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Connections Brighton Secondary School

Connecting with the past, building the future

2014 will be long remembered in Brighton Secondary School’s illustrious history.

Principal Comments

This year, we officially opened the magnificent Bright Centre, a state-of-theart learning facility and the Concert Hall with its award-winning acoustics. We completed the redevelopment of the old canteen into Physical Education spaces and a Spin Room; refurbished Science laboratories and Reception; relocated offices; external painting of buildings and the reinvigoration of the Spence Hall into a Senior Student Centre. Throughout the year, students and staff worked around dust and demolition noise, patiently awaiting the transformation to creative learning spaces. No one was disappointed with the outcome, especially the Year 8 students who were privileged to learn in the Bright Centre. All students have had many opportunities to show initiative and demonstrate their creative and critical thinking skills. For example, the Think Bright class in its inaugural year, has proved to be a most successful model to develop teacher teams and student-led learning. The students and staff in the Think Bright program have developed approaches to challenge-based learning to share with all Year 8 stakeholders. The team successfully produced an iBook which was uploaded onto iTunes. Students have been involved in challengebased learning in many different subjects. With the Technologies and Art teachers, the students designed and built creative furniture and sculptures to scatter throughout the lanes between buildings. These laneways are called Learning Laneways where an environment is created to provide for innovative short lessons during lunch time. Students in Years 9 to 12 have been fortunate to learn with a laptop since 2010 and in 2014 I am delighted that finally Year 8 students have been brought on board with their own mobile device. I thank the parents for agreeing to purchase an iPad for their child. At school, students learn how to engage with Asia in all their subjects as required in the Australian Curriculum. Students from the Student Leadership Council organised and publicised the successful Moon Lantern Festival with our Holdfast Partnership Schools and Kindergartens. The festival brought

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the wider Holdfast Council community together in a joyful celebration of intercultural understanding. Many students raised money through a variety of activities connected to understanding Asia to build a kindergarten for deserving children in Cambodia. Year 10 and 11 students personally built sections of the kindergarten when they travelled to Cambodia with the World Challenge Organisation. Students designed questions and composed the music for the inaugural Brighton Q & A (Question & Answer) event in the Brighton Theatre. A panel of experts discussed the premise that, ‘The Age of Entitlement is Over’. As parents and staff remain concerned about student safety on the Net and their capacity to make safe decisions, the Q & A event combined associated contemporary issues like privacy, work prospects, health and tertiary options. The community responded so positively to the Q & A it will become a bi-ennial event at Brighton Secondary School. Year 8 student, Charlotte Rayner, organised the highly acclaimed Biggest Morning Tea to raise money for cancer research. His Excellency the Governor, Kevin Scarce, accepted her invitation to attend as the special guest. Charlotte also secured Channel 9 to promote the event then broadcast it on the news. The delicious and abundant food provided to 550 Year 8 and 9 students was donated through her strategic planning. continued on page 2


CONNECTIONS

Principal Comments

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We were most grateful to His Excellency who attended the school a second time to present awards to the outstanding Music students who learn in the four Special Interest Music Schools. Students seem to have such a great time at Brighton that each member of the Principal Team became a student for a day, dressed in school uniform, following school rules. It was eye-opening for our team to view the school through the students’ eyes. We all concluded school is tiring! Brighton students continue the proud tradition, to ‘Do All Things Well’ through their learning, their participation in sport and their leadership like all those students before them since 1952. David Cranston Munt, old scholar and Chairman of Adelaide Airport Limited passed away in 2013. To honour his memory and his contribution to society, the Adelaide Airport Board established the generous $10,000 David Cranston Munt Scholarship for a deserving Brighton Secondary School graduate entering a double degree with Law. The first graduates to receive this wonderful scholarship, Audrey Lian and Rachel Shearer, will enter university in 2015. Old scholars continue to shine on the national and international stage. Widely considered the world’s most prestigious scholarship, the Rhodes Scholarship is offered to selected students from around the world to attend Oxford University. The scholarship is awarded to a graduate with outstanding character who has excelled academically. We are so proud that old scholar, Kelli Staite, was awarded the 2015 Rhodes Scholarship to continue her work in Pure Mathematics at Oxford University. Kelli was the 2009 Dux of the school and an accomplished athlete with a humble and generous character. Another old scholar, Matt Wenham, won the Rhodes Scholarship in 2005. Clearly an education at Brighton Secondary School prepares students for an ever changing world where creativity, communication and critical thinking are valued skills.

Biggest Morning Tea

2014 highlighted our success in recruiting award-winning teachers. Science teacher, Jeremy LeCornu, won the Teacher Excellence of the Year in 2013 and travelled to America to learn more about Flipping the Classroom, an approach that allows students to access lessons from their teachers on their laptops anywhere and anytime. To support this methodology a Recording Studio was created in the new library for teachers to film parts of their lessons and thus ‘Flip the Classroom’. Jeremy was also the winner of the 2014 Australian Technology, Science and Engineering Teacher of the Year Award. Science teacher, Samantha Moyle, not only won the Engineering Scholarship and the Early Career STEM Teacher award, but she also won the prestigious 2014 Early Career Teacher of the Year. Science teacher, Gerald Little was the state nominee for the BHP Billiton Science Teacher of the Year award. Thanks to the strategic action of Jeffrey Kong, Head of Music, a small Brighton Choir represented Australia at the Flanders 1000 Voices where the students performed a complex repertoire to a rapt audience at the Dawn Service in Belgium. The students were proud to be the only school representing Australia on this world stage. In 2014, Brighton Secondary School continued its proud tradition to ‘Do All Things Well’.

