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Issue 18

April 2013

Legacy Š Wild Game Fish Conservation International

The Journal of Wild Game Fish Conservation Published by volunteers at:

Wild Game Fish Conservation International Rated R – Contents for mature audiences

Excuse Limit

0 Conserve wild game fish!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Legacy Wild Game Fish Conservation International Wild Game Fish Conservation International (WGFCI): Established to advocate for wild game fish, their fragile ecosystems and the cultures and economies that rely on their robust populations. LEGACY – The Journal of Wild Game Fish Conservation: Complimentary, no-nonsense, monthly publication by conservationists for conservationists LEGACY, the WGFCI Facebook page and the WGFCI website are utilized to better equip fellow conservationists, elected officials, business owners and others regarding wild game fish, their contributions to society and the varied and complex issues impacting them and those who rely on their sustainability. LEGACY features wild game fish conservation projects, fishing adventures, accommodations, equipment and more. Your photos and articles featuring wild game fish from around planet earth are welcome for possible inclusion in an upcoming issue of LEGACY. Your “Letters to the Editor” are encouraged. Successful wild game fish conservation efforts around planet earth will ensure existence of these precious natural resources and their ecosystems for future generations to enjoy and appreciate. This is our LEGACY.

Wild Game Fish Conservation International Founders

Bruce Treichler

Jim Wilcox


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Legacy TThhee JJoouurrnnaall ooff W Wiilldd G Gaam mee FFiisshh C Coonnsseerrvvaattiioonn By Wild Game Fish Conservation International volunteers

Contents Commentary ______________________________________________________________________________________ 7 SPECIAL: Quinault Indian Nation to Washington Governor Inslee – Request opposition for further state financial support of harmful flood protection projects __________________________________________ 8 Seafood consumption: Food safety and health _____________________________________________________ 10                      

Food for thought _____________________________________________________________________________________ Enjoy seasonal wild Pacific salmon dinners at these fine restaurants:____________________________________ PROUD TO SUPPORT WILD SALMON – Leanne Hodges ________________________________________________ Standing up for wild salmon - Way to go Bravo Restaurant & Lounge ____________________________________ Bravo Restaurant and Lounge receives first Salmon Feedlot Boycott certificate __________________________ Wild Salmon Supporters – View entire list here _________________________________________________________ Video: Fox News – Seafood Fraud _____________________________________________________________________ Just say “NO” to farmed salmon ______________________________________________________________________ EU clears use of pigs, chicken in fish feed _____________________________________________________________ Brainwashing by open pen salmon feedlot industry’s morally bankrupt marketing machine________________ Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense infection linked to chilled salmon consumption. __________________________ Aquaculture and public health. The emergence of diphyllobothriasis in Chile and the world. _______________ Salmon Aquaculture and Transmission of the Fish Tapeworm ___________________________________________ From the archives: That Organic Girl - Farm Raised vs Wild Caught Fish _________________________________ New Oceana Study Finds 33% of Seafood Mislabeled ___________________________________________________ GSSI founder: Number of eco-labels lack ‘substance, credibility’ ________________________________________ This Fish – Journey from ocean to your plate tracking __________________________________________________ Begich Announces Two Bills to Strengthen Nation’s Seafood Industry ___________________________________ FDA steps up smoked salmon recalls __________________________________________________________________ MacDONALD: Consumers might turn up noses at virus-infected fish _____________________________________ Eating feedlot salmon does not save wild salmon; it destroys them. _____________________________________ Alaska lawmakers face down GMO salmon _____________________________________________________________

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 30 31

Impacts of open pen salmon feedlots ______________________________________________________________ 32 Marine Harvest – Your every despicable move is being watched and recorded ____________________________ NOAA: “Salmon aquaculture – a healthy source of seafood” ____________________________________________ WGFCI RESPONSE to NOAA - re. Open Pen Salmon Feedlot safety______________________________________ CleanUpSalmonFarming.com _________________________________________________________________________ Fish farm rejected by Nova Scotia government, risk to wild salmon cited _________________________________ Biosecurity: Protecting Farmed Fish ___________________________________________________________________ Dr. Alexandra Morton Talks: Video series ______________________________________________________________ Jefferson County drafting net-pen guidelines __________________________________________________________ Gorilla Radio interview with Dawn Morrison ____________________________________________________________ Are diseased Atlantic salmon safe? ___________________________________________________________________ Largest study of salmon health ever undertaken set to begin in B.C. _____________________________________ Study to probe death of billions of young Pacific salmon announced ____________________________________ New Film, Cutting-Edge Research Probe Salmon Virus Mystery__________________________________________ EMERGENCY CALL TO ACTION! LETTERS TO MEDIA AND CONSTITUENCY OFFICES IMMEDIATELY! _____ EWOS and Mainstream Canada are spreading infectious diseases in the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve ___________________________________________________________________________________  Norway’s Salmon Confidential - Media Blackout & Film Premiere in Bergen! ______________________________  Marine Harvest - Salmon supply and market outlook ____________________________________________________  Cermaq - Prerequisites for growth _____________________________________________________________________               

32 33 34 35 36 37 39 40 41 42 43 44 46 48 49 50 51 52


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! Video: Infected Salmon – Is this OK? __________________________________________________________________ Fish Farms Non-disclosure of disease and drugs _______________________________________________________ Response from Marine Harvest ________________________________________________________________________ Response to Clare Backman from Dr. Alexandra Morton: ________________________________________________ Sea lice from salmon feedlots suck the life out of wild salmon __________________________________________ No More Environmental Impact Assessments for Salmon Farms in Nova Scotia __________________________ Bill Taylor Commentary: Salmon Farming's Foul Record ________________________________________________ Immunohistochemical detection of piscine reovirus (PRV) in hearts of Atlantic salmon coincide with the course of heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) ____________________________________________  Atlantic salmon: Washington state record (14 lbs 6oz) – Ron Howard - 1999 ______________________________        

53 54 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

Climate Change and wild game fish _______________________________________________________________ 61  Pete McMartin: Global warming’s new frightening deadline ______________________________________________ 61  Corporate Environmental Responsibility __________________________________________________________ 63

Energy production and wild game fish: Oil, Coal, Hydropower, Wind, Natural Gas ____________________ 64 Oil – Drilled, Fracked, Tar Sands _________________________________________________________________________  Rebuilding the wild salmon economy __________________________________________________________________  New skimmer preps Neah bay for oil spills _____________________________________________________________  Draft Assessment of Tar Sands Pipeline "Devastatingly Cynical" ________________________________________  Keystone XL report by U.S. avoids conclusion, angering opponents _____________________________________  U.S. agency orders Enbridge to dredge Kalamazoo River two years after spill ____________________________  Take Action: Keystone pipeline _______________________________________________________________________  Dependence on oilsands could hurt Canada's economy: report __________________________________________  David Black says he's close to signing $25-billion Kitimat oil refinery deal (updated) ______________________  Tribes have questions for Port on crude shipments _____________________________________________________  Fracking our Farms: A Tale of Five Farming Families ___________________________________________________ Coal ___________________________________________________________________________________________________  Washington environmental figures hired by coal companies ____________________________________________ Hydropower ____________________________________________________________________________________________  A bad idea from another era: Alaska's dam to nowhere _________________________________________________  Our Views: Cooperation on Flood Control Issue Is Key __________________________________________________  Delayed plan to remove Matilija Dam near Ojai will get new studies ______________________________________  Alberta aboriginals oppose B.C. Hydro's Site C dam project; say needs more study _______________________

65 65 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 76 77 77 79 80 81

Forest management and wild game fish____________________________________________________________ 82  B.C. resource development remains ‘unknown and unmanaged,’ warns Forest Practices Board ___________ 82  Congress and the Tongass ___________________________________________________________________________ 84

Mining and wild game fish ________________________________________________________________________ 86  Rare-earth mining in China comes at a heavy cost for local villages ______________________________________ 86  Letter: Sportsman’s Alliance for Alaska – Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment (Update) ___________________ 88  Sandy Pond Alliance Court Case to Decide Fate of Lakes Across Canada ________________________________ 91

Pesticides and wild game fish _____________________________________________________________________ 92  Dow AgroSciences Wins Bid to Overturn Pesticide Proposals ___________________________________________ 92

Wild game fish management ______________________________________________________________________ 93     

Federal council adopts options for ocean salmon sport fisheries ________________________________________ There are fewer herring in the water as quotas increase _________________________________________________ B.C. places moratorium on salmon farming on North Coast _____________________________________________ Salmon worthy of official fish status because of its value to B.C _________________________________________ Mother Earth’s Magnetism Guides Spawning Sockeye Salmon Home Like GPS: Study ____________________

93 95 97 98 99

Special Recognition _____________________________________________________________________________ 100  Live from The Sockeyes - Oscar Goes Wild for Salmon! ________________________________________________ 100  “Pants on Fire” Recognition: Spencer Smith, Vice President-Commercial Services, Pacific Coastal Airlines _____________________________________________________________________________________________ 101

Local Conservation Projects _____________________________________________________________________ 102  Documentary: “Salmon Confidential” – two decades in the making _____________________________________ 102

Youth Conservation: ____________________________________________________________________________ 103  2013 Northwest Youth Conservation and Fly Fishing Academy _________________________________________ 103


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! Conservation-minded businesses – please support these fine businesses __________________________ 107         

Bravo Restaurant and Lounge - 46224 YALE ROAD, CHILLIWACK BC ___________________________________ Jackson Steak and Grill House 5725 Vedder Road, Chilliwack BC___________________________________________ Ponoi River Co. _____________________________________________________________________________________ Deep Sea Charters, Inc. ______________________________________________________________________________ Pacific Salmon Charters _____________________________________________________________________________ Hook-Em Up Fishing Guide Service (360) 880-0102 ____________________________________________________ Idaho River Adventures ______________________________________________________________________________ El Salto Adventures _________________________________________________________________________________ Cabo Sails __________________________________________________________________________________________

107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115

Attention Conservation-minded Business Owners _________________________________________________ 117 WGFCI endorsed conservation organizations: _____________________________________________________ 117 Featured Artists: ________________________________________________________________________________ 118  Holly Arntzen and Kevin Wright - The Wilds ___________________________________________________________ 118

Featured Fishing Photos and Fishing/Conservation Trips: _________________________________________ 119     

Video: Fly Fishing for Ponoi River Atlantic Salmon “The Incomparable Ponoi” ___________________________ Join Save Our Wild Salmon this August for a wild trip down the Middle Fork of the Salmon River!_________ “Tequila” then “Slammer” - Introducing the new ““SSllaam mm meerr”” ____________________________________________ Cabo adventure 2013 aboard Ursula IV and Cabo Sails _________________________________________________

119 120 121 122

Community Activism, Education and Outreach: ___________________________________________________ 124                

Leave this world better than when you found it ________________________________________________________ Flooding the Inboxes for Wild Salmon!________________________________________________________________ Speak for the Salmon ________________________________________________________________________________ Don’t want to risk eating ISA diseased fish? – Don’t buy open pen farmed Atlantic salmon _______________ Fish farm foes add sign to campaign _________________________________________________________________ Colourful and noisy fish-farm protesters march on DFO officers ________________________________________ Action Alert: Support a Proactive Solution to Protecting Oregon's Wild Fish _____________________________ Petition: Salmon Feedlot Boycott _____________________________________________________________________ Petition: United Declaration for Wild Salmon __________________________________________________________ Petition: Urge Washington Governor Inslee to support salmon solutions ________________________________ Action request: Let Pacific Coastal Airlines know that recreational fishermen oppose open pen salmon feedlots (e-mail: Susan Lundy lundys@shaw.ca) ______________________________________________________ Responses to Pacific Coastal Airlines’ promotion of open pen salmon feedlots __________________________ Re: Feedback email regarding Salmon Farming _______________________________________________________ Action – Send message to President Obama: Stop tar sands pipeline! __________________________________ CUTTHROAT TROUT FISHING IN PUGET SOUND AND FLY FISHING FOR BROWN TROUT IN EASTERN OREGON ___________________________________________________________________________________________ SPRING CHINOOK FISHING ON THE CHEHALIS AMD COWLITZ RIVERS ________________________________

124 125 126 128 130 132 133 135 136 137 138 139 141 142 143 144

Video Library – conservation of wild game fish ____________________________________________________ 145

Bonny Glambeck: Did you miss CBC's interview with DFO's Dr. Kristi Miller on the new salmon health study looking at viruses that may be harming wild salmon? You can listen here! Also on this podcast: discussion on closed containment salmon farming on Vancouver Island and coal port expansion. Bcalmanac 20130312 13798 podcast.cbc.ca


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Legacy Forward The April 2013 issue of Legacy marks eighteen consecutive months of our web-based publication, the watchdog journal published by Wild Game Fish Conservation International. No holds are barred in this issue where we feature the benefits and risks of seafood consumption. Legacy is published each month to expose current and planned actions that impact the future of wild game fish and their ecosystems around planet earth to our growing audience. Legacy is also utilized to promote the many benefits of healthy populations of wild game fish. Please share this uniquely comprehensive publication with others far and wide as it includes something of interest and importance for everyone. Our hope is that those who read Legacy will come to understand that what is good for wild game fish is also good for humans. Similarly, what is bad for our planet’s wild game fish is also really bad for humans! It’s exciting that a growing number of recreational anglers and others around planet earth are passionate about conserving wild game fish and their continued availability for this and future generations to enjoy and appreciate. Just as exciting is that growing numbers of consumers and retailers are paying close attention to the impacts each of us have on global resources through our daily activities and purchases. We continue to urge our global audience to speak out passionately and to demonstrate peacefully for wild game fish and their ecosystems; ecosystems that we are but one small component of. As recreational fishermen, conservation of wild game fish for future generations is our passion. Publishing “Legacy” each month is our self imposed responsibility to help ensure the future of these precious gifts that have been entrusted for safekeeping to our generation.

Bruce Treichler

James E. Wilcox Wild Game Fish Conservation International


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Commentary Jim Wilcox, publisher Legacy is published to communicate the diverse benefits of our planet’s wild game fish and to expose issues that negatively impact them and their ecosystems. Each month, we publish several relevant articles from many sources along with comments and photos for each topic. As recreational fishermen, we at WGFCI have conservation-based biases developed over the past fifty plus years. We do, however, include articles and quotes in Legacy from corporations and elected officials that may not agree with our positions or those of our colleagues.. The April issue of Legacy features articles regarding known, studied and documented human health benefits and risks of seafood consumption. Other diverse topics having local, regional, national and even global impacts on wild game fish that we explored while preparing the April 2013 issue of Legacy include: • Impacts of open pen salmon feedlots – Be sure to watch Salmon Confidential • Climate change / global warming • Energy production – oil, coal, hydropower, natural gas, wind • Forest practices • Mining • Wild game fish management Each issue of Legacy also features: • Special Recognition – Including WGFCI’s coveted “Burning Pants” award • Local conservation projects • Youth conservation activities • Conservation-minded businesses • Conservation organizations • Wildlife artists • Fishing photographs • Community activism, education and outreach • Conservation videos We sincerely hope that after reading this issue of Legacy you: 1. better understand these important topics 2. share this issue of Legacy with others who care about our planet’s wild game fish. 3. support the conservation projects, artists and organizations featured in it 4. share your comments regarding this issue of Legacy with me at wilcoxj@katewwdb.com Thank you for doing what you can to conserve wild game fish for this and future generations.

Jim


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

SPECIAL: Quinault Indian Nation to Washington Governor Inslee – Request opposition for further state financial support of harmful flood protection projects February 26, 2013


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Editorial Comment: This letter by President Sharp, Quinault Indian Nation (QIN), is absolutely on point given QIN federally-protected treaty rights including those that guarantee the QIN access to natural resources throughout the Chehalis River basin. This timely letter coincides beautifully with the ongoing Idle No More movement by indigenous people around the world insisting on their involvement with government decisions – especially decisions that negatively impact their cultures. Wild Game Fish Conservation International agrees fully with this thoughtful letter to Governor Inslee demanding QIN involvement in decisions regarding efforts to effectively reduce risks associated with seasonal Chehalis River basin floods We have sent letters to Governor Inslee, Governor Gregoire, county commissioners (Thurston, Grays Harbor, Lewis County), key Washington state legislators, members of the Washington state congressional delegation and members of the Chehalis River Basin Flood Authority to ensure the protection and conservation of this uniquely-valuable basin’s public owned and managed natural resources while efforts are explored to minimize Chehalis River flood risks. Even with formal opposition regarding these controversial projects from local tribes, conservation organizations and concerned citizens, funding in excess of $50 million over the next eight years for more studies in support of them is being debated by the Washington state legislature; without involving the QIN. Wild Game Fish Conservation International concerns: The proposed Chehalis River dam (if constructed) and its resulting reservoir will destroy the public’s wild anadromous and resident fish populations and significantly impact other natural resources – it will not reduce Chehalis River basin risks; it’s clearly documented purpose.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Seafood consumption: Food safety and health

 Food for thought

Eating Feedlot Salmon…

An Unhealthy Gamble What Happens in Norway…

Should Stay in Norway


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Enjoy seasonal wild Pacific salmon dinners at these fine restaurants:


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 PROUD TO SUPPORT WILD SALMON – Leanne Hodges

Anissa Reed: “Next week we will be unveiling the first of many restaurants stepping up and supporting a national boycott on feedlot salmon by displaying this decal in their window and adding their voice to this issue.”

