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Stefanie Hanna-Riggs 602.309.3319 Stefanie.HannaRiggs@gmail.com


Stefanie Hanna-Riggs 602.309.3319 Stefanie.HannaRiggs@gmail.com


Above: Images from 1st-6th Years of Architecture School (from left to right) not all projects above shown in this portfolio

Graduate Studio Work

University of Oregon: Portland Program

Portland Aquatic Community Center Fall 2011-Spring 2012 Gerry Gast Master of Architecture Thesis

Mississippi Avenue Cohousing

Page 14

Belmont Public Market

Page 20

Nature in the City

Page 26

North Portland Alternative Housing Winter 2011 Will Ullman 1st Year Graduate Studio

An Urban Industrial Agriculture Center Fall 2011 Thia Bankey 2nd Year Graduate Studio

Undergraduate Studio Work Arizona State University 4

Page 6

Creating Density in Phoenix Through the Use of Outdoor Space Spring 2010 Michael Underhill 4th Year Honors Thesis Studio


Additional Interests

Alisio Springs Intergenerational Exploratory Center

Page 28

Morrison Bridgehead Urban Design Study

Page 32

Travel & Sketches

Page 34

Pioneer and Military Memorial Cemetery

Page 36

Latifundia Spring 2009 Max Underwood and Michael Dobry 3rd Year Studio

Integrating Fragmented Districts Through Transit and Development Fall 2010 Gerry Gast 1st Year Urban Design Elective

Cover, Underlay, Back Page: Image from Spring 2009 Latifundia (Underwood/Dobry). Computer Aided Drawing showing the connections between points on a site.

Stages of Grief Spring 2008 Patrick Mayers 2nd Year Architecture/Landscape Arch Studio


Portland Aquatic Community Center 2011-2012, Graduate Thesis Studio Location: Southeast Portland, Oregon: SE Water & Mill Professor: Gerald Gast Hawthorne Bridgehead

Hawthorne Bridgehead

Opportunity: The studio is a self-written program that is located on an urban waterfront site. The Portland waterfront is currently fragmented with a hard water edge, and this project breaks down the edge by allowing access to both natural and manmade water elements. Response: The Portland Aquatic Community Center (PACC) is a large-scale aquatic community and recreation center for people across Portland that has a unique user base because it provides a unique amenity: access to the Willamette. This project will be developed as a public amenity for the City of Portland Parks and Recreation Department.

OMSI

This building is part of a loop of movement along the waterfront. Each important site, including OMSI, the Rose Garden, and the marina is an anchor point that is creating a tension moving people from one node to the next.

OMSI

This project holds down this point along the paths, stitching together the land, the Esplanade, and the water into a cohesive element.


Project Objectives: • Connect people to the water • Create a loop of movement with downtown: interact with Tom McCall Waterfront Park • Provide a unique amenity to Portland • Be a catalyst as a large public function for both tourists and residents PACC attracts people from across Portland to connect with the river and the community. The building is sited where land meets water on an artificially filled site that was once part of the river. The building meets the water and arcs over the esplanade, integrating with the public activity of the city.The building and the site create points of access to the Willamette. Midterm Model Photos

Typical Waterfront Situation in Portland The typical waterfront treatment in downtown Portland is a hard, impermeable edge between water and land. This cuts off access to the river.

Public Access Water

Park

Street

Public Access

Building

Hard Water’s Edge

Proposed: Uniting Land and Water Portland Aquatic Community Center breaks down this hard edge and allows access to the river.

Public Access Water

Civic Building

Park

Water

Public Access

Park

Public Access

Street

Public Access

Building


Site and City Context: There have been incremental steps made in the past three decades to make the east bank a more usable place. Between OMSI, the East Bank Esplanade, and now the new transit and pedestrian bridge, the character of the east waterfront is becoming public and active. This character will be strengthened in the new waterfront plan, the next step of which will be a the Portland Aquatic Community Center north of OMSI.

Proposed Site Concept: The building is sited where land meets water on an artificially filled site that was once part of the river. The building meets the water and arcs over the esplanade, integrating with the public activity of the city. The building and the site create points of access to the Willamette. A large-scale rainwater collection and filtration pool cuts between the building and the park. The seam between land and water is blurred, creating a continuous experience. This project mends the disjointed urban fabric by providing an anchor point along the waterfront, connecting people to the water. PACC creates a tactile experience by drawing people from downtown and creating a loop of activity with Tom McCall Waterfront Park. This civic space is a place for people to come together to engage with the water for recreational, social, and educational uses, serving as a center for the community. It combines aspects of healthy living (exercise and relaxation) through interaction with nature, water and community.

