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Stefanie Sword-Williams


Contents

LIVE PROJECT: universal works Stefanie Sword-Williams N0309424


01

Introduction pages 1-2

02

The Early Stages pages 3-10

03 methodology pages 11-12

04 BRAND IDENTITY pages 13-16

05 INCLUSIVE OFFER pages 17-26

06 COMMUNICATION PAGES 27-34

07 RECOMMENDATIONS PAGES 35-50

08 THE NEXT STEP PAGES 51-52

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REFERENCE LIST, ILLUSTRATION LIST & BIBLIOGRAPHY PAGES 53-60

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APPENDIX PAGE 61-84


‘Like all things you want to succeed in, you have to work stupidily hard and believe in what you are doing.’

(Keyte in Robinson 2011: online)


01 Introduction Universal works is a brand that stands for many things, quality, timelessness, authenticity but overall product. Originating in Nottingham in 2009 the menswear label has progressed to be a worldwide success across the globe in cities such as Stokholm, Tokyo and New York. With a huge following and interest, the brand recently opened its first flagship store in London and launched a fully transactional website. Whilst currently at the peak of its success Universal Works are looking to evolve the brand further to continue to achieve its global presence. As a group we have discussed various avenues to venture into and we have chosen to strengthen the brand identity, design a new communications strategy and overall create much more inclusive offer. Whilst the brand has shown huge success we believe that in order to continue this Universal Works need to improve on these areas. A thorough investigation into the brand, consumer insights and future possibilities are highlighted within this report. As the struggling retail market weakens Universal Works need to consider and address all the elements that make up a strong brand. The brand can no longer solely be about the product. Universal works have a personality and a genuine story to be told so we feel that if we leverage all qualities that build up the brand, Universal Works could be put in its rightful place of the market.

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The Early Stages In order to understand how to move forward with the brand, a large range of analysis was carried out. From exploring the brand online to building visual moodboards, we were able to discover the real identity of Universal Works. Initially we were briefed by owner David Keyte in which he discussed the background of his career, the development of the brand and his aims for the company. Here we present the key findings from the briefing that we considered a good starting point. (for full briefing see A1:61)

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Wants the tone of voice to be witty and honest Northern utiltiarium modern Universal works because it works Inspired by the Manchester look Less revolution more evolution British brand so needs to be british No time for womenswear Men are more loyal Most excited about film Likes the idea of marketing aimed to finding stories Interested in sportswear range Has a background in working with kidswear Potential for unisex products.

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FIGURE 2: Moodboard of pinterest & blog visuals


STORE VISIT

To get a better understanding of the brand we took a trip to flagship store in London, which we aimed to collect visual, and consumer research. Whilst on our visited to the store we spoke to part time graphic designer and stales assistant at Universal Works, Josh Morgan. He gave us a brief overview of the consumer, the brand and where they could improve. (To view full interview see A2:63)

‘We get a lot of creatives, but it ranges sometimes doctors, lawyers, with our location we attract a wide audience. As a store I see young men come in too, it’s a place where old boys will come to dress like men.’ (Morgan J 2012)

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consumer insight

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Andy Yao, 21

Phil Bambridge, 37

Why do you shop with Universal Works?

Why do you shop with Universal Works?

How do you feel about the mixed age appeal?

How do you feel about the mixed age appeal?

‘I like the style of the brand, its hard find brands that stay true to British heritage.’

‘I love all the brands on this street, Oliver spencer, Folk, they all have that good quality authentic feel.

‘I prefer that the younger market are wearing it too. It makes me feel better about buying it, I like that we are all coming from the same angle.’ (Bambridge 2012)

‘ It makes sense for the designer; I mean why wouldn’t you try appeal to everyone.’ (Yao 2012)

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Jonathon Andrews, 35

Neil Barker, 42.

Why do you shop with Universal Works?

Why do you shop with Universal Works? ‘I like it because you can tell the products are made to last, its hard to find that nowadays.’

I suppose you’d say we’re the part of society that don’t care about labels, so much more about the quality of the product, I know I can get that here.

How do you feel about the mixed age appeal?

How do you feel about the mixed age appeal? ‘ I just come in and look for myself, the other people in the shop don’t bother me, so I dont really have a problem with it. (Andrews 2012)

‘It doesn’t bother me particularly because its not that well known I don’t see every kid I know wearing it. ‘ (Barker 2012) (view all A3:68)

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Methodology Type of research: Store visit (Primary) Aim: To gain an understanding of brand experience instore, its location and speak to existing consumers. Reason for this method: We chose to visit the store to really understand the brand experience personally. Be able to physically see product, location and consumer allowed us to be able to give a full and round analysis of the brand.

Type of research: Interview via email with industry professionals (Primary) Who: Individuals working in the branding and marketing industry. Aim: To discuss the importance of branding and product development with specialists to gain an industry insight on how to progress with project. Reason for method: We were aware that all those contacted run their own businesses and have limited time available, so we chose to contact them via email. With option to look and consider the questions in their own time, the use of emails gives the respondents the time to think about what they are being asked and how the could reply effectively. The results gathered from this method can also be used as qualitative data to help show professional insights and opinions on the subject area.


Type of research: Communications Experiment (Primary) Who: The experiment was carried out on 16 current UW consumers with ages ranging from 20 – 45. Aim: To gain consumer insight on how they would like to be marketed to in the future. Reason for Method: We felt that the experiment could help gain a realistic insight from the current target audience. Asking the sample face to face allowed us to discuss and explain the idea to help gain the most reliable results. We could also instantly view the respondent’s initial reactions to each image to help determine their true feelings. We chose this over a survey as we wanted to collect data from the main consumers within the location.

Type of research: Interview in person with brand related individuals (Primary) Who: Interviewed UW sales assistant and head sales assistant of external UW stockists Sa-Kis. Aim: To gain an insight on the current consumer and how they might react to a brand extension. Reason for Method: We chose to interview the respondents in person as we felt we could build a better conversation with him about our content. It allowed to explain any questions misunderstood whilst also having no limitations on wording.