Editorial Comment: When making your next dining reservations for yourself, you and your loved one or a party, please be sure to look first at the restaurants that do not offer open pen feedlot salmon on their menu. This is a simple way that we can thank these businesses for their significant dedication and commitment to our iconic wild Pacific salmon.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Standing up for wild salmon - Way to go Bravo Restaurant & Lounge RESERVATIONS: 604-792-7721 OPEN 5PM TUESDAY to SATURDAY 46224 YALE ROAD, CHILLIWACK BC V2P 2P3

Editorial Comment: Louis De Jaeger (back row, center) - You and your team at Bravo Restaurant and Lounge are to be commended for your decision and associated actions to ensure a legacy of iconic wild Pacific salmon through your support of the ongoing Salmon Feedlot Boycott - we at Wild Game Fish Conservation International thank you for these actions and wish you tremendous success with your establishment.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Bravo

Restaurant and Lounge receives first Salmon Feedlot Boycott certificate March 14, 2013

Chilliwack, B.C – The Salmon Feedlot Boycott here in Chilliwack seems to be making ground with local companies regarding the type of salmon sold on its shelves or put on its menu’s. Thursday afternoon saw the boycott at the Bravo Restaurant, not for the purpose of informing consumers of how bad the salmon was being sold, but instead to honor the restaurant for its pledge to only use local produce, environmentally sustainable products, and wild salmon. Overwaitea Food Group has also decided to red-list open net farmed fish, instead stocking its shelves with the preferred wild salmon or salmon from land based closed containment feedlots. The decision to carry only wild salmon or salmon from closed containment feedlots was directed by David Suzuki, who supports the Salmon Feedlot Boycott movement. This is tremendous support when you consider the Overwaitea Food Group is Western Canada’s largest food store chain, including PriceSmart, Save On Foods, Overwaitea Foods, Cooper’s Foods, Urban Fare and Bulkley Valley Wholesale serving communities in both B.C and Alberta. Louie De Jaeger of Bravo restaurant here in Chilliwack has championed the cause of using environmentally stable products at their restaurant for a long time. “Bravo decided in 2004 took the conscious decision that we were going to help serve sustainable food,” De Jaeger informs. “And if we were going to take part in anything wild it was going to be ethical.” De Jaeger believes that those who are using the feedlots, spreading disease to wild salmon, are destroying what resource we are lucky to have out here. De Jaeger also believes that the next step for those taking up the boycott’s cause need to rally against the suppliers. If the suppliers stop purchasing from those companies that sell feedlot salmon, the industry would have to change and government would take notice. As of right now he is a little disappointed that the Chilliwack-Fraser Canyon MP Mark Strahl isn’t visible around this worthwhile cause. “He should be at meetings like this, he should be sending letters of support,” De Jaeger says. “What we’ve heard is absolutely nothing – nothing from him and nothing from this government. They’re part of the problem; they are not part of the solution whatsoever.” De Jaeger’s had strong sentiments for the local and provincial government, echoing Eddie Gardiner’s idea in urging the people of Chilliwack to back a candidate in the upcoming election that will be a champion for this cause and environmental sustainability as a whole. Eddie Gardiner of the Salmon Feedlot Boycott presented Louie De Jaeger with a certificate and a window decal in recognition of Bravo Restaurant’s business leadership in supporting environmental sustainability. De Jaeger was honored with the award, echoing once again how important it is to use sustainable products from ethical sources. With the provincial election two-months away, the theme of these gatherings has turned to making their position known to potential incoming politicians. Rex Weyler, who has served as a Director of the original Greenpeace, was on hand to support the cause he has been behind for many decades. He made note to the problem that continually causes environmentalists anxiety. “The people that are elected, that are supposed to be working for us, as Louis said, the people that are supposed to be working for us, that we’ve elected, that we are paying with our tax dollars are instead of looking after us and our interests and the interests of our children and the future and our environment and our ecosystem, they are looking after and serving the interests of the largest corporations on the planet,” Weyler says. Weyler went on to say to the 20 or so people in attendance that in all of his experience the only thing that has every stood in front of this ecological destruction is the people. He maintained that change will come if you keep fighting for change to save the communities that could potentially be destroyed if the status quo remains. The Salmon Feedlot Boycott is going to continue honoring those businesses that are using environmentally sustainable products, with the next honoree being Jacksons Steak & Grill House. The boycott will also be celebrating Canada Water Week, along with the WaterWealth Project. The first event takes place Monday, March 18th at 6:30 p.m. with a screening of “Salmon Confidential” at the WaterWealth Project Office, 45668 Storey Avenue in Chilliwack.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Wild Salmon Supporters – View entire list here

Eddie Gardner: BAD CHOICE! So called “Fresh Farmed Atlantic Salmon Steak Tip" is very fatty and this absorbs high concentrations of PCBs. For your health and for the well being of the marine habitat, do not purchase this product.

Nikki Lamarre: They couldn't pay me to eat that!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Video: Fox News – Seafood Fraud February 21, 2013

Buyer beware: Mislabeled fish in restaurants, grocery stores


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Just say “NO” to farmed salmon April 5, 2012 "While the potential health benefits of wild salmon are well known, the potential toxicity of the farmed salmon needs to be highlighted." Twenty years ago, a lead article in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that men in a Danish fishing village who ate at least 30 oz of salmon a week had half the risk of getting a heart attack as their bovine-consuming neighbors. Since heart disease had been, until very recently, the leading cause of death in this country physicians have been recommending that everyone eat fish at least once weekly. In addition to its benefit in reduction of cardiovascular mortality, fish oils have also been found to be of benefit in reducing arthritis and other inflammatory disorders and to improve cognition (particularly in the offspring of fish consuming moms). The NEJM article was published in May of 1985 and between 1987 and 1999 the annual salmon consumption in the United States increased by 23%. During the same time period it increased by 14% in Europe. This increase in fish consumption has unfortunately not proven to be a boon to the hardy fishermen and women of Alaska. In fact, since the Exxon Valdez disaster these hard-working folks are getting far less per pound for their fish than they were prior to the disaster (which is still not cleaned up). Close to 60% of the salmon now sold is raised in farms located around the globe (British Columbia, Washington State, Chile and Northern Europe) in which Atlantic salmon (genus Salmo) are crowded into pens and fed fish meal pellets. If you are looking at salmon in the grocery store or the restaurant and it says just “salmon” or “Atlantic Salmon”, it is farmed. The presence of these pens in the Pacific Northwest pose a serious threat to the native runs of pacific salmon (genus Oncorhyncus) in those areas. While the potential health benefits of wild salmon are well known, the potential toxicity of the farmed salmon needs to be highlighted. Several studies have now been done measuring the levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and other persistent chlorinated contaminants in farmed salmon. A study done by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland found that farmed salmon had an average of four times the amount of PCBs and Dioxins as wild salmon. In the United States, the Environmental Working Group (ewg.org) did a small study of farmed salmon that were purchased at stores in Washington DC, San Francisco, and Portland, OR.

READ ENTIRE DR CRINNION ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 EU clears use of pigs, chicken in fish feed February 14, 2013

(BRUSSELS) - The European Union said Thursday it has ended a ban on using fish meal made from ground-up pigs or chickens introduced at the height of the 'Mad Cow' food scare, just as it fights the latest scandal over horsemeat being passed off as beef. The European Commission said it had re-authorised the use of Processed Animal Proteins (PAPs) derived from non-ruminant farmed animals, in this case mainly pigs and poultry, in fish feed. Their use was banned in 1997 for cattle, and from 2001 for all animals, as part of efforts to tackle the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) or Mad Cow epidemic, caused when other ruminants, in this case sheep, were used in feed. The Commission said the latest data showed that the EU is close to eradicating BSE in its cattle population while the latest scientific opinion indicates "that the risk of BSE transmission between nonruminant animals is negligible provided that intra-species recycling (cannibalism) is prevented." In the absence of PAPs, farmed fish had been fed meal based on other fish, a more expensive substitute. The ban officially ends on June 1. A statement added that the Commission, subject to testing, would in due course propose reintroducing the use of pig PAPs in feed for chickens and chicken PAPs in feed for pigs. It stressed that it would not propose the re-authorisation of PAPs for feeding ruminant animals -cattle, sheep or goats -- or to re-use ruminant PAPs for feeding non-ruminant farmed animals.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Brainwashing

by open pen salmon feedlot industry’s morally bankrupt marketing machine

Responses to this deceptive Marine Harvest ad from a few Facebook friends: Addie Hollingsworth Another misleading use of words.....this is really starting to bug me!! Anissa Reed New camera angle... they are trying to get away from their big fat bars in the flesh of their feedlot salmon and make it look more wild. They are afraid.. and so they should be. Any true coastal person would find it extremely important to not give up on wild salmon. It's like giving up on ourselves. Addie Hollingsworth Fresh BC Salmon? to the peeps who live away from the sea...sounds like a good old fashioned BC salmon dinner.....oh boy Brian Silversides Fishing McKinlay fresh recycled chicken feathers and by products with added biotoxins and GMO soy and wheat.... gross Jim Wilcox: There's a reason the lady in this ad is in rubber gloves, rubber jacket and "shower cap" - it's not to protect the fish from her diseases - just the opposite!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Diphyllobothrium

nihonkaiense

infection

linked

to

chilled

salmon

consumption. January 18, 2012 Source Rollins School of Public shimizutaro7@gmail.com

Health,

Emory

University,

Atlanta,

Georgia,

United

States.

Abstract This is a case of a 40-year-old Japanese adult male who had acute onset watery diarrhea with intermittent abdominal discomfort. Several days later, he found a 1 metre of tape-shaped object emerged from his anus and was eventually admitted to our hospital for further investigation. Stool examination revealed eggs of Diphyllobothrium with characteristic shape in his stool. After oral praziquantel administration, segments of proglottids were expelled from his anus. The proglottids were sent to the Infectious Disease Surveillance Centre of Japan, and DNA analysis of the proglottids proved to be those of Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense. The patient confessed that he had an eating habit of chilled salmon. His diarrhea and abdominal discomfort were completely diminished after 1 day of oral praziquantel administration. He was successfully discharged from the hospital a few days later admission without any complication of the disease and the side effect of treatment. Claudette Bethune: “And we can't say we were not warned:”

 Aquaculture and public health. The emergence of diphyllobothriasis in Chile and the world. August 2007 Source Department of Microbiology and Immunology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10895, USA. cabello@nymc.edu Abstract Recent clinical and epidemiológical information, an analysis of the literature, and study of the technical aspects of Chilean salmon aquaculture indicate that this activity has the ability to expand the range of diphyllobothriasis caused by the fish tapeworm Diphyllobothrium latum. Evidence for expansion of the range of the fish tapeworm includes the emergences of clinical cases in Brazil related to consumption of salmon produced in Chile. Expansion of the range of this parasite is also suggested by an increase of its geographical range in Chile, beyond its previously endemic foci in the lakes of Regions IX and X. Prevention of further dissemination of this parasitic disease rests on an improvement of sanitation and sewage disposal around the lakes of Regions IX, X and XI in Chile, improvement in aquaculture methods including curtailing the use of fish tapeworm-contaminated lakes to grow juveniles forms of salmonids and more measures to decrease the number of salmonid escapees from marine pens to prevent their return to rivers and lakes carrying the infestation. Moreover, tracking the origin of juveniles in marketed salmon, determining the presence of plerocercoids in them, and increased education of the public regarding the potential dangers of eating raw fish should also be implemented. Only by stimulating the dialogue between the industry, consumers and state regulators will it be possible to implement appropriate measures to prevent further expansion of this parasitic disease by salmon aquaculture.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Salmon Aquaculture and Transmission of the Fish Tapeworm January 2007 Felipe C. Cabello

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Aquaculture of salmon constitutes a rapidly growing worldwide industry with an expanding globalized market (1,2). Although this industry has several economic benefits, according to recent reports it is also accompanied by effects that are detrimental to human and animal health and the environment (1,2). Aquaculture has been implicated in the transmission of infectious diseases. For example, in caged fish aquaculture, bacterial and parasitic diseases can be transmitted to wild fish (1,2). Furthermore, aquaculture-raised fish may be susceptible to the microorganisms and parasites of wild fish (1,3). However, in spite of the accepted fact that parasitic worms can be transmitted to humans by free-ranging fish (4), until recently, few examples have been reported of pathogens that could be transmitted to humans directly by the products and subproducts of salmon aquaculture. I discuss here information indicating that salmon aquaculture is involved in expanding the range of fish tapeworm infections in nature and to humans. Several recent publications report outbreaks of human cases of infection by the fish tapeworm Diphyllobothrium latum in Brazil (5–9). These infections have been epidemiologically linked to consumption of raw salmon produced by the aquaculture industry in southern Chile, thousands of miles away (5–9). Infections by D. latum have been detected in several cities in Brazil (5–9), and in 1 tourist who traveled there from Europe (10). These cases of diphyllobothriasis are noteworthy because this parasite was totally unknown to clinicians and parasitologists in Brazil, where it does not appear to have an endemic life cycle (5–9). D. latum is transmitted to humans by plerocercoid larvae present in fish meat and visceral organs (http://www.dpd.cdc.gov/dpdx). D. latum and the closely related sea gull tapeworm, D. dendriticum, have well-established endemic life cycles in a series of glacial lakes that dot Region XIX and Region X in northern Chilean Patagonia. Infections with these parasites have been detected in this geographic area since the 1950s in persons who ingested uncooked fish from these lakes and also in animals (11–14). The link that closes the epidemiologic chain between the Brazilian outbreak of fish tapeworm infections and the aquaculture of salmon in southern Chile is that some of the freshwater lakes where D. latum and D. dendriticum are endemic are used to grow the freshwater stages of juvenile salmon, or smolt, in cages (15). Smolt are temporarily grown in these lakes to accelerate their growth before they are transported to cages in the sea where the salmon will reach adult stages. The practice of growing smolt in freshwater lakes appears to be unique to Chilean salmon aquaculture; in other salmon aquaculture settings, smolt are grown in tanks containing filtered water. During the past 55 years, work by Chilean parasitologists has demonstrated that native species and introduced salmonid fish are infested with Diphyllobothrium plerocercoids in these lakes (11–14).

READ ENTIRE NCBI ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 From the archives: That Organic Girl - Farm Raised vs Wild Caught Fish May 20, 2012

Summary While fish farming's main purpose was to meet the increase in demand of fish, keep the costs low and decrease the levels of mercury; the added antibiotics, pesticides, herbicides, GMOs and artificial dyes, not to mention the harmful effects it has on the environment, outweighs all the good. Although there are some exceptions, it's generally safest to stay away from farm raised fish if you can, and instead consider buying wild caught. It may cost a bit more but just think of all the harmful PCB chemicals and additives you'll avoid while getting more essential Omega 3's and protein! It is definitely the healthier and overall better choice :)


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 New Oceana Study Finds 33% of Seafood Mislabeled February 21, 2013

At Ocean Views, we’ve covered the specter of mis-identified seafood several times. Today, the conservation group Oceana released a new report that brings the issue into even more focus.

Oceana collected fish samples from 674 retail outlets in 21 states and used DNA testing to compare those products against U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seafood labeling guidelines. What they found was that one-third, or 33 percent, of the 1,215 fish samples collected were mislabeled. The results varied by type of seller and region of the country, with some of this alleged mislabeling reaching levels above 90%.

In a statement, Beth Lowell, a campaign director at Oceana, said, “Purchasing seafood has become the ultimate guessing game for U.S. consumers. Whether you live in Florida or Kansas, no one is safe from seafood fraud. We need to track our seafood from boat to plate so that consumers can be more confident that the fish they purchase is safe, legal and honestly labeled.” Oceana suggests that mislabeling fish may throw a monkey wrench into well-meaning attempts by consumers to choose seafood that is both better for them and the environment. If someone is trying to reduce their mercury input by ordering fish that is traditionally low in that toxin, but they are given a substitution of tilefish, say, which is often high in mercury, their health could be directly impacted. Or if someone is paying more for “wild-caught salmon” only to be served farm-raised salmon, that could undermine the whole concept of sustainable seafood.

READ ENTIRE OCEAN VIEWS ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 GSSI founder: Number of eco-labels lack ‘substance, credibility’ February 21, 2013 US foodservice giant Darden Restaurants and canned seafood group Bumble Bee Foods, as well as the National Fisheries Institute (NFI), gave strong support to the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI). The three bodies are among the project’s partners, and have backed it due to a belief it can clarify just what a certified party delivers in the supply chain. The project’s success would mean a way of benchmarking the many certifications available globally, clarifying the eco-label process, and potentially causing some of them to fall unused. “I sure hope so”, said Chris Lischewski, CEO of Bumble Bee and now chairman of NFI, of the falling away of some eco-labels as a result of GSSI. “There are a number of eco-labels out there today that lack substance and credibility,” he told Undercurrent News. To succeed, the project will require “a true multiple stakeholder approach, including industry from all parts of the globe, along with NGO’s and academia”, he said. It needs to “develop a credible benchmarking tool that ultimately gains widespread acceptance as a measure of seafood sustainability”. Bumble Bee is a strong supporter of the initiative, having joined it as a founding partner. “[GSSI] will provide a means for retailers, and all parties in the seafood supply chain, to evaluate various sustainability schemes with a standard set of guidelines, and facilitate retail acceptance of various sustainability logos and seals,” said Lischewski. The hope is that the GSSI will develop a benchmarking tool that facilitates the sale and marketing of sustainable seafood in a transparent and consistent manner, he said. “This will make life easier for our retail partners and for stakeholders within the seafood supply chain, while also re-assuring our consumers about the sustainability of the seafood products they are buying and consuming.” Roger Bing, vice president of protein purchasing for Darden, parent company of the Red Lobster chain, agreed with this, stating the industry needed transparency and comparability of credible seafood certification programs.

