material used within the design is the cardboard of which is a two dimensional form. Technology allows this form to take a form and life transforming a mere piece of cardboard into an intricate design with depth and a meaning. The use of technologies allows for a precise and accurate piece of work that can not always be reflected in freehand traditional drawings, sketches and designs. Often, technology can lead to the designer himself finding new paths and further exceeding his initial ideas and expectations as Jon McCormack’s evolutionary virtual creations discussed in lecture 11. This can also be reflect through the work presented. In a semesters worth of work, i myself have further exceeded my own expectations through the assistance of today’s groundbreaking technology.

Further to this, the Guggenheim building is a design which has been made possible through the use of technology in which the difference between the soft and harsh elements can be similar in many ways yet also differentiable creating a harmonious design where two elements combine well together. However, on the other hand, the use of technology can often limit ones creativity in the sense that creations and designs achieved by hand cannot always be translated directly into virtual data thus some of the aesthetic appeal or originality and diversity of the design can be lost in translation.

“RECURSIVE SUNFLOWER” - Jon McCormack

“Since its opening in 1959, the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed Guggenheim building has served as an inspiration for invention, challenging artists and architects to react to its eccentric, organic design.”


REFLECTION MODULE 4


“ARCHITECTURE AND PAINTING ARE CONCERNED NOT WITH THE NECESSARY BUT WITH THE CONTINGENT NOT WITH HOW THINGS ARE BUT WITH HOW THEY MIGHT BE - IN SHORT, WITH DESIGN.” HERBERT SIMON


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FABRICATION

How may representations and their material realisations be mutually dependent? Throughout the semester, a lot of thought and process was taken to covey a single idea. To define the natural process of a bloom and to mould the two different concepts that contrast yet complimented each other was explored in module 1, created in module 2 and brought to life in module 3 by various techniques, technologies and materials. The concept of taking something natural and alive and translating it into a form was challenging however, became easier in the process. With the use of various architectural precedence and inspirations, the underlying message was easy to explain and discuss. From sketches to models, there were many harmonious relationships between different facets of the overall concept and design. As expressed within Ball’s ‘Form’ reading, Adrian Parr explains how on Da Vinci “takes the relationship of nature to art onto a deeper level – intending to express in his art every kind of form produced in nature”. Similarly, the subject required us to embody the concept of nature and explore it deeply to create our own art. The piece must reflect the context in its entirety. Using this idea in particular, a strong connection was to be made between the design ideas, the virtual concept and the real-life model. In particular, the relationship between the initial ideas and the virtual model needed to bond and combine together in harmony.

Within the fabrication process, there were many elements such as the materials and technologies that needed to work together to produce a successful outcome. Lecture four in particular highlighted the way in which materials and processes work together to create a coherent successful design. Earl Pinto’s ‘Anise’ decorative lighting design was directly associated to the particular materials chosen. Furthermore, the constraints of the materials of European birch wood placed certain limiting factors hat with consideration could be analysed and worked around. These factors along with the given audience, the spatial limitations and the environment for the design had an impact on the final representation. Such mutually dependent elements were highlighted within the lantern project for Virtual Environments. Through all stages, there were restricted material requirements such as the black or white card and the natural process that needed to be considered and weaved into the design. Furthermore without the help of modern technologies such as Rhincerous 3D and the FabLab which assisted the tight linked relationship between all aspects of the project.


FABRICATION

Within this subject, I have allowed myself to explore my creativity and I myself believe I have far exceeded my initial expectations. In this short amount of time, I have learnt so much about myself, my creativity and few of the limitless technologies that today can offer us. There were various aspects of which did not appeal to me however, with time management becoming increasingly efficient as the course went on, I no longer had to be a nocturnal creature. Many new ideas and concepts were introduced through lectures, tutorials, readings and my own individual research.

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What are the learning outcomes of this subject and its relevance to your further studies and future?

Not only has this subject allowed me to further develop my design skills but has also assisted in my communication and dedication to my work. I have also become more organised and have learnt the management of time is key when dealing with architectural I was strikingly surprised by the projects. These skills in particular way in which learning was so will be very useful and important fast passed and enjoyable when going into the workforce throughout the semester. Virtual in the future when dealing with Environments has allowed me any project and day to day to understand the world of architecture with clear open eyes. discussion and communication This semester made it clear to me between myself and the clients. that architecture is a career I most Most importantly, the critique definitely would like to pursue in of my own work became an my future. Primarily, the use of easy task as time progressed. I Rhino, InDesign and Photoshop was able to undertake this task have been great learning tools creating a platform of knowledge and explain myself. I focused on comparisons and backing up in preparation for larger more powerful CAD programs within my my reasoning with architectural evidence and designs. future.

“In addressing a task, one almost always has several possible options, sometimes only a few, and they may all be practical and functional. But they lack the aesthetic aspect that raises it to architecture.� - Arne Jacobsen Architecture, i have learnt, is not something that can be thrown together in a few days or one night, but something that takes time, effort and dedication to reflect yourself and your ideas in a beautiful ways.


“ALL ARCHITECTURE IS GREAT ARCHITECTURE AFTER SUNSET; PERHAPS ARCHITECTURE IS REALLY A NOCTURNAL ART, LIKE THE ART OF FIREWORKS.” GILBERT K. CHESTERTON

module four.  

the final module for semester 1.

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