Page 1

NEWSLETTER ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

IN THIS ISSUE FROM THE PRINCIPAL Diary Dates & Congratulations......2 Music News......................................3 Anzac Day Dawn Service...............4 Sports Day........................................6 Interschool Athletics.......................7 Touch Football & Volleyball...........8 Robe Surf Camp..............................9 Kokoda Trip Concert ................... 10 Geography News.......................... 11 Visual Arts News.......................... 12 Maths News.................................. 13 Drug Education & Old Scholars.. 14 Open Week..................................... 15 Year 12 Formal.............................. 16

Welcome to Term 2. The Parent / Student / Teacher conference evenings set the scene for continuous improvement but whether the students achieve to their potential is up to them. The students must step up to their role as selfdirected learners if they are to benefit from their teachers’ expertise. We talk about the skills required for the 21st century - such as critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity. We think character development is important - that is how we behave and engage in life and the world. At Brighton Secondary School we want to provide the time and space for the systematic, comprehensive and deliberate teaching of these skills. We think the qualities of mindfulness, resilience, curiosity, leadership and the ability to reflect and adapt are important. I encourage you to listen to the interview with Charles Fadel, Chairman of the Centre for Curriculum Pedagogies, a global organisation with links to the OECD. h t t p : // w w w . a b c . n e t . a u / radionational/programs/ lifematters/what-shouldstudents-be-learning-in-the21st-century/8496320

305 Brighton Road, North Brighton SA 5048 P:+61 8 8375 8200 E: admin@brighton.sa.edu.au brightonss.sa.edu.au

The teachers can not achieve these ends on their own. While the teachers are working

at making education more relevant, I expect our students to be working just as hard - and I expect our parents to support the school by developing growth mindsets in the children. This means encouraging the students to accept a fail as a means of learning, not as an end in itself. Growth mindsets help students to work to their potential. Learning is hard work. Most people can not multi-task. I urge our parents to access Daymap on a regular basis; to discuss what your child is learning and encourage your child to focus on their role which is to learn how to learn. Some of the highlights since the last newsletter include the successful Year 12 Formal, Sports Day and Open Week, events which require dedicated, hard work from the teachers. I congratulate the Head Prefects, Ella Warner and Kein Kurosawa, for their moving speeches at the Dawn Service.

CURIOSITY I COURAGE I CITIZENSHIP

Olivia O’Neill with a high school Principal from Jiaozhou City, Shandong Province, China who was visiting Brighton to observe best practice education programs and school facilities.

The uniform expectations for Brighton students are well known. It is tedious discussing inappropriate uniform when the correct uniform requirements are well advertised. To view photos of the required uniform visit the web site: http://brightonss.sa.edu.au/ wp-content/uploads/2017/03/ BSS-Uniform-Policy-2017.pdf Olivia O’Neill Principal

1


2017 DIARY DATES MAY

25

Year 12 Meningococcal Vaccinations

26

Year 10 PLP Focus half day

29-31 Year 12 SIV Aquatics 29

Year 8 Immunisations

29

Finance meeting 5.45pm

29

Primary Schools Music Festival auditions

29-2 Reconciliation Week 31

Year 12 Drama evening

31 Justin Coulson presentation to parents, 6.30pm Brighton Concert Hall

JUNE 1

Year 10 Drama evening

2

Reconciliation Day

5

World Environment Day

5

Governing Council 7pm

23

Semester 1 concludes

7

Polish Jazz Trio

23

Year 10 PLP Focus Day

8

In-School SIM auditions (Year 8 only)

24

Chaplains’ Concert

26

Semester 2 begins

performance

26

Finance meeting 5.45pm

8

SSSSA Cross Country

29 Music Centres Concert -

12

Public Holiday

13

Student Free Day (Staff Training)

14

Student Free Day (Staff Training)

8 Year 11 Drama matinee & evening

14-16 Choral Eisteddfod 16

Year 10 PLP Industry Guest Speaker

16

Music Stage 2 Ensemble Performance

19

Music Stage 1 Solo Performance

19-21 Year 10 SIV tour to South Coast 20-23 Year 11 In-class exam week 21

Music Stage 2 Solo Performance

CONGRATULATIONS Cody Rosenthal, Year 11, who represented SA in the Under 18 Lacrosse Team recently in Melbourne. Blake Tisher, Year 11, who was selected to represent Australia for volleyball in the Australia Junior Men’s Development Program 2017 Thailand Development Tour in January. Ryan Jones, Year 8, who has qualified for the National Baseball championships to be held at West Beach. The winning team will earn a fully paid trip to the USA to compete in the World Championships. Jasper Clark, Year 9, chosen in the Secondary School Sport SA interstate baseball championships in Cairns. Katharine Dowling, Year 11, selected to represent South Australia in the Under 18 State Hockey team. Sarah McMahon, Year 11, chosen to represent SA in the Women’s State baseball SA team Trial program. Sasha Simmonds, Year 11, selected to represent South Australia in the State Beach Volleyball Under 17 team. Congratulations to Callum Cunningham-Byrne, Lawson Hansberry, Oliver Hooper and Jackson Flaherty, Year 10 Debating team, who defeated St. Peters Girls in the first debate of the season.