Type of research: Case Studies, online research, journals, books (Secondary) Aim: I explored a variety of different mediums online and offline to help investigate and support every chapter covered with in the report. Reason for this method: To show an understanding on how to critically analyse competitors, brands and consumers. Displaying the ability to cross compare brands in order to learn and move forward with ideas. As the brand is still developing it was useful to use this platform to build on information that was not easy to gather personally. Whilst looking at books helped to contextualise and use varied methods to gain good consumer insights. 12


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BRAND IDENTITY Prior to our store visit we investigated into the current appearance of the brand how Universal Works market themselves as a company. Initially we looked into the branding, from the logo to the swing tags, we found that as a brand they have taken quite a basic approach. A simplistic style can often work effectively as competitor brands YMC, Our Legacy and Folk have proven with their minimalist aesthetics. However we feel that the dated typewriter font and bleak colours used for the Universal Works branding doesn’t create a strong desirable brand image. We later discovered the logo redesign created by design agency ‘The One Off ’ for the launch of the Universal Works flagship store. A selection of wall art, interiors and graphic redesign has given Universal Works the burst of energy that was much needed. ‘We created a store based around the brand image of honest, crafted and universal design’ (The One Off 2012: online). On our store visit we found the interiors of the shop felt much more authentic and appropriate to the brand whilst displaying their ability to not only offer product but a brand experience also. Although the powerful new logo gives Universal Works the modern image needed, the combination of the original font with the redesign doesnt quite fit appropriately.

*Tips: It is important for Universal Works to show consistency in the font and the logo, a reevaluation of how the two sit together might be needed when moving forward.

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ONLINE PRESENCE Despite the huge improvement on the logo and branding we were disappointed to find that the update of the aesthetics had not been fully implemented throughout the whole brand.

‘The more consistent the brand is across all customer touch points, then the more the brand will have a firm impression on people and will be more easily recognizable.’ (Tasner M 2010:online) CEO of web design company Taz Solutions Michael Tasner, explains that as once you have established how you want your company to be perceived you should make sure it is implemented throughout. This is specifically important to Universal Works to take note of, now they have confirmed a visual identity for the brand they need to apply to every platform. Similarly as illustrated in Figure 10 the general visual imagery used between each online network also lack of consistency. Although the content delivered through the website, blog and social networking sites is on brand and engaging the lack of continuation from one site to another displays an unclear brand image and direction.

*Tips: In order for Universal Works demonstrate a clear brand identity the brand needs to implement similar aesthetics throughout all consumer touch points.

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INCLUSIVE OFFER

As universal works pride themselves on appealing to a wide range of ages we wanted to explore how the brand could create a product extension to become a much more inclusive offer. Our initial thoughts were to add additional sizes of the range to appeal to another set of consumers. To understand how possible this could be we interviewed Universal Works agent Martin Gill. We made enquiries as to how easy it would be to create additional sizes, how they would sit with the brand and how we could market it. (For full interview see A2:67) From Martins responses we discovered that with careful consideration into product and consumer acceptance, the idea to extend the sizing could be a potential possibility to move forward with. Our next step was to identify brands that successfully appeal to a varied target audience through an extension of its product offering.

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We are aware that UW cater to the smaller sized market in other countries, is it a possibility that sizes made for japan could be translated to the uk? M: ‘Absolutely it’s all proportionate; so it’s simply a case of the smaller sizes being more important commercially in the Japanese market.’

From a practical point of view how easy would it be to create additional sizes of the current collection? M: ‘Practically it relies on grading and grade scales. Some factories are very good at grading across broad size ranges but some may be reluctant to have to grade down too far. It is though, not too difficult a task.’

Which of the garments included in the current collection would the easiest to adapt into smaller sizes? M: ‘It’s not so much about the easiest styles to adapt per se but more about the end consumer’s ability to accept those garments. A mini version of a parka for example may prove too expensive whereas jersey and sweat styles can be manufactured more cheaply as the fabric rating is lower.’ (Gill 2012)

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AMERICAN APPAREL One brand that has already effectively done this is American Apparel. Known for its cotton basics, the brand has managed to subtly design similar products that can be offered to mixture of consumers. The versatility of the designs have allowed the brand to cater to a varied market through the adaptation of sizing. With little variation of products, the brand now markets it’s mixed range encorouging consumers to ‘match with kids’. Online they place the same product for each consumer alongside one another so they can easily match their looks.

*Tips: A subtle transformation is important when integrating age and gender. If Universal Works were to extend its sizing, altering staple items could be the way to progress.

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The Market To understand who to target we researched into both the womenswear and the childrenswear market to see which highlighted an opportunity for Universal Works. With a much broader and fast moving market, the women’s wear category was one that we braised with caution. As female consumers has a wide variety of choice in style and price we feared that entering and succeeding in this market could be difficult. We also noted that when briefed by David at the start of the project he claimed that he didn’t have enough time for womenswear, as men are much more loyal. (Keytes 2012) Prior to starting his own label David’s background in designing varied from working closely with Paul Smith to also working on kidswear. With this in mind we felt investigating the current childrenswear market could help determine whether there was a gap in the market to venture into. We explored the current UK kidswear market where we found there are opppurtunites for growth to be considered. It is not only our analysis of the market that highlights the potential to move into the childrenswear, but Country Manager Jonny Hewlett also discussed why Diesel are considering venturing into the market. Although there is potential in the market, Universal Works would need to consider ways of catering to the younger market without alienating the existing consumers.

‘Not only does kidswear in general offer big expansion potential, but the UK market specifically is yet to be fully maximised.’ (Hewlett in CWB 2012: online).

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cultural trends In terms of culturally, there has been a rising trend in family blogging and styling online. Bleubird Vintage, Dawn & Deeper and Babble, are just a few of the blogs all dedicated to illustrating individual key looks and family style. The blogs have received a huge online following and could be described as key influencers in youth fashion today. The success and rising demand of this type of blog outlines the development in attitudes toward style conscious families and fashionable children. As the craze of documenting family style continues to rise the demand for more stylish childrenswear will too increase. Not only is there a growing interest socially online, but Mintel recently reported how it is now the child that cares most about their appearance as they are becoming much more style aware. ‘Two thirds of 7-12-year-olds believe it is important to look good. (Mintel 2012: online) The childrenswear report explained that it is these children that have a high level of influence over their parents and what they want them to purchase. As children are becoming to have much more power over their parents spending, targeting this age bracket could prove to be effective.