READ ENTIRE UNDERCURRENT NEWS ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 This Fish – Journey from ocean to your plate tracking

Learn all about the seafood you eat, and connect to the fisherman who caught it, by tracing its journey from the ocean to your plate. Fishing is an ancient pursuit, steeped in legend and lore the world over. Yet nowadays most of us are disconnected from our seafood. ThisFish, however, brings you closer to your seafood by tracing its journey back to its origins: who caught it, when, where and how. ThisFish is committed to helping you make more informed choices about the authenticity, quality and sustainability of the seafood you eat, while promoting the folks who proudly stand behind their catch. We want to make the seafood business more transparent and reward those who responsibly harvest and handle your catch. We believe there shouldn’t be anything fishy about eating seafood.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Begich Announces Two Bills to Strengthen Nation’s Seafood Industry March 14, 2013 U.S. Sen. Mark Begich introduced on Wednesday two bills to strengthen the nation’s seafood industry by addressing workforce needs within the industry and cracking down on the problem of mislabeled and fraudulent seafood on the market. Begich, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, and the Coast Guard, announced the bills the same day he stopped by the International Boston Seafood Show where he visited with Alaskans displaying their famous seafood products at the world renowned show. SAFE Seafood: Sen. Begich’s first bill seeks to put an end to the influx of mislabeled and fraudulent seafood entering the marketplace and hurting Alaska fishermen and consumers alike. The bill will improve consumer protection by ensuring commercially distributed seafood is properly labeled and meets applicable federal food quality and safety requirements. “I’m putting the seafood bandits out of business. Passing off farmed salmon as wild salmon and selling illegal Russian crab by labeling it Alaska crab is dishonest. This is a serious problem for Alaska’s honest, hard-working fishermen as well as a public health concern and problem for sustainable fishery management,” Begich said. “This bill gives government agencies better tools to deal with bandits who take part in the $20 billion illegal and unregulated high seas pirate fishing industry.” Begich’s SAFE Seafood bill would: o Strengthen cooperation between seafood inspection arms of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); o Toughen up labeling requirements; and o Improve the traceability of seafood products. Begich’s bill honors the legacy of the late Daniel Inouye, the Hawaiian Senator who originally championed similar legislation. It is modeled after legislation Rep. Ed Markey (D-MA) introduced last week in the House of Representatives, H2O Seafood Processing Visa: Citing Alaska’s unique set of needs, Sen. Begich is seeking an important fix to the recent restrictions on the Summer Work Travel (J-1 visa) program which has created problems for seafood processors, especially in remote areas. The H2O visa would create a separate visa category for the seafood processing industry. The bill requires certification that there are not enough U.S. workers who are able, willing, and available to do the seasonal work. “Seasonal jobs in the seafood industry have traditionally been tough to fill,” Begich said. “With a national debate underway about immigration reform, this bill will address the specific workforce needs within the seafood industry. I’ll be working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle in the coming weeks to see if this bill can be included in a broader immigration package.” Begich said he will also be working with labor leaders on the issue of seafood workers and visas.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Don Staniford: “The backlash against farmed fish fed on chicken and pork continues as a French trout farmer pledges to ban Land Animal Protein. The label will say ‘exclusively fed from vegetable and fish ingredients, without terrestrial animal products’, said Stephane Dargelas, marketing and commercial director at Aqualande http://donstaniford.typepad.com/my-blog/2013/02/backlash-against-chicken-pork-in-farmedfish.html”


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 FDA steps up smoked salmon recalls February 21, 2013 Another company, MKG foods, has become the latest company to issue a recall for Atlantic smoked salmon due to Listeria Monocytogenes this week. The frequency of these smoked salmon recalls prompted us to take a look at whether the US Food and Drug Administration has changed its behavior. It appears it has. Fully 60% of all the salmon recalls for listeria since Jan 2011 have happened in the last 120 days. The FDA says listeria is ubiquitous in the environment, and cannot be 100% kept out of cold smoked products, despite their zero tolerance. But their regulatory attention has clearly changed. There appears to be a stepped up inspection effort by the FDA targeting listeria in smoked salmon, judging by the sharp increase in recalls in the last four months. In 2011 there were six recalls of smoked salmon for listeria. In 2012, there were five. Yet in the four month period, from November 2012 through February 2013, there have been 11 separate recalls of smoked salmon for listeria. In other words, 61% of the recalls for listeria published since January 2011 have occurred in the last four months. A number of major companies have been involved including Whole Foods, Ocean Beauty, and on a different issue – salmonella, Costco. Currently the FDA has a zero tolerance policy on listeria, yet also admits that it is ubiquitous in the natural environment. The increasing level of recalls can hurt the smoked salmon market, unless a different way is found to address the risk of listeria. Listeria can potentially cause serious or fatal infections, however, no illnesses have been reported in this recall, nor in the 11 recalls that have been done on smoked salmon in the last four months. Listeria is widespread and naturally occurring in the environment, and readily grows on cold smoked salmon. The FDA says “It is not possible to produce cold-smoked fish consistently free of L. monocytogenes”.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!  MacDONALD: Consumers might turn up noses at virus-infected fish February 25, 2013 DO YOU KNOW that you can eat up to a kilogram — or more — of insects per year? It’s a little gross (and sorry to blow the whole “ignorance is bliss” deal here) but studies have shown it to be true. Apparently, we unknowingly gulp insects down all the time (think biking, snoring), and while they may not be listed on nutrition labels, they, or bits of them, can quite often be found in the food we eat. If you don’t believe me, just go to Health Canada’s website at hc-sc.gc.ca, read the current Guidelines for the General Cleanliness of Food, and you’ll see that there are actually “acceptable concentrations of microorganisms or amounts of extraneous material” (such as dead mites, insect fragments or rodent hairs) allowed in our collective groceries. Personally, it doesn’t bother me too much. I wrote about food contamination way back when I was in university and have been aware of this particular tidbit of nourishment trivia for years. I’ve also lived long enough to realize that finding a worm in an apple, a slug in a head of lettuce or a fly in my soup is just a natural part of life. So when sea lice were discovered on local grocery store salmon — farmed salmon, specifically — not so long ago, I wasn’t too freaked out. I guess I figured that since sea lice could be found on wild salmon as well as farmed salmon, and that the lice could simply be washed off, much like that slug in my lettuce, I just let the whole issue slide. But that all changed with the subsequent news that farmed salmon with infectious salmon anemia were deemed fit for human consumption. Even though I quite enjoy salmon, I actually went so far as to declare a personal and family moratorium on eating farmed salmon. While I was able to psychologically (and pragmatically, I feel) deal with the sea lice issue, I am completely unable to get beyond the ick factor that comes with the thought of eating virus-ridden, sick, infectious and anemic fish. I know that some people will call me misinformed. Those who work in fish farming or make money from it, or get elected based on such things, will no doubt huff at my words and consider me a thorn in their collective fiscal backside. What such people also must realize, however, is that I am very much representative of the type of person who will ultimately decide the fate of fish farming in this province. I buy the groceries in my household. I cook for my family, I’m the one who worries about their health and wellbeing. I’m a busy mother and I have a job of my own. And while I am not a scientist or an environmental expert or an activist, I am capable of using a computer. I am capable of learning. When dinnertime worries begin to slide down the slippery slope from sea lice to infectious and viral salmon diseases and I begin to question what the heck is going on, I am more than capable of seeking out answers. A few suggestions: the Association for the Preservation of the Eastern Shore at nsapes.ca or the David Suzuki Foundation at davidsuzuki.org. Perhaps the most important thing these people — the ones who would call me misinformed and consider me unimportant — must always remember is that I am, in addition to being all these other things, at all times also a consumer. And in the end, it will be the consumer — will we buy or not? — who will ultimately decide just how fish is farmed, marketed and sold in this province.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Eating feedlot salmon does not save wild salmon; it destroys them.

Shame on Albion for stooping to false/reckless/irresponsible marketing of open pen feedlot salmon; an industry known around the planet for devastating wild salmon populations, their ecosystems and their natural food sources. Hopefully this unscrupulous marketing strategy will cease immediately before it bites you in your proverbial butt..

Editorial Comment: • The open pen salmon feedlot industry and those who enable it are destroying the world’s wild salmon, their ecosystems, local communities, cultures and economies. • Open pen salmon feedlots are nothing more than cesspools that breed deadly salmon diseases and parasites. • Open pen salmon feedlot practices destroy the seabed below them by allowing tons of feces, excess feed and deadly chemicals to fall to the sea floor. • Salmon are carnivores – feeding naturally-occurring forage fish to salmon raised in feedlots removes the forage fish from diets of wild salmon and other species around planet earth


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Alaska lawmakers face down GMO salmon Murkowski asks Alaskans to contact FDA during extended comments February 23, 2013 Genetically-modified salmon is nearing federal approval for human consumption and Alaska’s sate and federal lawmakers have taken up torches against what they refer to as “Frankenfish.” In the novel Frankenstein; or, “The Modern Prometheus,” author Mary Shelley’s subjects played out the uneasy relationship between man and his science and technology, and examined questions about the morality of man as a creator.

This tension is on more and more minds in the Lower 48 and Alaska as AquaBounty's genetically modified AquAdvantage nears approval for the dinner plate. Many Alaskans see this new organism as a threat to human health and to the state's vital wild salmon market. Proponents of the Pout-salmon hybrid say the farmed fish will provide protein faster to a world with a growing demand for food AquaBounty’s AquAdvantage Salmon is an Atlantic salmon, the species commonly raised in fish farms, spliced with the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of a Pacific Chinook ‘King’ salmon and the eel pout. These modifications push AquAdvantage Salmon to reach a larger market size of five to 12 pounds more rapidly than traditionally farmed Atlantic salmon. All AquAdvantage Salmon are female in the attempt to prevent reproduction, according to the FDA’s Draft Environmental Assessment. However, up to 5 percent could be able to reproduce. As an added measure of security, AquaBounty has said its genetically modified eye-eggs would be raised only by specific “physically-constrained fresh water culture facilities.” This removal of proximity from the ocean is expected to prevent the GMO from escaping into the wild environment. The biotech firm AquaBounty of Maynard, Mass. has one more piece of red tape to cut before its AquAdvantage Salmon is approved for human consumption. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration released two draft reports in Dec. 2012 that recommend AquAdvantage approval. Public input on the Finding of no Significant Impact and Environmental Assessment was scheduled to end in February. The deadline was extended until April 26.

READ ENTIRE JUNEAU EMPIRE ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Impacts of open pen salmon feedlots  Marine Harvest – Your every despicable move is being watched and recorded

Alexandra Morton: Dear Marine Harvest: Your vessel “Orca Chief” went north yesterday evening, loaded. Vessel tracking shows “Orca Chief” paced back and forth along the entrances to Kingcome and Knight Inlet all night. In the morning the “Orca Chief” went to your fish farm at Shelter Bay across from Port Hardy and returned empty shortly after. Did you just put known piscine reovirus infected fish into the public waters of British Columbia, onto the migratory path of wild salmon?

Leanne Hodges: ...a disease is a deleterious substance, effluent full of pesticides like Ivermectin, antibiotic residue and antifouling covered nets sloughing off, human waste over top of it all from the floating staff building,.... it's criminal and charges should be laid. Harper is complicit with industry and they are just laughing at us while they destroy the oceans .... polluting our waters while the majority of the profits go back to Norway..... I would think Eco-tourism, sport fish and commercial operators would be storming the walls of DFO ..... nope just a hand full of dedicated activists. Watch www.salmonconfidential.ca ..... and get royally pissed off.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 NOAA: “Salmon aquaculture – a healthy source of seafood”

Excuse Limit

0 Conserve Wild Game Fish The U.S. farmed salmon industry, based in Maine and Washington, produces a small fraction of the salmon consumed in the United States. The majority of farmed salmon you will find in the store has been imported from Canada, Chile, or Europe. Once-healthy wild populations of Atlantic salmon became devastated by industrialization and dam construction along rivers in the northeastern United States. In response to the decline of these populations in the early 1800s, Atlantic salmon have been raised in hatcheries since 1864 to enhance the wild populations and sustain the fisheries that depend on them. In the late 1970s, commercial aquaculture ventures started raising salmon to market size. The U.S. Atlantic salmon aquaculture industry has grown to some 12,000 tons (live weight) per year produced in Maine (around $78 million) and around 8,000 tons in Washington State (roughly $52 million). The United States also imports over 280,000 tons a year of salmon, mainly from Canada, Scotland, Norway, and Chile. State and federal governments have developed regulations that ensure domestic salmon farms meet stringent environmental, fish health, and human food safety standards. These strict environmental requirements address issues such as siting to minimize environmental effects and coastal use conflicts, waste discharge, aquatic health, and potential effects on endangered species, fish habitat, and marine mammals. Through 40 years of culture practice in the United States, salmon farmers have developed a variety of management practices to meet these rigorous requirements and provide a healthy, safe, and sustainable seafood product.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

ď ś WGFCI RESPONSE to NOAA -

re. Open Pen Salmon Feedlot safety

The following message regarding Information associated with the open pen Atlantic salmon feedlot industry as published at: http://www.fishwatch.gov/seafood_profiles/species/salmon/species_pages/atl antic_salmon_farmed.htm

is being shared with wild game fish conservationists around our planet who work day in and day out (most with no financial compensation) to educate individuals, organizations, first nations, corporations and elected officials regarding many of the known impacts of open pen Atlantic salmon feedlots to human health, wild species and their ecosystems as well as to local cultures, communities and economies. This message is also being shared with specific US senators, state legislators and agency directors It appears that the text associated with the benefits of open pen Atlantic salmon feedlots was written by marketing professionals associated with the filthy and problematic open pen Atlantic salmon feedlot industry. This appears to be the norm as repayment for unethical campaign contributions NOAA's endorsement of the US based (Washington state and Maine) open pen Atlantic salmon feedlot industry leads Americans and others around the world to believe that NOAA is as corrupt as other domestic and foreign agencies that place short gain over long term human health and wildlife conservation. The language on the above referenced NOAA site is incorrect and is offensive - it is unacceptable given the known impacts of open pen Atlantic salmon feedlots. Recommendation - deactivate this page as soon as possible!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 CleanUpSalmonFarming.com

Clean Up Salmon Farming Open-pen salmon feedlots are breeding grounds for diseases like the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAv). Once infected, ISAv can spread quickly to other farmed salmon and can infect wild salmon and other species such as cod and herring swimming near the farms. The salmon farming industry has destroyed more than 10 million diseased fish in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Southern Newfoundland, while being compensated by (Canadian) taxpayers for more than $100 million. Can you afford the cost? CleanUpSalmonFarming.com


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Fish farm rejected by Nova Scotia government, risk to wild salmon cited March 13, 2013 HALIFAX - The Nova Scotia government has rejected an application from Snow Island Salmon to allow a fish farm in Shoal Bay. Fisheries and Aquaculture Minister Sterling Belliveau says during the 22-month review process, Fisheries and Oceans Canada expressed concern about the salmon farm's impact on wild salmon in the bay near Sheet Harbour. The federal department said the site would represent a moderate risk to wild salmon. The province says it is the first time Fisheries and Oceans has described a proposed fish farm as representing a moderate risk to wild salmon. Belliveau says the province's decision is not a sign that the government is changing its support for fish farms, which was part of its aquaculture strategy released last year. There has been opposition to fish farms around Nova Scotia, including proposals by Snow Island Salmon to develop farms in Spry Harbour, Shoal Bay and Beaver Harbour on the province's Eastern Shore. Several groups have asked for a moratorium until a full environmental assessment can be done on open-pen farming to determine its impact on wild salmon, the lobster fishery and residents. Belliveau says the government believes the aquaculture industry can help rural Nova Scotia's economy. "We are growing aquaculture into an economically, environmentally and socially sustainable industry, creating year-round jobs and increased wealth in rural Nova Scotia," he said in a statement released on Wednesday. Also reported here: •

http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/969277-province-rejects-fish-farmapplication#.UUCVrLKH7yw.twitter

http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/fish-farm-rejected-by-n-s-government-risk-to-wild-salmon-cited1.1193715?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20130313004

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/fish-farm-rejected-by-nova-scotia-governmentrisk-to-wild-salmon-cited/article9726828/

Claudette Bethune How can the risk and mitigation be different between coasts, with less precaution in the West given the Pacific coast is more at risk? Sabra Woodworth Possibly a sign of a response to Cohen's report? This is the wording of his recommendations, & this week as well we have Kristi Miller's research going ahead on farmed salmon!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Biosecurity: Protecting Farmed Fish What is Biosecurity? Biosecurity is the process of taking precautions to minimize the risk of introduction and spread of infectious organisms into or between populations. Why is Biosecurity so important? Biosecurity is very important to aquaculture because it prevents or limits the introduction and spread of disease within or between aquatic animal production facilities and sites. Since very few effective treatments are available for most aquatic animal diseases, effective biosecurity is the key to preventing these diseases. How are infectious organisms transmitted? Disease agents that infect aquatic animals are frequently spread between aquatic organisms in the environment, or equipment used to transfer animals from one holding unit or site to another. Some diseases can also be spread directly through the water by animals releasing the infectious agent or by sick animals dying. Known sources of aquatic animal infections include contaminated feed, equipment, untreated wastewater, fish bearing source waters, and pests such as birds or rodents. What can I do to reduce the risk of disease introduction or spread? 

   

 

Enforce strict sanitary measures for personnel, feed suppliers, veterinarians, harvesters and visitors: o Provide disinfected protective clothing o Provide hand and footwear disinfection stations at each entrance and exit Routinely disinfect equipment and water with recommended disinfectants. Ensure that the disinfectant can be applied safely and poses no toxic risk to humans, aquatic animals or the environment. Restrict vehicle, boat and equipment contact with culture and holding units. Maintain a log of all visitors coming in contact with your aquatic animals. Plan the flow of personnel movement through the facility and require that personnel undertake disinfection procedures between holding units and/or buildings. Contain and/or treat effluent and organic waste at origin and prohibit it from re-entering production areas. For open water facilities, dispose of organic waste on land at a site that has measures to prohibit escape of breakdown products into surrounding waters. Use pest management protocols to keep out birds, vermin and/or predators. Use signage at the facility to inform visitors and personnel that there are biosecurity requirements in place such as controlled access, footbaths, video surveillance, etc.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! How do I keep the aquatic animals in my facility healthy? 

     

Choose your facility/site location carefully with biosecurity in mind; considering, for example: hydrographical characteristics, accessibility for stock in - stock out movements, and health status of surrounding farmed or wild aquatic animals. Choose a safe water source for land-based facilities such as well water or spring water. Where such water sources are not available, use a disinfection and/or filtration system(s). Stock only with certified disease-free eggs and/or aquatic animals. Schedule routine disease monitoring with a veterinarian and implement an aquatic animal health management plan. Remove mortalities and moribund animals routinely. When disease is suspected, contact your veterinarian. Use caution prior to moving aquatic animals between holding units or farms. Aquatic animals showing signs of disease should not be sold or transferred to other facilities. Minimize handling wherever possible to reduce stress that can predispose aquatic animals to infectious diseases.