Olivia O’Neill Principal

Kane and Olivia

1000 Voices in Belgi um


Student Leadership

CONNECTIONS

The Student Leadership Council is made up of passionate students from Years 10 to 12. It is a great opportunity to become a leader, develop personally and give back to the local and wider community. 2014 has been a fantastic and productive year for SLC, whose main focus was the construction of a kindergarten in Cambodia. We had a vision ‘To Be the School that Built a School’. To support this initiative, we organized a range of activities throughout the year including the Box It appeal, Dress for a Cause Days, Sausage Sizzles, Bake Sales, the Moon Lantern Festival, Op Shop Day and the sale of Year 12 shirts. Student Representatives Year 11 Martin Oakley Roan Johnson Edward Miller Elijah Tardio Daniel Williams Bridie Armour Alexandra James Mia Krecu Anyue Lang Phoebe Wittwer-Smith

Head Prefects Olivier Beaumont - Head Prefect Audrey Lian - Head Prefect Lachlan Tyler-Dowd - Deputy Prefect Bec Whetham - Deputy Prefect

Year 10 Sean Henschke Marcus Falckh William Wright Celine Chia Aishya Foley Justine Zatorski

Prefects Daniel Akers Chris Buckley Sung Min Bae Ella Bergoc Zoe Lee Shannon Pearce

Buffalo

Cygnet

Holdfast

Rapid

Year 12

Lewis Warland Haylee Tisher

Dylan Cox Renee Kosonen

Lachlan Tyler-Dowd Celestina Dona

Cody Kumnick Chloe Taylor

Year 11

Chris Beaty Taylor Hards

Tylah Kendall Saxon Klass

Jacob Kamara Liza Kashtaeva

Drew Crichton Molly Duncan

Year 10

Brian Lian Eloise Jones

Ryan France Haylee Arnott

Caspian Weekley Sam Franson

Travis Collins Maddie Tierney

Year 9

Cadence Brooke

Cameron Edwards Caitlin Francis

Connor Gurr Stella Batelaan

Callum Neilson Tahlia Kalleske

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Old Scholar Awards

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2014 Dux of the School Maddison Sims This certificate is awarded in recognition of the most outstanding level of academic achievement in Year 12 studies in 2014. Maddison is a very worthy recipient of this prestigious award. Maddison excelled in all chosen areas of study, achieving a very impressive set of results. The Brighton Secondary School congratulates Maddison on her excellent achievements.

Maddison Sims

Year 11 Friends of Brighton Secondary School Old Scholars Award Martin Oakley This award is presented by the Old Scholars of Brighton Secondary School to a Year 11 student who has demonstrated leadership and citizenship qualities in the school community. Martin has demonstrated to his teachers and peers an exemplary level of commitment to study, observance of school policy, involvement in extra-curricular activities and service to the school and wider community. He brings honour to Brighton Secondary School.

Martin Oakley

Martin is a most worthy recipient of this award in 2014.

Year 12 The Friends of Brighton Secondary School The Fac Omnia Bene Old Scholar’s Award Dylan Bentley Dylan has demonstrated to a very high degree the school values of cooperation, excellence, fairness, integrity, respect and responsibility.

Dylan Bentley


Staff Congratulations

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Congratulations to the following Staff Maj-Lis Borgen-Smith • 2014 Mentor Teacher Award, Knowledge Jeremy LeCornu • Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, SA Division 2014 Teacher Award Gerald Little • South Australian nomination for the BHP Billiton Science and Engineering Teacher Award Sam Moyle •  Science Excellence Awards SA Early Career STEM Educator of the Year, School Teaching •  SA Excellence in Public Education Awards, Teachers Health Fund Early Career Teacher of the Year

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School Expansion

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The invited guests were almost overwhelmed when they entered the breathtaking auditorium of the Concert Hall with its magnificent award-winning acoustics. They were equally impressed by the Bright Centre and its contemporary learning spaces in the library, the science laboratories, the glass walled classrooms and the sunny common learning areas overlooking the courtyard. Architects, Thomson Rossi and Mossop Constructions captured our vision for the state-of-the-art project that will take Brighton Secondary School into the future. Business Manager, Sandra Hall, took a lead role and was a key player in the success of this project. The students are to be congratulated for their patience and attention to their studies throughout the Expansion Project. After a year in an alternative staffroom in Spence Hall, the staff love their new comfortable and stylish staffroom in which to recharge. The last phase of construction includes the restoration of Reception and the transformation of Spence Hall into a Senior Student Centre for Year 11 and 12 students, due for completion May 2015.

Guests included: Hon. Jennifer Rankine, Minister for Education and Child Development Matt Williams, Member for Hindmarsh Andrew Southcott, Member for Boothby David Speirs, Member for Bright Duncan McFetridge, Member for Morphett Corey Wingard, Member for Mitchell Ken Rollond, Mayor of City of Holdfast Bay Architects - Thomson Rossi Builders - Mossop Constructions Department of Education and Child Development staff Principals, local schools Directors, local kindergartens Governing Councillors

The Minister for Education and Child Development, the Hon. Jennifer Rankine, officially opened the new Bright Centre and the Concert Hall on 31st October, 2014.


CONNECTIONS

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Sports

Day

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RECORDS BROKEN EVENT

WHO

HOUSE

OLD RECORD

NEW RECORD

100m Yr 8 Boys

Hamish Petherick

Buffalo

12.57sec

11.27 sec

100m Yr 9 Girls

Gwen Humphreys

Rapid

12.93 sec

12.87 sec

200m Yr 8 Boys

Hamish Petherick

Buffalo

26.15 sec

25.19 sec

400m Yr 8 Boys

Hamish Petherick

Buffalo

60.93 sec

56.93 sec

High Jump Yr 10 Boys

Jackson Tilley

Holdfast

1.77m

1.86m

High Jump Yr 9 Girls

Caitlin Francis

Cygnet

1.47m

1.50m

Javelin Yr 8 Girls

Alicia Miller

Holdfast

23.98m

26.71m

Long Jump Yr 8 Boys

Hamish Petherick

Buffalo

5.07m

5.10m

Triple Jump Yr 8 Boys

Hamish Petherick

Buffalo

10.05m

10.33m

Triple Jump Yr 8 Girls

Rebecca Catt

Cygnet

9.02m

9.57m

4 X 100m Yr 8 Boys

Ruben Barry

Buffalo

55.20 sec

54.72 sec

Hamish Petherick Spencer Holdback Jay Muecke

FINAL SCORE:

