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ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO by Stefanija M. Sieler


GEBURTSDATUM:

25. März 1988

GEBURTSORT:

Montenegro

STAATSANGEHÖRIGKEIT:

Montenigrin

ADDRESSE:

Magdalenenstrasse 26/5 1060 Wien, Österreich

Tel. Nummer:

06507507853

E-Mail: E-M

stefanija.majstorovic@gmail.com


CURRICULUM VITAE:

AUSBILDUNG: Masterstudium Architektur TU Wien

ARBEITSERFAHRUNG: Wien, AUT

2011-217 Bachelorstudium Architektur Architektur Universität Belgrad Ar

April 2016-jetzt : Selbstständig Buenavistaarchitecture Mitarbeit bei Projekten im Bereich Wohnbau, Innenausstattung und Design in allen Projektphasen; Einreich-, Polier- und Ausführungsplanung sowie Baustellenerfahrung

Belgrad, RS

März 2014-October 2014 : Praktikum Sue Architekten

2006 -2009 JU Kotor Gymnasium

Kotor, MNE

2002-2006

Mitarbeit bei Projekten verschiedener Größenordnungen, vom Entwurf bis zur Umsetzung; Wettbewerbserfahrung, Ausführungsplanung Mai 2009 - September 2009: Praktikum Kotor Engineering Mitarbeit in Entwurfsphase von mehreren Wohnbauten im Küstengebiet von Montenegro

SPRACHKENNTNISSE:

SOFTWARE SKILLS: Archi CAD

Photoshop

Serbokroatisch, Bosnisch (BHS)

Muttersprache

Auto CAD

Illustrator

Englisch

Fließend

Rhino

In Design

Deutsch

Fließend

Sketch Up

MS Office

Französisch , Spanisch

Fortgeschritten


PROJEKTE:


11

EILEEN GRAY ARCHIVE; DUBLIN ENTWERFEN SS 2014; GESTALTUNGSLEHRE Prof.Andras Palffy Betreuer.Walter Cernek

SITUATION //COLIN BARRACKS

The project assigment was to plan an archive for the Irish designer-architect Eileen Gray, whose work,at the time, is either a part of diverse private collections, or belongs to an Irish National Museum, situated at Collins Baracks, in wester area of Dublin. This is also where the given building site is positioned. The Historic Barracks , characterised by their simplicity and bareness as well as by the spatiouse U shaped courtyards, are positioned on an artificialy made plateau 7m above the street level and further furth down the river Liffey. The middle of the three prevously existing Barrack trakts is the building site area.The invisioned Archive complex spreads on almost the entire area of the forseen site. By surrounding the archive building itself with walls the concept of square within the square is created.This newly formed place invites its visitor to pause, stop and take a moment to reflect.The entrance to this complex is provided from both the palteau and the street level, the latter one beeing most likely to be used by majority of visitors, taking in consideration it s proximity to the tram station. Staircase path, cutting through the surroding wall of the platform and connecting it with the street plain provides for the direct acess to the new archive. Situated on the south front area of this newly created place,as a separate entity, is a visitors bar, overlooking the neughbouring site of a Guinness factory.The interior of the archive is organized in a relativley simple manner. Situated in a small basment area are building serveces.Foyer, shop,offices (north side),delivery and temporary exhibition area are situated on the buildings ground floor. The actual archive is situated on the first floor and opens itself up to a spatious roof terrace that offers room for a sculpture bu garden, whereas third floor features the archives library. By displacing the building floors in an opposing manner an interresting form is created, that transports the functions and contents of this building to it s outer shell. The impression the spectator gets by looking at the invisioned building differs from the one of inclosed entity, created by the surrounding walls, to the impression of openness of the glass facade groundfloor and further to the mixed and contrasted nature of the upper floors.