Date modified: 2011-11-06

Editorial Comment: The 2011 CFIA biosecurity guidelines must be revised, formalized and effectively enforced. Areas of concern to Wild Game Fish Conservation International and our colleagues include: • Deliberate and intentional exclusion of infected salmon eggs and salmon smolts of foreign origin as known sources of animal infections. • Independent disease-free certification of salmon eggs, smolts and consumer products must be performed and adequately documented. • Independent examinations of salmon feedlots and the salmon within them must be conducted during feedlot salmon rearing with results available to the public • Diseased salmon are not to be sold or transferred to other facilities Otherwise, the CFIA biosecurity guidelines are worthless!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Dr. Alexandra Morton Talks: Video series

Alex Talks 1

Alex Talks 2

Dr. Alexandra Morton Marine Biologist

Alexandra Morton: “In the ongoing effort to communicate what is going on with the salmon feedlot industry I am doing short videos like these. Marine Harvest you might want to watch them. European viruses are too dangerous to pour into the Pacific Ocean.”

Watch “Salmon Confidential” Here


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Jefferson County drafting net-pen guidelines March 11, 2013 PORT TOWNSEND — The shoreline Editorial Comment: management program for Jefferson County came a step closer to ratification Monday as Given the known adverse impacts of open pen the county moved toward developing a salmon feedlots to human health, wild salmon, their conditional use permit process for finfish ecosystems and to communities cultures and aquaculture. economies it is unconscionable, if not immoral and bordering on insanity that Jefferson County The county commissioners instructed (Washington state) is allowing the Washington Department of Community Development staff Department of Ecology to force them to provide for to implement modifications the finfish portions filthy, open pen salmon feedlots sited in wild salmon of the management plan, clearing the way for a and trout migration routes near Jefferson County’s shoreline program update that first was sent to valuable shorelines. the state in November 2010. The millions of salmonids of Canadian and United The Department of Ecology approved most of it Sates origin that utilize this unique area as juveniles, in February 2011, except for a proposed ban adults and throughout their lives are far more valuable on finfish aquaculture, which raises non-native than subpar, problematic salmon that would be species, such as Atlantic salmon, in pens. artificially reared and chemically treated in these Since that time, the commissioners worked feedlots – the impact to wildlife (including Puget toward developing a conditional-use process Sound’s endangered Orcas) is incalculable! that limits the location and scope of potential This provision in Jefferson County’s shoreline net-pen businesses because the state management plan must see the light of day! Department of Ecology said counties lack the authority to ban the industry outright — which commissioners sought to do. “I’m happy with our progress here, but we are being put in a position of having to allow net pens in Jefferson County, which I oppose,” said Commissioner Phil Johnson afterwards. “But it’s better for us to create our own conditional use rather than allowing Ecology to make the decision for us. If we don’t come up with our own plan, Ecology can impose their own regulations,” Johnson said. The permits have several requirements, including the presence of a disaster plan should the farmed fish develop a disease that requires quarantine, as well as insurance coverage that will pay for any damages. Community Development staff now will assimilate the revised net-pen section into other parts of the shoreline program that already has met Ecology’s approval. That draft will be presented at the March 25 commissioners’ meeting. If approved, a three-week public comment period would begin that will include one public hearing. “This is only a piece of the full package,” said Planning Manager Stacie Hoskins. “The commissioners need to look at this one more time before they put it together for public review.” The latest draft of the policy contains 21 potential requirements for net pens, including requiring a genetic similarity between farmed and native fish, controlling the odor and regulating the lighting used in a fish-farming operation. While strictly governing the process itself, the plan imposes geographic restrictions on where a fish farm could locate in Jefferson County waters. There are four areas where net pens could be constructed in the Port Townsend area, while a 20square-mile area northwest of Port Townsend and extending to the San Juan County nautical border also could house the facilities, according to the proposal. There are currently no active applications for net-pen construction, and none has been received for several years according to shoreline management program update Project Manager Michelle McConnell.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Gorilla Radio interview with Dawn Morrison February 26, 2013 The following text and audio recording are available here It's said; "March comes in like a lion..." and from Ireland to Norway to Vancouver the month begins with the 'March for Wild Salmon,' an international link-up of citizens', environmental, and indigenous groups roaring its determination to halt the spread of the transglobal fish farming industry. Vancouver's mobilization is led by the Indigenous Salmon Defenders, kicking off a month-long campaign consisting of a series of events, culminating on the final day of March with a global vigil for wild salmon. The timing is no accident, as the coming Spring is the most crucial moment for the next generation of salmon smolt, who must transit a veritable gauntlet of disease-ridden, sea lice spawning fish feedlots dotting their migratory route to the open ocean.

Dawn Morrison Indigenous Food Sovereignty Network

Dawn Morrison is founder of the Indigenous Food Sovereignty Network, a group formed in conjunction with the BC Food Systems Network. She also coordinates the Vancouver Native Health Society's Urban Aboriginal Gardens and Kitchen Project. Morrison is too a leader for Indigenous community engagement in association with the BC Bioregional Food Assistance Planning Project, and she'll be at the head of the March for Wild Salmon. She says the message is simple: “Stop Norwegian Fish Farms from Killing Wild Salmon!”


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Are diseased Atlantic salmon safe? February 28, 2013 The Canadian Food Inspection Agency recently declared 240,000 Atlantic salmon fit for human consumption even though it has Infectious Salmon Anemia. The CFIA has admitted it is impossible to eradicate ISA in Atlantic waters. Only Canadians will eat this as the United States won’t import fish with the virus. Last year, however, the CFIA ordered the destruction of 450,000 such fish into landfill or fish meal. These fish were all grown in fish pens in open water off the coast of our Maritime provinces. It is a program hidden behind the scientific name Aquaculture, or the more friendly name, “fish farms.” But the problem of ocean conservation and sustainability is much greater than this. Selling diseased fish to the public is just wrong. Selling diseased fish that isn’t labelled as such is immoral! This company produces a disgusting product while destroying the ocean environments that they operate in. Wild Atlantic salmon have been decimated anywhere they come into contact with this unsustainable industry. Over 99 per cent of the Atlantic salmon you buy in stores, or eat in restaurants, are grown in these net-cages in the oceans. Many of them are roughly the size of two football fields and can yield 200,000 fish! Of course, there can be no natural food supply for such an enormous quantity of fish, so they are fed pellets of fish meal, and require 3-5 lbs of this fish meal for every pound of harvested fish. I think you know where these thoughts are going. The excrement from such a farm can equal the sewage of a town of 10,000 people, and it’s flowing straight into the surrounding ocean, unable to be assimilated by nature, disrupting the natural habitat enjoyed by other species. And secondly, the need for such a huge supply of fish meal requires the decimation of other fish stocks that feed other fish species. And because of the tight surroundings of these growing fish, there is a possibility of disease, so they are fed antibiotics, which, of course, are not all digested within the confines of the net-cages. The Atlantic Salmon Federation recommends against open water net cages, and that farming salmon in freshwater, closed-containment facilities on land is the right choice to ensure that disease and parasites do not spread to wild fish populations and to keep our fish safer to eat. Please tell your political representatives at the federal level we must do more for ocean conservation and sustainability, and to protect our food sources. Until all fish farming is done in a closed containment system where the fish can be protected, and the wastes can be treated before being discharged into our oceans, I won’t be eating any Atlantic salmon. How about you?


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Largest study of salmon health ever undertaken set to begin in B.C. For years Kristi Miller has been probing the complex and controversial world of fish diseases on the West Coast, where scientists are trying to unravel the mystery of why millions of apparently healthy salmon die annually. Now Dr. Miller, the groundbreaking head of molecular genetics for Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Brian Riddell, a former top scientist with DFO who directs the non-profit Pacific Salmon Foundation, are teaming up with Genome B.C. in the most comprehensive study of salmon health ever undertaken in the world. “This is going to be the first really large-scale effort to look at the health of all salmon,” Dr. Riddell said. “It’s exciting. It’s incredibly exciting.” Dr. Miller, whose cutting-edge genomic research has largely been kept under wraps by the government, testified at the Cohen Commission inquiry into the collapse of Fraser River sockeye stocks in 2011. But she was not allowed to talk to the media at the time. In her first interview since then, she said the research project will rely on new technologies designed at the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo on Vancouver Island. “There is … technology that I have been developing for the past year … that has the capacity to run about 45 microbes across 96 individual [fish samples] at a time, so one can quite rapidly generate a lot of information from a platform,” she said. “And that’s our goal at the moment – to assess 45 microbes that are known or suspected to cause disease in salmon worldwide.” Dr. Miller made a startling find a few years ago when she detected a genomic signature in salmon that died in rivers before they had a chance to spawn. Her research caused a big splash in the U.S. journal Science, because it suggested a virus was causing those pre-spawn mortalities. But she was not cleared by DFO to talk about her work. Her silencing was one of the key events that led to complaints against the federal government for “muzzling” scientists. But Dr. Miller got approval from Ottawa to talk this week about her new research, which she says will build on her earlier work. “I am speaking now … and I hope that this is a signal [of continued openness],” she said. Dr. Miller said infectious salmon anemia (ISA), which has wiped out farmed salmon in some areas of the world and is suspected of being loose in B.C., will be one of the key microbes she looks for. “It is our intention to have ISA as one of the microbes on the chip,” she said.

READ ENTIRE GLOBE AND MAIL ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Study to probe death of billions of young Pacific salmon announced March 11, 2013

The first phase of a unique four-phase, five-year study to find out what's killing billions of juvenile Pacific salmon wraps up in April with sample collection of wild, hatchery and farmed salmon. Genome British Columbia, the Pacific Salmon Foundation and Fisheries and Oceans Canada made public their partnership to discover the microbes "that may be undermining the productivity of BC's Pacific salmon" Monday. The project is being managed in four sequential Phases with Phase 1 valued at $930,000 that started in May 2012 and ends in April 2013. The first phase establishes a large-scale sampling program, running over 12 months, for wild, hatchery and aquaculture salmon


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! "The project will conduct epidemiological assessments to explore the transmission dynamics and historical presence of detected microbes, with key focus on microbes that are suspected globally to be causing disease in salmon," the press release said. "Researchers will apply genomic technology to identify and verify which microbes are presently carried by BC's wild and cultured fish." Phase 2 will run from April 2013 to April 2015 and will develop, test and validate a "novel, high throughput genomic technology to get a 'snapshot' of the microbes carried by wild and cultured salmon in BC." This segment will also involve epidemiological assessments to identify when and where microbes are transmitted and how long they may have been in BC. The release said the aquaculture audit samples, which are the only samples collected from fish dying in the ocean, will offer an invaluable opportunity to begin to relate specific microbes with disease. "This project is about developing effective monitoring tools to assess the microbes in BC's salmon, assessing the risk of these microbes to Pacific salmon, and establishing public confidence that people are watching over the health of our wild salmon populations," said Dr. Brian Riddell, president and CEO of the Pacific Salmon Foundation, who is heading up the first phase. "The uniqueness of the project is its comprehensiveness. We are bringing a strong team of scientists together to assess the risk of disease to all species of wild salmon, including salmon produced in our hatcheries and salmon from aquaculture. We will also engage the full range of stakeholders, including government, industry, communities and conservation groups that have an interest in this research." Of note also is that the first phase is being co-led by Dr. Kristi Miller of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, who was a central figure in the Cohen Commission and someone that anti-fish farm sectors said was being muzzled by DFO. Over 90% of juvenile salmon migrating from freshwater into the ocean will die before returning to freshwater to spawn. The scientific community believes that mortality is highest during the first few months in the marine environment and that disease may be a significant factor in this mortality, but not enough is known about what pathogens or diseases might be involved. What is already known comes almost exclusively from observations of cultured fish (both in hatcheries and in aquaculture). Consequently, there is a fair understanding of pathogens and diseases that impact salmon in freshwater hatcheries and sea-water net pens, but a much poorer understanding of pathogens affecting Pacific salmon in the ocean, the press release said. Phase 3 will run from Oct. 2014 to Oct, 2016 and will focus in on the microbes identified in Phase 2, with an emphasis on microbes that have not been extensively researched previously and that are thought to be of pathological significance in salmon. A portion of the samples collected for molecular surveillance will also undergo "histopathological analysis and the audit samples in the library will be used for both molecular analysis and histopathology." Phase 4 runs from Oct. 2016 to Oct. 2017 and will include reporting of research and presentations to management agencies on the potential utility of methods developed and the application of outcomes to future monitoring. The culmination of the project will likely be in 2017 when data has been compiled and research outcomes are clear.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 New Film, Cutting-Edge Research Probe Salmon Virus Mystery March 12, 2013 The mystery of BC's disappearing wild salmon is back on the radar this week, with the release of a new documentary on the subject and the launch of a groundbreaking research partnership to study farmed and wild fish for viruses that may be affecting both. Salmon Confidential, a feature-length film released online last week, explores the battle over salmon science that was at the centre of last year's federal judicial inquiry into rapidly declining Fraser River sockeye stocks, referred to as the Cohen Commission. Filmmaker Twyla Roscovich tracks the extraordinary efforts by several federal and provincial government agencies to muzzle leading scientists hot on the trail of exotic viruses - foremost among these the Department of Fisheries and Oceans' own Dr. Kristi Miller. The film is already generating some buzz, garnering over eleven thousand online views in under a week. Also central to the film's narrative are the Quixotic efforts of an unlikely team of scientists operating outside the government's control - people like independent salmon biologist Alexandra Morton, SFU's Dr. Rick Routledge, and two world-renowned virus experts in Atlantic Canada and Norway analyzing the samples of farmed and wild fish collected by Morton's largely volunteer team. While they maintain, along with DFO's Miller - who operates a state-of-the-art genomics lab out of Nanaimo's Pacific Biological Station - that the deadly diseases like Infectious Salmon Anemia virus they're finding offer a plausible answer to the mystery of BC's disappearing salmon, government representatives have gone out of their way to attack the credibility of these scientists and labs and undermine their findings. The narrative these researchers presented to the public was initially drowned out by highly sophisticated, effective media relations counterattack led by representatives of DFO and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. But the latest chapter in this salmon virus saga may well tell a different story, as a newly announced government-backed research initiative, led in part by Dr. Miller, suggests (more on that below). Watch Salmon Confidential for yourself here. The Kristi Miller we see in Salmon Confidential has been muzzled by her government minders, prevented from speaking openly to media about her leading-edge use of genomic profiling to assess fish health and diseases. Only through official subpoena by a judicial inquiry is she able to suggest that these viruses may well be the "smoking gun" in the collapse of BC's wild salmon. But there is evidence today that the intense public and media pressure that grew in reaction to Miller's muzzling has had an effect on the Harper Government.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

This week, a new scientific partnership to study salmon diseases was announced between Miller's DFO lab, a government-supported research cluster called Genome BC, and the non-profit Pacific Salmon Foundation. According to a media release touting the new venture, "The project will conduct epidemiological assessments to explore the transmission dynamics and historical presence of detected microbes, with key focus on microbes that are suspected globally to be causing disease in salmon. Researchers will apply genomic technology to identify and verify which microbes are presently carried by BC's wild and cultured fish." The project will span 4 phases over 5 years, with the first phase, valued at $930,000, already underway and set to conclude mid-2013. Phase 1, which involves collecting samples of farmed and wild fish for testing, is being co-directed by the PSF's Dr. Brian Riddell and DFO's Dr. Miller. The initiative grew out of the final recommendations of the Cohen Commission, which focused heavily on the impacts of open net pen salmon farms and the diseases they incubate on wild salmon. "The research conducted by the Pacific Salmon Foundation and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and funded in part by Genome BC, will address specific recommendations from the Cohen Commission report and build on the body of research referenced by the Commission," the media release noted. According to Riddell, president of the Pacific Salmon Foundation, "This project is about developing effective monitoring tools to assess the microbes in BC's salmon, assessing the risk of these microbes to Pacific salmon, and establishing public confidence that people are watching over the health of our wild salmon populations." As Riddell told The Globe and Mail this week, “This is going to be the first really large-scale effort to look at the health of all salmon...It’s incredibly exciting.” Also of note is Miller's new-found freedom to speak publicly about her work. In her first interview in several years, she explained to The Globe's Mark Hume the comparative advantage of her lab over less up-to-date techniques for tracking these elusive viruses. “There is … technology that I have been developing for the past year … that has the capacity to run about 45 microbes across 96 individual [fish samples] at a time, so one can quite rapidly generate a lot of information from a platform,” Miller said. “And that’s our goal at the moment – to assess 45 microbes that are known or suspected to cause disease in salmon worldwide.” With significant resources at their disposal, Miller's leading-edge lab and methods, and the credibility of a multi-stakeholder effort involving government, non-profits and the scientific community, this venture may hold the key to unlocking the mystery of BC's disappearing salmon, once and for all.

Legacy birthplace


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 EMERGENCY

CALL TO ACTION! LETTERS TO MEDIA AND CONSTITUENCY OFFICES IMMEDIATELY!