GIRLS INDIVIDUAL WINNERS

HOLDFAST 1715 CYGNET 1352 RAPID 1289 BUFFALO 1264

YEAR 8

YEAR 9 YEAR 10 OPEN

GIRLS

HOUSE

POINTS

Winner

Rebecca Catt Bethany Lane

Cygnet Buffalo

46

R/U

Ava Harris

Holdfast

42

Winner

Caitlin Francis

Cygnet

48

R/U

Stella Batelaan

Holdfast

46

Winner

Katie Gardner

Rapid

48

R/U

Olivia Griffiths

Buffalo

46

Winner

Cel Dona

Holdfast

50

R/U

Tylah Kendall

Cygnet

44

HOUSE

POINTS

BOYS INDIVIDUAL WINNERS BOYS YEAR 8 YEAR 9 YEAR 10 OPEN

Winner

Hamish Petherick

Buffalo

50

R/U

Thomas O'Connell

Cygnet

36

Winner

Ossie Tyler-Dowd

Cygnet

48

R/U

Jay Seo

Holdfast

44

Winner

Jackson Tilley

Holdfast

50

Cygnet

R/U

Ryan France

Winner

Lachlan Tyler-Dowd Holdfast

44

R/U

Jack Whaley

39

Cygnet

42


CONNECTIONS

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Special Interest Volleyball

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Achievements Australian Volleyball Schools Cup Championships - Melbourne Tour 8 days - 21 teams entered Brighton Secondary School won Overall Australian Champion Volleyball School. Named 2014 Girls Champion School of Australia. 16 teams won medals 5 Gold, 8 Silver and 3 Bronze.

South Australian Schools Cup Champion School Trophy Brighton Secondary School was named as Winner of the South Australian Schools Cup Champion School Trophy.

Year 10 Pairs Beach Competition

Year 10 Pairs Beach Competition at Glenelg, 2 Gold Medals and 3 Silver Medals.

Indoor Volleyball

5 Females and 3 Males selected in Australian Junior Teams that toured overseas for Indoor Volleyball during this year.

Knockout Volleyball Open Knockout Volleyball Girls and Boys Teams both won Gold Medals. Year 10 Knockout Volleyball Boys Team won Gold Medal, Girls Team won Silver Medal.

Volleyball SA VSA Year 9 Beach 4 Gold Medals and 3 Silver Medals. VSA Year 8 Beach 4 Gold Medals and 3 Silver Medals.

SIV Performace Awards Boys Year 8 Edward Beinke Year 9 Connor Gurr Year 10 Jackson Holland Year 11 Mitchell Wakefield Elijah Tardio Girls Year 8 Ashleigh Bussenschutt Year 9 Danielle Mun Year 10 Madeline Tierney Haylee Arnott Year 11 Phoebe Wittwer-Smith Amy Czernich-Pearce

SIV Recognition Awards Boys Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11

Thomas O’Connell Thomas Jones Otis Carthy Thomas Wass Mitchell Brown Jarred McEvoy

Girls Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11

Tabitha Howat Torz Mensforth Casey Muirhead Rachel Reeve

Year 8/9 Knockout Volleyball Boys Team won Gold Medal, Girls Team won Silver Medal.

Volleyball Captains Jack Whaley - Captain Kelly van der Linde - Captain Cody Kumnick - Vice Captain Jessica Jones - Vice Captain

mpionships Australian Volleyball Schools Cup Cha


CONNECTIONS

Eyre Peninsula Tour Year 9 Eyre Peninsula 5 Day Cultural and Community Tour to Ceduna, Koonibba and Streaky Bay, 42 Year 9 students participated along with 2 Year 11 Mentor students.

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CONNECTIONS

New Events & Programs

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Think Bright This year 25 Year 8 students began their quest as the inaugural Think Bright class. The Think Bright program seeks to extend students’ creative and critical thinking abilities to enrich the learning experience of students who have demonstrated initiative, leadership, problem solving capabilities and an interest in rigorous learning. They stay together for their core subjects and teachers develop a curriculum that includes the extensive use of thinking tools, cross-curricular planning, a Gifted and Talented Study day, challenge-based learning and special projects such as the Write-a-Book-in-a-Day competition. Throughout the year students completed many challenges and tasks, some of which were harder than others and all were very useful for personal development and knowledge. One of the tasks students completed as a class was a challengebased learning activity where they had to create or raise the identity of a group in the community. The class attended a lecture at Concordia College, run by Julia Ayrliss from Oxford University, England. Oxford is one of the most prestigious and respected universities in the world. To be able to listen and learn from one of its graduate students was brilliant. Another big event for students was the Write-aBook-in-a-Day contest. In groups of eight, they had to plan, write, illustrate, edit and format a novel within twelve hours. The students are looking forward to participating in this program again next year. They strongly recommend the Think Bright program to anyone who would like to be challenged and stretched to think deeply about topics and issues.


New Events & Programs

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The Biggest Morning Tea The Biggest Morning Tea held on 22nd May was an outstanding success by any measure. Year 8 student, Charlotte Rayner, honoured her auntie who died from cancer by organising a Biggest Morning Tea fundraiser for cancer research. The school raised $2,368.00 for the Cancer Council of SA. Charlotte’s grandmother, Paula Coward, and the many volunteers, helped her to make it an extraordinary event. His Excellency Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce, Governor of South Australia, and Mrs Scarce accepted our invitation as did Jayne Johnston, Chief Education Officer, DECD, the Mayor of Holdfast Bay, Ken Rollond, and his wife and Channel 9 news.

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CONNECTIONS

New Events & Programs

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Q & A Event Brighton Secondary School held its very own and first ever “Q and A” event on the topic “The Age of Entitlement is Over” in the Brighton Theatre on Thursday 23rd October. The panel included Tony Harrison, Chief Executive, Department for Education and Child Development; Laurel Papworth, Social Media Analyst; Alison Barrett, Journalist and Young Entrepreneur; Ric Schultz, Youth Justice Sergeant Sturt Crime Prevention Unit; Professor Martin Westwell, Director 21st Century Science Department, Flinders University and Natalya Giffney, Consultant for the Safe Schools Coalition. The very enthusiastic media personality Kelly Nestor hosted the “Q and A” in a highly professional and engaging way and, along with the panel and the TV-like atmosphere, made this evening a truly memorable event. Panel members were presented with questions covering a broad range of topics impacting young people and their families, ranging from education, health, work, lifestyle, social media and gender diversity. The audience included a broad range of community organisation representatives as well as politicians, academics, parents, students and staff.