Group MacKenzie Alder Street Kayak & Canoe

Portland Community College Downtown View Corridor

Site

Existing OMSI Warehouse (Removed)

South Waterfront View Corridor

Power Station

Existing Esplanade

Building Concept: The concept of the convergence of land and water carries through to the building. The curtain walls allow people to visually connect to the river and land, while the openings in the roof allow ample natural light. The pools are arranged in a linear fashion, allowing a visual connection between the spaces.

Railroad Tracks

SE Water Avenue Service Entry

OMSI Parking

Streetcar Line

Existing Parking/Empty Lot

New Proposed Parking Structure

Lightrail Line

The project, located north of OMSI, explores the scenario of the I-5 freeway being removed as a long-term plan. The site can be developed now and expanded upon with the removal of the freeway.

Lightrail Station

New Milwaukie Light Rail Bridge

OMSI Expansion Master Plan by ZGF


Spatial Organization The building sits on a site equivalent in length to two Portland city blocks. The visual continuation of the three streets that run into the project became a driving spatial organizer for the project. As these 60 foot wide axes (green) change from streets to walkways, they become points of access to the water, defining the building into two sections. In the north/south direction, the central interior corridor (yellow) provides access to the pools on the west and the support/ secondary spaces on the east. These interior axes are distinguished by unobstructed skylights above.

Structure The main structural elements of PACC are large steel trusses that span the width of the space. Steel is used due to its efficiency in spanning the large distances over the pools. The 25’ bays created by the distribution of the bold blue trusses provide a rhythm to the long, linear spaces. View south towards OMSI


A large-scale rainwater collection and filtration pool cuts between the building and the park.The seam between land and water is blurred, creating a continuous experience. Vegetated, Non-Accessible Rehabilitated Shoreline

Seating Structures

SE Clay Street

DN

Boat Launch

DN

UP

DN

DN

UP

DN UP

Storage

Therapy Pools

Break Room Office Office Physical Therapy/Training DN

Storage Change Room

A

Baths Olympic Sized Lap Pool

DN

UP

DN

Security

Barge Pool

DN DN

Reception

UP

Display Area DN

Living Room

Cafe

Children’s Area

Kid’s Pool

Play Structure

Administration Offices

A

SE Water Avenue

Misc. Sports Fields

Change Room DN

Conference Room

SE Market Street Open to Below

Class Room DN

UP

Open to Below

DN

Open to Below

Hot Tub

DN

Event Room DN UP

Leisure Pool

Open to Below

Loading/Services Basketball Court

Seating

DN

Fish Pond

UP

Open to Below

Outdoor Swim

Open to Below

Basketball Court

DN

Service Entry

DN

Water Taxi Launch Seating

SE Mill Street

Seating Structures

Ground Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan Vegetated, Non-Accessible Rehabilitated Shoreline

Basement and Third Floor Plan shown in Monograph

School Bus Parking/Loading

Open Grass Field

(Shared with OMSI)

SE Stephens Street OMSI/PACC Shared Social Space


View West over Leisure Pools


View from 3rd Floor

Natural Lighting maximized by angle of Sunshades

34’ Ground Floor Level 30’ 100 Year Flood Line 23’10 Year Flood Line 18’ Average High Water Level

Rainwater Collection and Natural Filtration Piles

Section A: ECS & Tectonic Diagram

Light Permeating Esplanade Vegetated Sea Wall

3’ Average Low Water Level


View south towards OMSI through Lap Pool


Mississippi Avenue CoHousing North Portland Alternative Housing

Winter 2011, 1st Year Graduate Studio Duration: 9 weeks Location: Portland, Oregon: North Portland Professor: Will Ullman

Above: Mississippi Avenue Street Elevation (East Elevation)

Opportunity: Cohousing is a housing typology that involves creating a unique type of community with many distinct advantages. While it has been done in Europe for many years, its adaptation to the United States requires thoughtful consideration of priorities. Response: In order for cohousing to be a viable option to single-family housing, a level of privacy, personal space, and outdoor space must be maintained while integrating the community. N

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Looking North Towards Common House, Revit & Photoshop

Context Figure Ground, AutoCAD & Illustrator


Mississippi Ave 3

2 UP

UP

Living

UP

Children’s Room

DN

UP

UP

UP

Garden

DN DN

DN

Dining

DN DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

UP

Fremont Street

Elevated Planter Play Area

DN

1

1 Lobby

Sand Box

Kitchen

Mailboxes

UP

UP

UP

DN

UP

UP

UP

UP

Kitchen Storage

DN

Workshop

3

2

Above: Ground Floor Plan, Revit & Adobe

N

Below: Rendering from Dining Room towards lobby and kitchen, Revit & Photoshop

N

Below: Plans of Common House, from left: Basement, 2nd Floor, 3rd Floor2 Roof Terrace UP