Up to 500,000 PRV Piscine Reovirus infected Atlantic salmon smolts have been dumped into our coastal waterways during the highly sensitive out migration of wild Pink and Chum smolts leave freshets. Fraser River Sockeye smolts in May will pass through these pathogens .... Please write a brief to the point letter and storm the media... this insanity has got to stop ! Please read Dr Alexandra Morton's Letter and do your part. Copy and paste ... if you like. Send to friends in their FB messages.... can you say deleterious ! Please act now .... your local papers and representatives need to know. Dear Editor: Marine Harvest’s Dalrymple Hatchery, 40 km north of Campbell River, reared ~500,000 piscine reovirus infected Atlantic salmon smolts destined for net pens on wild salmon migration routes. Piscine reovirus first appeared in Norway in 1999 and spread to over 400 farms, damaging the hearts and muscle of salmon. July 2010, Columbia University’s Center for Infection and Immunity, a World Health Organization disease detective lab, identified the piscine reovirus associated with the disease. They warn that it spreads like “wildfire.” A wild salmon with this disease may not be able to swim up a river. Up to 90% of some Fraser sockeye runs are dying in the river, before reaching their spawning grounds. Is this virus killing salmon trying to swim up the Fraser River? The Province of BC reports they found piscine reovirus in 75% of BC farm salmon, although this data did not appear in the Cohen Commission. I am finding it in my research on wild salmon and farm salmon from supermarkets. Marine Harvest, a large Norwegian salmon feedlot company operating in BC, denies the virus in their fish causes disease. They say DFO is not concerned about this virus either and suggest maybe it has been here all along. International research recommend it be controlled form spreading, but BC is doing nothing. See the film on this: www.salmonconfidential.ca The precautionary principle is the duty to prevent harm, when it is within our power to do so, even when all the evidence is not in. This principle appears in several international treaties to which Canada is a signatory. I am writing to inform the people of the Fraser River of these events. The Province of BC is the legal landlord of the fish farm industry. If this matter concerns you, write to the leaders of the political parties and tell him how you feel about this. The Precautionary Principle is needed now to quarantine salmon feedlots away from wild salmon, just like chicken farms were closed from contact with wild birds. adrian.dix.mla@leg.bc.ca premier@gov.bc.ca leader@greenparty.bc.ca office@bcconservative.ca Alexandra Morton http://deptwildsalmon.org/pathogens/prv/


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 EWOS

and Mainstream Canada are spreading infectious diseases in the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve

Don Staniford: In Bergen at the North Atlantic Seafood Forum - fish feed giant EWOS (owned by Cermaq) has a tanker moored opposite the conference venue! Read how EWOS and Mainstream Canada are spreading infectious diseases in the Clayoquot Sound UNESCO Biosphere Reserve: http://www.globaltvbc.com/group+reports+outbreak+of+ihn+virus+on+salmon+farm+in+clayoquot+so und/6442642910/story.html


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Norway’s Salmon Confidential - Media Blackout & Film Premiere in Bergen!

The film ‘Salmon Confidential’ has its Norwegian premiere this week as delegates gather for the North Atlantic Seafood Forum in Bergen. In keeping with the theme of the film, conference organizers have banned the film from being screened and banned the media from reporting. ‘Salmon Confidential’ follows biologist Alexandra Morton and Professor Are Nylund from the University of Bergen as they track salmon viruses in British Columbia back to Norway.

“I thought I was in Norway not China,” said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA) who will be protesting peacefully outside the conference venue. “Censorship is alive and kicking both the public and the media in the teeth at the North Atlantic Seafood Forum in Bergen. It is shameful that Norway awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo in 2010 yet in 2013 are clamping down on freedom of speech. Norway claims to be a bastion of human rights and free speech yet the Norwegian salmon farming industry is being shielded from legitimate public criticism. ‘Salmon Confidential’ lifts the lid on the can of worms that is Norwegian salmon farming.”

Listen to Don Staniford speaking about salmon censorship on NRK radio – online here


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Marine Harvest - Salmon supply and market outlook March 6, 2013 (North Atlantic Seafood Forum)


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Cermaq - Prerequisites for growth March 7, 2014 (North Atlantic Seafood Forum)


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Video: Infected Salmon – Is this OK? Dr. Alexandra Morton March 1, 2013

Editorial Comment: Wild Pacific salmon along North America’s west coast are impacted day in and day out by parasites and diseases due to the unethical practices of the British Columbia Salmon Farms Association and their members, under the “watchful eyes” of Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Fish Farms Non-disclosure of disease and drugs

 Response from Marine Harvest March 7, 2013 Thank you for your recent letter of concern and forwarding of a blog posting by Alexandra Morton about the health of the Atlantic salmon smolts grown by Marine Harvest Canada. We respect and value the health of both the fish we produce, the wild fish that inhabit the waters and the environment. I am writing to summarize the known facts about piscine reovirus (PRV) in BC. Two things of which we are certain about this virus is that it is new to fish health research (2010) so it could not have been identified as early as 2008 ( Palacios et al, PloS One 5(7): 2009) and that its presence is not correlated to heart disease or any disease. (G Marty: in prep). Ms. Morton is incorrect to suggest that PRV originated from Norway; its first identification was in Norway but that does not mean that it has newly appeared; only that our ability to detect it is new. Nor does its subsequent discovery in BC imply that it was transferred here. It is just as likely to have been here but previously undetected. Certainly it is incorrect to state that PRV is the causal agent of HSMI. It that were true, PRV would be found along with HSMI in compromised or sick fish. This is not the case as no farmed Atlantic salmon in BC have been diagnosed with HSMI although PRV is sometimes identified. There is some debate about this in Norway but even recent papers there state that detection of PRV alone does not establish an HSMI diagnosis. (Oystien et al. Veterinary Research: 2012, 43:27)


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! If PRV was capable of causing harm to our fish or having the potential to cause harm to wild salmon we would take immediate steps to eliminate the virus or to destroy these animals. Contrary to the opinion of Alexandra Morton, DFO and CFIA do not have PRV on the list of reportable diseases/pathogens, nor do they find that the science concerning PRV supports the level of concern or opinions that she holds. At the present time PRV appears to be a benign virus that may have been long present in the world’s oceans. The practices and fish health records of fish monitoring presented by BC salmon growers impressed the authors of Technical Reports 5A-D and led Justice Cohen to recommend that fish health data reporting continue in order to remove any limitation on determining statistical correlation imposed by the existing 6 year time series. We are continuing to report fish health information towards the additional 10 years of data that the Cohen report recommended. Once again, thank you for your expression of concern for the well-being of BC’s magnificent salmon, as this is a sentiment that we share. Clare Backman

 Response to Clare Backman from Dr. Alexandra Morton: March 7, 2013 Dear Clare The presence of piscine virus is indeed correlated with Heart and Skeletal Muscle Inflammation, • • •

www.wired.com/wiredscience/.../salmon-disease-identified http://www.virologyj.com/content/7/1/309 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22486941

Wild juvenile salmon collected in the region of Kingcome and Knight Inlet in 2008 were indeed tested for PRV, in 2010 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22233513 I look forward to this debate entering the scientific literature. I take it from this email that your fish at Dalrymple are indeed infected with piscine reovirus, because that is the one thing you have not denied. Alexandra Morton


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Sea lice from salmon feedlots suck the life out of

Svend Erik Albertsen: This poor wild salmon had more than 100 sea lice.

wild salmon


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 No

More Environmental Impact Assessments for Salmon Farms in Nova Scotia Navigable Waters Act omnibus cut leaves gap in federal assessments; province won't pick up the slack Video: Cooke Aquaculture’s recipe for tortured salmon – eat at your own risk

In Nova Scotia, Environmental Assessments are no longer required for fin-fish farms like this one. Halifax -- "I'm absolutely gobsmacked," says Marike Finlay. "I really cannot believe this is happening in Canada." Finlay is president of Association for the Preservation of the Eastern Shore (APES), a group that is actively opposing the licensing of two new salmon farming operations in Spry Harbour and Shoal Bay. But it's not the bid to set up open net pens off the Eastern Shore that is surprising to Finlay. In the past two years, 4 new ocean-based salmon feedlot sites have been proposed and approved in other coastal Nova Scotia communities. What's astounding to Finlay is that unlike the feedlot sites that have gone before them, neither Shoal Bay nor Spry Harbour will undergo an environmental assessment.

READ ENTIRE HALIFAX MEDIA COOP ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Bill Taylor Commentary: Salmon Farming's Foul Record November 29, 2012 Brian Crowley’s account of aquaculture as the means to feed a growing world population ignores the serious impacts of some aquaculture practices like farming Atlantic salmon in open net cages in the ocean. He expresses his disappointment that Fisheries and Oceans Canada is not doing more to facilitate aquaculture expansion. I guess it depends on your vantage point as to your perspective. In Ottawa, it may not be immediately clear as to the impacts on the environment. Conversations with people who live in Nova Scotia, where salmon aquaculture is expanding – lobster fishermen, folks who live in coastal communities, anglers and tourism operators – would help Mr. Crowley understand the growing opposition to open net pen aquaculture and the reasons for it. Traditional salmon farming fouls the inshore waters with fecal debris equivalent to that of thousands of people. I doubt that Jacques Cousteau would enjoy diving in these areas of sickening sludge today. A lot of people thought salmon farming was great back in 1973, when Mr. Crowley says Jacques Cousteau proclaimed we must farm the sea as we farm the land. But that was when salmon farming was just gaining a foothold in Norway. I must admit that the Atlantic Salmon Federation welcomed salmon farming as a way of constantly supplying fresh salmon to the market and thus decreasing the pressure on wild salmon from commercial fishing. But we see what has happened in actual practice, and I think that Jacques Cousteau would be horrified today by the pollution, outbreaks of disease and parasites and the impact on the Atlantic salmon’s ability to survive their migration. Salmon densely packed and stressed in cages are a breeding ground for parasites like sea lice and viral diseases. Mr. Crowley fails to note the impact of the harsh chemical treatments for sea lice that resulted in the deaths of hundreds of lobsters here in New Brunswick and actual charges by the Department of the Environment against aquaculture industry leaders. He fails to note the millions of taxpayer dollars used to compensate the salmon aquaculture industry in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland for farmed salmon that were destroyed because poor husbandry practices and overcrowding in open sea cages led to outbreaks of infectious salmon anemia. And, then there is the insidious permanent damage to the wild gene pool because of wild salmon interbreeding with farmed escapees, which far outnumber the threatened and endangered wild salmon that have the misfortune to live near aquaculture operations. The impacts have been identified by Dalhousie University, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s scientists, the Atlantic Salmon Federation’s scientists and the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel to name a few (all studies can be found on the Atlantic Salmon Federation’s website at asf.ca). And what about the recommendations of Justice Bruce Cohen as the result of a $26-million enquiry on the west coast into Fraser River salmon, initiated by Prime Minister Stephen Harper? Justice Cohen recognized the potential conflict in the mandate of the Fisheries and Oceans Canada to both develop salmon farming and protect Canada’s wild salmon. He recommended that the Government of Canada remove from the mandate of Fisheries and Oceans Canada the promotion of salmon farming as an industry and farmed salmon as a product. This is a far cry from the direction Mr. Crowley would have Fisheries and Oceans Canada take towards acceleration of the expansion of open net pen aquaculture. And lastly, no mention is made by Mr. Crowley of the massive strides being made in land-based, freshwater, closed-containment aquaculture, which grows salmon and other fish completely separate from the environment. Recirculating systems reduce to a minimum the water used, and because there are no disease outbreaks and sea lice, there is no need for using harsh chemicals, disease treatments and antibiotics. I agree with Mr. Crowley that there is room for expansion in aquaculture. However, in the case of farming Atlantic salmon, closed containment is the way to go.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Vet Res. 2012; 43(1): 27. Published online 2012 April 9. doi: 10.1186/1297-9716-43-27 PMCID: PMC3384478

 Immunohistochemical detection of piscine reovirus (PRV) in hearts of Atlantic salmon coincide with the course of heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) Abstract Aquaculture is the fastest growing food production sector in the world. However, the increased production has been accompanied by the emergence of infectious diseases. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) is one example of an emerging disease in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L). Since the first recognition as a disease entity in 1999 it has become a widespread and economically important disease in Norway. The disease was recently found to be associated with infection with a novel reovirus, piscine reovirus (PRV). The load of PRV, examined by RT-qPCR, correlated with severity of HSMI in naturally and experimentally infected salmon. The disease is characterized by epi-, endo- and myocarditis, myocardial necrosis, myositis and necrosis of the red skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of PRV antigens in heart tissue of Atlantic salmon and monitor the virus distribution in the heart during the disease development. This included target cell specificity, viral load and tissue location during an HSMI outbreak. Rabbit polyclonal antisera were raised against putative PRV capsid proteins μ1C and σ1 and used in immunohistochemical analysis of archived salmon heart tissue from an experimental infection. The results are consistent with the histopathological changes of HSMI and showed a sequential staining pattern with PRV antigens initially present in leukocyte-like cells and subsequently in cardiomyocytes in the heart ventricle. Our results confirm the association between PRV and HSMI, and strengthen the hypothesis of PRV being the causative agent of HSMI. Immunohistochemical detection of PRV antigens will be beneficial for the understanding of the pathogenesis of HSMI as well as for diagnostic purposes.

READ ENTIRE NCBI ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Atlantic salmon: Washington state record (14 lbs 6oz) – Ron Howard - 1999 Sport caught – Green River – Auburn, Washington

READ MORE FISH RECORDS VIA PURSUE THE OUTDOORS


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Climate Change and wild game fish

 Pete McMartin: Global warming’s new frightening deadline March 8, 2013 In April 2009, the science journal Nature published a paper entitled Greenhouse-Gas Emission Targets for Limiting Global Warming to 2 C. Its subject was the end of the modern world. At the time, it attracted little notice. It was a half-dozen pages long. For laymen, its technical content was impenetrable. The purpose of the paper — researched and written by a team of European scientists headed by Malte Meinshausen, a climatologist with Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact — was to determine just how much time mankind had left before our burning of fossil fuels would cause catastrophic global warming. The marker for what would be considered “catastrophic” warming was generally agreed to be anything above a rise of two degrees Celsius in global temperature. “More than 100 countries,” the paper noted, (the actual number was 167 countries) “have adopted a global warming limit of 2°C or below (relative to preindustrial levels) as a guiding principle for mitigation efforts to reduce climate change risks, impacts and damages.”

“Even the International Energy Agency and the World Bank have recently conceded that even if present agreed-upon policies were implemented, the world is likely headed to four Celsius degrees warming by the end of the century. This would render much of the most heavily populated parts of the earth uninhabitable ...”

The problem was, no one was exactly sure how much fossil-fuel consumption had already contributed to global warming, or how much fossil fuel mankind could consume without going over the two degrees Celsius marker. Those phenomena needed to be quantified. Meinshausen’s team did just that. It constructed a rigorous model by incorporating hundreds of factors that had never been grouped together before, and then ran them through a thousand different scenarios.

READ ENTIRE VANCOUVER SUN ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Corporate Environmental

Responsibility

October 4, 2010 In 2006, an article in Reason magazine declared an age of “corporate environmentalism.” Reason attributes part of the rise of corporate environmentalism to independent environmental groups. Since the administration of George W. Bush was seen as hostile to their goals, the article suggests, groups shifted their lobbying efforts to corporations. The recent expansion of corporate social responsibility to include environmental issues is notable. A brief web search of the 30 companies on the Dow Jones Industrial Average reveals that each company makes some reference to sustainable practices on its website, and that the majority of these companies have web pages devoted entirely to sustainable environmental practices. Significantly, DuPont, General Electric, Exxon Mobil, and Alcoa all have websites that specifically discuss their environmental practices, yet those four companies all rank in the top 10 corporate air polluters in the United States. Are companies truly committed to sustainable environmental practices, or are most of their environmentally friendly claims well-placed propaganda, or “greenwashing?” A new Harris poll suggests the latter. Executives are skeptical that corporate environmental efforts will attract consumers, and in a similar vein, consumers have expressed their doubts that claims of corporate environmentalism are genuine. A disconnect exists between the willingness to engage in sustainable practices and the actual implementation and profit from these practices. This conflict between intent and practice demonstrates some of the pull of environmental groups and activists. The fact that so many companies make sustainable pledges and devote space to issues of sustainability on their websites is a testament to the accomplishments of the environmental movement, but changing practice is another matter entirely. This breeds an important question: should companies hold themselves to effective sustainable practices? If they pontificate about sustainability and proclaim their commitment to sustainability in their corporate social responsibility charters, the answer is yes. If a company proclaims its sustainable practices on a glossy website but still pollutes massively, it is not a sustainable company. The presence of some sustainable practices amidst a multitude of unsustainable ones makes for dishonest propaganda. As to whether or not companies need to be sustainable in the first place, that does tie in to the nebulous, philosophical question of corporate responsibility. From a purely scientific standpoint, companies have to start being sustainable. Most pollution is directly tied to corporate enterprise. If global warming progress is to be made, government regulation will have to restrict pollution, companies will have to take initiative in reducing pollution, or green-tech ventures will have to find universal energy solutions. The first two options are more likely in the short run, so companies will either face regulation or successfully deter regulation.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Energy production and wild game fish: Oil, Coal, Hydropower, Wind, Natural Gas


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Oil – Drilled, Fracked, Tar Sands  Rebuilding the wild salmon economy February 27, 2013

“It’s a wild salmon economy here,” said Taylor Bachrach, the Mayor of Smithers, in describing the Bulkley Valley. “People fly here from all over the world in October and November to fly fish for steelhead. The First Nations have an in-river fishery with traditional sites at Babine Lake and other places. People still dip net for salmon. Closer to the ocean, there’s the marine commercial fishery.” “We share the same watershed from here all the way up to Prince Rupert,” he continued. “Salmon tie the fate of all of these communities together.” According to Coastal First Nations Executive Director Art Sterritt, an oil spill on BC’s north coast could cost the province 56,000 jobs. An estimated 26,000 fishing and fish processing jobs directly depend on a clean marine ecosystem. About a fifth of those belong to First Nations. The Gitga’at, one of many First Nations dependent on coastal resources for subsistence, estimates replacement


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! value of its yearly traditional harvest at $2 million per year. In Old Massett Village on Haida Gwaii, about 60 per cent of the food still comes from the sea. A promotional piece from the BC government in 2005 stated that BC’s ocean economy creates 167,805 jobs and $7.6 billion in labour income. A 2006 study commissioned by the Northwest Institute for Bioregional Research found that the Skeena River wild salmon industry generates up to $110 million per year. This amount includes revenue from recreational tourism, sport fishing, commercial harvesting, wholesale values, value added processing, retailing, value to First Nations and values to Alaska (many salmon caught in Alaska spawn in the Skeena). About seven fish processing plants have closed in Prince Rupert in recent years, but fishing is still a major economic player in the northern economy. Arnold Nagy estimates about 1000 jobs during salmon season at the Canadian Fishing Company processing plant where he works as a millwright. He estimates about 700 licenses for gillnetters and seiners to fish the northern waters, more for the trawlers. There are crab, urchin, shrimp fisheries and clam openings as well. People buy materials and supplies in the town. There are two fish processing plants in Massett, on Haida Gwaii. Tourism and steelhead fishing are other job generators that would be lost in the event of a spill. “Myself as a tradesman working in the plant year round I make a pretty good living out the fishing industry,” Nagy said. “If there’s ever a spill, there’s nothing to do but go to the bank and say I’m bankrupt, how do you want to deal with this? Because there’s no way that I’m going to be able to pay the bills.” Doug Donaldson, MLA for Stikine Valley, views wild salmon as a treasure worthy of a fight. He told the Joint Review Panel during intervener testimony in Smithers that wild salmon habitat deserves local, regional, provincial, national and global protection because there is nothing like it remaining in the world. According to Pat Moss, coordinator of the Smithers-based coalition Friends of Wild Salmon, the threatened Skeena salmon fisheries have brought together commercial fishermen, sport fishermen, First Nations and environmentalists. The group successfully banned fish farms on the north coast. Then it turned its attention to the Sacred Headwaters, a basin where three major BC rivers originate, the Skeena, Stikine and Nass, and turned back a coal bed methane development there. Now the focus is keeping the major salmon rivers free of risk from pipeline spills. The proposed pipeline route runs along the Morice River for 34 kilometers, an inaccessible stretch of river with excellent areas for salmon spawning and rearing that is also prone to landslides. Nagy described it this way: “If you have an accident on the pipeline in those stretches where it goes over and under Skeena River tributaries, the oil will end up in the Skeena River and come all the way down here to Prince Rupert. Fish from the Nass and Fraser Rivers all migrate along the coast before they head out to the ocean to do their loop out there. Then they head back down along the Aleutians all the way down from Alaska back here again. They’ll all be affected by any oil that washes down the river to the ocean.”