The Q and A event began as a way of promoting school safety and student wellbeing and recognising the fact that parents and the wider community have a role to play in this. Two education grants, one a parent initiative, the other a student initiative, provided further incentive. A small group of staff, students and a Governing Council member, Jacquie Squires, developed the event over time which included selecting the panel and host, as well as considering the range of questions submitted. I would like to acknowledge music student Rhys Williams who composed the event’s musical theme and Marcus Falckh who created the visual effects and was our floor manager for the evening. Tony Jones, Mr Q and A himself, emailed to wish the school good luck for the event and said, ... “That is so cool...it makes us very proud that others have taken up the public democracy format … engagement with ideas and public debate is fundamental to that democracy.” We intend entering the Brighton Secondary School Q and A event into the 2014 City of Holdfast Bay’s Event of the Year.

Jill Brindley Assistant Principal


New Events & Programs

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Subs in Schools Brighton Secondary School has been invited to participate in the Future Submarine initiative as part of Re-engineering Australia’s push to support and develop STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) programs in Australia. There are three students this year who will present their submarine to the Australian Engineers Convention in Melbourne, as part of their Stage Two Technology course. Next year will see the RC Submarine course offered to Year 11 students.

eChallenge Two student teams entered the entrepreneurship eChallenge program for schools held in conjunction with the University of Adelaide. The teams were required to create a product or business with the potential to be successful in the real world. The teams’ ideas were the creation of free mobile calls and a watch that monitored the condition of people’s hearts and sent out GPS locations to emergency services if the person’s heart rate indicated they were in trouble. The Year 11 team ‘BrightLife’ won 2nd prize overall and won the major prize of a ‘Day at Microsoft’ with their heart watch concept.

Year 11 Brightlife Team

The Year 10 team ‘Alequam’ won the Best Presentation Award.

Year 10 Alequam Team

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New Events & Programs

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Moon Lantern Festival 2014 was the first year of the Department for Education and Child Development’s new Partnership Model for schools and pre-schools. Brighton Secondary School became part of the Holdfast Partnership comprising Brighton, Glenelg, Paringa Park, St Leonards and Warradale Primary Schools and Warradale, Ballara Park, Oaklands Estate, Seacliff Community, Somerton Park, Baden Pattinson, Dover Gardens and Dunbar Terrace Kindergartens. The 14 sites work together to improve outcomes for children and young people from birth to Year 12. In 2014, Brighton Secondary School was successful in applying for a Federal Asia Education Foundation grant to further explore the Australian Curriculum and especially, the Curriculum Priority to Engage with Asia. Brighton Secondary School joined with Brighton and Warradale Primary Schools to increase intercultural understanding through service. With the benevolent support of Paul and Aileen Munn, the students embarked on a variety of Asia-related projects to raise money to build a kindergarten in Cambodia.

Their work was so successful, the Holdfast Partnership decided to combine resources and run a community event for the wider Holdfast Council area. The event raised awareness of intercultural understanding, engagement with Asia and was a fun activity to bring people of all ages together in celebration. Thus the Moon Lantern Festival was realised. Over 1000 people attended on the 23rd September, 2014 gathering at Wattle Park Reserve to walk to Brighton Jetty with lanterns held high. The atmosphere was joyful and the procession was colourful. Channel 9s Virginia Langeberg delivered the weather against the spectacle of colourful lanterns outstretched along the jetty. Special acknowledgement goes to parent, Jimi Krecu, who imported 600 lanterns to sell in the schools and kindergartens. Given that the Adelaide Moon Lantern Festival was cancelled the previous week due to bad weather, Brighton’s Moon Lantern Festival gave the wider community another opportunity. Improvements for 2015 will include music, entertainment and food stalls at the jetty. Future annual Moon Lantern Festivals will continue to highlight the leadership of students and staff at Brighton Secondary School.


New Events & Programs

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Music Trip to Belgium Ten Special Interest Music students, 2 staff and 5 parents travelled to Flanders in Belgium in November to attend the 1000 Voices for Peace concert. 1000 Voices for Peace conveys a powerful message of solidarity and determination to fulfil the mission set out in the opening words of the United Nations Charter: ‘to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war’. There were magical moments of pure emotion from so much harmony and beauty. What made the musical project of fellowship unique is the pure commitment of everyone involved. Every participant will surely treasure the lasting memory of this musical and emotional response to the horrors of World War I.

Jeff Kong Head of Music

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New Events & Programs

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World Challenge - Building a school in Cambodia After launching the Cambodia World Challenge in 2013 two teams formed. The students were challenged with the theme ‘ordinary people achieving something extraordinary’. Their challenge was to raise their own funds to travel to Cambodia. The expedition involved four phases. First, the acclimatisation phase, second, a trek in the mountainous jungle, third, to be involved in building a kindergarten and finally cultural engagement in a rest and relaxation phase. To prepare for this expedition, students met weekly to plan the program, participated in fitness activities and took part in a training expedition. Fundraising activities, including a quiz night, were undertaken to raise $6,000 for the kindergarten charity. During after school briefings, staff developed ‘in country’ scenarios which students discussed to develop their personal leadership capacity. The final pre-departure check took place two weeks before leaving for Cambodia. Each backpack was unpacked, carefully scrutinised and repacked with just the essentials for the twenty-five day trip. Students were extremely proud of being part of this amazing experience.

The Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia Australian Curriculum propriety saw Paul and Aileen Munn invited to Brighton Secondary School to talk about their work in Cambodia relocating and supporting families from the rubbish tips of Phnom Penh. ‘Schools building schools in Cambodia’ become a catch phrase at Brighton Secondary School and the journey to build a kindergarten in Cambodia began. The Student Leadership Council raised money and two teams of World Challenge students travelled to Cambodia to assist in the building of the kindergarten with $20,000 raised by Brighton students.


