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513.324.1511

stefaniedirks@gmail.com

stefaniedirks.com

leed ap bd+c

stefanie dirks


kamen tall architects


This building, constructed in 1927, saw several minor repair programs over the past 80 years. Unfortunately these repairs were executed improperly or without understanding of the cause of the deterioration evidenced in the facade. By the time work began on the building much of the terra cotta ornament evidenced serious cracks, nearly 60 percent of the lintels were deflecting, and the masonry showed full height cracks at both sides of nearly every corner. Surprisingly, the majority of the structural steel above grade remains in excellent condition. Only three spandrel beams at the sixteenth floor and two bulkhead beams require replacement, along with the reinforcement of several adjacent columns. Below grade however, we are currently proceeding with repairs to thirteen severely deteriorated perimeter columns. Because of the building’s age, material types, and its location within a proposed historic district, all repairs, when possible, are being made in place and all replacements are being made in kind. Over the past year we have restored the majority of the facades, with only the steel repairs and roof replacement remaining.

upper west side landmark


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1. bird’s eye view of building prior to repairs 2. cracked facebricks due to lintel corrosion and deflection 3. cracked facebricks due to lintel corrosion and deflection 4. cracked facebricks and deteriorated mortar at corner quoin 5. overturning bulkhead wall 6. full height corner cracks due to uneven thermal expansion 7. extreme masonry cracks due to underlying beam corrosion 8. cracked sill due to water infiltration and steel corrosion 9. severe loss of steel section due to water infiltration and corrosion 10. severe loss of steel section due to water infiltration and corrosion 11. corroded steel angles at terra cotta cornice 12. spalled and delaminating terra cotta banding 13. cracked terra cotta banding 14. cracked terra cotta cornice

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1. building mobilized for repairs 2. suspended scaffolds during repairs 3. general repair notes 4. terra cotta repair detail 5. limestone patching color tests 6. brick samples 7. cleaning samples 8. repointing and brick replacement at exterior parapet 9. corner reconstruction detail 10. marking repairs at terra cotta cornice 11. steel repairs inside terra cotta cornice 12. lintel and brick replacement 13. steel column prior to waterproofing 14. steel column shored during repairs 15. repointed and cleaned terra cotta 16. repointed, patched, and cleaned terra cotta 17. new terra cotta replacement sections 18. terra cotta patches 19. terra cotta patch

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This small cooperative building in the Noho Historic District came to us with a serious problem. In the middle of the night a four-foot section of the cast iron watertable fell off the building and landed in the middle of the entry stair. As part of the repair program, we further examined the existing conditions at the building to determine if any other components were in or near failure mode. We discovered the biggest issues at the cast iron storefront and at the wood cornice, both of which relied on decades of paint to compensate for severely deteriorated substrates. After removing all coatings from the street facade, we restored the wood cornice, filling in several smaller areas that were missing original material. We replaced the delaminating brownstone sills in kind and applied fresh paint to the brick in a historically accurate color. We worked with an artisan to fabricate replacement sections for the watertable, to create new ornamental florets for those that were missing from the column capitals, and to secure the remaining elements. Most of the column capitals required extensive, careful repairs that considered both the needs of the historic district and the co-op board’s finances. In the end, we restored the building to rave reviews while protecting its unique character for years to come.

n o h o l a n d m a r k


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1. location of fallen cast iron watertable 2. interior brackets and backup masonry behind cast iron watertable 3. bridge installation prior to beginning repairs 4. deteriorated cast iron storefront at second floor 5. deteriorated masonry coating, sills, and metal lintel caps 6. south facade repair notes 7. delaminating brownstone sill and failing masonry coating 8. cast iron watertable repair detail 9. deteriorated cast iron column capital with masonry fill 10. missing floral ornament at deteriorated cast iron column capital 11. missing scrollwork at deteriorated cast iron column capital 12. missing top plate at deteriorated column capital 13. deteriorated stone lintel and sheet metal lintel cap