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 New skimmer preps Neah bay for oil spills NEAH BAY — A new oil-skimming system is up and running at Neah Bay. The Elastec/American Marine X150 grooved-disc skimmer has more storage capacity and is three to four times faster than other systems, state Department of Ecology officials said. “We're tickled because this is cutting-edge technology,” Ecology spokesman Curt Hart said. The state-of-the-art skimmer is part of the Washington State Maritime Cooperative's umbrella oil-spill readiness plan that Ecology approved last week. The contingency plan covers more than 1,600 commercial vessels that enter the Puget Sound and Grays Harbor. The Neah Bay area is of particular importance because of its position at the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its proximity to environmentally sensitive areas such as the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Olympic National Park and coastal tribes. First oil skimmer An oil-spill response tug has been stationed at Neah Bay since 1999 to help ships in distress, but “there haven't been any oil-skimming resources until this one was placed there,” Hart said in a Thursday phone interview. NRC-Environmental Services, a private spill-response contractor, stationed the new oil-skimming system and oil-storage barge at Neah Bay on behalf of the Washington State Maritime Cooperative for its oil-spill readiness plan. “Every year, billions of gallons of oil are transported into and across Puget Sound and Grays Harbor waters,” Ecology spill-preparedness Manager Linda Pilkey-Jarvis said in a statement. “The WSMC plan helps safeguard our economy, cultural resources and environment by assuring us spillers can quickly mount an effective response. This is a substantial achievement because we have vessels from around the world that transit our waters every day.” The Elastec/American Marine X150 is designed to be pulled by two lead vessels with a V-shaped containment boom. The oil is funneled through a series of grooved, rotating drums and stored in a mobile box that can be attached to the side of a barge. “If you needed more storage, you could put [the box] on a larger barge,” Hart said. “It's really cool.” The system, which was field-tested at Neah Bay last month, met the requirements of the oil-spill readiness plan.

READ ENTIRE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Draft Assessment of Tar Sands Pipeline "Devastatingly Cynical" March 2, 2013 The U.S. State Department late Friday released a draft environmental impact assessment of a contentious pipeline project that simultaneously acknowledged the dangers posed by climate change while also noting the project would “not likely result in significant adverse environmental effects”. Scientists and advocates have reacted with significant alarm, warning that the new report, officially a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS), is merely recycling deeply flawed conclusions offered in previous such assessments. Since the project was first proposed by a Canadian company, TransCanada, in 2008, it has been beset by local and national opposition in both countries, including drawing some 40,000 protesters to Washington last month. “Here we are again, with the State Department producing basically the same report they produced before, saying there will be no big impact from this pipeline – a conclusion that is at odds with every scientist, diplomat and every other observer that has looked at this project,” Bill McKibben, the founder of 350.org, an environment advocacy group, told reporters immediately following the SEIS release. “The 1.4 million public comments that poured into the State Department on this project seem not to have made much of an impact, nor has the testimony of leading scientists in this country and around the world.” Known as the Keystone XL project, the pipeline would stretch from “tar sands” in south-central Canada to refineries in the southern United States, on the Gulf of Mexico. It would carry a noxiously dirty form of oil, known as bitumen, that releases around 17 percent more greenhouse gases than conventional oil. Scientists say the tar sands would be able to be mined for around 50 years. According to a 2012 report by the Congressional Research Service, the U.S. Congress’s research wing, bitumen from the tar sands would release the same amount of carbon dioxide as adding four million more cars to the roads. Others have put this figure even higher, the equivalent of six million additional cars. Climate scientists, meanwhile, say that by itself the tar sands bitumen would release around half of the carbon dioxide left before the planet reaches a global temperature increase of two degrees Celsius, currently seen as a critical cut-off point by the United Nations, among others. “This is the most important issue for the environmental movement here in a very long time,” McKibben said. “More people have gone to jail for [protesting] Keystone than for any issue in this country in the last 30 years. To have their concerns, and those of our leading scientists, blithely dismissed for a reiteration of the same tired boilerplate is very sad.” He continued: “However, we’re hopeful that [Secretary of State John] Kerry and President Barack Obama will figure out that the bureaucrats have done a poor job here.”

READ ENTIRE TRUTH OUT ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Keystone XL report by U.S. avoids conclusion, angering opponents March 1, 2013 A long-awaited assessment of TransCanada Corp.'s Keystone XL pipeline by the U.S. State Department made no specific recommendation on the project, cheering oil companies and outraging environmentalists. The draft analysis, which will begin a public comment period on the pipeline, examined the revised route TransCanada proposed after President Barack Obama blocked an original path amid concerns it posed a threat to an aquifer in Nebraska. The State Department draft analysis doesn't make a recommendation on whether the pipeline should be approved or not. It instead points to ways in which the pipeline could impact the environment.

President Barack Obama visits the TransCanada Stillwater Pipe Yard in Cushing, Okla.

"We're looking for feedback now from the public to help us shape this going forward," Kerri-Ann Jones, State's assistant secretary for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, told reporters in a conference call today. The analysis said that while oil sands mining releases more greenhouse gases, "the project is unlikely to have a substantial impact on the rate of development in the oil sands, or on the amount of heavy crude refined in the Gulf Coast area." Production of the tar sands would take place even without the pipeline, the report concluded. Environmental groups such as Sierra Club and 350.org called the State Department's analysis incomplete, and warned that building the pipeline would exacerbate global warming. Environmentalists oppose the pipeline because they say it will exacerbate climate-change risks by promoting mining of Alberta's oil sands, which they said will release more carbon dioxide than conventional drilling. "There is a direct link between Keystone XL and expansion of the tar sands," Susan Casey-Lefkowitz, director of international programs at the Natural Resources Defense Council, said in an interview. "There are no alternatives for the pipeline either to the west coast or to the east coast. The oil industry wants those overseas markets. Without that we see projects being postponed or put on hold.' Oil and gas producers say the project proposed by Calgary- based TransCanada will create thousands of jobs and boost U.S. energy security. ''No matter how many times KXL is reviewed, the result is the same: no significant environmental impact,'' said Marty Durbin, executive vice president for the American Petroleum Institute, a Washington-based group whose members include Exxon Mobil Corp. ''The latest impact statement from the State Department puts this important, job-creating project one step closer to reality.'' Bill Day, a San Antonio-based spokesman for Valero Energy Corp., the world's largest independent refinery by capacity, said he believed the pipeline would be approved after reading the analysis. ''Nothing that has come out in this report or any of the others would be reason for even this delay, let alone a denial,'' Day said in an interview. A final decision on the pipeline won't come until later this year.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 U.S. agency orders Enbridge to dredge Kalamazoo River two years after spill March 14, 2013

In this July 29, 2010 photo, a worker monitors water in Talmadge Creek in Marshall Township, Mich., near the Kalamazoo River. VANCOUVER - More than two and a half years after a Canadian pipeline rupture spilled heavy oil into a Michigan River, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is ordering Calgary-based Enbridge (TSX:ENB) to perform additional dredging to remove submerged oil. The agency said it has repeatedly found oil in sections of the Kalamazoo River. "The dredging required by EPA's order will prevent submerged oil from migrating to downstream areas where it will be more difficult or impossible to recover," the EPA said in a statement issued Thursday. The agency is also ordering Enbridge — proponent of the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline through northern British Columbia — to maintain sediment traps throughout the river to capture oil outside the dredge areas. The agency gave the company 15 days to provide a work plan, and said dredging should begin this spring. The July 2010 spill near Marshall, Michigan, has dogged the company as it proceeds through a federal review of the Northern Gateway to deliver oil sands products to a tanker port in Kitimat, B.C. The ability to clean-up diluted bitumen from Alberta's oil sands has been raised at the hearings by project opponents. The American environmental agency issued a searing report last year criticizing the company's spill response. A letter sent Thursday to Rich Adams, vice-president of operations for Enbridge's U.S. operations, from EPA co-ordinator Ralph H. Dollhopf, said the oil mixed with river sediment and organic matter had turned to sludge, "making it difficult to find and recover." EPA documents note that they met twice with company officials about the administrative order. "Enbridge's comments challenged the validity and interpretation of the data relied upon by U.S. EPA in making its determination ...," said a 36-page response. In it, the agency discounts Enbridge's suggestion that allowing the oil to biodegrade is the best option for dealing with the remaining oil.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Take Action: Keystone pipeline

This is it -- the most important comment period yet for stopping the climate-killing Keystone XL tar sands project has arrived.

The biggest public comment period against Keystone XL is beginning.

The State Department just released their latest report on the pipeline, and it's reckless beyond belief. The draft is outrageous malpractice that refuses to acknowledge Keystone XL's huge impact on the climate. And get this: State actually used one of TransCanada's own contractors to help them write the report! 1

We cannot -- and WILL not -- stand for this assault on our climate, water, air, and health. This report means the State Department is now required to take your comments -- act now to prevent Keystone from becoming "the Obama tar sands pipeline!"

100,000 comments from Sierra Club

2

Tell President Obama to look at the climate, not at this report -- submit your official comment against Keystone XL and the world's dirtiest oil today.

activists like you is the best chance to stop this climate nightmare.

The science is settled: President Obama will be breaking his word to fight the climate crisis if he simultaneously moves ahead with the world's dirtiest, most carbonintensive fossil fuels. This isn't regular crude oil -- according to NASA's leading climate scientist, tar sands expansion could mean "game over" for the climate. 3

Activists like you have only a few weeks left to show President Obama and Secretary John Kerry how furious you'll be if they ignore their climate commitments and approve Keystone XL. This administration has made great climate progress on clean energy and vehicle standards, but so much of it will be wiped away if the United States does not stand up to the tar sands. Last summer, Sierra Club activists like you sent 75,000 comments against the tar sands. This time, it will take 100,000 to show the president how fast our movement is growing. Take action now. Send in a statement today -- it will only take a few seconds -- and we'll keep you updated on other ways you can harness the momentum of the Forward on Climate Rally and fight back against Keystone XL before the deadline, including local events and letter-to-the-editor drives. Thanks for all you do for the environment, Michael Marx Sierra Club Beyond Oil Campaign Director P.S. After you take action, be sure to forward this alert to your friends and colleagues -- five comments will have even more impact than one!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

ď ś Dependence on oilsands could hurt Canada's economy: report February 20, 2013 OTTAWA - A new report warns of the perils to the Canadian economy of relying too much on the oilsands. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives study says Canada is heading towards a "staples trap," whereby the more quickly bitumen is exported, the less diversified and productive the economy becomes. The study's authors also warn of a looming "carbon trap" in which the Canadian economy is so closely linked to carbon-producing industries that it becomes difficult to adopt measures to deal with climate change. "What goes up always comes down where commodities are concerned," co-author Jim Stanford, an economist with the Canadian Auto Workers, said in an interview. "Our concern is that Canadian policy makers who were so quick to jump on the bandwagon of us becoming an energy superpower forgot those lessons of the potential downside of a staples-based strategy for our whole economy." A big danger facing the oil industry is shrinking markets for fossil fuels as a result of global efforts to address climate change, says the report. The report was co-written with Tony Clarke, head of the left-leaning Polaris Institute; Diana Gibson, former research director of the Parkland Institute in Alberta; and Brendan Haley, a PhD candidate at Carleton University in Ottawa. Countries that rely too heavily on raw materials can fall into a dangerous cycle, they argue. "Staples-based economies must make enormous fixed-cost investments in production and transportation infrastructure, generally undertaken by large, often foreign-owned companies," the report says. "To pay off these overhead costs and reward investors, staples industries face an enormous motivation to produce and export their staple faster." Doing so can drive down the price. Investing so much into one industry can also cause others to wither, say the authors, who point to manufacturing as one industry that has suffered from a high Canadian dollar linked to soaring oil prices. "The brunt of resource-driven sectoral restructuring in Canada's economy has clearly been borne by the manufacturing sector," the report says. The report recommends tighter regulations and control of the oilsands to slow development, and transitioning to a low-carbon economy in which governments play a greater role than they now do.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 David

Black says he's close to signing $25-billion Kitimat oil refinery deal (updated) March 6, 2013:

VANCOUVER — Media mogul David Black said Wednesday he’s close to signing a memorandum for financing to build a new pipeline and oil refinery in Kitimat. Speaking to the B.C. Chamber of Commerce Black said his new company Kitimat Clean Inc. expects to sign a memorandum of understanding with Switzerland-based Oppenheimer Investments Group for the $25 billion project, including $16 billion for a new refinery. The rest would be spent on oil and natural gas pipelines and tankers. Black’s project still faces many hurdles, including opposition from environmentalists. But Richard Cooke, the senior managing director of Oppenheimer Investments Group, said the firm has enough investors interested in the project to fund the entire amount through a debt-financing model that would keep 100 per cent of the ownership in British Columbia. The refinery would still have to be approved by the province. “We have the investor seed. We have the commitment for this. I was being serious about that when David said we have 100 per cent commitment to this,” Cooke said. Cooke said he believes first nations will also take a share in the ownership of the company.

Editorial Comment: There is still no plan in place to protect Douglas Channel, the coasts of Vancouver Island or the west coast of Canada from impacts of oil or liquefied natural gas spills associated with the pipelines, refineries and tankers. This blatant and arrogant disregard for environment, wildlife and cultures by Enbridge and Black are irresponsible, unethical, shortsighted and absolutely unaceptable!

Black told the breakfast meeting the cost of the refinery has risen by $3 billion from the original proposal of $13 billion because it will use new greenhouse gas-reducing technology developed by Alberta-based Expander Energy. The GHG emissions would be cut in half from seven million tonnes a year, he said, something Cooke believes will force other refineries around the world to match.

READ ENTIRE VANCOUVER SUN ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Tribes have questions for Port on crude shipments February 22, 2013 TAHOLAH — All three Port of Grays Harbor commissioners and their top staff held a rare special meeting at the Quinault Indian Nation Tribal Chambers Thursday to discuss the three pending proposals to ship crude oil through Port facilities in Hoquiam. Among the central issues were potential harm to tribal fishing and natural resources, the marine and river environments, and whether the tribe would be consulted as the permit and environmental review process unfolds. The Quinault Nation requested the meeting to talk about the oil shipping proposal and other issues. “Our history is up and down this coast, along with the Hohs and Quileutes, the Makahs, and our neighbors to the south in Shoalwater Bay,” said Ed Johnstone, Quinault tribal fisheries spokesperson, illustrating how any decision that affects the marine environment affects all tribes on the coast. “We’ve been here since the creator put us here, which is a long time.” The 1855 Quinault River Treaty with the U.S. government was what initially paved the way for development of Grays Harbor, Johnstone noted. But it also gave the tribe sovereign rights to its natural resources, which ‘“are very dear to us,” he said. “It is how we live and fish and crab and smelt.” PORT INTEREST Port officials said they currently are considering plans from two existing tenants, Westway Terminals and Imperium Renewables, that have applied for initial permits to export crude oil from North American deep wells by rail and ship by expanding their existing operations at the Port. A third company, US Development, now has an access agreement with the Port while it Studies building a separate facility at the Port’s Terminal 3 near the wastewater treatment plant in Hoquiam. All three proposals would be in the city of Hoquiam, which is the co-lead permit agency with the state Department of Ecology. Port Commission President Chuck Caldwell described the proposals as currently being in the study phase, such as when the Port previously considered the possibility of shipping coal through Grays Harbor before those ideas were abandoned. “We’re still in the infant stages and we’re all working to get all the best information put together before the final decision is made,” he said. “We’re definitely interested,” Caldwell added. “We’ve always been pushing for worker bees. We’re pushing for employment on the Harbor … . That’s completely and totally in our minds when we are working on these projects.” Port Executive Director Gary Nelson explained that Westway and Imperium are now involved in a checklist process for the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). US Development is expected to complete its initial site review within the next two or three weeks, he added. “I think they are interested in proceeding,” Nelson said of the Terminal 3 site. He noted that one of the questions asked by opponents of the projects is why not do something else to generate jobs? “We work in a competitive environment at the Port, with all the ports up and down the coast,” Nelson said.