Rhodes Scholarship

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Kelli Francis-Staite (2009) Adelaide University mathematics student Kelli Francis-Staite is the 2015 South Australian Rhodes Scholar • by: Tim Williams Education Reporter • From: The City • October 09, 2014 10:35PM Maths whiz Kelli Francis-Staite is SA’s Rhodes Scholar for 2015 - she also has a love for surf life saving. For a passionate surf lifesaver, moving from Adelaide to a landlocked English city with miserable weather seems like a bad idea. But Kelli Francis-Staite has very good reason to be over the moon about the prospect of living in Oxford. The 22-year-old Adelaide University pure mathematics student was yesterday announced as South Australia’s Rhodes Scholar for 2015. For three years she will rub shoulders with the some of the world’s best academic minds as she completes a doctorate in her field of differential geometry, nutting out solutions to Einstein’s Field Equations to expand knowledge about curves of gravity, time and space. While she is still in “complete shock” about her achievement and the career opportunities it will bring, the longtime Brighton Surf Lifesaving Club member is already planning to join the Oxford University Lifesaving Club, though she knows training and competing in the pool won’t be the same.

“That’s going to be one of the hardest things to deal with,” she says. “I will miss the hot sunny weather and the desire we have to go to the beach the whole time.” A Brighton local, Ms Francis-Staite has won a scholarship before — a volleyball scholarship to Brighton Secondary School. She was a promising netballer and swimmer too before a series of devastating injuries as a teenager, including two knee reconstructions, redirected her ambitions from sport into academia. “It was a great loss to me to not continue with netball, but I do look at how far I’ve come and see it as a sort of blessing in disguise,” she says. The Rhodes scholarship, which Ms Francis-Staite estimates is worth $85,000, recognises her character, leadership ability and commitment to community service as well as academic excellence. Once she could no longer play netball she turned to coaching. In lifesaving, she has managed nippers’ groups as well as beach patrolling, while achieving world title success in the march past discipline. Ms Francis-Staite also inspires high school students through the outreach program of Adelaide University’s School of Mathematics. Already a seasoned traveller who has visited 20 countries, she will take advantage of her UK base to attend conferences across Europe. She hopes to secure postdoctoral research positions in Europe and the UK before eventually returning to Australia, ideally to become a professor at Adelaide University.

Kelli Francis-Staite Picture: Mike BURTON Source: News Corp Australia

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Rhodes Scholarship

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Matt Wenham (1994-1998) Matt’s policy on science Sunday, 20 January 2013, 6:34:44 AM | Candace Gibson 2005 Rhodes Scholar Matt Wenham has enjoyed a varied career path, using his science degree to teach high school students in rural Malawi before crossing continents to Washington DC where he now works for a non-profit think tank that links scientists and policy makers. Name: Matt Wenham Secondary and tertiary education Brighton Secondary School, 1998

details:

University of Adelaide − Bachelor of Science (Molecular Biology), 2001; Bachelor of Science (Honours), Biochemistry, 2003 Monash University − Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary), 2005 University of Oxford − Doctor of Philosophy, cell biology, 2009 Why did you choose undergraduate degree?

Adelaide

for

your

I wanted to study at a top class university, but stay close to my family in Adelaide and the various activities I was involved in. Adelaide also had a great selection of science subjects and researchers, which was very attractive. Apart from your academic qualifications, how did your experience at the University of Adelaide shape you as a person?

What has been your career path since then? After finishing my DPhil (PhD), my wife and I worked for a development organisation in rural Malawi for three months, where I taught science to high school students and ran teacher training programs. Following that, we moved to the United States, where I took up a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health just outside Washington, DC. After my NIH fellowship, I was offered a position as an Associate Director with the Institute on Science for Global Policy, a non-profit think tank that works to improve the links between scientists and policy makers. In this role, I work with government officials and distinguished scientists from around the world on science and technology challenges that have a critical influence on key public policy issues. How has the Rhodes Scholarship changed your life? Aside from the wonderful experiences I had whilst at Oxford and the great friends I made there, the Scholarship has helped to open a number of doors career-wise that I might not otherwise have had. The Rhodes is extremely well known and respected in the US, so this has been very helpful in moving out of research into the policy field. Advice to incoming students to gain the most from their time at university

By staying in Adelaide, I was able to keep up my involvement with many of the groups and organisations I had developed links with. I also had the opportunity to participate in sport, music and leadership activities through the University.

Although the academic side of uni is very important, the extracurricular activities are possibly even more important. Make sure you take advantage of all the other opportunities available through the University and outside of it.

Details of scholarships (including Rhodes and any others)

Any tips for new graduates on choosing their employment path?

Rhodes Scholarship, Australia-at-Large, 2005

The most important thing for me has been finding a field that I am passionate about, which happens to be science policy. It’s much easier to follow a career path if you enjoy what you’re doing, even if the path is difficult. Try to find the sort of work you enjoy in a field that interests you, through internships, work experience or volunteer work. Finally, don’t feel limited by the specific degree you’ve undertaken – as a scientist, for example, there are a huge number of different paths to take outside of the traditional research track, so try different things and see what interests you.

US National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship, 2010

Intramural

World Life Sciences Forum, BioVision.Nxt Fellow, 2011 Describe your time at Oxford – what were the standout memories? I have a lot of fantastic memories from Oxford, including listening to and meeting a number of world-famous speakers, attending events at Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament, attending sporting events as a participant or spectator, countless formal dinners and balls, performing with a student group at the Edinburgh Fringe, and completing the reserve officer training course at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.


Where are they now ?

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Old Scholar News Jake Grant and Tom Agars, old scholars of 2012 and 2013 and part of the victorious Cold Fusion team winning first place at the 2012 World Finals of the F1 in Schools competition in Abu Dhabi, have arrived at London City University to take up their three-year scholarships for Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautical Engineering degrees respectively. London City University has been a major partner of the F1 in Schools programme, offering scholarships each year to the winners of the annual world final competition as the top prize. Jake and Tom were students at Brighton Secondary School in Adelaide.

At the world finals, each team has an opportunity to bring along a pit display, their cars and portfolio and a verbal presentation for the judges.

F1 in Schools aims to assist in changing the way Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is viewed by creating a fun and exciting learning environment for young people to develop an informed view about careers offered in STEM pathways. Students are given a brief to design a model compressed air powered F1™ car of the future using computer-aided design/computeraided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) engineering techniques. Cars are then manufactured on a computer numerical control (CNC) machine. Each team of between three and six students brings together their portfolio of work to present to a judging panel with a verbal and written presentation to support their model car, which is raced on a specially designed test track.