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1. cast iron paint stripping test 2. wood paint stripping test 3. stone paint stripping test 4. new stone samples 5. cast iron replacement section 6. new cast iron installation 7. new cast iron installation 8. cast iron ornament replication 9. cast iron repair 10. finished cast iron storefront 11. finished cast iron column capital 12. finished cast iron dentils 13. finished stone and metal lintel 14. finished cast iron storefront 15. finished wood cornice 16. finished wood cornice 17. finished cast iron storefront with repaired wood windows

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In New York City, the Department of Buildings requires facade inspections every five years for all buildings six stories or higher. As a restoration firm, we regularly perform these inspections for both new and existing clients. This 40 story building in the Upper West Side recently needed a report to satisfy this requirement. Through scaffold inspections from the highest roof level to the ground, observations through binoculars, and examinations from adjacent roofs and terraces, we determined the existing condition of the facades. I compiled a report of these items, designated as “SWARMP” or “Safe With a Repair and Maintenance Program,” which we submitted to the DOB, the co-op board, and the managing agent. Recently we performed a series of probes at the facades, to determine the causes of the observed conditions. The majority of the deteriorations result from the quality of the original construction. The brick ties at several locations appear to be installed incorrectly, if at all. More importantly though the waterproofing at multiple locations is unsealed, unadhered, improperly formed, and wrinkled. This along with significant mortar accumulation prevents the cavity from draining as intended, which causes the cladding materials to deteriorate. Facade repairs are currently scheduled to begin in the Spring of 2013.

upper west side landmark


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1. flexible masonry tie embedded in mortar joint but not attached to structural column 2. corrugated masonry tie not attached to either structural column or brick cladding 3. flexible masonry tie embedded in wall cavity 4. thin gauge corrugated masonry tie and dovetail slot of structural column 5. heavy mortar accumulation and improper drainage of cavity causing vertical cracks of brick cladding 6. overlapped waterproofing without sealed seams 7. waterproofing not sealed or adhered to substrate 8. waterproofing at steel shelf angle missing end dams

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cooperative internships


For my third and final co-op internship I chose a medium sized firm with a regional style and focus on community-based, publicly funded, and educational projects. I crafted many types of models for design exploration, problem solving, and client presentations. The largest and most complex of these, the UCSD model, actually began as a light model but served as a working model for developing the atrium spaces and solar shading systems. The models for UCSD, Bellevue Community College, and Edgewood City Hall all required a puzzle like construction. By minimizing adhered joints and maximizing mechanical ones, I altered the models as needed while saving significant quantities of time and material by not starting anew. I built the Edgewood model for a very successful public presentation where we unveiled the overall design and sustainable strategies based on LEED guidelines. A simple, yet clean model for the LOTT water treatment facility helped convey the project’s overall design and scale relative to the larger than average site. Even the smallest models, for a Japanese Community Center and the addition to the University of Michigan’s Architecture Building, proudly became part of winning proposal packages by effectively demonstrating multiple design solutions.

mille r hull par tne rs hip


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1. bellevue community college, study model

2. bcc

3. bcc

4. ucsd engineering building, atrium sail study

5. ucsd,

atrium skylights study atrium

6. ucsd

7. ucsd offices

ucsd atrium ceiling entry

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9. ucsd

10. edgewood city hall,

presentation model 12. ech, offices assembly

11. ech

13. ech, during

14. ech

15. lott

water treatment facility, schematic 4

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model

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16. lott

17. lott

18. lott

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To broaden my understanding of architectural practice, I chose for my second co-op a large firm that practices mostly in the commercial sector. During my first quarter I collaborated on the schematic design and design development of a mixed-use condo tower in Miami, Florida. During my second quarter I assisted with the schematic design and design development of several hotels in the Chicagoland area. I helped prepare for client meetings, consultant meetings, and worked with local zoning boards on project appearance and compliance issues. I also assisted with the master planning of a large development, which involved several hotels, a conference center, numerous retail spaces, and a variety of residential buildings, in the nearby town of Hinsdale. As with other projects, I created a wire frame 3D model over which a co-worker rendered the proposed design. Late in my internship I attained the privilege of working on an educational project. We prepared a multi-scheme proposal for developing the edge of Case Western University’s campus into a dynamic mixed-use area. Shortly before I left came the high point of my internship when I found out we won the project.