Adelaide Town Hall 30

SIV Year 10 Knockout at Brighton

JULY 3

Governing Council 7pm

4

Music Showcase 1

7

End of Term 2, 1.00pm dismissal.


MUSIC NEWS Recitals Australia On Wednesday 29th March, eight senior students performed as part of the Recitals Australia Lunchtime Concert Series in Pilgrim Uniting Church, Adelaide. Stephen Badger, Jim Zhang, Tim Braslavskiy, Esmond Choi, Emma Richardson, Kiran Sachdev, Lauren Owens and Charlotte Rayner presented a varied program, which was recorded by 5MBS and will be broadcast at a later date.

Congratulations Rock band Experiment One has taken out the 2017 Murray Bridge Battle of the Bands. This prolific young group that includes three Brighton students (Ben Waltho, Charlie Waltho and Isaac Byrnes) blew away the opposition to win $1000 worth of studio recording time. The group aims to follow up on their first EP, Tic Tacs and Mardi Gras, recorded last April and released in September, 2016.

ANZAC Day Dawn Service In their first official performance, the 2017 Tour Choir braved the early morning in the middle of the school holidays to sing at the ANZAC Day Dawn Service at Brighton Jetty. As is the tradition at this solemn occasion, the choir sang four hymns, O Valiant Hearts, Abide With Me and the national anthems of Australia and New Zealand.

Volunteers’ Morning Tea On Wednesday 10th May, we had the honour of performing at the Volunteers’ Morning Tea at the DECD Centre Gallery, Adelaide. This event allowed DECD to officially recognise the invaluable contribution made to the organisation and the community by volunteers. The six students involved (Lucas Horta, Hanz Matutina, Matthew Stone, Emma Richardson, Jess Hok and Serena Duke) were grateful for the opportunity to perform their solo repertoire to a very appreciative audience in preparation for their performance exams at school.

Colin Oliver Music Scholarship Congratulations to Year 10 student, Gina Sinclair, who is the 2017 recipient of the Colin Oliver Music Scholarship. We are fortunate to have an ongoing partnership with The Wyatt Benevolent Institution that allows us to offer this grant to one Year 10 student each year.

Exciting News We are very proud to watch the continued success of Old Scholar, Jess Kent, who has recently secured a gig as support act to Coldplay!

Finally In a slight name change, the subject “Music” will now be called “Core Music” for Years 8, 9 and 10. We hope that this slight modification will simplify some of our communication with students, families and staff. Andrew Barrett Head of Music

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

3


ANZAC DAY DAWN SERVICE On Anzac Day, 25th April 2017, our 2 Head Prefects, Ella Warner and Kein Kurosawa, presented the following speeches at the Brighton jetty dawn service. The 2017 Special Interest Music Tour Choir sung the hymns and national anthems at the service. Good morning honourable guests, ladies and gentlemen and citizens of the Brighton community. My name is Ella Warner and I am very humbled and privileged to be able to speak on such an occasion, although I am too young to properly know the sacrifice of war and the cost of freedom borne by the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps during two world wars. Like many Australians today, I have parents from different nations. My great grandfather lived in Singapore during the Second World War and wrote a biographical account of his life for his grand daughter - my mother. Reading about his life during World War II in Singapore in preparation for this Anzac morning gave me a deeper appreciation of life during these times and how these World Wars profoundly affected so many people in so many countries. This was also one of the enduring lessons I learnt walking through the KANCHANABURI WAR CEMETERY Memorial in Thailand 6 years ago with my family. I learnt that during the notorious construction of the Thai (Siam)-Burma railway more than 13,000 Prisoners of War died and I also learnt that some 100,000 forced civilian labourers from Malaya and Dutch East Indies also lost their lives. While my Father’s family is Australian, my mother’s has lived in Malaysia for 5 generations. While we rightly gather here to remember our own, let us never forget the great cost also borne by people everywhere in times of war and conflict.