An Opportunity of a Life Time for Jake & Tom Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Professor Jamshid Nouri, said: “London City’s mechanical and aeronautical engineering department is delighted to be involved in the F1 in Schools programme through which we promote STEM subjects in schools and support young students to develop their skills in the use of CAD/CAM, CNC machines and testing. We are pleased to be awarding three-year scholarships to two talented young Australian students to study with us from this year: Jake Grant, for the MEng in Mechanical Engineering and Thomas Agars for the BEng in Aeronautical Engineering.”

Jake was taken on a tour of the University’s engineering labs on 15th September, accompanied by Team Principal of the City Racing Fomulae SAE Team Roger Valsler, Jake’s father Don Grant and F1 in Schools’ director of communications and events, David Howes. Jake is “pleased to be studying at City” and is “keenly looking forward to the challenges of the engineering courses”.

Andrew Denford, Chairman and Founder, F1 in Schools UK, commented: “It’s great to see two of our F1 in Schools alumni taking up London City University’s generous scholarship and we wish Jake and Tom all the best in their degree courses. We’re indebted to City for its support of F1 in Schools and helping us to assist talented students in achieving their ambitions and following their chosen career paths.”

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James Crawford (1961-1965) Head Prefect Legal mind nurtured in SA, shaping the world Roscoe Whalan | 27 November 2014

Meet the Adelaide-raised lawyer who is about to take on one of the most significant legal positions in the world. On 6 March, 1965, South Australia changed forever. After more than 26 years as Premier, Sir Thomas Playford’s reign was over. It took just two seats to change government that day: Glenelg (now Bright) and Barossa. In Glenelg, a grassroots campaign saw Hugh Hudson defeat Sir Baden Pattinson. It was 16-year-old James Crawford’s first opportunity to see democracy in action – his father, and wellknown local businessman, Jim Crawford, had been an ardent supporter of Hudson throughout the campaign. “One of my first political excitements was the election he (Hudson) won for the seat of Bright in which he ended the Playford Government,” James Crawford recalls. And so, a new era in South Australia was born; so too were the beginnings of one of the most distinguished legal careers to come out of the state. In early November, that local boy from Brighton was elected to the International Court of Justice. “Professor Crawford is the most eminent international lawyer Australia has produced,” Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said. He’s the second Australian to receive such an honour; Percy Spender did likewise nearly 50 years ago. Speaking from his office in Cambridge, Crawford reflected on the journey – and it’s been a long one. He was first nominated to the court three years ago, and he won’t join the 14 other judges in The Hague until next year. Crawford in his final undergraduate year in 1971. Photo: University of Adelaide “The actual process is a rather tortuous one because [of] the diplomatic process,” he told InDaily. “One is elected by the General Assembly and the Security Council and needs to get a majority in both places. So if you’re not rather hardened to UN processes it can be a bit mercenary,” he explained. Luckily for Crawford he’s well versed in how to make things happen in the international community. Pragmatic and steadfast, he admits while the appointment is a great achievement, it’s a relief to finally focus on the job ahead.

“It means I no longer have to go around saying, ‘if I get elected’ and I no longer have to speak in terms of contingencies.” Despite his appointment resting largely on his international achievements, Crawford first made a name for himself, right here, in Adelaide. His pioneering nature should come as little surprise – his grandmother, Aileen Constance Ingleby, was the second woman admitted to the South Australian Bar. “So there was some law in the distant background but not much in the foreground when I grew up,” Crawford said. In fact, the Crawford name has historically been more closely connected with the South Australian motor industry. His paternal grandfather, Sidney Crawford, launched Commercial Motor Vehicles back in the 1930s. Now, in its third generation, Crawford’s brothers run the business – one of the top privately owned companies in South Australia. However, Crawford found himself drawn to law at the University of Adelaide. “It was a very good Law school with very good and inspiring teachers and I became fascinated by the law as a discipline and it was really that fascination together with the interest in public affairs that led me to international law.” Crawford flew the nest to continue studies at Oxford but returned to Adelaide to teach, before joining the Australian Law Reform Commission . Most notable were the three years Crawford spent travelling to the most remote parts of the country, leading the commission in its most renowned work: its report on Aboriginal Customary Law. Groundbreaking in its findings and commitment to connecting with indigenous communities across Australia, the report was highly controversial at the time. “It was part of Michael Kirby’s philosophy of law reform that you took the issues to the people who are affected by them and who in this case the people whose law it was,” Crawford said. Although many of its recommendations weren’t adopted, the report was instrumental in leading the High Court towards recognising native title in the historic Mabo verdict.


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Crawford still holds this piece of work as one of his finest. “The work on Aboriginal Customary Law was probably the single most important piece of work, intellectually, that I ever undertook.” Academically, Crawford’s career has been a procession of prestigious appointments: Professor of Law at the University of Adelaide, Dean of Law at the University of Sydney and Whewell Professor of International Law at the University of Cambridge. Former Justice of the High Court Michael Kirby once called him “one of the most brilliant legal actors on the scene”. He was the first Australian member of the United Nations International Law Commission, where he helped draft the terms of state responsibility which determine how a nation is held responsible for a breach of its international obligations. But that’s not all. He also led the charge in establishing the International Criminal Court. In a twist, Crawford then found himself before the very institution he helped establish, arguing why a man once dubbed, “The World’s Most Wanted” should be tried in a different arena. Acting for Libya, Crawford won the case, arguing that Abdullah alSenussi, a former intelligence chief in Muammar Gaddafi’s regime, should be tried in Libya rather than before court.

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Last year, Crawford led Australia to one of its greatest victories in international law against Japan and whaling in the Southern Ocean. “That was a win even though it didn’t, and it was never going to, stop Japanese whaling under socalled scientific whaling.” After 20 years and more than 100 cases in international litigation, Crawford will have to get used to being on the other side of the bench. “I regret not being able to do the work in presenting cases to the court. “It’s been fascinating to watch it [public international law] grow. It may go on growing and it may become even more central to the way things are but it’s only part of what’s going on.” And although his legal mind has shaped many parts of our world, Crawford’s still very much an Australian at heart. “The main part of my family still live in Adelaide and it’s in one sense still home. “One of the advantages of the appointment to the court is that I’ll be able to come to Australia more often, hopefully talk to people about international law and the work of the court. “I’m still very much Australian.”