UP

Teen Room

Private Living

Music Room

UP

DN

UP

UP

UP

DN

Flex Space/Sun Room

UP

1 Storage

UP

UP

UP

DN

DN

DN

DN

Guest

Storage

Storage

UP

UP

UP

DN

Laundry

UP

UP

UP

3

UP

UP

DN

UP

UP

Media Room

3

2

UP

Open to Below

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

Studio

1

11

1

1

1

Studio

Bike Storage UP

Open to Below

UP

UP

UP

Guest

UP

UP

UP

DN DN

DN

Storage

DN

DN

2

DN

UP

UP

DN

DN

2

UP

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

3

DN

3


2

3

3 N

2

East Elevation (Mississippi Avenue Elevation)

3

2

3

2 N

Section 1

Below: Northeast Corner of Site: Fremont Street and Mississippi Avenue Intersection 1

Section 2: South side of the Common House


Series Below: (from left) Fremont Street Entry Rendering, Looking Southeast from Common House, Looking West at Southern Units, Revit & Photoshop

Above: Looking West at Play Space and Southwestern Units

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Housing Units

Flexibility of Units Base Unit Options (each 15’ wide): 40’ unit or 32’ unit. Upper Floor(s) Options: 2-bedroom unit or 3-bedroom unit. Flex Space: There is a 10’ wide flexible sunroom that can be placed anywhere between the main units. This allows the user to choose the sizes of their front porch and back yard.

UP

UP

UP

Given these occupant-defined options, there are many customizable possibilities to suit everyone’s needs. B

B

B

Unit Plans 2

UP

UP

UP

UP

32’ Base Unit B

DN

UP

Flex Space

40’ Base Unit

32’ + 3 BR + 2BR

DN

Double Stack 1 BR

UP

UP

40’ + 3BR+ 2 BR

32’ + 3BR+ 2 BR

40’ + 2 BR

40’ + 2BR+ 2 BR

Garden

DN

DN

DN DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

UP DN

B

DN

UP

UP

DN

Play Area

DN

1

1 Sand Box UP

UP

UP

UP

DN

UP

Double Stack 1 BR

DN

UP

32’ + 3 BR + 2BR

UP

32’ + 2 BR

Double Stack 1 BR

UP

32’ + 2 BR + 2BR

32’ + 3 BR

UP

B

DN

3 Bedroom

B DN

2 Bedroom

DN

UP

Workshop

Unit 3 not shown 2nd floor up

2

Unit Types

Glass

B

DN

B DN

Glass

B

18

DN

B

Site Section 3

Unit Section Unit Section B


Looking South Through Main Space


SE Belmont Street Food

Craft

Service

Food

SE 11th Avenue

SE Yamhill Service (Retail/Office)

SE 10th Avenue

Existing Proximity

Craft/Production

Site Analysis

Belmont Public Market An Urban Industrial Agriculture Center

SE Taylor Street

Fall 2011, 2nd Year Graduate Studio Duration: 9 weeks Location: Southeast Portland, Oregon: SE Belmont & SE 11th Ave Professor: Cynthia Bankey Opportunity: Located in the Central Eastside of Portland, the site is in a historically industrial and food service sector of the city. In 1910, a warehouse was constructed for a farmer’s market and two restaurants. The warehouse was closed in the late 1990’s and later burned down under questionable circumstances. The prescribed program explores the reintroduction of light industry, food services, urban farming, and live/work spaces back into the historically colorful neighborhood. Response: Portland is in need of a large, indoor public market that can be open year round. This will be provided on the site, as well as live-work spaces for urban farmers above the farmer’s market. This program mix brings together the complete lifecycle of local agriculture (see diagram on next page). 20

Site Plan

Northwest Entry


Bringing  together the complete lifecycle of local agriculture.  Rain Collection Toilets

Wash food grown onsite  Irrigation Extend growing  season Heat water

Food produced on site 

Heat collected

Composting bins

(greenhouses and roof gardens

Farmer’s Market Eaten on site (Restaurants)

Neighborhood Waste  Collected

Input/Output Diagram

Sold to people and  surrounding  restaurants

View of Goods Market (above; Revit, hand drafting and Adobe), Southwest Corner (below; physical model)