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ACCEPTANCE The changes in consumer attitudes, emerging style trends, and the gap in the market all highlight a potential opportunity for Universal Works to create additional smaller sizes that would appeal to the youth market. Universal Works have already been successful in gaining a varied age range following, one that could be extended further to the boyswear category. To gain a better understanding of the current consumer and how they would react to a product extension, we discussed our ideas with Head Sales assistant at Nottingham stockist Sa-kis Jack Crofts. (to see full interview see A2:64) Jack pointed out in his interview that the current consumer has a high level of confidence that wouldn’t be easily knocked. As long as the brand doesn’t isolate or neglect existing customers a product extension could be well received.

*Tips: If Universal Works were to consider moving forward with additional sizes they would need to ensure the way in which they market the product would involve both the current consumer and the new consumer.

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We want to create a stronger brand identity and potentially extend the offer to appeal to a broader market, how do you think the current consumer would react to it? ‘I think they’d be quite open to it, I mean the customers we usually get with universal works kind of do their own thing if they like the product they buy it. They wouldn’t feel intimidated if you brought in other things, as long as the stuff for them is still there. But I do think they could with bulking out the label a bit more.’ (Crofts J 2012) 26


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Communication As a brand Universal Works have formed a large fan base and the love for the brand continues to grow purely around the product. And although it is an impressive accomplishment, if the brand were to divide more time into the marketing aspects of the business they could reach out to a larger audience. Sa-ki’s Jack Crofts, explained that the brand has some good quality pieces but lacks in appealing to the younger market. Until joining the store a year ago Crofts was unaware that the brand even existed. He agreed that offering more marketing could reach out to a broader market and when asked how the brand could improve Crofts replied,

‘By appealing to a younger audience mainly because at the moment its quite stale in my opinion. It could do so much better as a brand if they put themselves out there a bit more.’ (Crofts J 2012) As Jack is an example of a young consumer who could be interested in the brand it was useful to get his insight on how he perceives Universal Works. It is clear that a development in the marketing could involve the younger market more and build brand awareness.

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We also discussed importance of having a focussed brand message and communication strategy with Purple Circle’s brand director John Lyle. He explained that when brands don’t have a focussed strategy customers can feel lost and uninvolved, he described it as ‘schizophrenic behavior’. He then went onto reference French connection and their lack of brand focus, ‘One minute it’s French chic, next minute it’s Fcuked’. (Lyle J 2013). From our interview with John we found that learning from your mistakes and moving forward is essential for any brand to succeed. If we want to market Universal Works as more of a lifestyle brand we need to demonstrate why the consumer would benefit from the brand. Lyle explained that we all have enough stuff there has to be a reason for it.(Lyle J 2012)

*Tips: Universal Works need to establish an appropriate brand message and tone of voice when communicating with a range of consumers.

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RELATIONSHIPS Currently Universal Works display quite amateur visuals of both the young and old consumers modeling the products. What we love about the brand is the fact that it does appeal to a mixed age audience however currently their marketing approach seems quite disconnected. As a group we feel that the brand could put more emphasis on the relationship between the consumers to create a more united appeal. Two brands that we feel have been hugely successful in marketing themselves around relationships are the Kooples and Kinfolk.

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THE KOOPLES The Kooples are a brand that communicates stories on real people in real relationships. Through the use of print, film and online they deliver original and inclusive content that appeals to a varied audience. In an interview with Drapers, Co Founder Alexandre Elicha explained that for them the brand is more than just a product.

Today a brand isn’t just about the product. Of course the product has to have an espirit, but then it’s the message, the store, Raphaels films, it all goes together. (Elicha in Santi 2011:online)

Not only do they promote a strong identity and message but they also have different ranges and collaborations to help broaden appeal. Universal Works need to realize that each element that builds up the brand is important when creating a strong overall brand message.

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Kinfolk Another brand that we feel successfully promotes themselves through the use of relationships is independent magazine Kinfolk. Through their use of soothing, calming and emotive imagery and film, the brand conveys themselves as a welcome community. As a brand they challenge the modern interactions of connectivity and they want to focus more on returning to communications around the table.

‘Every element of Kinfolk the features, photography, and general aesthetics are consistent with the way we feel entertaining should be: simple, uncomplicated, and less contrived.’

(Kinfolk in MagNation 2013:online)

Their refreshing stripped back approach delivers true and instantly connecting emotive marketing. Universal Works could benefit from Kinfolk’s method of marketing, by going back to its routes and emphasizing its most attractive qualities.

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EXPERIMENT So with this in mind we wanted to test the idea around marketing relationships to the Universal Works consumer and get their thoughts on the approach. We therefore conducted an experiment in which we took a trip to the St Conduits street flagship store and asked customers which imagery they feel more instantly connected to. The aim was to discover what appeals most to the current consumer in order for us to build an appropriate and relevant marketing campaign for the existing and new range. Out of the 16 customers asked 11 chose Image A whilst 5 chose Image B. When asked why respondents chose the image around relationships, the responses were:

‘You feel more drawn to the warmth of the image’ ‘Its more intimate’ ‘Sometimes its boring just to see the product, its nice to see bit of background. ‘Yeah, I think universal could do well with this’ ‘We see the product in store its nice to see bit more of the brand’

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A

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RECOMMENDATIONS

Taking into consideration all of the research conducted we feel that the next step for Universal Works is to focus on creating more inclusive offer. To do this we feel a stronger brand identity needs to be emphasized, and extension of the current product offer and deeper communication strategy needs to be designed. David specifically pointed out in our first meeting any brand extension would have to be in line with his current ‘ageless style’ (Keytes 2012). We have taken into consideration Davids brand aims and preference to help build three main recommendations.

STRONGER BRANDING As mentioned there appears to be a lack of consistency of the branding from online right through to offline. As previously mentioned we found the instore visuals much more brand appropriate and effective which is why we feel they should be implemented throughout all mediums. In our interview with John Lyle he claimed it is ‘vital’ for brands to demonstrate consistency when communicating to the consumer to ensure that they instantly recognize the brand. (Lyle 2012) The visual imagery used across the various online platforms should also be connected to ensure that the journey the consumer takes is one that flows effortlessly. We believe if Universal start by making the small steps of consistent branding they could benefit as an instantly recognizable and rounded brand.