When I surveyed some of the five thousand and eighty-five White commonwealth gravestones at the KANCHANABURI WAR CEMETERY Memorial I was also educated about the tragedy and cost of War. This was followed by a visit to the Hellfire pass Museum and a walk along part of the death railway listening on headphones to the stories of courage, mateship and sacrifice of some of the surviving diggers. And these were just a few of the many Australian soldiers who endured the horrors of War that I can’t even begin to fathom or imagine. It’s hard to understand that in times past my peers were signing up to go off to war and that one of the chief reasons my generation enjoys peace and prosperity is because of the many thousands who made the ultimate sacrifice. Still today our service men and women continue to put themselves in harms way in order for us to stand here in peace. There are museums and memorials all over the world to teach us about the many theatres of war where Australian men and women have served and sacrificed not just for our nation but for many other nations. This is part of the reason I’m proud to be an Australian standing here this morning. It seems to me that these museums and memorials are there to help us and our children after us to never, ever forget the harsh and costly lessons of war. May I humbly encourage all of us to visit these memorials when we have the opportunity so that we might never forget the courage and cost of the freedom that I hope we never take for granted. And as we remember those who have served, may we also have in our thoughts and prayers the many men and women currently serving both at home and abroad. Let us remember them all. Ella Warner Head Prefect


Good morning, my name is Kein Kurosawa. We stand here today in memory of the brave men and women who have done our country the honour of serving in the Armed Forces ensuring the peace and prosperity of our nation. Their sacrifice has gifted us with a proud past and a burgeoning future for all Australians. The 100 year commemorations of certain battles in 1917 gives us the opportunity to reflect on the qualities that defined the ANZACs; Courage, Mateship and Sacrifice. These simple, yet central traits to Australian life are as important today as they were in the battles on the Western Front. Learning about these battles at school can not only foster an interest in the pivotal history of our nation, but also allows younger generations to develop a sense of courage, mateship and sacrifice. Australia will continue to forge ahead as a great nation if we can live our lives with these qualities. Who could imagine summoning the courage to attack a triple reinforced line of German trenches without the planned support of allied tanks? Just taking the first step out into 1000 yards of nomans land while being fired on by German machine gun crews is unimaginable. However, there were still the thick belts of barbed wire to negotiate in order to get to the first of three significant trenches! Courage was obviously in great supply in the battle of Bullecourt. Unfortunately, this battle also resulted in the largest single capture of Australian troops on the Western Front.

The Battle of Messines had a considerably different outcome, and in-fact was the best planned offensive of the Western Front. Mateship was on display for this battle as Australian, New Zealand and allied troops dug long ‘mines’ under enemy lines and filled them with explosives, a million pounds of explosives in fact! As the earth erupted under the German strong-holds, Australian and New Zealand troops moved together as one, for the first time since Gallipoli. The German troops could only hold out for a short time against the ANZACs who had forged their mateship through the fires of the toughest battles in history. Sacrifice could diplomatically describe the third Battle of Ypres culminating in the Battles of Passchendaele. In eight weeks of fighting Australian forces incurred 38,000 casualties. The battle comprised of a series of limited and costly offensives, often undertaken in the most difficult of waterlogged conditions due to the destruction of the low lying drainage systems and the atrocious weather. The Australian troops were finally relieved by Canadian forces just before the second Battle of Passchendaele. It is difficult to believe the examples of courage, mateship and sacrifice that ANZACs continually demonstrated in these battles and forged our national identities. It is no wonder that the Long Tan and Spirit of ANZAC awards are the most sought after in our local schools these days. Kein Kurosawa Head Prefect

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

5


SPORTS DAY 2017 The Brighton Secondary School Sports Day was held on Friday 24th March. The perfect weather spurred on the House spirit. The track was alive and bustling with House colour and the cheers from the House areas spurred competitors on down the final straight. It was a very successful day, which promoted physical activity for all, in a carnival like atmosphere with the support of the Year 11 Social Awareness Laneway. Students supported their House by participating in track, field and novelty events. There was an outstanding involvement in track and field events.

OVERALL RESULTS: Place

House

Points

1

Buffalo

1464

2

Holdfast

1392

3

Cygnet

1309

4

Rapid

1230

The Sports House Captains did a great job of decorating House areas and rallying support and participation. Thank you to the Physical Education staff whose skills and support in the organisation of the day helped it run seamlessly. Thanks also to the ground staff, teachers who officiated, SSO staff and the Principal Team. Congratulations to all students for the way they supported the event, each other and for their participation in a great day and to Buffalo House for winning the 2017 sports day shield. It is fantastic to have such a positive start to our first carnival event of the year. Points from this event contribute to the Sports Carnival Shield and the overall House Shield. Peter Vowles Coordinator Healthy Lifestyles