21


Mezz. above Services Open to Below Residential Lobby

Food Market

Lightwells

Seating/Eatng Area

Third Floor Plan Produce Distribution

Goods Market

Down to Parking Garage

Green Houses

Industry

Vines growing over glass-- visible from below Green Houses

Loading Dock

Ground Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan Fifth & Sixth Floors continue to step back, Plans not shown

Sketches & Process Work

22


View of Central Outdoor Space at the end of Yamhill; Revit, hand drafting and Adobe

23


Belmont Entry

West Elevation

East Elevation

24

1


Farmer’s Market; ; Revit, hand drafting and Adobe

Greenhouse Storage/Service

Greenhouse

Farmer’s Market Parking

Section

25


17-26. Residential

27. Roof Deck

17-26. Residential

8-16. Hotel

7. Pool/Deck

6. Under Pool/Service

5. Gym

3. Restaurant/Performance Space

1. Lobby/Bar

8-16. Hotel

7. Pool/Deck

6. Under Pool/Service

5. Gym

3. Restaurant/Performance Space

1. Lobby/Bar

Long Section Looking South

Nature in the City

Creating Density in Phoenix Through the Use of Outdoor Space

Spring 2010, 4th Year Project Duration: 10 weeks Location: Phoenix, Arizona: Downtown at Adams & 2nd Professor: Michael Underhill Opportunity: “The efforts to bring more dense housing into the central areas of Phoenix, Tempe and Scottsdale have had mixed success. The most disappointing aspect has been the incorporation of mixed-use, which have not yet worked well in greater Phoenix, and this has stymied our desire to become more urban.” The studio’s goal was to “design housing in conjunction with other urban uses that functions well and has some of the desirable qualities of detached housing.”

Sec 1

Response: Phoenix’s uniquely pleasant weather provides a climate prone to outdoor living, a benefit achieved in single-family detached homes. In order for people to be willing to live in denser housing, it must have the same benefits of detached housing and provide various outdoor spaces ranging from public to private. N

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17th Floor


Existing Structure: Hanny’s

N

3rd Floor- Restaurant

7th Floor-Pool Deck

From left: current intersection, proposed intersection, east end of site, neighboring historic building

18th Floor

19th Floor

27th Floor- Roof Deck

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Alisio Spring Intergenerational Exploratory Center A Latifundia Located Outside of Tubac, Arizona

Spring 2009, 3rd Year Project Duration: 6 weeks Location: Tubac, Arizona

Tubac

Professors: Max Underwood/Michael Dobry

3.5% 9.5%

Opportunity: Presented with the chance to create a selfsustaining community of 25 people (a “latifundia�) in an artistic community comprised of mainly adults. Response: Youth and adults live and learn together at the center where they explore self-chosen topics of interest. Through experience-based learning, the youth attain their high school degree and the adults expand their knowledge and remain connected with the area. The diverse group brought together bridges technology and art through innovation. Done as part of an equal collaborative team.

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2.0% 1.1% 14.1% 17.7% 21.2% 30.9%

Age <10 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s >70

Surrounding Areas 18.5% 19.3% 12.4% 13.1% 13.4% 9.3% 6.4% 7.7%


Sketchup, Artlantis & Photoshop


Interior View; Physical Model, Sketchup, Artlantis & Photoshop

30

Exterior View; Physical Model & Photoshop


Upon arrival, residents are given a kit of parts to build their shelters which adapt and move with gained knowledge of the site, eventually being taken down when they leave the center.


younger artistic crowd and increasing the amount of residential space downtown, especially for students, artists, and midrange income. The sites facing Naito Parkway will work to enliven the Waterfront Park and create a more pedestrian-friendly street. Naito will be reduced in size and have generous sidewalks on both sides to increase the waterfront atmosphere. In addition the sidewalks on both sides of the park, there will be increased connections through the park to the retail district past Naito. Proposed major land use actives, including catalysts The Saturday Market and new performance center will both act as catalysts to bring people into the site. The improved waterfront park will serve as a major magnet bringing people from downtown, through the site, to the park.

Couch

Artistic Community

Artist Community Burnside

Relationship to Downtown Portland This would be a natural transition between the business district of the south and the creative and social district above Burnside. This proposal will bridge the gap between these two different areas and help to create social interaction between different kinds of people. There will be a large concentration of high-rise residential development towards the southern business district of the site. By creating mixed-use activity throughout the site, more consistent, round-the-clock use will be established. Public Places, Open Spaces--Indoor and Outdoor No additional large ground level open spaces will be added as there is already an impressive park on the site. Rather, renewed public spaces and redefined street fronts will help to improve the existing park by bringing different people and events to the area. The largest district of public spaces is the already popular Saturday Market along Ankeny. The already popular public space at Skidmore Fountain along Ankeney Street will be renewed with a new administrative building containing art galleries with attached retail where vendors could exhibit all week. Therefore, this space could act as a permanent showcase for the Saturday Market.