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MORE INCLUSIVE OFFER Our overall aim is to create a much more inclusive offer. As Universal Works already target a varied age range we feel the brand could extend the bracket with additional sizes to appeal to a younger consumer. In our initial research we discussed appealing to either the female or child consumer however further investigation into the current market led us to believe there are more opportunities in kidswear. An article from the Telegraph also reported that new research claims men are more loyal customers than women, as they tend to stick to the same brands. (Telegraph 2010: online) We feel that if Universal Works were to appeal to the consumer at a younger age they could build a stronger relationship with the consumer, which would in time lead to brand loyalty. We propose taking a selection of the current range and creating additional sizes in XS, XXS, XXXS. To ensure we create an inclusive offer we want to include the additional sizes within the current Universal Works title instead of creating a kidswear subrand. As a group we would like to build on the universal appeal and avoid creating a segmented brand identity. As agent Martin Gill pointed out, there should be careful consideration into what products are taken forward into smaller sizes. Consumer acceptance and practicality, are factors that will determine the most appropriate products to create in additional sizes. Martin suggested that opting for jersey garments and lower priced products would be easier to manufacture and sell for the brand. Figure 24 and 25 are examples of the current pieces of collection the could be created in smaller sizes. We understand that there would be a variation of consumers that would be interested in the product extension. We have identified three consumers that we feel best describe our target audience: The Stylish Mother, The Emerging Boy and Universal Works Father..

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STYLISH MOTHER Style conscious women who pride themselves on their own personal style and the appearance of their families. She shops at a variety of brands Barbour, Jil Sander and Kenzo as well as high street stores such as French Connection and Zara. She uses net-a-porter for online shopping. She works hard and has a keen eye for style. She loves visiting the city on days out and travelling with her family to see new and exciting places. She struggles to find good quality clothes for her kids that are not cheaply made and do not survive the wear and tear of their busy lifestyle.

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EMERGING BOY As he is growing up he is becoming more aware of individual style and what it means to him. He wants to create a look that is his own and enjoys putting different styles together. He enjoys the trips his family take him out on and loves having a browse in stores. He admires his dads knitted jumpers, coats and shoe’s, he understands the quality of his tastes. He enjoys reading, film and taking photos with his gradad’s polaroid camera, which influences a lot of his style. He loves it when he is treated to a new Paul Smith coat from his parents and wears it with pride.


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Uw father He has already bought into the brand and loves the classic and timeless items they offer. He understands that you have to pay for quality these days when it comes to clothing. He enjoys educating his kids on film, music and art and enjoys spending more money on better quality for his kids clothing. He buys Universal Works because he feels they are reliable and trusts their designs. He doesn’t take himself too seriously but still treats himself to a designer suit and watch to finish off his staple wardrobe.

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LOCATION Within our primary research we highlighted the opportunity to extend the product offer in relation to the UK market. As a group we were unable identify few, if any direct competitors with the same product offer. Authentic, stylish clothing for the young male consumer highlights a huge potential for universal works whilst premium brands such as Diesel have also identified the gap in the market. With an opening in the market, we feel the extension should be initially launched in the UK, exclusively from the flagship store. As the brand holds a British heritage we also feel it would be most appropriate to start in the original location. We are aware that smaller sizes might not fit appropriately in current Universal Works stockist stores, which is why it would start firstly in the flagship location, and later explore into other methods of distribution.

‘Choosing garments that give off a cool vibe is particularly important to those who live in the capital’ (Mintel 2012: online)

If the range were to be successful a future recommendation could be to expand the additional sizes worldwide. As Mintel highlighted it is particularly important for ‘cool’ clothing to be worn by those living in a capital city. In relation to Universal Works the next locations to consider could be style capitals cities New York and Tokyo. Whilst the growing interest around Europe also highlights opportunities for the brand to launch its collection in emerging style cities Copenhagen and Stockholm.

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Focussed Communications Strategy The one area Universal Works is hugely lacking in is its marketing. David has admitted that very little has been put into that side of the brand due to lack of time and knowledge he explained he just “doesn’t understand marketing” (Keytes 2012) We believe that although David’s products have obviously grabbed and impressed an audience, if a stronger communication strategy was developed Universal Works could be a stronger overall brand. We feel in order to create a more inclusive offer our marketing strategy needs to involve the selection Universal Works consumers. To do this want to focus on the varying relationships that are apparent with in the brand, with a strong focus on community. Taking inspiration from The Kooples and Kinfolk for their emphasis on relationships we would like to visualize brand with a much more fresh and honest approach. Through emotive visuals, film, print and online we want to reach the varied target audience through all consumer touch points.

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EVENTS

SUPPORT

COLLECTING

CONNECTIONS

fixing things

MEETING PEOPLE

BUIDLING THINGS

MODERN SOCIETY

STARTING A GROUP

SOLVING PROBLEMS

C O M M UNIT Y

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The next Step A brand that started out to create good quality, timeless and ageless product has reached its goal. The next chapter for Universal Works is to broaden the appeal. In order to move forward we believe a stronger brand identity needs to be implemented throughout all platforms of Universal Works, once the brand demonstrates consistency it can then consider how to broaden its appeal. The rising trend in stylish children, consumer changes and an opportunity in the market support the extension on sizing. We have understood David’s request on continuing his ‘ageless’ style and we believe by offering additional sizes the brand can continue to be timeless. The final area that needs to be improved is the communications strategy; with the wide range of target consumers a more inclusive marketing approach could help increase brand awareness and form a stronger relationship with existing customers.

The time to make Universal Works truly universal, is now.

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Word Count: 3217 (exlcuding quotes)