A

A

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


BASEMENT PLAN

SECTION A-A


ANSICHT OST


21 DORFTEXTUR; BURGENLAND MOERBISCH AM SEE

ENTWERFEN SS 2013; GESTALTUNGSLEHRE Prof.Andras Palffy Betreuer.Walter Cernek Project assigment was to build the extension of an exsiting neighbourhood located in Moerbisch on Lake area of Burgenland.The housing architecture of Moerbisch is typical for the area of Burgenland-elongated structures,with public areas oriented frontaly and built in the line with street regulation,and private areas accomodated in the back of the structure . In post war period this historic village texture was damaged by new extentions that were based more on freestanding house types. On the building site borderd by old part of the village and freestanding houses on one side, and Neusiedler lake on the other, the new extension was to be built, influenced by historical village texture but modernized and adapted to the contemporary needs. The designed masterplan is on its south and north side bordered by carparks, and intersected by a main traffic street , accomodating a public space along the line of it. Houses positioned on weste side of the site are regulated more strictly towards the street line whereas the houses oh the east side are positioned more loosley and are opening themselves in the direction of lake and natural surroundings.Alltogether five house types have been invisioned for this masterplan, all of wich represent a variation of the traditional courtyard house. Each house has, apart from one more opened courtyard, one or more that are private and withdrawn. The inner courtyards play important part in providing the light for the interior of the house but also in connectig and sepparating the individual rooms. In order to keep the image of a existing historicalvillage, materials used for the building of the houses -brick and white plastering for the facades- are also kept traditionall..


GROUND FLOOR PLAN OF AN EXAMPLARY BLOCK

SECTION THROUGH AN EXAMPLARY BLOCK


SITE PLAN


b

a

a

HOUSE TYPE A

b

TYPE A //SECTION bb

TYPE A //SECTION aa

TYPE A //VIEW bb

TYPE A //VIEW aa

TYPE A //GROUND FLOOR PLAN


b

a

a

b

HOUSE TYPE B

TYPE B //SECTION bb

TYPE B //SECTION aa

TYPE B //VIEW bb

TYPE B //VIEW aa

TYPE B //GROUND FLOOR PLAN


b

a

a

b

HOUSE TYPE C

TYPE C //GROUND FLOOR PLAN

b

a

a

TYPE C //SECTION bb and ELEVATION bb

TYPE A //SECTION aa

TYPE C //VIEW aa

b

TYPE C //FIRST FLOOR PLAN

TYPE C //SECTION aa


b

a

a

TYPE B //GROUND FLOOR PLAN

HOUSE TYPE D

TYPE D //SECTION bb

TYPE D //SECTION aa

TYPE D //VIEW bb

TYPE D //VIEW aa

b


b

a

a

b b

HOUSE TYPE E

b

TYPE E //SECTION bb

TYPE E //ELEVATION bb

TYPE E //GROUND FLOOR PLAN

TYPE E //SECTION aa

TYPE E //ELEVATION aa


31

LITERATURE CENTER GLASGOW ENTWERFEN WS 2012; GESTALTUNGSLEHRE Prof.Andras Palffy Betreuer.Walter Cernek

Glasgow Literature Center is supposed to acommodate Scottish writers society, providing spaces for exhibitions, lectures, presentations, workshops, library, as well as work and living. The main idea was to create new place where writers could gather and exchange ideas and knowledge.The chosen location is Nelson Mendela place, situated in the center of Glasgow, in direct proximity of the main shopping street, train staition and the city s central traffic axe. Building site itself is positioned in the midst of historic buildings, St.George s church, as well as fewer examples of post war and post modern architecture. Therefore the design needed to be carefully inserted within these surroundings. Proposed design is based on play of volumes achived with use of minor but significant overlaps that break the compact form predefined by borders of a building site, but also on interplay of transperent and solid surfaices, that adds to the rythm of the building. The interior of the design is defined by clear separation of primar and secondary functions. Comunication lines, storage rooms and general infrastructure, are placed in the far back of the building, living enough space for creating flow between main functions,through using mainly galleries and voids.