RECORDS BROKEN: Event

Name

House

Old Record

New Record

8 Boys Long Jump

Owen Hughes

Buffalo

5.10m

5.19m

10 Girls High Jump

Ruby Sulicich

Holdfast

1.53m

1.54m

9 Boys High Jump

Jarman Sigal

Cygnet

1.69m

1.79m

9 Boys 4x100m Relay

Holdfast

Holdfast

52.33sec

51.81sec

INDIVIDUAL WINNERS: Year

Girls

House

Points

Year

Boys

House

Points

8

Talitha Owies

Cygnet

41

8

Deklyan Kay

Holdfast

31

8

Eloise Sulicich

Cygnet

40

8

Owen Hughes

Buffalo

25

9

Olivia Hastings

Buffalo

50

9

Cruize Papandrea

Holdfast

46

9

Allysha Sims

Cygnet

42

9

Travis Foley

Buffalo

33

10

Rio Tyler-Dowd

Rapid

48

10

Vincent Stevenson

Buffalo

46

10

Chloe Stewart

Holdfast

40

10

Mitch Riddle

Buffalo

44

10

Ruby Sulicich

Holdfast

40

10

Douglas Brookes

Cygnet

44

Open

Bethany Lane

Buffalo

46

Open

Daniel Turner

Rapid

46

Open

Rebecca Catt

Cygnet

32

Open

Tom O’Connell

Cygnet

42


INTERSCHOOL ATHLETICS On Wednesday 12th April, Brighton competed in the ‘A1’ Division of the School Athletics Championships. On a day of tough athletic competition Brighton performed strongly, achieving 23 ‘Standards’ throughout the day was really quite remarkable. Special mention must go to Olivia Hastings who achieved 4 ‘Standards’. Congratulations to all of the athletes who competed and represented Brighton so well. Every athlete contributed to our combined final ranking of 4th, only 3 points off of 2nd place. Special thanks to Mr Fuss, Mr Mahar and Ms Packard. Jason Archer Sport Coordinator

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

7


OPEN KNOCK OUT TOUCH FOOTBALL Stage 2 Physical Education students, supplemented by other Touch players, competed in a Knock Out Touch competition at TouchSA on Greenhill Road. It was a great day in the sunshine and all players continued to develop their skills and tactical knowledge. Both teams defended strongly and finished 3rd in a competitive field. Thanks to Mr Kouwenhoven for coaching the boys team. Lori Mulhall Physical Education Teacher

2017 SENIOR BEACH CHAMPIONSHIPS The ‘Senior Champions of the Beach’ tournament was held at Brighton Secondary School on Thursday 13th April. For the first time Hallett Cove entered teams in both the boys and girls draws and provided strong competition. Their boys team made it all the way to the grand final, whilst the girls were successful in winning the B division after being knocked out in an earlier round. We look forward to having Hallett Cove on board in future years. The day ran smoothly largely due to the efforts of Jamie Tester, SIV leaders and their team of helpers. Winners and Runners Up were as follows: Senior Girls Champions Tia Maschotta and Jacqueline Hendrie-Wolsten Croft Senior Girls Runners Up Isabella Dew and Bethany Lane Senior Boys Champions Coen Key and Max De Vries Senior Boys Runners Up Bowen Mitton and Branden Miecinski (Hallett Cove) Shane Durbridge Volleyball Teacher


SACE STAGE ONE OUTDOOR EDUCATION - ROBE SURF CAMP On Wednesday 3rd May until Friday 5th May, Mr Vowles and Ms McCann’s Outdoor Education classes combined and embarked on our journey to Robe for the surf camp. We had been preparing for this throughout term one. Participation in group dynamics activities, stand up paddle boarding “SUP”, a surf day, coastal environment studies, risk management, camp craft practices, fitness paddling and a range of fitness activities aided the success of this camp.

The group appreciated Ms Rudduck and the Pre Service Teachers Tamae and Chris’s support. Our surf instructors shared their knowledge and motivated students to learn, through their passion and enthusiasm. This was a very successful camp and our students definitely achieved the objectives of our outdoor program, through connecting with themselves, others and the environment. Peter Vowles Coordinator Healthy Lifestyles

We had been studying how weather effects surf conditions and we got lucky on camp with light offshore winds and a solid 2 - 3 foot swell. These conditions were ideal for the learners and more experienced students to develop their skills. Upon arriving at Robe, we set up tents at our site, then surfed in ideal conditions at first ramp, finishing up at sunset. Every student was successful standing up on a wave in this first session. Everyone’s skills, knowledge and safety developed at Beachport the next day and back at Robe for our third and fourth sessions. The cooking and cleaning was undertaken by students in duty groups. The food was tasty and the efforts of these groups were appreciated by all. We embraced the experience of being in the natural environment and enjoyed a night walk under the stars and through the trees. We took our time on the walk to get to know others and share experiences we had in common.

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

9


KOKODA TRIP CONCERT On 28th March at 7pm in week 9 of Term 1, Brighton Secondary held its fundraising concert, March to Kokoda. The concert was a celebration of Aboriginal culture and was split into 4 sections, Culture, Colinisation, War and Reconciliation. Funds raised from the night are going towards the Reconciliation Kokoda Trek. Overall the night was a complete success and was enjoyed by all who attended. We’d like to thank the music department staff and students who performed at the concert and helped organise such a brilliant night. We’d also like to thank all those who attended and supported the concert on the night. The Reconciliation Kokoda trek is occurring in September this year, and will see two Year 11 students, Alex Witty and Harrison McLeod attending in conjunction with two staff members, Caitlyn Davies and David Thomson. Overall there will be 30 South Australian attendees on the trek, made up of Reconciliation SA staff members and 6 different schools across the state, with two students and two staff from each school involved. The trek’s aim is to promote the conversations around Reconciliation and honouring the Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal soldiers who fought along the track. We are excited to share our journeys on the Kokoda trek with the school community when we arrive back! Caitlyn Davies Aboriginal Secondary Transition and Education Officer