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REFERENCE LIST Andrews J 2012 Consumer insight. Interview with: Stefanie Sword Williams, Universal Works London 7th November Crofts J 2012. Head Sales Assistant at Sa-kis: Interview with Alice Hammerton, Sa-kis store, Nottingham 23rd November. Bambridge 2012 Consumer insight. Interview with: Stefanie Sword Williams, Universal Works London 5th November Barker N 2012 Consumer insight. Interview with: Ellena Barron, Universal Works London 5th November Elicha in Santi, A. 2011. The Kooples. [online] Available at: http://www.drapersonline.com/news/independents/the kooples/5029574.article [Accessed: 12/1/2013]. Gill M 2012. Agent of Universal Works: Interview with Ellena Barron via email 15th November. Hewlett in CWB, 2012. Diesel Power. [online] Available at: http://www.cwb-online.co.uk/article.php?id=298 [Accessed: 28/12/2012]. Keytes D 2012. Universal Works Briefing [Lecture to Fashion Communication and Promotoion]. 25/10/2012 Keytes in Robinson, M. 2011. Ten Questions with David Keyte, Founder of Menswear Label Universal Works | OEN. [online] Available at: http://the189.com/ten-questions/ten-questions-with-david-keyte-founder-ofmenswear-label-universal-works/ [Accessed: 26/10/2012]. Kinfolk in Magnation.com 2013 Kinfolk Magazine Subscription . [online] Available at: http://www.magnation.com/Kinfolk-magazine-subscription-3366.php [Accessed: 23/1/2013]. Lyle J 2012. Brand Director of Purple Circle: Interview with Ellena Barron via email. 12th November. Mintel 2012. Childrenswear – UK [online] Availble at: http://oxygen.mintel.com/sinatra/oxygen/list/ id=590005&type=RCItem#0_1___page_RCItem=0 [Accessed on 4/11/2012] Morgan J 2012. Sales Assistant at Universal Works: Interview withStefanie Sword Williams, Universal Works Store, London. 6th November. Tasner, M. 2010. The Importance of brand consistency. Michael Tasner, [blog] July 14th, Available at: http:// michaeltasner.com/blog/the-importance-of-brand-consistency/ [Accessed: 24 Jan 2013]. Telegraph 2010. Men make more loyal customers than women, researchers claim - Telegraph. [online] Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/7869155/Men-make-more-loyal-customers-than-women-researchers-claim.html [Accessed: 12/1/2013]. Theoneoff.com 2012. Universal Works Retail Store for Universal Works | The One Off. [online] Available at: http://www.theoneoff.com/work/browse/client/unoversal_works [Accessed: 27/10/2012]. Yoa A 2012 Consumer insight. Interview with: Alice Hammerton, Universal Works London 5th November

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Illustration List Figure 1: Sword Williams S (2012) Universal Works store [photograph] own image. Figure 2: Selectism (2010) Q&A with David Keyte [photograph] Available at: http://www.selectism. com/2010/08/27/qa-with-david-keyte-of-universal-works/ Figure 3: Sword Williams S (2013) Pinterest Moodboard [moodboard] own image. Figure 4: Sword Williams S (2012) Store fireplace [photograph] own image Figure 5: Sword Williams S (2012) UW works customer 1 [photograph] own image. Figure 6: Sword Williams S (2012) UW works customer 2 [photograph] own image. Figure 7: Sword Williams S(2012) UW works customer 3 [photograph] own image. Figure 8: Sword Williams S (2012) UW works customer 4 [photograph] own image. Figure 9: TheOneOff (2012) Universal Works Redesign [sketch] Available at: http://www.theoneoff.com/ work/browse/client/unoversal_works Figure 10: Sword Williams S (2013) Universal Works online presence [moodboard] own image. Figure 11: American Apparel (2012) Match with kids [photograph] Available at: http://store.americanapparel.net/scaled-down.html Figure 12: American Apparel (2012) Match with kids 2 [photograph] Available at: http://store.americanapparel.net/scaled-down.html Figure 13: Carolines Mode ( 2012) Boy [photograph] Available at: http://bambinostreetstyle.com/category/ boy/page/2/ Figure 14: Ellesworth L (2013) Lyon Family [photograph] Available at: http://bleubirdvintage.typepad.com/ blog/2013/01/what-we-wore-the-lyon-family.html Figure 15: Ellesworth L (2013) Lyon Family styling photo [photograph] Available at: http://bleubirdvintage. typepad.com/blog/2013/01/what-we-wore-the-lyon-family.html Figure 16: Sa-Kis (2012) Sa-Kis shop floor [photograph] Available at: http://www.sakis.co.uk Figure 17: French Connection (2000) Cool as FCUK [advert] Available at: http://www.marketingweek.co.uk/opinion/blogs/seb-joseph/how-french-connection-reversed-its-fortunes-with-new-adstyles/3030355.article Figure 18: Universal Works (2009) Universal Works – Spring/Summer 2010 Collection [photograph] Available at: http://swipelife.com/2009/10/14/universal-works-springsummer-2010-collection/ Figure 19: Universal Works (2010) Universal Works Autumn/Winter 2010 Collection Lookbook [photograph] Available at: http://the189.com/style/fashion/universal-works-autumnwinter-2010-collection-lookbook/

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Figure 20: The Kooples (2012) Alex Cunha [photograph] Available at: http://blog.sight-management.com/ alex-cunha-for-the-kooples/ Figure 21: Kinfolk (2012) Kinfolk Dinner [photograph] Available at: http://thenouveauromantics.com/kinfolk-dinner-austin Figure 22: Sword Williams (2012) Communications Experiment [moodboard] own image. Figure 23: Sword Williams (2012) Instore branding [photograph] own image. Figure 24: Universal Works (2012) Option A for product extension [photograph] Available at: http://www. universalworks.co.uk/pocket-tee-shirt-9 Figure 25: Universal Works (2012) Option B for product extension [photograph] Available at: http://www. universalworks.co.uk/radford-sweatshirt-4 Figure 26: Sword Williams (2013) Stylish Mother Consumer Profile [moodboard] own image Figure 27: Sword Williams (2013) Emerging Boy Consumer Profile [moodboard] own image Figure 28: Sword Williams (2013) UW Father Consumer Profile [moodboard] own image Figure 29: The Yard (2012) World Map [photograph] Available at: http://theyardpdx.tumblr.com/ post/40819738984 Figure 30: Kinfolk (2011) Kinfolk Manifesto [print screen] Available at: https://vimeo.com/33173768 Figure 31: Sword Williams (2013) Community Moodboard [moodboard] own image. Figure 32: The Yard (2011) Growing book [photograph] Available at: http://theyardpdx.tumblr.com/ post/12376670662