B

A

A

B ERDGESCHIOSS //LOBBY + SHOP


SCHNITT AA


B

A

A

2 OBERGESCHOSS// LIBRARY

B B

A

A

1 OBERGESCHOSS// LCG CAFE

B


ANSICHT AA


B

A

A

4 OBERGESCHOSS// LCG VERWALTUNG

B B

A

A

B

3 OBERGESCHOSS// LCG VORLESUNGSRAUM


41

ARCHIVE MARZONA; FRIAUL

ENTWERFEN SS 2012; GESTALTUNGSLEHRE Prof.Andras Palffy Betreuer.Walter Cernek

SITUATION PLAN FRIAUL

The concept ,therfore, consist out of simple, opened groundflor level that is completley transperent, through use of glass facades, and connects exibition spaces to the surrorunding landscape.This opennes transfers itself also on the upper, overlapping level, that provides for generous view overlooking the whole area. Back of the building is partialy ingraved into a hill, on top of which lies an upper floor terasse, that furder opens itself to the landscapeรถ. In contrast to the grounfloor level, upper floors only glglass facade is the frontal one,therefore the space recieves light mainly through the roof openings.Material chosen for upper volume, other than glass, was Corten Steel, mainly for its colour and texture but also because the impresion it gives changes through the seasons.


A

B

B

A

GROUND FLOOR PLAN//EXHIBITION


A

A

MID-FLOOR PLAN //ADMINISTRATION +LIBRARY A

B

B

B

B

B

B

A

A

BASEMENT//ARCHIVE

A FIRST FLOOR PLAN//EXHIBITION +LIBRARY


ELEVATION A A

SECTION A A


ELEVATION B B

SECTION B B


51

OBJEKT UND PRODUKT DESIGN; FAIR STAND-MODULAR DESIGN

MODULE 1

MODULE 2

MODULE 3


SCI TU SHOW


The assignment was to create a Stand for Tu Science Fair, with features of flexibility, simple assembly, low cost production and easy transport. Taking in consideration these requests we decided to use modular design approach, creating three different types of triangulary shaped modules that combined in various ways provide for different functions and uses of a fair stand.Connecting these triangles to one another is performed via silicon molded connectors fitted to their perforated surfaices.The modules themeselves are consisted of individual perforated alluminium parts, assembled and brought to triangular shape by using safety belt that has been previously attached to these elements with special press and clic connectors.


MODUL SS 2011/OBJEKT UND PRODUKT DESIGN Prof. Chrisian Kern Betreuer.Peter G.Auer; Fridolin Welte Design by: Stefanija Majstorovic; Igor Dimitrovski; Vanja Stojanovic


61

INDUSTRIAL TO CULTURAL

DIPLOMARBEIT 2017; GESTALTUNGSLEHRE Prof. Andras Palffy Betreuer.Walter Cernek

PLANNING A MULTIDISCIPLINARY CULTURAL CENTER ON THE ABANDONED INDUSTRIAL SITE OF OBOD FACTORY IN CETINJE, MONTENEGRO The city of Cetinje is the old royal republic of the country of Montenegro, situated between Croatia and Albania on the Adriatic coast. The city is situated between the touristic coastal region and the business centre and capital of Podgorica, and has a huge significance for the Montenegrin identity and cultural life. Historically a centre for administration, arts and religious and political power, after the second world war it was developed as an industrial region, with the refrigeration factory OBOD providing most of the employment of the city. After the crises of the 1990‘s and the following economical de demise, the population of the city is in decline and the former factory areas are left unused, resulting in a disruption of the informally developed housing areas around them. The idea to reuse these factory buildings as part of a cultural centre first came from performance artist Marina Abramovic and OMA, although investments for the proposal never took off. The proposed design builds on the Abramovic project, but expands its functions to performance art, theatre, museum and archive as well as teaching and administrative functions of the local university. By opening the site in all directions and using a mixture of orthogonal and organic shaped roads and paths, the new cultural centre will be better integrated in its surroundings and offer local residents easy access to its park; the newly constructed buildings form a connection in scale between the single-family homes of the surrounding and the massive factory halls of the existing site.


LAND - USE PLAN Research of its historic data shows that the city of Cetinje has a long tradition of culture, education, openness and hospitality. This sense of communit, nurtured throughout centuries, is therefore reflected in the spatial and architectural formation of Cetinje. Mainly characterized as a cultural and historic city, today Cetinje has more than 55 protected monuments. There are 15300 inhabitants in the territory of Cetinje, but the number is decreasing as a result of economic decline and unemployment. Despite its declined economic development, Cetinje city is still an economic center of Cetinjes administrative region, and due to it being the former royal capital, as previously mentioned, it enjoys a special status.The map on the right shows the distribution of land-uses such as residential, commercial, cultural, industrial etc. on the territory of Cetinje.