Australia continues to reap the benefits of producing one of the world’s finest legal minds.

Crawford (right) with University of Adelaide Vice-Chancellor Warren Bebbington in 2013. Photo: University of Adelaide

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Sam McEwen (2006) and Jemma Pietrus (2008) Sam McEwen (2006) and Jemma Pietrus (2008) have taken on the personal challenge of ensuring the children of a small village in Nepal, Chainpur, have access to a sustainable community based education centre. Sam outlines his and Jemma’s inspiring story of community service in the article below.

It was on this initial trip that I was introduced to Chainpur. This small village sits atop a hill, about an hour’s trek from Thulekhet where access to life’s basic necessities such as education and healthcare is limited. I left Nepal after 2 months with a new found love of the country, the landscape, but mostly the people.

In 2008, after a failed attempt at a Beach Volleyball career and a need to escape as far away from the sand and sea as possible, I volunteered in Nepal. A landlocked country in South Asia that borders India to the south and Tibet to the north. I was placed in a rural village called Thulekhet about 20km (but a 90-minute local bus-ride!) outside the popular tourist destination/trekking start point, Pokhara. I spent 6-weeks teaching English and living with community leader and High School teacher, Dhurba Bhanari and his family.

In 2012, Jemma visited Nepal (and Chainpur) for the first time. She felt the same. This year (2014) we returned to Nepal as part of an 18-month round-the-world trip, with a mission we’d set out in 2012. To start-up and maintain a sustainable, community-based education centre for the children of Chainpur. For the 20 primary school aged children who reside in this small village, educational opportunities are limited. The closest Primary School does not always open, the next closest is a 3-hour return trip on foot, as is the closest High School. There is no road so walking up and down hundreds of steps is the only option. As a result, many children are unable to receive a constant stream of learning to ensure basic skills: reading, writing and mathematics. Several years ago Dhurba assisted in the opening of a resource centre in Chainpur after the success of a similar centre in Thulekhet. The centre’s intention was to give children who wanted to learn the opportunity to take part in extra-curricular lessons for two hours each day.


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While structurally sound (apart from a dodgy toilet that’s now been fixed!), a lack of funds meant for the six months prior to our arrival the teacher was unable to be paid and classes had ceased. Our first step was to kickstart daily classes. On the first day, 19 children from 4 years to 10 came along to learn! This was incredibly encouraging. Next was to ensure materials were updated: books, pens, pencils and posters. Before

Once this was done, then came the makeover! We wanted to create a place where children would want to come learn. The grey cement inside and out was transformed into bright whites, red, yellow, blues and greens - the brightest building in the village! The smiles, enthusiasm and intrigue on the faces from those who live in Chainpur - from parents, to children, to the elderly whose families had been there for centuries - gave us the motivation to get up early and walk up (and then back down) a 1-hour high hill 8 times in 11 days. The final step now is to ensure the centre continues to run. We decided to keep the project community-based and reached out to our closest friends and family for support. The centre is currently under a 6-month pilot project of which all parties - Dhurba and the Chainpur Development Committee and we - have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to achieve a list of goals over this period. Thanks to the support of our wonderful friends and family, the teacher’s salary is guaranteed for these 6-months as are funds for additional learning materials and any structural maintenance for the building.

After

The centre now runs 2-hour lessons Sunday to Friday covering basic reading and writing (in Nepali and English), as well as mathematics and creative activities such as drawing and painting. Attendance has been great and steady since the reopening, and the community response has been incredible. Most importantly, classes are delivered free-of-charge, 6-days a week, by an educated teacher, to every Chainpur child who wants to learn. For us, that’s the first step.

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Sam Willoughby (2009) Sam Willoughby has won the 2014 Advertiser and/Channel 7 Sports Star of the Year Award after an outstanding BMX season in Europe and the United States. This is the second time Sam has won the prestigious award after he took the honours in 2009 when he was just 18. In 2012, he won the Australian Institute of Sport Junior Athlete of the year Award Sam has had an impressive BMX rider’s career after leaving Adelaide at the age of 16 to live in California. He won the junior BMX title in 2008 and again in 2009. Willoughby advanced into the senior ranks within two years of his arrival and won his first senior BMX World Championship in May 2012, which advanced his ranking to the number one spot in the world. During the London Olympics, Sam won a silver medal. In 2014, Sam’s entire early-season focus was on reclaiming the World Title, which he did in emphatic fashion in July.

Kirra Cheers (2009) Finds Success In New York City Pursuing Her Dreams. Kirra Cheers (2005) excelled in Mr Kelly’s Photography class and was rewarded with a SACE Merit in that subject for her outstanding work. After leaving school she continued to study Photography and gained her Advanced Diploma in Commercial Photography. While working in Australia she won the Australian Institute of Professional Photography Travel Scholarship and was a major Award winner at the International Aperture Awards in Photojournalism. Her talent soon took her from Australia to New York where she secured a job with a world renown wedding/portrait photographer. After only 3 months in this job, Kirra was named in the Top 30 Rising Stars of Wedding Photography by Rangefinder Magazine. In late 2013 Kirra left her studio job to pursue a future in creative photography she dreamed of. In an attempt to find her own exhibition space Kirra worked in partnership with Spence Lum of ‘Five West Studios’ to establish The Brooklyn Collective. This provided space for a community of photographic artists to exhibit their work and change the conversation surrounding wedding photography. Kirra has written the following tribute to her teacher Barry Kelly. At school he was Mr Kelly my photography teacher but now, years later, he is Baz – my friend and mentor. No trip home to Adelaide is complete without a chat with Baz to update him on a career that has taken me all the way to New York

City. A long way from the dark room at Brighton Secondary School where at the age of 15 I developed my first roll of film and planted the seed for a career that has taken me all over the world. I don’t believe that school holds all the answers but I do believe that one positive influence can set the framework for what’s to come. What Barry gave me was a chance. He identified my talent and set me up with all the tools I needed to succeed. It was Barry who lent me my first digital camera, who organized work experience with a local photographer, who helped me prepare my application to study photography at TAFE, who gave me my first photography job when he asked me to photograph his wedding and when after three months in New York I was named in the top 30 wedding photographers in the world, it was Barry whom I thanked. As the curtains close on what has been the most successful year of my professional life, I took some time to reflect on how far I’ve come. If only my 15 year old self could see me now, with my own photography studio in New York, my first solo show and a body of work that has been published all over the world. It’s been a long journey since my days at Brighton, but I always remember that it all started with that first role of film and a teacher who believed in me. Thanks Baz. To read more about Kirra’s story please visit her website http://tempting alice.com