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Our Legacy 2012 01 - Our Legacy. [online] Available at: http://www.ourlegacy.se [Accessed: 27/10/2012]. Peggsandson.com 2012 Universal Works | Universal Works Clothes | Peggs & son. [online] Available at: http://www.peggsandson.com/brands/universal-works [Accessed: 26/11/2012]. Phillips, T. 2013 Universal Works SS13 Lookbook. [online] Available at: http://pausemag.co.uk/?p=8212 [Accessed: 23/1/2013]. Polaroids On Sidewalks 2013 Look of the Day. Polaroids on Sidewalks, [blog] 19th Decemeber, Available at: http://polaroidsonsidewalks.com/2012/12/19/the-look-for-the-day-159/193584483954160088_irwkrmcv_c/ [Accessed: 20/12/2012]. Proper 2013. Universal Works Paisley Tshirt. [online] Available at: http://www.propermag.com/site/universal-works-paisley-t-shirt-2013-01 [Accessed: 24/1/2013]. Keytes in Robinson, M. 2011. Ten Questions with David Keyte, Founder of Menswear Label Universal Works | OEN. [online] Available at: http://the189.com/ten-questions/ten-questions-with-david-keyte-founder-ofmenswear-label-universal-works/ [Accessed: 26/10/2012]. Rugged Old Salt 2013. Sun Spot. Rugged Old Salt, [blog] 20 January, Available at: http://ethandesu.com/ post/40979056207/sun-spot [Accessed: 30/11/2012]. Santi, A. 2011. The Kooples. [online] Available at: http://www.drapersonline.com/news/independents/ the-kooples/5029574.article [Accessed: 12/1/2013]. SCHLEY, B., & NICHOLS, C. 2005. Why Johnny can’t brand: rediscovering the lost art of the big idea. New York, Portfolio. Shane, M. 2011. Exclusive Q&A with Universal Works Designer/Founder David Keyte. [online] Available at: http://pursuitist.com/exclusive-qa-with-universal-works-designerfounder-david-keyte/ [Accessed: 30/10/2012]. Sproules, G. 1974. Fashion Theory: a Conceptual Framework. Advances in Consumer Research, 1 p.463472. Available at: http://www.acrwebsite.org/search/view-conference-proceedings.aspx?Id=5731 [Accessed: 13/12/2012]. Stylesavage 2009. StyleSavage speaks to Universal Works. Style Savage, [blog] 29th July 2009, Available at: http://stylesalvage.blogspot.co.uk/2009/07/style-salvage-speaks-to-universal-works.html [Accessed: Tasner, M. 2010. The Importance of brand consistency. Michael Tasner, [blog] July 14th, Available at: http:// michaeltasner.com/blog/the-importance-of-brand-consistency/ [Accessed: 24 Jan 2013]. Telegraph 2010. Men make more loyal customers than women, researchers claim - Telegraph. [online] Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/7869155/Men-make-more-loyal-customers-than-women-researchers-claim.html [Accessed: 12/1/2013]. Theoneoff.com 2012. Universal Works Retail Store for Universal Works | The One Off. [online] Available at: http://www.theoneoff.com/work/browse/client/unoversal_works [Accessed: 27/10/2012]. Thisisnottingham 2010. The ex-miner taking on the fashion world. [online] Available at: http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/ex-miner-taking-fashion-world/story-12243463-detail/story.html [Accessed: 27/10/2012]. 59


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APPENDIX

A1 : Intiial Briefing with David Keyte pages 61-62

A2: Interviews pages 63-67

A3: Consumer insights page 68

A4: Consent Forms pages 69-73

A5: Tutorial Sheets pages 74-79

A6: Case Study Notes pages 79-80

A7: Critical Path pages 81-82

A8: Team Blog Details pages 83-84

A1: Initial Briefing with David Keyte: - UW currently sold through many independent retailers, small boutiques, also Urban Outfitters now and trade shows/fairs - small independent/community aspect important to brand - Just opened new store and website, beginning to grow, brand needs to keep up - online presence, marketing, branding and communication needs improvement. - Currently don’t have a marketing strategy, other than putting their own products next to other products and brands of similar desirability (another reason stockists important) -

Strengths - really good product that really works - now need to let everyone else know

- Menswear is less about revolution, more about evolution (we want to evolve the brand, but subtly so that it is still understandable and accessible menswear, just extended) - Always considering womenswear but its an issue of time and a different market - Men are either really lazy or really loyal, women shop around across different brands more (Steph doesnt want to do womenswear) - David “doesn’t understand marketing” - understands product more as this is where it all starts - now need to work out how to get it in front of people. 61


- All their “marketing” atm is about distributing, selling and clients (all internal operations, no consideration of consumer communications) - Methods of communication - old mediums seem to be dying - film seems to be very exciting, cheap and easy, engaging, looks more real to people - Wants to make products ageless, questioned people about age targeting, and all results and answers varied by and reflected the models’ and respondents’ own ages. -

Stylish products - depending on style of person, not age brackett

-

“We happen to be of a time where age is very forgiving”

-

Brand extension would have to be in line with this ageless style etc

- Story of the brand - small team of motivated, talented team - brand story never intended to be personal though, but have been wary of the ‘cult of celebrity’ - Wanted product success to be about strength of product, not celeb endorsement - But, brand story and authenticity and authority can be related through real people, and stories, and relatability. - UW is interested in lifestyle of consumers, particularly aesthetically - Want website to talk about music, fishing, chip shop on friday as well as newest shirts - Don’t want to sell stuff to people, just want to engage with them and let them buy if they like it - Womenswear is hard market, don’t have enough time for it and women are much more loyal. - Want honesty, a bit of humour and wit, a “go on, buy something else” “lets just chat” vibe - Want to create dialogue with consumer - Think about realistic limitations of staff and time etc which comes with creative ideas (all our ideas are relatively easily executed - adding new sizes, may only be 1 extra pattern size? creating stronger branding and identity not hard, comm strat tbc) -

Could market menswear as unisex

-

Japanese buyers bought collection for women - but some sizing issues - need smaller

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A2: Interview with Universal Works sales assistant Josh Morgan Josh: My name is josh morgan and Im 22years old. Stef: And what is your role at UW? Josh: I am the part time sales assistant Stef: How long have you worked there Josh: Since a little bit after we opened the store august 2012 Stef: And how would you describe the brand? Josh: Its humble, honest full of integrity not simple but attention to detail Stef: What type of consumers Josh:Err we get a lot of designers a lot of people in advertising and graphic design. Stef: So quite a lot of creatives? Josh: Yeah a lot of creative but it ranges sometimes doctors, lawyers, with our location we attract a wide audience. As a store I see young men come in too, it’s a place where old boys will come to dress like men. Stef: Do you get a range of consumers, like men, women, children? Mainly like 18 onwards, loads of women shopping for their partners and with their partners. To make sure they look good. Stef: In terms of branding how would you describe the brand? Josh: Well it doesn’t really follow a theme, its not been branded to its full. The colours I would like to associate with the brand are utilitarian colours like navies greys whites, but Id add bursts of contemporary colours, using work wear theme style by including temporary colours not to bold. Stef: Would you wear the brand? Josh: I do, yeah. Stef: Are you aware of any marketing that they do? Josh: Its really fresh at the moment, its starting out because they have launched the presence the marketing is still in the making, which is why it could be open to changes. Stef: Do you think that more marketing could help appeal to a wider audience? Josh: Of course, it needs a boost, to spread the word. Getting to people online, more social media different forms of advertising could do a lot for the brand. Stef: What areas do you think universal works could improve? Josh: Marketing as mentioned, design is fine, space could be something, another location, another store. So people have two point of contact that they could venture out to. 63