voa associates inc


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1. rendering, le meridian hotel and conference center

2. elevation, le meridian

le meridian

3. first floor plan,

4. rendering, hotel and conference

center near o’hare airport

5. rendering, alternate

for le meridian hotel and conference center

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site plan, two hotels near o’hare airport

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master plan, case western university campus edge development university

8. master plan section, case western

9. master plan, case western university

10. rendering, master plan of hinsdale development 3

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master

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development

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For my first co-op I chose to work at a residential firm just north of Chicago. My initial goals in architecture involved starting my own firm and an internship here provided key insight into such a choice. Due to the small size of the office, I worked very closely with the owner and project manager on proposals and projects. During my first quarter, I helped develop restoration, renovation, and addition drawings for one of the oldest homes in Winnetka, dating from the late 1800s. I visited the site, met with the clients, and drafted the necessary drawings for the extensive work we intended to perform. While planning future projects, I visited with new clients, performed preliminary tasks, and met the construction crew associated with our office. During my second quarter, I focused mainly on a private residence located further north in Lake Forest. This home required a significant addition to the original structure, an addition to the garage, the design of a separate guesthouse, and a coherent development of the site. Throughout my stay I also worked on smaller projects such as custom furniture and cabinetry designs for our clients.

n o we s n i c k a rc h i t e c t s


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1. multiple additions to private residence, lake forest

2. new

butler’s

garage,

quarters

over

private residence, lake forest custom dining chair dining chair chair 1

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4. custom

5. custom dining

6. custom dining chair

private residence, winnetka

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private residence, winnetka

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private residence, winnetka

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private

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residence,

winnetka

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university of cincinnati daap


For my master’s thesis I explored how community, education, and cultural appreciation relate to artistic creation. I selected a very distinct type of common art, Appalachian folk art, to demonstrate that these concepts extend well beyond museums, universities, and the typical sources of cultural knowledge. Through combining the roles and methodologies of four essential institutions: the art center, school, museum, and library, I developed a project that would utilize their strengths while mitigating their weaknesses. A main facility in Front Royal, Virginia anchors the project, rooting it at the top of Shenandoah National Park, an important gateway to the Appalachian region. Portable workshops in custom designed trucks allow rotating artisans to travel throughout the region, teaching the history and methods of their craft. To access a broad audience, these trucks dock at numerous satellite stations with varying degrees of development: a full platform and gallery in urban locations, a partial shelter in smaller towns, and a mere utility hookup in rural areas. By showcasing the artists’ backgrounds and making their techniques more accessible, this project will emphasize the importance of the creative process over the final product of it.

an appalachian arts project


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1. primary and secondary views from front royal station 2. iteration of truck sail 3. iteration of multitruck circulation 4. iteration of truck sail structure 5. first floor iteration of front royal station 6. diagram of truck movement within shenandoah national park 7. diagram of truck movement during summer season throughout appalachia 8. illustration of truck supergraphic 9. front royal site model 10. single truck rural configuration 11. single truck small town configuration 12. multi-truck urban configuration 13. front royal station bay model 14. truck model 15. truck model 16. front royal station model