YEAR 9 GEOGRAPHY One Wednesday, towards the end of term 1, Mr Oakley’s Geography Year 9 class went on an excursion to the Royal Botanical Gardens and the Adelaide Zoo. Mr Oakley was unable to join the excursion, so the students were accompanied by Ms Moody and Mr Braithwaite. The students had been discussing biomes in class. By identifying biomes, we can examine how climate affects the environment in different areas of the world. Animals, plants and soil adapt and interact with each other within a biome. Biomes occur naturally, but can also be constructed to aid food production or inform scientists. The class identified constructed biomes in the Botanical Gardens which are preserving plants, and in the Zoo, where they are homes to the animals. Clynton Oakley Geography Teacher


GEOGRAPHY WARRIPARINGA WETLANDS On 6th April, the Year 10 Geography class had an excursion to Warriparinga Wetlands to deepen their learning experience during the term. When we were on the excursion the guide took us through the wetlands and taught us about their way of living. The Indigenous Leader/guide was a very passionate and informative person who shared many personal experiences with us. Some things we learnt:

What we liked about the excursion was:

• the wooden trees near the entrance. I learnt about the shields and the significance of it

• learning so much about indigenous people and doing it in a beautiful wetland made it better.

• the salt bush and other plants - I learnt that there is more food to survive on in the bush

We would recommend:

• the art underground - I learnt about the significance of aboriginal art • that the Indigenous community can make food out of pretty much anything they find (plants/animals) and they cook all their food together in a pit - so women cook in one pit; the men in the other and all the food is brought together as a community gathering/feast.

• we got to learn about how the owners of the land live and how their values mean a lot to them

• coming on your own or with a tour, it is beautiful either way. • taking part in the tour to learn how they live and to learn more about the Indigenous way of life. Thanks to Mr Oakley for organising the excursion. Lotti Kurusa & Ryan Mulholland Year 10 Students

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

11


VISUAL ARTS NEWS Year 12 Art and Design Visit to the Year 12 2017 SACE Show Each year the best of the Year 12 Art and Design Practical Products and Folios are displayed at the Dame Roma Mitchell Art Gallery at the Adelaide TAFE. These works are selected to demonstrate excellence in concepts, techniques and the students’ abilities to develop high levels of skill in the production of art and design pieces. The 2017 Art and Design group visited the exhibition at the end of Term 1 with their teachers, Ms Evans and Ms Paterson. A diverse range of media and approaches were on display and as expected these works made a significant impression on the viewing audience. Students explored a wide variety of themes and issues in this cross section of art and design from 2016. Themes extended students’ thinking through links to current artists’ styles and approaches. 2016 Visual Art students, Abbey Miller, Emma Hanlin and Isobel Lorton were amongst the selected artists to exhibit in 2017. Abbey Miller (BSS 2106), exhibited her finely developed cut paper and painted figure composition of a refugee woman. In Design a range of functional products addressed packaging, posters of current events, fashion and environmental works. Francesca Olds and Mikayla Stewart from the BSS Year 12 Design group were amongst the selected exhibitors. Special congratulations to Mikayla for being selected as the poster winner for the 2017 SACE Art Exhibition. Mikayla designed and crafted an outstanding lighting design. This was again an inspirational day that provided the 2017 students with a huge range of motivating ideas and learning experiences.

SALA 2017 This year our SALA exhibition is CREATIVES 17. 15th - 18th August, 2017 Concert Hall Foyer SALA exhibitions are held annually across South Australia and celebrate the work of living artists. We support our artists at Brighton Secondary School with an inclusive exhibition that displays both students and staff work. This year we will again be sponsored by Eckersley’s Art Supplies who kindly donate monetary vouchers as encouragement awards. In 2017 we will have awards in each year level. Throughout this term students will be encouraged to start thinking about what work to exhibit and to prepare their pieces. There are many final products on the way in the year levels and this should be a dynamic exhibition. The opening night is on the 15th August in Term 3 from 5pm to 6.30pm. Refreshments will be served and award recipients announced. The works will be on view to the end of the week and available to students in their school time and parents and friends at lunchtimes. We hope many students will be involved and proudly take part in Creatives 17. Yasmin Paterson Coordinator The Arts


MATHS NEWS On 28th March, students from Stage 1 and 2 Specialist Maths and Mathematical Methods were invited to attend a careers day focussed on Women in Mathematics at the Capri Theatre. The day was part of the Australian Mathematical Sciences Initiative’s Choose Maths Project and included a screening of the film ‘Hidden Figures’. The girls heard from three women who have studied maths at a tertiary level and the impact of this on their work and lives. “It was good to hear that someone who didn’t get straight A’s at school and only started studying maths seriously when she was 30 was still successful without investing her whole life in it.” - Stage 1 Specialist Maths Student