READ ENTIRE DAILY WORLD ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Fracking our Farms: A Tale of Five Farming Families February 20, 2013 Author’s note: On Sunday, Feb. 17, I marched with the OCA at the Forward on Climate rally in Washington, D.C. At one point, our banner, “Cook Organic Not the Planet,” caught the eye of a dairy farmer. He approached. I handed him a flyer and launched into my pitch about how organic agriculture has the power to bring dangerous carbon dioxide levels back down to the safe level of 350 parts-per-million. He nodded politely, then stopped me short with this “If they frack all the farms, there isn’t going to be any organic.” Back home, I sat down at my computer to research farms and fracking. I learned that there’s a growing movement of farmers around the country who are fighting fracking. And I found some stories that should give all of us pause. Their names are Carol, Steve & Jackie, Susan, Marilyn & Robert, and Christine. They share a bond. Two bonds, actually: They all own, or owned, farms. And those farms, along with their own health and the health of their farm animals, have all been ruined by fracking. More than 600,000 fracking wells and waste injection sites have popped up across the country, according to ProPublica. The oil and gas industry, along with federal regulators, would have you believe that injecting trillions of gallons of toxic liquid deep into the earth is harmless. But tell that to Jacki Schilke of North Dakota, who lost two dogs, five cows, chickens – and her health – after 32 oil and gas wells sprouted up within three miles of her ranch. Or Christine Moore, a horse rescuer in Ohio, who sold her farm after a well went up five miles from her farm, creating an oily film on her water and making her too sick to care for her horses. With hundreds of thousands of fracking wells and waste injection sites in the U.S., it’s likely that our food supply already contains water, plants and animals (meat) contaminated with fracking chemicals. While we hear a lot about drinking water contamination, including people’s water catching on fire straight out of the faucet, that shouldn’t be our only concern. Contaminated crops and farm animals raised for food are also possible avenues for exposing humans to fracking chemicals. Of course, not all farm animals are destined for the food chain. Those unfortunate enough to live near fracking wells can tell us a lot about the potential danger from fracking chemicals to our own health.

READ ENTIRE ORGANIC CONSUMERS ASSOCIATION ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Coal  Washington environmental figures hired by coal companies March 1, 2013 Coal trains will be inconvenience A coal train goes through Seattle on the way to Vancouver, B.C. Recent efforts to bring coal terminals to Washington and Oregon have seen ‘green’ strategists working with coal companies. “‘Green’ strategists now back coal trains” [page one, Feb. 26] reveals that a great deal of money is being spent by proponents of coalunit trains and terminals in Western Washington. This is discouraging and irritating. Since the proposal was introduced, we have heard a lot about environmental effects, health and safety effects and temporary employment effects. We likely will be hearing a lot more. The terrible and essentially perpetual adverse effects of the proposal on the public convenience and the quality of life of millions of people who live here are seldom mentioned. Anyone who has waited at a railroad crossing on the Seattle waterfront for the seemingly interminable passing of a unit train moving at a snail’s pace will know what I mean. It actually is being proposed that we all be subjected to this dozens of times a day. This is lunacy. The coal-unit trains and terminals proposal is a selfish and inherently bad idea. It should be disposed of with all deliberate speed. Coal trains will disrupt environment, job market Anyone who argues that the jobs argument trumps global warming had better learn how to subtract. The coal-train proposal would disrupt commerce daily throughout the Pacific Northwest, driving away marine-dependent employment from the harbors. Sodo would be gridlocked as commuters wait on 20 miles of coal trains. The Ballard railroad trestle would daily be down for hours, bottling up ships in Lake Union and Salmon Bay. Exporting 150 million tons of coal puts the long-term future of my industry, North Pacific fishing, at risk. The Port of Seattle estimates 15,000 fishing-related jobs in the Seattle area alone. Increasing acidification in the oceans caused by the burning of carbon-based fuel is already causing damage to the state’s shellfish industry and will, if unchecked, threaten the marine web on which my salmon fishery depends. Why trade sustainable livelihoods for a few jobs based on a one-time extraction of a nonrenewable resource?


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Hydropower

 A bad idea from another era: Alaska's dam to nowhere March 2, 2013

A lone kayak on Southwest Alaska's Chikuminuk Lake, the proposed site of a large hydroelectric project. It is hard to think that in terms of politics or our approach to the environment that we’d ever revert to the madness of Alaska in the late 1950’s.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! Alaska was a hotbed for ridiculous government projects then, with the pinnacle of such endeavors being Project Chariot, a plan to ignite an atomic blast, equating to nearly 160 of the bombs dropped on Hiroshima, underground near the village of Point Hope. Naturally, this was all to be done in the name of the Three P’s: peace, prosperity, and progress. Supporters of that ingenious idea said the explosion would create a useful deep-water port and be a boon to economic development in the area. Fortunately locals and a few vocal scientists managed to have the plan scuttled, but that didn’t stop several other atomic detonations from occurring in Alaska. But now, in 2013, we seem to be revisiting the 1950’s. Our current legislature is mulling all sorts of 1950’s throwback bills. From bounties on sea otters, public funding for religious schools, and building dams on salmon streams. Yes, dams. At a time when the rest of the US is tearing down many dams to restore habitat, Alaska is bravely forging new paths towards an uncertain future. Imagine one of the most pristine Alaska State parks, one of the most remote parks in the country. No roads. No powerlines. Little sign of man at all, with the exception of a few old cabins here or there. This is wilderness defined. Deep mountain lakes loaded with fish, huge bears roaming the tundra, berry-covered hillsides, and caribou passing through --- and if you listen to the few proponents of HB 32, the world’s best place for a dam. Yes, a dam. Why a dam here? Well those supporting the bill will claim this dam will bring much-needed electricity to the people of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, some hundred odd miles of wilderness and parkland away. In a place with endless wind, and villages already starting to tap that wind power, supporters of the dam suggest the power will offset the high cost of fuel used to generate electricity. In order to get the power from this dam on the Allen River huge transmission lines would have to be strung across remote and pristine wilderness, an area with no road system, not to mention endless permafrost and wetland (and two federal refuges!). The $10,000,000 study for this dam, as proposed in HB 32, borders on ridiculous. For one, there is little chance the Feds will allow such an intrusion through two refuges, and two, the people in the area don’t support the measure. If that money is intended to help the people of the area, it could be put directly into wind energy projects and not into a boondoggle study. What’s more, citizens of the state of Alaska will be outraged when they realize and see the project’s cost and true intent, to power the Donlin Creek million-ounce-a-year gold mine (proposed transmission lines from the dam to Donlin have been posted online by Nuvista, one of the companies behind the dam). Notice this 10-million-dollar price tag is only the cost of the study. The company behind this dam projects the total cost to build the dam and transmission lines at over five hundred million. Let me write out those digits for you, from one of their own preliminary reports: $507,000,000. We don’t need to waste 10 million dollars on a study about whether we should later pay 500 million dollars to dam a river in one of the crowning jewels of our state park system, on a river that feeds important fishing habitat, in an area where the majority of the citizens don’t support the project. Please, contact your state representatives about HB 32, tell them we’ve moved beyond the 1950’s. We don’t need to be stopping the flow of our rivers, we need to be stopping the flow of our state money to projects that will only set us back to a century where we thought more bombs and more dams would lead us to prosperity and peace.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Our Views: Cooperation on Flood Control Issue Is Key 1 comment February 25, 2013

As the rain falls outside on this February day, we should remember that we need to continue working now to prevent a future disaster. We remember the February 17 years ago when a “pineapple express” washed over us, leaving behind the then-record Chehalis River flood of 1996. And it was just over five years ago when the remnants of a Pacific typhoon sent us even more water in the new record flood of December 2007. Those destructive and tragic floods are unforgettable, but we have hope that their devastation laid the groundwork for milestones that will also live in memory. One came last year when then-Gov. Chris Gregoire assembled a group of diverse community leaders to advise her on the next steps for flood control. This group, which included representation from the Chehalis Tribe, the dairy farming community and local governments, agreed on $28 million in projects that range from dirt work on localized flood fixes to finalizing studies for a major basinwide project, giving us the information we need to make a final decision on an upper watershed dam as a long-term solution. It was heartening and inspiring to see the work by a collection of public-spirited leaders who bring a wide variety of philosophies and beliefs to the negotiating table. Rather than disagreement, we saw people working together and learning from one another’s perspectives. (ed. Conservation organizations were deliberately excluded from this politically-motivated group) After they made their recommendations to Gregoire, they stayed together and changed their name to the Chehalis Work Group.

Editorial Comment: Effective regulation of steep slope, clearcut logging throughout the Chehalis River basin is one of the true keys to reducing flood risks – not the unethical marketing strategy to “control floods” via a dangerous and irresponsible multipurpose dam sited in the headwaters of the Chehalis River!

They know how much is at stake, and they are willing to continue their cooperative effort. As this legislative season moves forward, we have watched members of the Chehalis Work Group reaching out to lawmakers, civic groups and city councils to explain the need for a strong forward push for this slate of proposals. A long bipartisan list of lawmakers has gotten behind this effort. The next milestone we need is to have Gov. Jay Inslee add his energy and support. Members or representatives of the Work Group have presented their perspective to several legislative committees. They’ll continue their work at upcoming hearings of the House Capital Budget Committee and the Senate Ways and Means Committee. “It would greatly aid the process if we could get a supportive affirmation from Gov. Inslee,” said Jim Kramer, a flood control project facilitator. The Work Group represents groups that once had a hard time seeing eye to eye. They now agree on a way forward, a strong slate of projects that begin fixing the problem now and lay the groundwork for a comprehensive fix to take the most devastating crest off the worst floods. We ask lawmakers and Inslee to join the forward momentum on this most important issue for Southwest Washington.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Delayed plan to remove Matilija Dam near Ojai will get new studies March 3, 2013 Longtime plans to tear down the Matilija Dam north of Ojai soon will get another look. More than a decade in the making, the $140 million project stalled a few years ago. But representatives from government agencies and nonprofit groups, property owners and others kept meeting to find a way to move forward. Plans now call for hiring consultants to study possibilities for removing the dam and the stickier issue of what to do with 2 million cubic yards of fine sediment built up behind it. “We’re just beginning the selection process,” said Peter Sheydayi, deputy director of the Ventura County Watershed Protection District, a lead agency on the project. “The list of possible consultants is so lengthy that we’ll go through a qualifications process ... before inviting some to interview,” he said. Sheydayi expects to have a contract in place next summer. Funding will come from a California Coastal Conservancy grant. “Things never move as fast as I would like, but it’s moving in the right direction now,” said Paul Jenkin, Ventura campaign manager for the Surfrider Foundation. Jenkin, a member of the selection committee, has called for the dam’s removal since the mid-1990s. Removing the dam on the upper Ventura River would help restore the ecosystem and aid endangered steelhead trout, officials say. There has been widespread agreement on removing the dam for years. The bigger challenge was dealing with the 2 million cubic yards of fine sediment, which could dirty the water supply for the Casitas Municipal Water District downstream. After extensive studies and environmental reviews, Congress approved the removal project in 2007. But as agencies worked out the details and design, construction costs derailed the plans. The Army Corps of Engineers, also a lead agency on the project, offered alternatives, but local groups opposed them. After negotiations stalled in 2010, interested parties started meeting to figure out the next steps. A technical advisory committee was formed, and plans to hire the consultant team to look at several proposals grew out of that process. The team likely will consider effects of notching the dam or removing a section of it to prevent more sediment from building up. In September 2011, someone offered up a solution: A giant pair of scissors was painted on the face of the 200-foot dam, along with 8-foot-tall dotted lines guiding where the shears should go. Sheydayi and Jenkin said they hope the information garnered in the new studies will help inform the larger group on the best plan moving forward. Even if a consensus is reached, there’s still the question of how to pay for the project, last estimated at more than $140 million. For more information about the project, visit http://www.matilijadam.org


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Alberta aboriginals oppose B.C. Hydro's Site C dam project; say needs more study March 03, 2013 EDMONTON - Alberta aboriginals are lining up against an energy project deemed crucial to the B.C. economy. At least six bands in the northern part of the province — supported by the Alberta government — have registered major concerns with B.C. Hydro's plans to build another dam on the Peace River, saying the utility still hasn't understood the effects of previous projects on the Athabasca Delta and refuses to study them. "It's a very, very narrow approach to environmental assessment and we have so much concern," said Melody Lepine, spokeswoman for the Mikisew Cree. B.C. Hydro is currently accepting public comments on the environmental assessment of its proposed Site C Dam, which would be located south of Fort St. John.

B.C. Hydro’s Site C Clean Energy Project would be the third dam and hydroelectric generating station on the Peace River in B.C.’s northeast.

The project would generate 1,100 megawatts of electricity and require a dam a kilometre long and 60 metres high, creating an 83-kilometre reservoir about three times the current width of the river. But the Alberta bands point out Site C would be B.C. Hydro's third dam on the river. The giant Bennett Dam is further upstream. They say the provincially owned company is refusing to look at the cumulative effects of those dams. They're angry that B.C. Hydro isn't including the delta in its study area, despite abundant evidence that B.C.'s dams are causing big problems in Alberta. "By not including the delta in their assessment they can't mitigate potential impacts," said Lepine. "They don't even care. "That's the biggest issue for us — just include the delta." The Bennett Dam was built in the 1960s, before environmental assessments were required. None was conducted. But research since has documented significant impacts from the dam on the Athabasca Delta, despite being hundreds of kilometres downstream. The Northern River Basins Study from the mid-1990s found nearly half of the wetlands had disappeared by 1989. Animals that depend on them, such as muskrats or ducks, had lost up to 90 per cent of their numbers. Annual flooding patterns, which refresh many lakes and flush streambeds, were severely disrupted. River levels during normal high-water periods were found to be significantly lower post-Bennett.

READ ENTIRE GLOBAL TV EDMONTON ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Forest management and wild game fish

 B.C. resource development remains ‘unknown and unmanaged,’ warns Forest Practices Board February 20, 2013

A cutblock near Chetwynd that was harvested and subsequently replanted by Canfor. When inspectors visited they found a gravel pit operated by a mining company. Canfor had not been told of the change in land use. When Forest Practices Board auditors visited a cutblock near Chetwynd to check on seedlings replanted by logging company Canfor, instead of a healthy young forest, they found a gravel pit. A mining company was operating the gravel pit. And the seedlings, of course, were gone. The gravel operation was situated within a tree farm licence, but Canfor had not been told of the change in land use, which according to a bulletin the independent forests watchdog issued this week, is only one example of a long list of competing activities within that single tree farm licence. The board auditors found everything from wind farms, mines, and natural gas wells, to pipelines, power lines and mineral exploration. Roads de-activated by the forest company had been re-activated in an improvised manner to explore for coal. Drill sites had been built on existing cutblocks, permanently removing the forest cover. It’s a problem that is occurring time after time on forest land throughout the province as global demand grows for B.C. resources and the province issues more and more resource development permits on lands that used to be dedicated primarily to forestry. And there is no way of telling if the land can sustain all of these new uses, the board warns. Throughout B.C., there are 250,000 active permits authorizing activity on the land. Yet their cumulative impacts remain unknown and unmanaged, the board warns.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! “Individually, these permits may have minimal effect on the landbase. Collectively, however, their effect can be significant,” the board states in its bulletin. Board chair Al Gorley said the lack of oversight on the cumulative impacts of resource development is a problem that needs to be faced. He said the board considers it a top priority. “We know that we are deriving benefits from all those things now. We are using the resources and they are providing some benefits. But in the long term, whether that’s sustainable on the landbase – or if we continue to add things to the landbase, whether that’s sustainable – is a bit of an unknown,” Gorley said. The ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations is responsible for monitoring what the land can bear, but Gorley described the ministry – which was created three years ago to consolidate resource permitting and then split up again – as “a work in progress.” “When I say it’s a work in progress, I mean that I don’t think they are fully there in terms of coordinated management; probably not where they would like to be yet.” Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson, acknowledged that the growing list of competing users on the land presents a problem in terms of sustainability but he said the government is responding. “The province recognizes the increasing demands on the land base and agrees with the board that resource development cannot proceed at any cost,” he said in an email. “This is in part why an integrated approach to land management was adopted with the formation of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations. As the province’s ‘one land manager’, we have a 360 degree view of the landbase. Canfor, whose reforestation efforts were destroyed by the gravel mine, had little to say except to say that the fact laid out in the board’s report are accurate. Sometimes it has been provided an opportunity to comment on the non-forestry activities on the landbase, at other times it has not. “While there is certainly room for improvement as identified by the FPB report, there shouldn’t be a sense that there is no coordination taking place as government has made progress in this regard,” said Canfor spokeswoman Corinne Stavness. John Allan, president of the Council of Forest Industries, said there is a need to move all permitting to one government ministry but that he would not consider it priority issue. “We need to keep up an ongoing effort to streamline approvals on the landbase to make sure it’s as efficient as possible and that resource values are not being compromised.” Allan Lidstone, director of Resource Management Objectives at the Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations, said the ministry is moving toward the concept of one land manager for the province. “Are we there yet? No, not quite. Can we do better? Yes. Do we look at the cumulative impact of different activities and different values on one another when we make decisions? Yes we do.”


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Congress and the Tongass March 12, 2013 A group of Alaska and Pacific Northwest residents – mostly commercial and sport fishermen, along with charter operators and guides, — are speaking out in Washington, D.C., this week on behalf of wild Alaska salmon from the Tongass National Forest. They’re there as part of the Tongass 77 campaign.