As this city’s primary activity, living encompasses 60 % of the built structures on the Cetinje plain. Housing blocks vary in their type and size, from closed to semi-opened, from predominantly single-family houses to collective living blocks, with the housing development rate dropping from city’s centre to its periphery. The city‘s central activities, places of cultural, historic and also religious significance, bars, hotels and shops are concentrated mainly within the already mentioned historic city core, which is most urban and populated zone of Cetinje city. Situated in this area are also the two universities and the academy whose role along with that of cultural-touristic landmarks presents the core of Cetinje‘s functions.


GREEN ZONES

STREET NETWORK

The cities largest free green areas, forest zones, are situated around the rims of the Cetinje plain whereas the city’s significant parks, such as 13 July Park, Njegos Park an Vladicina Garden as well as its recreational and sport locations such as Eagles Rock, Summer stage and Obilica stadium are situated in close proximity to the city‘ s historic core. As mentioned the former industrial sites are situated in the outskirt city zone and correlate with housing units and green surfaces. Without even taking into consideration the contamination level, the positioning of these sites is considered negative, due to their structure and size, which is not in accordance with the city’s architectural ambiance. wh

The main roads of the orthogonal traffic network, the historic Njegoseva street and Montenegrin Heroes Boulevard, Baja Pivljanina street and newer Mojkovacka street (continuing onto regional road R1 on the Cetinje Plain) are longitudinally oriented (direction north-west to north-east). The named historic roads are both starting from the historic core and are continuing along the city’s central area. Njegoseva street extends to the Boulevard of Montenigrin Heroes and continues throughout the Industrial zone of upper Cetinje and Bajice area, whereas Baja Pivljanina street ends in the residential area of the second city zone.


V I SUA L M AR KE RS

Reco gn iza b le loca tions are si ng led out on th e map on the right, selected throug h sub jec ti ve analysi s of Ceti nj es spa tial and archi tectural quali ti es an dvi su a l m arkers. T he m aj ori ty o f these places are concentra ted wi thi n t he ci ty‘s hi stori c core, whi ch o n ce agai n confirms i ts posi tion and signif i ca nce. The e xtrac ted streets-li n ear m arkers are t he mai n axes of movem ent wi t hi n th e ci ty, acti ng a s a c onnec tor b et ween landscape and landmark markers. T he p ri mary li near m ar ker , t he Bou levard of Montenegri n Heroes, co nn ects th e f or mer In dustrial area, si tua ted i n the upper parts of th e Ceti n je plai n, wi th t he h i stori c core of C eti nje. Lo st d ue to the econom i c d emi se an d consequential seize of i ndustrial acti v i ty, th e id enti t y of th e form er factori es such as the Fridg e Factory Ob od, Shoe Factory Ko sut a and Tra nsport Systems Factory B oj ana i s yet to be n ewly d efi ned. Any ci ty, irrel evant of i ts size , i s d efi ned and represented by i ts center (or ce nters) . T he ci ty ce n ter i s where t he ci t y‘ s popu la tion i ntegra tes and merg es i nto a commun i t y. “A c ti va ti n g” the former i ndustrial si tes of the u pp er Ceti nje plai n wo u ld revi ve a n d repur pose thi s a bandoned and obsolete c i ty area. T he d evelopm ent an d organiza tion of thi s new potential c en ter wou ld be i n fluenc e d by e c onom i c, c u l tural, poli ti cal and sociologica l f actors .23 Pres ent brownf i eld loca tio n s are a ba ndone d and unpreserved, w hi ch refle ct s p oorl y on the vi sual charac ter of t he ci t y. Wi thout a user and functions , th e l oca tion i s l eft wi th out a pur pose. For i t to be of value agai n, i t wou ld first need to acco mm oda te and p rovid e for a larg e nu mber of v ersa ti l e users. Ma ki n g an i ntervention on such a lo ca tion wou ld consequently i nfluence th e nu mb er and t ype of i ts users, t heir ne eds, acti vi ti es and i mpressions. In u rb an surroundi ngs con si sted of a nu m ber of “non-places”, such as the sub jecte d i ndustrial area o f Ceti n j e , c rea ti ng a place wi th a specifi c id enti ty wou ld provid e for th e unique character of the entire loca tion.