Interview with Sa-Kis head sales assistant Jack Crofts Jack: Jack Crofts and Im 20 Alice: So what is your role at Sa-kis? Jack: Im the main sales assistant working full time pretty much. Im also in charge of the full promotion of the shop around Nottingham Alice: And how long have you been working at Sa-kis? Jack: For just under a year now Alice: What type of consumers come into the store? Jack: All ages really, mainly from twenty plus and you’ve got a lot of your high end 40 year old men Alice: Do you get like a range of consumers, men women and children? Jack: Usually males really obviously as it’s a menswear shop but towards kind of Christmas time you’ve got a lot of women coming in. And children, we’ve got quite a streetwear area, which appeals to the younger ages. So you get quite a mix. Alice: And what are your views on universal works as a type of brand? Jack: Its nice brand, the quality of the clothing is lovely I believe that the designs could be better they’re a bit basic. Alice: And would you wear the brand? Jack: Yeah I like some nice stuff they have, the jumpers and shirts are really nice. Alice: Are you aware of any marketing from the brand? Jack: No I’m not aware of any, Alice: So you’ve never seen any in your own time? Jack: No I’ve never come across any, I didn’t hear about the brand until worked at Sakis Alice: Do you think that maybe marketing could help appeal to a wider audience? Jack: Definitely Alice: What areas do you think universal works could improve? Jack: Designs maybe, and appealing to a younger audience mainly because at the moment its quite stale in my opinion. It could do so much better as a brand if they put themselves out there a bit more. Alice: Because we want to create a stronger brand identity and potentially extend the offer to appeal to a broader market, how do you think the current consumer would react to it? Jack: I think theyd be quite open to it, I mean the customers we usually get with universal works kind of do their own thing if they like the product they buy it. They wouldn’t feel intimidated if you brought in other things, as long as the stuff for them is still there. But I do think they could with bulking out the label a bit more.


INTERVIEW WITH BRAND DIRECTOR JOHN LYLE (via email) Hi John, Im emailing to ask whether you might be able to contribute to my university live project. We are currently working on the menswear brand Universal Works and we wondering if we could get your input on the importance of brand. With your consent we would later use your responses to the following questions in our work as references. You are fine to use my answers later on. How important is it for a brand to update it’s logo and visuals? Update yes, but dramatic change very rarely works This article Says a bit about it http://johnnylyle.co.uk/2009/07/28/why-coca-cola-really-won-the-cola-wars/ gap made a simple change that was pointless and reversed it when the customer complained. I think that changing logos should only be done to mark a massive change. A line in the sand that how you behaved before is not how you are going to behave going forward It has to be that significant or it will fail it’s moving the chairs around on deck of a sinking ship, putting lipstick on a pig A new logo changes nothing, but a change in the way you behave at every level, marked by a new logo can sometimes work saying that, I can’t think of (m)any How can a focused communication strategy and message help create a really strong brand identity? By constantly banging the same beat on the drum if you imagine one of your friends or someone you have trusted. one minute being fine with you and listening and chatting away and then turning on you it gives out confusing messages and even more so if they are friendly and chatty next time You won’t hang around with them long as you don’t know where you stand with them. Same with brands. it’s almost schizophrenic behaviour and that’s what happens when brands don’t have a focussed comms strategy just look at French Connection One minute it’s french chic, next minute it’s Fcuked. What brands do you think do this well already? Virgin, amazingly well even though they get a lot wrong, they apologise, learn from it and move on when they make mistakes, they close them down and again, move on co-operative, they can be trusted for food and banking Waitrose, they would NOT put a horse in your burger How important is it for a brand to demonstrate consistency when communicating with consumers? Totally vital, as above

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In terms of the visual identity would you say that inconsistency can create confusion and put off consumers? See the coke article above I think in extreme cases, people just won’t recognise the brand for what it is and may reject it as being fake or an extension too far It’s almost like a toxic shock Look at the extensions KitKat did a few years ago with an over enthusiastic Brand manager, totally wrecked the brand consistency. Visually colours were all over the place, but people didn’t understand where that snack should fit into their lives, was it healthy,unhealthy, indulgent etc. Do you have any tips on how could communicate themselves as ageless? yes, be classy, rise above fads and make things that are timeless, expensive and beautifully made if things last, it gives consumers more time to enjoy them and justify the quality of their purchase if they are expensive and fail quickly this is the worst of all worlds as people just think it’s a rip off, don’t come back and tell their friends I’m like that with Oswald Boateng whose suit fell apart very quickly. What do you see is the future of communications for lifestyle brands? There has to be a reason for it We all have enough stuff. no-one needs to own more things, so anything lifestyle has to make you happier, healthier, richer, more attractive etc as per the list on Why Johnny can’t brand http://johnnylyle.co.uk/2008/07/09/the-best-book-on-branding/ Hope that helps All the best John