Ankeney

New Residential/Retail to New Residential/Retail/Theater Theater(Community bring two groups together Center) to bring groups together.

Ash

Pine

Oak

Star

Was hi

k

ngto

Alde

r

Business District

Mor

rison

1st Av e

2nd Ave

3rd Ave

Business District

n

Yam

Pull people from downtown to the waterfront with new pedestrian connections and an improved Naito Parkway

hill

View of current pathway into park

Aerial View of Existing Area

Concept Diagram

Morrison Bridgehead Urban Design Study

Couch

Integrating Fragmented Districts Through Transit and Development

Burnside

Fall 2010, 1st Year Graduate Urban Design Elective Duration: 4 weeks Location: Portland, Oregon: Downtown Waterfront

Ankeny

Ash

Professor: Gerry Gast

Pine

Opportunity: In many cities, waterfront locations are utilized as high-density areas because of their desirable location. In Portland however, the majority of land along the western bank of the Willamette River has remained underdeveloped with an undefined connection to the downtown core. For many reasons, the area surrounding the Morrison Bridgehead is a dying district in a lively city.

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Star

Was hi

k

ngto

n

Alder

Mor

rison

1st Av e

2nd

Ave

3rd Ave

Response: The lengthy off-ramps from the bridge are removed and replaced by large iconic buildings which serve as a more appropriate entrance to the city. On 1st Avenue, the lightrail-only street opens up cars and pedestrians which is achieved by splitting the light rail between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue. This simple shift opens up both streets, as well as the entire district, to increased amounts of traffic and creates a 24-hour neighborhood, the key to creating a thriving area.

Oak

Yam

hill

Parking Garage Lightrail Stop Proposed Plan with Transit Changes

Lightrail Line Catalysts


3 Dimensional Drawing

Existing vs. Proposed Structures

Couch

lustrative Plan

Couch

Burnside

Ankeney

Proposed

Ash

Built

Burnside

Pine

Existing vs. Proposed Structures

Proposed buildings shown in the existing urban fabric of downtown Portland

Oak

Stefanie Hanna-Riggs & Alysia Baldwin

Stark

Wash

ingto

n

Ankeny

son

1st Av e

2nd Ave

3rd

Ave

Alder

Morri

Yamh

ill

Ash 3D View: Existing with proposed development (top), New/existing (bottom)

Existing vs. Proposed Structures

Pine

Proposed buildings shown in the existing urban fabric of downtown Portland

Oak

Stefanie Hanna-Riggs & Alysia Baldwin

Star

Was hin

gton

Alde

r

Proposed Existing vs. Proposed Structures

Built and Proposed Buildings

Built

Mor

rison

k


St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basilica: Rome, Italy

Above:Vancouver, British Colombia, Photomontage

Travel

Summer 2002-Present London, England: School Trip Mexico: Community Service Trip Puerto Rico: January 2010 Europe 2010: Backpacking Trip 34

Rome, Italy

The Column of Trajan: Rome, Italy


Above: Graphite on Paper, 10”x 10”

Above: Graphite on Arches, 24” x 36”, Summer 2007, 1st Year Studio, Milagros Zingoni

Series: Ink on Paper, 6”x 6” 99

Above: Graphite on Paper, 10”x 10”

Sketches and Drawings

100

101

Series: Ink on Paper, 6”x 6”

4

2006-present

Above: Ink on Paper, 6”x 6”


Phase 1 Wall Plan, Charcoal on Paper, 10” x 36”

Phase 3 Site Plan:Watercolor on Paper, 24” x 36”

Pioneer and Military Memorial Cemetery Stages of Grief

Spring 2008, 2nd Year Project Duration: 15 weeks, 3 stages Location: Downtown Phoenix, Arizona Professor: Patrick Mayers Opportunity: Reinvigorate the historic Pioneer and Military Memorial Cemetery in Downtown Phoenix. Response: The movement through the wall and site reflect a progression through levels of grieving: from unprepared, to reflection, to grief and finally to recovery. The front of the graves are indented into the ground to create a tangible personal space for each person. The blue jacaranda leaves fill the graves with vibrant colors with the changing of seasons.

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Stefanie Hanna-Riggs 602.309.3319 Stefanie.HannaRiggs@gmail.com


Stefanie Hanna-Riggs Academic Portfolio  
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