OBOD BROWNFIELD Although the term brownfield is nowadays widely used, it does not have a single widely recognized definition. Its meaning varies and is mostly formulated at the level of individual countries. As a relatively new concept, dominant use over the past two decades in the US and Europe has still not resulted in the definition of a precise meaning. The most commonly cited brownfield definition comes from the Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in 1997: „Brownfields are abandoned, idled, or under-utilized industrial and commercial facilities where e^xpansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination“ . Brownfield developments hold a central place in architectural and urban planning incentives as they imply rehabilitation of brownfield sites and their conversion into new and healthy urban environments. Most cities in the world are faced with the issue of having a significant number of unused surfaces, which often occupy attractive land but are largely environmentally unfriendly. Areas that have been known as unified and uniform spatial components during the industrial era now have the opportunity to become, through their upgrade, new carriers of urban identity, key landmarks, areas where social processes are taking place, and visually dominant sites.26 OBOD Cetinje Electrical Industry, together with the other abbandoned former industrial structures of Cetinje is a brownfield site, whose adaptive reuse, decontamination and reactivation could change and bring a new life to not only the visual and functional identity of Cetinje but to that of the whole of Montenegro.


CONCEPT-IDEATION The first plan to reinvigorate the area of OBOD factories came from performance artist Marina Abramovic and was presented at the 2012 architecture Biennale together with Rem Koolhaas and his office OMA. Born in 1946 in Belgrade, Marina Abramovic has become one of the most important performance artists of her generation. After studying at the Fine Arts Academy in Belgrade, she pioneered the art form of performance art and is the only one of her peers to still conceive and perform new pieces today; almost always, the medium and the subject of her works is the human body, and more specifically, her own body. This can result in works presented in performances, video, photography, sound or sculpture and always provides for an intense viewing experience, as for example in her seminal work „The Artist is Present“, during which she spent 700 hours sitting on a chair in the middle of an exhibition of her own work in MoMA, New York. After being the reciprient of a number of awards for her life‘s work, such as the Austrian Commander cross for her contribution to art history, the golden lion for best artist at the Venice Biennale, various honorary doctorates as well as teaching obligations in europe and north america, she has focused on establishing the Marina Abramovic Institute (MAI), which seeks to teach her method of performance art through collaberations with schools and workshops throughout the world. 28 The expansion of the institute would include institutes in Hudson NY, Manchester, Moscow, Niigata (Japan) and Nagarjunakonda (India), meaning the Cetinje Institute would be a centre for activities in continental europe. Unfortunately, investments for the proposal never took off; financing was to be split between public and private sources, with half the spaces going to light industrial production and different industries, such as film production. Also planned were retail spaces, a boutique hotel as well as bars and leisure spaces. The vision was for the centre to be a „generator of change, a massive driving force for reanimation, revitalisation, thawing, 'clearing‘ and 'airing‘, for the 'confluence of clear waters‘, as a motivator of cultural development in Montenegro itself and of its linking up as a network with individuals, groups, institutions, ideas and initiatives in the modern international cultural context .In order to design a succesfull cultural centre on this site, the Abramovic Project can be used as a solid basis for a reimagination of the functional program, so that a sustainable and well integrated design can be conceived.


FU NC T IONS

Th e si te an d th e who le ci ty o f Ceti n je i s o bvio usl y an i d eal p lac e f or i n -d ep th works ho ps , tea ch i n g an d stud yi n g, refl e ctio n an d p rac ti ce; due to i ts i m med ia te c o nt ac t wi t h na tu re a n d t h e ro ugh a nd wi l d mo un tai n o us terrai n , i t o ffers a u ni que s et ti n g for arti sts wh o se ek pri vac y wi t h ou t di s rup tio n an d, a t t he sa me ti m e, a c o mmu n i t y o f t h eir p eers. Th ere fore, a n emp hasi s o n performa nc e art, as p ro p ose d by Mari na Abram ovi c, as well as vi sua l art s i n a b ro ad er se n se , su ch a s pai nti ng, sc u l pura l and vid vi e o an d so un d art sh o u l d b e m ad e .In ord er to ro ot th e cen tre i n t h e c omm un i t y surro un di n g i t , ro om s for tea ch i ng a nd research s ho u ld be ma d e a vai la bl e to t he lo c al u ni versi t y; th i s co u ld i nc l ud e stu di es of wi l dlif e an d na ture, a s well a s archi te ctura l stu di es such as t he p res erva tion o f t he ma ny mo nu m en ts o f Ceti n je.Fi nal l y, i n ord er to crea te a s en se o f c om mun i ty an d mai n tai n th e c en tre year-ro un d, h ousi n g un i t s for arti sts i n resid e nc e s ho u ld be c rea ted , so tha t arti sts worki ng on l on g- term pro jec ts ca n ma ke t he spa c e th ei r o wn a nd c rea te a pers ona l c on ne ctio n to t he si te.