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The intent of this project stemmed from a real competition for a museum near the archaeological site of Troy. Without a secure location designed to display the treasures found at the site, Turkey may never be able to claim the countless artifacts currently scattered throughout the developed world. The museum, designed using the metric system, sits along the only road to and from the ruins. The exhibit rooms, facing southwest, flow chronologically from Troy 1 through Troy IX. Smaller, more precious items rest in jewelry style display cases embedded in the entrance corridors, while the larger artifacts sit in open galleries. Intricate wooden screens, typical of the local architecture, give form to the molded ceramic tiles that clad the exterior, and which would be produced by a local ceramic company involved in the actual museum competition. Perforated metal panels shield the galleries and outdoor sculpture garden from the intense sun, while a rooftop terrace provides both event space and a stunning view of the Aegean Sea beyond ancient olive groves. In an anonymous poster session held at the end of the quarter, a panel of five judges decided on the winner of the studio competition, me.

t r o i a

m u s e u m


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1.

site

plan

showing

troia

archaeological site in green and proposed museum site in blue

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bus stop concept

3. gallery entry

corridor displays

4. first floor

plan

5. second floor plan

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exterior ceramic tile rainscreen cladding

7. atrium rendering

entry drive rendering

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9. site plan

10. section through theatre, atrium, gallery, and sculpture garden

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section through entrance, atrium, 4

gallery,

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rooftop

terrace

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Over the course of eight weeks I developed this model of a live/work space for a violin craftsman, located in Bellevue, Kentucky. The design emerged using several unusual methods: model only, section only, and with brief production periods. I made several quick study models during Monday charrettes based on a specially selected song, a specific piece of art, or an excerpt on architectural theory. During the remainder of the week, I created a section model, which further expanded on the ideas from Monday. Each section represented eight feet of the project site and could not be modified after the weekly critique on Friday afternoon. During the quarter my design evolved significantly from a simple, wood framed storefront to a very organic envelope. Eventually bamboo or a similar, highly flexible, high strength plant would form the structure for both the walls and floor, while more typical building systems would weave between the canes. The upper floor would provide a living space for the craftsman. The lower floor would house the violin showroom, workshop, and any necessary storage areas.

violin workshop


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1. entry, first slice 2. living space, second slice 3. living space and workshop/ showroom, first through third slices 4. workshop, first through fourth slices 5. living space and workshop, fourth slice 6. workshop, fifth slice 7. storage area, sixth slice 8. storage area, sixth slice 9. covered patio, sixth slice 10. living space and storage area, first through sixth slices 11. living space and storage area, seventh slice 12. workshop, third slice 13. backyard, eighth slice 14. violin maker’s workshop and living spaces, first through sixth slices

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On my own I explore ideas for housing, museums, and small commercial spaces. Most potential sites do exist, but are only vaguely referenced in the designs. The commercial and civic concepts generally occur within city limits or along developed neighborhood streets. Most of the housing concepts find inspiration in the unused portions of urban rooftops or in isolated, rural areas. The Rooftop Squat, which takes advantage of an otherwise poorly used space, represents the most developed concept in the series. Multiple sections form each unit, each section with several components: roof, wall, and floor, all sized to be transported on a flatbed truck. On site a hoist can lift the components to the roof for assembly. In one iteration, recycled plastics form the shell of the modular structure; extruded and filled with insulation, the sections key and clip together for stability. In another iteration, recycled plastics and organic materials merge to form the shell of the modular structure, but this time constructed in a much more typical, layered fashion.

renderings and explorations


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1. light study cincinnati 2. modular sections of rooftop squat 3. rooftop squat assembled 4. rooftop squat section 5. rooftop squat partial elevation 6. rooftop squat section 7. rooftop squat detail 8. reflection study 9. urban infill

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first floor plan 10. urban infill perspective 11. rooftop modern site plan 12. rooftop modern first floor plan 13. rooftop modern perspective 14. gallery displays concept house site plan plan

17. jay pritzker pavilion millenium park

chicago 4

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cincinnati

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15. forest

16. forest house first floor

18. watercolor study, crosley tower 19. shadow and highlight study

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DIRKSportfolio  

A collection of my projects from studio, cooperative education internships, and professional work.

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