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Interview with Universal Works agent Martin Gill Hi Martin, Hope you are well. Im not sure if you remember but my group are looking at the potential of adding additional sizes to the range to appeal to a broader audience so we just have a few questions related to the idea. If okay with you we would use your response as a reference within the body of our reports. No Problem. From a practical point of view how easy would it be to create additional sizes of the current collection? Practically it relies on grading and grade scales. Some factories are very good at grading across broad size ranges but some may be reluctant to have to grade down too far. It is though a not too difficult. We are aware that UW cater to the smaller sized market in other countries, is it a possibility that sizes made for japan could be translated to the uk? Absolutely it’s all proportionate; so it’s simply a case of the smaller sizes being more important commercially in the Japanese market. Which of the garments included in the current collection would the easiest to adapt into smaller sizes? It’s not so much about the easiest styles to adapt per se but more about the end consumer’s ability to accept those garments. A mini version of a parka for example may prove too expensive whereas jersey and sweat styles can be manufactured more cheaply as the fabric rating is lower. More complex garments such as outerwear still have lots of sewing work and component parts that will keep the price up and not so child or youth friendly. That’s in crude terms about consumer expectation of pricing. Which items would customers be prepared to spend more money on? I think that’s fairly apparent based on the garment type but in reality I find trousers/jeans to be very price resistant and knitwear of anything like decent quality tends to be more expensive but the end consumer often doesn’t ‘get’ what’s gone into the garment and higher priced knits are often a more difficult sell. Relatively speaking printed/embroidered jersey and sweats can command a good margin and appear to be able to command higher prices relative to cost. Outerwear and jackets also tend to be able to command relatively higher prices. How do you think stockists would react to UW adding additional sizes? The current distribution would not find smaller sizes very relevant I think you need to look at an alternative or an addition distribution channel for this kind of extension to the range. See if you can see any new opportunities outside of the current stockists. Having said that there are some of the current retailers who could carry extra product like you are suggesting. And of course any UW own retail. Do you think that a product extension in size should distributed through external stockists or should they be distributed purely through Universal Works as a brand exclusive? ( see answer above) Hope all goes well. Martin.

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A3:Consumer Insights Andy Yao, 21 Why do you shop with Universal Works? A:‘I love all the brands on this street, Oliver spencer, Folk, they all have that good quality authentic feel. How do you feel about the mixed age appeal? A: ‘ It makes sense for the designer; I mean why wouldn’t you try appeal to everyone.’ (Yao 2012) Phil Bambridge, 37 Why do you shop with Universal Works? P: ‘I like the style of the brand, its hard find brands that stay true to British heritage.’ How do you feel about the mixed age appeal? P:‘I prefer that the younger market are wearing it too. It makes me feel better about buying it, I like that we are all coming from the same angle.’ (Bambridge 2012) Jonathon Andrews, 35 Why do you shop with Universal Works? J: I suppose you’d say we’re the part of society that don’t care about labels, so much more about the quality of the product, I know I can get that here. How do you feel about the mixed age appeal? J:‘ I just come in and look for myself, the other people in the shop don’t bother me, so I dont really have a problem with it. Neil Barker, 42. Why do you shop with Universal Works? N:‘I like it because you can tell the products are made to last, its hard to find that nowadays.’ How do you feel about the mixed age appeal? N:‘It doesn’t bother me particularly because its not that well known I don’t see every kid I know wearing it. ‘ Nathan Wells 27 Why do you shop with Universal Works? N: ‘I like to mix English utility style with American style, I love finding pieces that you don’t see on everyone. Its not about brands for me, thats why I like Universal Works stuff. Its not in your face.’ How do you feel about the mixed age appeal? Yeah I quite like it, its a good mix of people.

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A4:Consent forms for consumer insight

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Consent forms for Morgan & Crofts Interview

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Consent forms for experiment

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A5:Tutorial Progress Sheets

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Case Study Notes Case study: The Kooples One brand that we feel successfully communicates the idea of relationships is The Kooples, through this unique approach to marketing. The Kooples was founded only three years ago yet has been extremely successful with 180 stores, 100million euros in sales and about to enter the US market. Brazenly launched just months before the recession hit, it apparently ‘helped’ them, according to their creative director, rather than hindered. Founded by three French brothers, Alexandre, Laurent and Raphael Elicha, and their success has been staggering. Their entrance to Britain in November 2010 was aggressive, opening 20 stores and running a hard-tomiss campaign that featured ‘real life’ couples modelling the label’s sharply tailored clothing. “For Elicha and his two brothers, Laurent and Raphael, the “spirit” of The Kooples is as important as the product. “Today, a brand isn’t just about the product. Of course, the product has to have an esprit,” he tells me in French, “but then it’s the message, the store, Raphael’s films [featuring the likes of Johnny and Corinna, which are shown in cinemas and on The Kooples’ website]. It all goes together.”” (drapers) In this quote, the creators are highlighting the importance of a brands ‘spirit’ alongside the brand message, the store and other communication methods such as film. The Kooples use real people, real stories and real relationships as their main marketing campaign. Through the use of these various communication methods, they are able to bring together their main message of couples and their relationships through the brands marketing. The Kooples offer different ranges and collaborations to broaden their appeal. These include the Kooples Sport casualwear and a Pete Doherty collaboration march 2012. Some say ‘I don’t think there’s anything particularly unique about its fashion design’ (Portas, 2012: Online) possibly revealing the strength of the brand lies in their creative marketing campaign. With the high quality products Universal Works offer alongside a creative communication strategy could be key in helping them stand out from competitors. Although The Kooples have accumulated huge success over their short existence of 3 years, we feel that their message of couples could be seen as restricted and could struggle to continue to capture their audience’s interests over the years. We feel that our idea of ‘community’ using relationships through the ages holds longevity through the numerous routes and relationships that could be focused on throughout Universal Works life span.

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UW UNIVERSAL-BRAND MESSAGE: Marketing to “families” CASE STUDY: Brand Communication Analysis: KINFOLK - Kinfolk Manifesto video etc - Communications are calming, soothing, simple, beautiful - blue/grey tint - An artistic and soothing approach to living life well - gentleness and awareness, slow - Bleak and rustic aesthetic, raw, honest, true. - “Take your time” - “Friends will be found in shared experiences” - Simple, uncomplicated, less contrived What can be learnt: GOING BACK TO BASICS. - Re-connecting and re-energizing with people - Respect and care for one another - Challenge modern contrived inter-connectivity - Return to communications round a table - Share yourself with others, have relationships - Inclusive Community, Universal Community? Applying inspiration to UW: Marketing to families. Starting points and themes for communications stategy: - Nostalgia - Generations - Tradition - Emotive - Hobbies - Skills - Teaching - Advice - Respect - Speaking and listening - Communication - “Old fashioned” - Back to basics - Authentic - Respect your elders - Photographs, memories, stories, sharing - Male bonding activities, skilled hobbies - Fishing, camping, sport, mechanics, hunting, road trip, music, gardening, DIY - Encourage forming small communities, and spending more time in person - Quality time, father-daughter, brother-brother, grandfather-grandson, aunt-nephew - Connections, relationships, collaborative

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Group Critical Path


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Team Blog: http://teamthumper7.tumblr.com Pinterest: pinterest.com/teamthumper7


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Universal Works - Stefanie Sword Williams