B y o pe ni ng up t he si te to the pu bli c, ma ki n g the central par k area a c cessib le , i nteracti on b etwe en the lo ca ls o f Ceti nje and the ar ti st s i n resid ence wou ld be ena b led , resu l ti ng i n a li v eli er neighb ou rho od . To su m mari z e , th e mai n fu nc ti on s id entifi ed are: P E R F OR M A N CE A RT V IS U A L A RT TEACHING C O M M U N ITY S PA C ES Th T hee m ai n cha lleng e of the d esi gn w i ll b e to group these functions i n a w ay t ha t o ffers bo th p ri va cy and comm uni ty, allow s for spa ces of contem pla ti on , b ut a lso p ro je cts openness, so tha t the p ro je ct w i ll be ac c epte d a nd emb rac ed by the l ocal s. Thi s wi l l be a f a ctor i n t he d ev elopm ent o f ac ces- ways and pa ths, but also i n t h e o v erall s cale of th e bu i ldi ngs , si n ce the exi sti ng structures are i n st ark contrast wi th th e surro undi ng si ng le-f am i ly h om es. I t w i l l t here fore b e i mporta nt to f i nd the right mixture bet w ee n t h e t wo sc ales, a nd crea te a f aca d e tha t shows of f the i n terior f unc tio ns , whi le no t looki ng forei gn or ali en on approach.

Acess by road i s ess ential a nd sho u ld, a t th e sa me ti me , b e fairl y d iscre et, so as to not i nterrup t t he sce ner y and clut ter u p th e c aref u ll y cre a te d pu bli c s paces. S i nc e Montenegria n s oci ety i s very h ea vi l y d ep en dan t on cars as a mod e of trans port a tion , a n a pt ly size d parki ng g ara g e wou ld allow f or plenty of vi si tors to arri ve easi ly, whi le al so en suri ng th e space transf er of ar t obje cts i n a nd out of the com ple x duri ng th e of ten rai ny wi nter season. By crea ti ng acc ess to th e garag e b y ram ps from t he m ai n road and the back of the bui ldi n g, traf fi c co u ld fl ow by t he si te a nd easi l y turn to par k wi thout di s rupti ng vi si tors arri vi ng o n foo t or bike . Esp e cial l y d eli veri es wo u ld grea tly ben ef i t from a c onti nuous ro ad ru n ni ng th ro ugh the gara g e. Ped estrian acc ess i s esse nti al to the suc c ess of the d esi gn , si nce the centre shou ld not only a t trac t arti st s a nd th e p eop l e worki n g i n i t, but als o locals and vi si tors. S i n ce C eti nj e i s s o cl os e to t he to uri sti c coast al region, wh i ch i s one of th e f astest growi ng tou ri sti c reg ion s i n europe, th ere i s a m ar ket f or a hu g e nu mb er of tou ri st s loo ki ng to s pen d eu a day i m mersed i n cu l ture, away f rom t he sea; Ceti nj e al rea dy of fers plenty o f hi stori ca l mo nu ment s and m useu m s, s o vi si tors scro lli ng th rough the ci ty shou ld b e enc oura g e d to d i sc over t h i s area b y ple n ty of i n teresti ng and i nvi ti ng pa ths . Thi s wi ll be achi e ved b y d esi gn i ng t h es e access pa ths i n a na tu ral, organi c s hape , remi n i s ce nt of th e pa th s th rou gh the adj ace nt moun tai ns; t hes e wi ll i nterse c t wi t h t he ort h ogo nal pa ths p or trudi ng f rom th e si te, s ymb oli zi ng the u nio n bet we e n t he t wo d ifferent sy stem s of d esign aestheti c.