Name

Points

Medallion

Esteban Cure

437

Gold

Natarsha Jaffer

298

Gold

Divanshu Saini

277

Gold

Maya Butterworth

208

Gold

Isabella Conner

202

Gold

Manasi Deshpande

201

Gold

Entries for the AMSI Choose Maths Student Awards close on 23rd June with student entries focussed on the theme ‘Maths is our Future’. Each team of students must complete a 3-5 minute video with prizes ranging from $100-$2000 for the most creative and original videos. For more information or to register, visit http://teachers.choosemaths.org.au/ student-awards/ or contact your Maths teacher.

Erin Taylor

193

Silver

Victoria Katsoulis

168

Silver

Declan Farrell-Oates

152

Silver

Izzy Thorpe

133

Bronze

Victoria Munn

113

Bronze

Nicholas Pardon

112

Bronze

Khaled Elbelidy

104

Bronze

Millah Hansberry

101

Bronze

Hayden Barwa

100

Manga High Ninja Challenge In Term 1 Maths students in Years 8-10 competed against schools across Australia in the Manga High Ninja Challenge. The challenge was comprised of a series of online learning modules which students completed outside of class time. Overall as a school we achieved 5350 points and ranked in the top 10 schools in Australia at the end of the challenge. The following students achieved medallions for the incredible amount of work they put into progressing their learning in maths over the challenge period.

Bronze

Congratulations to these students and the many others that were so very close to achieving medallions. Femia Bakuszowski Coordinator Mathematics

Recipe To Riches In Term 1, 2017, Mrs Bakuszowski’s Year 8 Think Bright class completed a cooking and money based project. The project was called Recipe to Riches, a name you may recognise from television. The aim of the project was to produce an item of food to sell in the bake sale held on Harmony Day, 21st March. Calculations and estimations were required for this project, and we always had to give reasons of how we reached the number that we got to. We parted into our separate groups of about 5 and over a duration of four weeks solved problems using percentage, discounts, profit and loss. We had to make financial decisions based on calculations and evaluate strategies used to advertise discounts. We also improved on our standing knowledge about volume and surface area to make decisions on the most economical and ethical production methods. At the end we had to present our findings in a keynote to the rest of the class. It was a really fun project, we got to cook and we learnt about finances. We had set questions that we had to answer before we even contemplated starting cooking. Some examples of the questions were how many of our items we would cook, how much each item would cost to make, how much we would charge for our item and how we would package it in an environmentally friendly way. All groups made a plan for the cook, with little ideas of the rush of cooking. Most groups fell behind what they had planned, and only just finished their cooking on time. A day after the mad rush of cooking it was time to sell what we had put so much time into. Some groups made a profit, and some made a loss. These differences aside, all groups came away from this project with new skills that we can use in everyday life. We feel lucky to get a project like this, as we haven’t found it common to have a project that you learn lots from and also have masses of fun. The profits that we earned from this sale went to UNICEF as well as a few donations from students and staff. Isabella Conner and Poppy Maddern Year 8 Students

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

13


DRUG EDUCATION Introducing Paul Dillon - Drug and Alcohol Research Training Australia (DARTA). Paul Dillon has been working in the area of drug education for the past 25 years. Through his own business, Drug and Alcohol Research and Training Australia (DARTA) he has been contracted by many agencies and organisations across the country to give regular updates on current drug trends within the community. He continues to work with many school communities across the country to ensure that they have access to good quality information and best practice drug education. An ex-school teacher, Paul has an interest in working with young people, and regularly provides drug information sessions and workshops to students across the country. With a broad knowledge of a range of content areas, Paul regularly provides media comment and is regarded as a key social commentator in Australia, appearing on a wide range of television programs including Sunrise, TODAY and the 7PM Project discussing topical issues. He has had many media interviews on the subject of drug culture, and his current areas of interest are drug education, youth issues, ecstasy and related drugs. Paul also has a blog (http:// doingdrugs-darta.blogspot.com.au/) where he discusses topical issues of the day, as well as addressing some of the questions and queries he is regularly asked by those attending his presentations. His latest blogs are titled: • ‘5 things parents should discuss with their teens before they leave home for a sleepover, party or gathering’; • ‘A simple ‘how-to-guide’ when deciding whether your teen should attend a party, gathering or sleepover’ and •  ‘Parents, teens and trust: Are teens more likely to lie during adolescence’. He can be found on various social media platforms including Facebook and Twitter.