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Prefects Back row: John Pain, Graham Allen, Colin Ford, John Holmes, Dean Corston, Graham Pearce, Bruce Wetherall. Front row: Peter Bennett, Philip McMahon, Brian Freeborn, Peter Hicks (Head Prefect), Denis Fry (Deputy Head Prefect), Roger Peake, Rhodric Wright

Overage “A” Hockey Squad Back row: Roger Peake, Brenton Behn, Chris Martin, Geoff Walker, Mark Manuel, Graham Allen, Bruce Wetherall (Vice-captain), Chris Claxton, Brenton Jones. Front row: Peter Gubbins, Brenton Smith, Geoff Skinner (Captain), Philip Thomson. Sent in by Roger Peake (BHS, 1962 - 1966)

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In Memorium

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John Frederick Bligh (1952-1954) John passed away on January 17, 2015, aged 75 years. John was a committed and active member of Friends of Brighton Old Scholars for many years and was passionate about the need for alumni to stay connected with their high school. Brighton Secondary School truly valued his participation in our school community.

Dr Olivia Menz nee Hassell (1969) 26/11/52 – 8/05/13 Olivia had a long association with Flinders

With her youngest at kindergarten, Olivia returned

University at both undergraduate and post graduate

to study at Flinders. She had personal, professional

level.

and academic interests in gifted education and

Olivia was born in Salisbury UK and moved with her family to Adelaide in 1964. After completing secondary school as dux of Brighton High School

in 1969, she began studying at Flinders University in 1970, but left to study nursing. Olivia returned to Flinders to study for a BA in 1974-6, majoring in English and History, she won the University Medal when she completed BA (Hons) in English Literature in 1977. She completed an MA in English Literature at Carleton University in Canada in mid 1979, and returned to Australia where she did a Diploma of Education and commenced teaching, initially at Wirreanda High School, then Pembroke School. During this time she also completed a Diploma of Religious Education. She left the paid workforce in 1984 to commence her family, having married Robert, a then young medical doctor in 1978. As well as being a brilliant student, Olivia was also a dedicated and loving mother whose generosity and kindness knew no bounds. She raised 4 wonderful children to adulthood, her first born son having died aged 1.

completed a Graduate Certificate in 1997, and her PhD in 2002. The thesis was a narrative entitled: Hearing the Falconer: An idea for the extension and enrichment of gifted secondary school students. Olivia’s supervisor described her as the most brilliant student she had ever supervised, and Olivia’s examiner’s report reads: “This Dissertation is a cornucopia of knowledge from a dazzling array of sources. Olivia is a gifted writer, a subtle thinker and an inspired educator. The work is more challenging than Sophie’s World and deserves the same fame.” ‘Falconer’ opens with this brief poem by Olivia.

Under the Earth I go On the oak leaf I stand. I ride on the filly That was never foaled And I carry the dead in my hand Olivia will be much missed by Robert, Clementine, Ursula, Matilda, and Lawrence, her mother Toni, and her bother Peter.


Staff Retirement

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Val Bleechmore (2004-2014) Val commenced her career in the Education Department in 1987, after winning a position as Laboratory Manager at Salisbury High School. A decline in student numbers saw her move to a role in the school’s library. During her time there she successfully studied for and was awarded a Diploma in Library Studies. In 2004, in order to be closer to home, she took the opportunity to transfer to Brighton Secondary School, where she held the position of Library Technician for 11 years.

Barry Kelly (2002-2014) Barry’s teaching career started at Eyre High School, in Whyalla. Being a larger country town was an ideal placement for “learning the ropes” as a beginning teacher, while also offering a wide range of sporting and recreational activities. On returning to Adelaide, he was able to teach many of subjects offered within the Design and Technology (Technical Studies) area eg wood, metal, outdoor construction, electronics and motor mechanics. During his 13 years at Brighton Secondary School he specialized in the teaching of Photography. Starting in the traditional darkroom spending a lot of time under safelights with a strong smell of chemicals, wet mops and towels along with the sound of constant running water eventually gave way to the new digital world.

Lyn Hearn (1994-2014) 1970 English language assistant Collège d’Enseignement Secondaire, Kourou, French Guiana 1973-76 teacher of French and Maths Para Hills High 1977 French and History Senior, Millicent High 1977-78 English language assistant, Lycée La Colinière, Nantes, France 1978 teacher of French and English, Christies Beach High 1979-84 French, History and Art Senior, Victor Harbour High 1985-89 Language, History and Bus Studs Senior/Coordinator, Glengowrie High 1990 Term 4: teacher of French and Japanese, Moreton Bay College, Brisbane 1991 Open Access College materials unit 1992 teacher of Japanese and French, Northfield High; 1993 teacher of Japanese, Norwood Morialta High; 1994-2013 Languages/Exchanges/EALD Coordinator, Brighton Secondary School

Nevin Childs (2004-2014)

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Margie Brown (2007-2014)

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Application Form

Friends of Brighton Secondary School Name: ________________________________________________________________________________________ Name at School: ________________________________________________________________________________ Postal Address: ________________________________________________________________________________ Suburb: ______________________________________________________________________________________ Postcode: __________________________ Email: ______________________________________________________ Phone [h]: __________________________ [w]: ________________________ [m]: ___________________________

[Please tick] Yes

I would like to join Friends of Brighton Secondary School [$20 full membership]

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SCHOOL ATTENDED

c Brighton c Mawson High

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Years Attended: ___________________

c Brighton Secondary School

Brief summary of activities, work and family since leaving school. Photograph now and/or then, optional. (Sorry, photograph can not be returned.)

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_____________________________________________________________________________________ Please print this form, complete and return with payment to Brighton Secondary School, 305 Brighton Road, North Brighton SA 5048

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Brighton Secondary School Connections 2014 Newsletter 2014  
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