Th ro ug h t he pa t hs , g re e n area s are d ef i n e d, resu l ti ng i n d iffere nt , org a ni c al ly sha pe d fi eld s, a s t h ey are f ou n d t h ro ug ho ut th e surro und i n g su bu rb s . As th ey have a more i nf orm al charac ter, the y s hou ld be fi l l ed wi th typi cal l y l oc al g rass p lan ts a nd tre es, su ch as pi n es a nd li nd en . As th e y app roach th e si te , th e fl ora c ou l d b ec om e more c u l ti va te d , un ti l t hey reach t h e fu l l y orth o go nal f i el d s b et we e n th e pa t h s of t he cu l tura l ce ntre . Insid e th e c on fin es of t he si te , gree n areas s h ou l d sti ll have a na tu ral fe el , but si nce the y are restri c te d b y li mesto ne or c on c rete wal kways t he y wou ld ha ve a more c u l ti va te d a nd orga ni ze d fe el. Th e m ai n ram p a t the fro nt of t he b ui l di n g l ea di n g u p to th e wal kways of t h e fi rst f lo or i s al s o green , a s are s evera l fi eld s o n t he first fl o or. Trees o n t he bi g g est green sq uare are kep t, wh i l e th e s mal l er ne w g re en areas are rep la nted wi t h trees f oll o wi n g th e orth o go na l ra ster a nd d egra di n g i nto more l oo se pa tterns on th e bigg er s pa ces a vai la bl e. Taki n g t he si ze of the si te i n to ac co u nt , i t be com es o bvio us t ha t all o wi n g for s evera l pha ses o f co nstru c ti o n i s ne cess ery , a l lo wi ng f or on e sec ti on o f p lan n i ng to b e co mp leted a nd fu nc ti oni n g be fore th e next ste p i s u nd ertake n. The f irst p ha se wou ld b e t he revi ta li sa ti on o f t h e f actory b u i l di ng s and t he ca n ti n e, c rea ti ng th e muse u m, arch i ve an d p ro du ctio n s pa c es whi ch wo u ld f un ctio n as a s e para te e nti ty; as a s ec ond ste p, th e t hea tre al o ng wi t h th e g ara g e wo u ld b e bu i l t , whi le th e t hi rd step wou l d be th e rem ai n i n g b ui ld i ng s towards th e ba ck , cl osi n g t h e cou rtyard an d c entra l park. bu


CULTURAL CENTER OBOD-SITE PLAN


GROUND FLOORPLAN


FIRST FLOOR PLAN


SECOND FLOOR PLAN


SUBLEVEL PLAN/RESEARCH+GARAGE


B

A

c

E

E

D

D

B

A

C

SECTION BB

SECTION DD


SECTION AA

SECTION CC

SECTION EE


MUSEUM ARCHIVE PRODUCTION This part of the centre hosts a museum, archive as well as spaces for the production of art, all located in the old factory halls of OBOD. Through the saw-tooth roof, there is plenty of indirect light, and the industrial architecture makes for perfect surroundings and a modern, gallery-like atmosphere. On the first floor, all three factory halls are connected by a walkway, allowing visitors to observe and interact with artists and teachers

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


FIRST FLOOR PLAN


MUSEUM ARCHIVE PRODUCTION SECTION


THEATER RESEARCH RESIDENCE The newly constructed buildings house a fully functioning theatre with complimentary practice- and preparation rooms, housing for artists in residence, offices for administration as well as research labs for the local university, specializing in monument restoration. It also features the existing cantine, repurposed as an info point and welcome centre, and access to the underground level via ramp.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


SECOND + THIRD FLOOR PLAN


THEATAR RESEARCH RESIDENCE SECTION


FIRST FLOOR PLAN


PERFORMANCE ART EVENT WORKSHOP DIGITAL


RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION EDUCATION In order to connect the cultural centre to the surrounding housing area, organically shaped paths are used on the fields next to the site; these are interlocked with the orthogonal paths portruding from the site, An atrium allows light to fall into the basement rooms which need them.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN SECOND FLOOR PLAN


RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION EDUCATION SECTI-


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