The Brighton Secondary community will be the first public school in South Australia to work with Paul. On Wednesday September 27th Paul will provide 3 separate 90 minute presentations to our senior students: •  Year 10: Young people, alcohol and risk taking: Looking after your mates •  Year 11: Looking after your mates: What do Year 11s need to know? • Year 12: Last year at school: What do I need to know about alcohol and other drugs? Parents will be invited to attend his final evening presentation: “Teens, parties and alcohol: A practical parent guide to keeping them safe.” Teenage parties provide young people with valuable opportunities to develop a range of social skills that they need to relate effectively with their peers. As they get older alcohol is likely to become a part of these social gatherings and, unfortunately, things can go wrong. Using the latest research, this presentation will examine what we know about school-based young people and alcohol use and its use at parties. It will also provide some practical strategies and simple tips for parents considering allowing their teen to attend such an event to help ensure they are as safe as possible. Stay tuned for further information leading up to Paul’s presentation. Lori Mulhall Health & Physical Education Teacher

OLD SCHOLAR NEWS Brighton Secondary School is proud to congratulate James Tamblyn who graduated in 2016. James has been awarded The Mabel Tapp Prize at the University of Adelaide in the School of Mathematical Sciences. The prize is awarded to the student with the highest academic merit in Mathematical Studies and Specialist Mathematics who completed the South Australian Certificate of Education in the previous year.


OPEN WEEK 2017 In 2017 Brighton held an extremely successful Open Week (10th - 13th April) having 6 school time tours for parents and students to visit the school in action. A Principal’s tour is held on the first Wednesday of each month, leaving the front reception area at 9.00am.

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

15


YEAR 12 FORMAL The very successful Year 12 Formal was held at the Adelaide Convention Centre on 31st March.


ISSUE ISSUE33II MAY 2017

17


PARTNERSHIP HOLDFAST P ARTNERSHIP Secondary School:  Brighton Secondary School

Primary Schools:     

Brighton Glenelg Secondary School: Paringa Park  Brighton Secondary School St. Leonards Primary Schools: Warradale

 Brighton Kindergartens:  Glenelg ParingaPark Park  Ballara  St. Leonards  Baden Pattinson  Warradale

     

Dover Kindergartens: Dunbar Terrace  Ballara Park Oaklands Estate  Baden Pattinson Seacliff Community  Dover Park Somerton Dunbar Terrace Warradale Oaklands Estate  Seacliff Community  Somerton Park  Warradale

9 WAYS TO A RESILIENT CHILD “

DR. JUSTIN COULSON

PRESENTATION31ST MAY 20 WEDNESDAY

6.30pm 8.00pm 9 WAYS TO– A Brighton Secondary School RESILIENT 305 BrightonCHILD” Road, North Brigh “

Brighton Concert Hall WEDNESDAY 31ST MAY 2017 6.30pm – 8.00pm

305

OBTAINING TICKETS: Brighton Secondary School The Brighton Secondary School Concert Hall holds 35 Brighton Road,a seat North Brighton. people. To secure please collect free tickets fro Front Office of Brighton Secondary Brighton Concert Hall School. The ticket be numbered and you will be asked to present your t on the night.

OBTAINING ForTICKETS: information contact denise.hoskin@brighton.sa.edu.a The Brighton Secondary School Concert Hall holds 350 people. To secure a seat please collect free tickets from the Oneofof the most frequent questions asked Front Office Brighton Secondary School. The tickets will is “How can my child be will more resilient?”. Perhaps you feel your ch be numbered and you be asked to present your ticket on the night. gives up too quickly and easily, moaning ‘I can’t’. Mayb For information contact denise.hoskin@brighton.sa.edu.au

child resists going to school because he doesn’t like hi teacher or his friend rejected him. Maybe she failed in One of the most frequent questions asked is “How can I help sporting contest or an exam. my child be more resilient?”. Perhaps you feel your child gives up too quickly and easily, moaning ‘I can’t’. Maybe your Resilience is the ability to recover quickly from adversi child resists going to school because he doesn’t like his adapt to difficulty in positive ways. Research shows th teacher or his friend rejected him. Maybe she failed in a resilience levels of our children have dropped significa sporting contest or an exam. many risk. quickly Friendship issues, bullying, physic Resilienceputting is the ability to at recover from adversity and development and that parenting styles ar adapt to changes, difficulty in identity positive ways. Research shows the resiliencesome levels of of our significantly, thechildren issues have thatdropped can affect our children’s ability putting many at risk. Friendship issues, bullying, physical bounce back. changes, identity development and parenting styles are just some of the issues that can affect our children’s ability to Dr Justin Coulson is one of Australia’s most respected bounce back.

relationships speakers, authors and researchers. He w

Dr Justin Coulson (www.justincoulson.com) Dr Justin Coulson (www.justincoulson.com)

Dr Justin weekly Coulson isparenting one of Australia’s respected advicemost column for Sydney’s Daily Tel relationships speakers, authors and researchers. He writes a Today sho The Advertiser and appears regularly on The weekly parenting advice column for Sydney’s Daily Telegraph, he is the parenting expert at kidspot.com.au. He is the The Advertiser and appears regularly on The Today show and six children. he is the of parenting expert at kidspot.com.au. He is the father of six children.


ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

19


PASTORAL CARE WORKER Position Vacant

Brighton Secondary School Schools Ministry Group and the South Western Schools Ministry Inc. are seeking applications for this 11- 12.5 hour per week position commencing Term 3, 2017. The position exists to offer a chaplaincy service to students, staff and the school community. A Job and Person Specification and details on “How to apply” is available from SMG on 8378 6800 or mail@smg.asn.au.

Closing date: Friday 2nd June—9.00am

for more information go to www.smg.asn.au or call Steve Mills SMG Regional Manager ph.: 8378 6819


Does your teen have a sleep problem?

Does your child have a sleep problem?

Is your teenager unable to fall asleep at a conventional time? Does your teenager experience difficulty waking early for school, university or work? The Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic in the School of Psychology at Flinders University is running a treatment study for a common adolescent sleep problem. The clinic is currently welcoming referrals for adolescents and young adults aged between 13-25 years. For information about participating in research please contact the Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic on: Email: casc.enquiries@flinders.edu.au Phone: (08) 8201 7587

Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic Flinders University School of Psychology GPO Box 2100 Adelaide SA 5001 Tel: (08) 8201 7587 Fax: (08) 8201 3877 Email: casc.enquiries@flinders.edu.au

Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic

Phone: (08) 8201 7587 Email: casc.enquiries@flinders.edu.au

Caption describing picture or graphic.

About Us International research suggests that sleep problems are prevalent across the lifespan. To meet the growing demand for a specialised sleep service in South Australia, the Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic opened in early 2006 to offer and pioneer evidence-based psychological treatments for a wide range of sleep problems, including Insomnia and Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders, including Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder. Who We Are The clinic is run by a group of registered sleep psychologists.

What We Do

Where We Are

Sleep problems can affect young people's mood, motivation, concentration and school, university or work performance. The Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic offers cognitive and behavioural therapy programs tailored to the nature of client’s sleep problems, to help them attain a better night's sleep.

The Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic is located in the Social Sciences North Building at Flinders University, on level two, in room 253.

The treatments we currently provide are known as cognitive and behavioural therapies. These treatments involve educating children and families about the nature of sleep and sleep problems, modifying behaviours around bedtime, and teaching children and adolescents how to modify the way they think about their sleep problem. We also use a technique called Bright Light Therapy with adolescents and young adults who have difficulty falling asleep and waking at their desired times. This type of treatment helps to shift sleep rhythms earlier so clients can fall asleep earlier and wake up more alert.

The Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic is only open on Wednesdays between the hours of 9am-5pm. Appointments run for approximately 50 minutes on the hour.

Treatment involves several sessions over a period of 4-8 weeks. In order to ensure that the treatments we provide at the Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic are the best, we are constantly evaluating their effectiveness. For the children, adolescents, and parents in the program, this means completing sleep diaries and questionnaires along the way, and where possible wearing wrist monitors to assess sleep.

When Are We Open?

How do I obtain a referral to the Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic? You will need to obtain a Mental Health Care Plan from a GP prior to booking an appointment at the Child & Adolescent Sleep Clinic. Be mindful that this may require a longer than normal appointment with your GP. For More Information: Visit our website by searching “Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic” on the Flinders University webpage.

The Child and Adolescent Sleep Clinic is currently accepting referrals for children, adolescents and Flinders University students.

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

21


Nationwide STEM outreach program for Students in year 9 or 10 in 2017 A three-day or four day hands-on practical STEM program, will be conducted again in 33 Australian universities and tertiary institutions throughout 2017-2018. The programs are non-selective and open to all students in Years 9 and 10. Each program includes a wide variety of practical activities, excursions, career information together with interesting presentations by leading Australian scientists and engineers. This is a Rotary Youth Services Project, supported by the Australian Science Teachers Association and The Young Scientists of Australia. Local Rotary clubs are often willing to sponsor students to attend, so please contact your local Rotary club for details, if funding is required.

Enjoy 3 or 4 days of science, engineering, technology & mathematics

Perform interesting experiments in a university laboratory

Located on 33 campuses nationally see the where and when page on our website.

Hear leaders in science, technology and engineering speak

Financial assistance maybe available for those who require it through the local Rotary club.

Learn about careers in the science area

Cost $150 for the 3 day program, $200 for the 4 day program

Further information and application forms are available from your school science teacher or The ConocoPhillips Science Experience website www.scienceexperience.com.au or by phoning 03 9756 7534 or email; admin@scienceexperience.com.au. The ConocoPhillips Science Experience, PO Box 158 Monbulk Vic 3793.

ISSUE 3 I MAY 2017

22

Brighton Secondary School Newsletter May 2017  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you