The trip, sponsored by Trout Unlimited, aims to educate key Congress and Administration officials about the need to strengthen habitat protections for the best salmon watersheds of the Tongass, a lush, 17-million-acre temperate rainforest teeming with five species of Pacific Salmon, steelhead, rainbow and cutthroat trout, Dolly Varden, and other fish. A world-class destination for anglers, the Tongass boasts more than 17,000 miles of clean, cold salmon-filled waters. Sport fishermen catch close to one million salmon here every year, nearly 60 percent of them Coho. Less than five-percent of Alaska’s land base, the Tongass is a biological powerhouse: nearly 30percent of the state’s entire salmon harvest every year originates from freshwater streams, lakes and rivers in this unique forest. Last year, that meant big money. Commercial salmon fishermen – who work in a highly regulated and sustainable industry in Southeast Alaska – landed nearly 37 million fish with a dockside value of $153.2 million. For the second year in a row, Southeast Alaska took the top spot as most lucrative region in Alaska for salmon fishing.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

So what does this have to do with the trip to DC this week? Everything. Even though salmon populations are healthy in the Tongass, these fish face threats on a variety of fronts including logging, mining, hydropower proposals and land privatization proposals. And although the Tongass is the nation’s number one salmon-producing forest, 65-percent of salmon habitat there is not protected on the watershed scale and is open to development. That’s why folks like Juneau fly fishing guide, Matt Boline, are back in D.C. asking Congress to support the Tongass 77 proposal. If enacted into law, the Tongass 77 would permanently conserve at the watershed scale some 1.9 million acres of high-value salmon and trout habitat on the Tongass and make fish and wildlife the highest management priority in these 77 key watersheds. As Boline told The Drake magazine, “these are mostly intact systems and there are only a handful of streams in the proposal that have been logged at all.” “Ultimately we don’t want them to end up like the Columbia. We don’t want to see the same mistakes we’ve made in the Pacific Northwest in terms of having to retroact protections to fix what we’ve broke,” Boline said. “The goal is to fix it before we break it.” For more information about the Tongass 77, visit www.americansalmonforest.org


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Mining and wild game fish

ď ś Rare-earth mining in China comes at a heavy cost for local villages August 7, 2012 Pollution is poisoning the farms and villages of the region that processes the precious minerals

Health hazard ... pipes coming from a rare-earth smelting plant spew into a tailings dam on the outskirts of Baotou in China's Inner Mongolia autonomous region

. From the air it looks like a huge lake, fed by many tributaries, but on the ground it turns out to be a murky expanse of water, in which no fish or algae can survive. The shore is coated with a black crust, so thick you can walk on it. Into this huge, 10 sq km tailings pond nearby factories discharge water loaded with chemicals used to process the 17 most sought after minerals in the world, collectively known as rare earths. The town of Baotou, in Inner Mongolia, is the largest Chinese source of these strategic elements, essential to advanced technology, from smartphones to GPS receivers, but also to wind farms and, above all, electric cars. The minerals are mined at Bayan Obo, 120km farther north, then brought to Baotou for processing. The concentration of rare earths in the ore is very low, so they must be separated and purified, using hydro-metallurgical techniques and acid baths. China accounts for 97% of global output of these precious substances, with two-thirds produced in Baotou. The foul waters of the tailings pond contain all sorts of toxic chemicals, but also radioactive elements such as thorium which, if ingested, cause cancers of the pancreas and lungs, and leukemia. "Before


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! the factories were built, there were just fields here as far as the eye can see. In the place of this radioactive sludge, there were watermelons, aubergines and tomatoes," says Li Guirong with a sigh. It was in 1958 – when he was 10 – that a state-owned concern, the Baotou Iron and Steel company (Baogang), started producing rare-earth minerals. The lake appeared at that time. "To begin with we didn't notice the pollution it was causing. How could we have known?" As secretary general of the local branch of the Communist party, he is one of the few residents who dares to speak out. Towards the end of the 1980s, Li explains, crops in nearby villages started to fail: "Plants grew badly. They would flower all right, but sometimes there was no fruit or they were small or smelt awful." Ten years later the villagers had to accept that vegetables simply would not grow any longer. In the village of Xinguang Sancun – much as in all those near the Baotou factories – farmers let some fields run wild and stopped planting anything but wheat and corn. A study by the municipal environmental protection agency showed that rare-earth minerals were the source of their problems. The minerals themselves caused pollution, but also the dozens of new factories that had sprung up around the processing facilities and a fossil-fuel power station feeding Baotou's new industrial fabric. Residents of what was now known as the "rare-earth capital of the world" were inhaling solvent vapour, particularly sulphuric acid, as well as coal dust, clearly visible in the air between houses. Now the soil and groundwater are saturated with toxic substances. Five years ago Li had to get rid of his sick pigs, the last survivors of a collection of cows, horses, chickens and goats, killed off by the toxins. The farmers have moved away. Most of the small brick houses in Xinguang Sancun, huddling close to one another, are going to rack and ruin. In just 10 years the population has dropped from 2,000 to 300 people. Lu Yongqing, 56, was one of the first to go. "I couldn't feed my family any longer," he says. He tried his luck at Baotou, working as a mason, then carrying bricks in a factory, finally resorting to selling vegetables at local markets, with odd jobs on the side. Registered as farmers in their identity papers, the refugees from Xinguang Sancun are treated as second-class citizens and mercilessly exploited. The farmers who have stayed on tend to gather near the mahjong hall. "I have aching legs, like many of the villagers. There's a lot of diabetes, osteoporosis and chest problems. All the families are affected by illness," says He Guixiang, 60. "I've been knocking on government doors for nearly 20 years," she says. "To begin with I'd go every day, except Sundays." By maintaining the pressure, the villagers have obtained the promise of financial compensation, as yet only partly fulfilled. There has been talk of new housing, too. Neatly arranged tower blocks have gone up a few kilometres west of their homes. They were funded by compensation paid by Baogang to the local government. But the buildings stand empty. The government is demanding that the villagers buy the right to occupy their flat, but they will not be able to pass it on to their children. Some tried to sell waste from the pond, which still has a high rare-earth content, to reprocessing plants. The sludge fetched about $300 a tonne. But the central government has recently deprived them of even this resource. One of their number is on trial and may incur a 10-year prison sentence.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Letter: Sportsman’s Alliance for Alaska – Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment (Update) February 21, 2013

To nature lovers, wild places like the Wood River Mountains and Lake Nerka in Wood-Tikchik State Park are the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. To proponents of the Pebble mine, the lure is real gold—possibly the largest deposit on Earth. (National Geographic) Thank you for all of your past and ongoing support of the campaign to protect the world’s most productive wild salmon fishery and one of the planet’s finest sport hunting and angling destinations in southwest Alaska’s famed Bristol Bay region. The battle to stop the proposed Pebble Mine project continues to gain momentum, with now over 870 hunting and angling groups and businesses signed onto our efforts in support! As the calendar has turned to 2013, I wanted to provide a quick snapshot of where things stand today, and what needs to happen to push our efforts across the finish line this year. As you may know, the EPA issued its Draft Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment last spring. Over 230,000 public comments were submitted (with 90%+ in favor of EPA taking action to protect Bristol Bay and its incredible fish and wildlife resources as well as the thousands of jobs that are dependent


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! upon them) and a panel of 12 expert scientists reviewed the Draft. The Draft concluded that even under the best-case-scenario (if something the size and scale of Pebble Mine could be built and operated in a place like Bristol Bay, and do so safely over its lifespan), there would still be significant impacts to the region and its fishery resources. In fact, even under those rosy assumptions, up to 87 miles of salmon streams and 4,300 acres of salmon wetland habitat would be destroyed. It only gets worse if there are problems, ranging from small to large, during the construction and/or operation of the mine. We believe that this document shows what we’ve known all along. That a large-scale mining operation is incompatible with the existing resources and economy of Bristol Bay. The EPA recently announced it plans to have the peer review panel re-examine the Draft Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment which has been updated based on input from the peer review panel and the public. They also will open another round of public comment on the updated Assessment. They plan to do this in the next few months. We believe that this is redundant, and only delays the protection of this fishery. Our focus is turning to President Obama and the White House. It is the President that we must convince on this issue. He must see that protecting Bristol Bay is good for fishing and hunting, it’s good for American jobs, it’s what the science suggests be done, and it’s within EPA’s power and responsibility to do so. It must be done sooner, rather than later. We are sending this message to the White House directly, but we are also calling on Senators from states where we’ve got a lot of support – asking the Senators to contact the White House and urge them to move now to protect Bristol Bay. The letter below is going to your (US) Senators (Washington State). It will list all of the hunting and angling groups and businesses from your state who have so strongly supported our efforts to this point. If you happen to be in contact with your Senators in the coming months, please let them know directly how important this issue is to America’s sportsmen and women. With your help, and with your Senator’s support, we can win what will likely be viewed as the signature fishery conservation battle of our lifetime. Should you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me. Thank you again for all of your past and ongoing support.

Sincerely,

Scott Hed Director Sportsman's Alliance for Alaska (605) 351-1646 www.sportsmansalliance4ak.org


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! Senator Maria Cantwell 311 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Senator Patty Murray 154 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Senators Cantwell and Murray, As hunting and fishing equipment manufacturers, sporting goods retailers, conservation groups, outfitters, and guides from Washington, we appreciate your work and concern over the proposed Pebble Mine project in Alaska, and its potential threats to our nation’s largest wild salmon fishery. Your support and efforts have made a tangible difference in advancing the Obama Administration’s EPA Draft Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment. However, recently the Administration announced that it will delay the final Assessment for a second, redundant review, creating additional uncertainty for sportfishing and outdoor businesses for yet another season. Sportsmen did not ask the Administration to write a science review of Bristol Bay; we asked them to protect sportfishing and outdoor businesses and jobs from the threat of large-scale acid mine drainage at the headwaters of the fishery that supports the jobs and century-old fishing industry in Bristol Bay, Alaska. While we appreciate their emphasis on science, the process and review has been substantial, including eight public hearings, and an extended public comment period that produced over 230,000 comments – more than 90% of which supported the Assessment and analysis. In addition, the Administration conducted an independent peer review process with a panel of 12 respected scientists, including additional public hearings. We are now told the Administration will reconvene the science panel and may take until the end of the year to finalize the Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment. This will extend the study period into a 3year span, creating a harmful climate of uncertainty for sportfishing and outdoor businesses, jobs and investment. We ask that you take a strong stance on protecting the Bristol Bay fishery, which is crucial to our livelihoods and a regional economy. Please contact President Obama and his Administration to let them know the time is now to protect this fishery from large-scale mining threats. It’s urgent that they complete the Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment and move forward with protecting the nation’s largest, most valuable wild salmon fishery, and its jobs and industry, under the Clean Water Act.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Changing public policy and mining practices to ensure the health of individuals, communities and ecosystems English Español Français About Us Contact Us

 Sandy Pond Alliance Court Case to Decide Fate of Lakes Across Canada MEDIA ADVISORY – Monday, 25 February 2013 (St. John’s, Newfoundland) The federal Fisheries Act was intended to protect fish and fish habitat in part by prohibiting the dumping of harmful substances into fish-bearing waters. The intent of the Act has been diluted by regulations that give the mining industry an exemption to allow the conversion of pristine lakes, wetlands, and streams across Canada into mine waste dumps. Among these is Sandy Pond, a lake near Long Harbour, Newfoundland, that was known for its trophy trout. In 2010, in an effort to save Sandy Pond and other lakes across Canada, the Sandy Pond Alliance filed an application in Federal Court that the regulations allowing these exemptions be declared ultra vires, that is, beyond the discretionary powers that government ministers have in relation to an Act of Parliament. Subsequent interventions by mining giant Vale and the Mining Association of Canada have prolonged the legal process, but February 27 and 28 are now set for the application to be heard in Federal Court in St. John’s.

Sandy Pond, a lake in Newfoundland, has been reclassified as a tailings impoundment area by the federal government at mining giant Vale's request.

The outcome of this case should be a landmark decision by the Federal Court in Newfoundland as to whether the federal government has been acting illegally by permitting the use of lakes as dumpsites for metal mining companies in Canada.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Pesticides and wild game fish  Dow AgroSciences Wins Bid to Overturn Pesticide Proposals February 21, 2013 Dow Agrosciences LLC and two other pesticide makers won a bid to overturn U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service proposals to protect salmon when an appeals court found the agency’s decision “arbitrary and capricious.” The fisheries service recommendations to protect salmon from the pesticides chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion were based “on a selection of data, tests and standards that did not always appear logical, obvious or even rational,” the appeals panel in Richmond, Virginia, ruled today, reversing a lower court and sending the proposals back to the fisheries service. The fisheries office also failed to supply an economic reason to ban pesticides from buffer strips of land abutting salmon habitats, according to the ruling by Judge Paul Niemeyer, writing for a threejudge panel. “By not addressing the economic feasibility of its proposed ‘reasonable and prudent’ alternative providing for one-size-fits all buffers, the Fisheries Service has made it impossible for us to review whether the recommendation satisfied the regulation and therefore was the product of reasoned decision-making,” Niemeyer wrote. The fisheries service, a unit of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, is reviewing the ruling, Fionna Matheson, a NOAA spokeswoman, said in an e-mail. Fish Threat Stephen Mashuda, an attorney for Earthjustice, a San Francisco-based environmental advocacy group that joined the case on the government side, predicted that the fisheries service will be able to supply the evidence to back up its position the the pesticides pose a threat to salmon and related species, such as steelhead trout. “We’re still confident that the agency’s ultimate conclusions about the pesticides will stand,” Mashuda said.“These are three of the most toxic pesticides on the planet, to wildlife and to humans.” Garry Hamlin, a spokesman for Indianapolis-based Dow Agrosciences, said the company is pleased by the ruling. Dow was joined in the case by Makhteshim Agan of North America Inc. and Cheminova Inc. U.S.A. The case is Dow Agrosciences v. National Marine Fisheries, 11-cv-2337, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (Richmond, Virginia).


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Wild game fish management

 Federal council adopts options for ocean salmon sport fisheries March 11, 2013 TACOMA – Anglers fishing along the Washington coast will likely see a lower catch quota for chinook salmon this year, while the quota for coho is expected to be similar to last season, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced today. Three options for ocean salmon fisheries approved today by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) anticipate a lower abundance of lower Columbia River hatchery chinook in the ocean, but an increase in Columbia River hatchery coho. The PFMC establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast. The three options establish a framework for developing fishing opportunities on healthy wild and hatchery stocks while meeting conservation goals for weak salmon populations, said Phil Anderson, WDFW director. “The abundance of lower Columbia River chinook is forecast to be down from last year, but the expected return should be strong enough to allow for another quality chinook fishery in the ocean,” said Anderson. “While a higher abundance of Columbia River hatchery coho is forecast this year, the quota will likely be similar to 2012 because of the need to meet conservation objectives for naturally spawning stocks.” Anderson, who represents WDFW on the management council, said two of the three options include recreational mark-selective fisheries for hatchery chinook in June for the fourth straight year. Markselective fisheries allow anglers to catch and keep abundant hatchery salmon, but require that they release wild salmon. Hatchery fish are marked for identification with a missing adipose fin. The options also include allowing hatchery chinook retention in the LaPush and Neah Bay areas during short halibut openings in May. About 126,000 lower Columbia River hatchery chinook are expected back this season, about 65,000 fewer fish than anticipated last year. Those salmon, known as “tules,” are the backbone of the recreational ocean chinook fishery. The abundance of Columbia River coho is forecast to be about 500,000 fish, about 183,000 more fish than last year’s forecast. Columbia River coho also account for a significant portion of the ocean catch. The PFMC is expected to approve final harvest guidelines for this year’s recreational ocean fishery in early April. The three options announced today establish parameters for state and tribal fishery managers in designing this year’s fishing seasons. The recreational fishing options are: · Option 1 – 51,500 chinook and 75,600 coho. · Option 2 – 41,500 chinook and 71,400 coho. · Option 3 – 30,000 chinook and 63,000 coho. The PFMC last year adopted recreational ocean fishing quotas of 51,500 chinook and 69,720 coho salmon. Under each option for this year, the ocean recreational fishery would vary:


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! Option 1: The recreational salmon fishing season in marine areas 3 (LaPush) and 4 (Neah Bay) would begin with two three-day openings for hatchery chinook, May 10-12 and May 17-19. The markselective fishery for hatchery chinook in those two marine areas would then reopen June 15 and run seven days a week through June 28. Mark selective fisheries for hatchery chinook would be open seven days a week June 8-June 22 in Marine Area 2 (Westport/Ocean Shores) and June 8-June 21 in Marine Area 1 (Ilwaco). In all areas, anglers would have a daily limit of two salmon, except anglers must release coho and wild chinook. The fisheries could close earlier if a coastwide quota of 8,000 hatchery chinook is reached. The traditional recreational salmon season for chinook and hatchery coho would begin June 22 in Marine Area 1, June 23 in Marine Area 2 and June 29 in marine areas 3 and 4. Anglers would have a daily limit of two salmon in marine areas 3 and 4. Those fishing marine areas 1 and 2 would also have a two-salmon daily limit, but could keep only one chinook. The fishery would be open daily in marine areas 1, 3 and 4, while Marine Area 2 would be open Sunday through Thursday. Anglers also would be allowed to retain one additional pink salmon in marine areas 3 and 4. Option 2: The recreational salmon fishing season in marine areas 3 and 4 would begin with a threeday opening for hatchery chinook, May 17-19. The mark-selective fishery for hatchery chinook in those two marine areas would then reopen June 15 and run daily through June 21. Mark selective fisheries for hatchery chinook would be open daily June 15-June 29 in Marine Area 2 and June 15June 21 in Marine Area 1. In all areas, anglers would have a daily limit of two salmon, except anglers must release coho and wild chinook. The fisheries could close earlier if a coastwide quota of 8,000 hatchery chinook is reached. The traditional recreational salmon season would then open for chinook and hatchery coho June 22 in marine areas 1, 3 and 4 and June 30 in Marine Area 2. The season would run through Sept. 22 in marine areas 2, 3 and 4 and through Sept. 30 in Marine Area 1. Marine areas 1, 3 and 4 would be open seven days a week, while Marine Area 2 would be open Sunday through Thursday. Anglers fishing all four marine areas would be allowed to retain one chinook as part of a two-salmon daily limit. Anglers also would be allowed to retain two additional pink salmon in marine areas 3 and 4. Option 3: The recreational salmon season would open for chinook and hatchery coho June 28 in marine areas 3 and 4, June 29 in Marine Area 1 and June 30 in Marine Area 2. The season would be open Tuesday through Saturday each week in marine areas 3 and 4 through Sept. 15. Marine Area 1 would be open daily through Sept. 30, while Marine Area 2 would be open Sunday through Thursday each week through Sept. 22. Anglers fishing all four marine areas would be allowed to retain one chinook as part of a two-salmon daily limit. Anglers also would be allowed to retain three additional pink salmon in marine areas 3 and 4. Also included in this option is the possibility for anglers to retain both wild and hatchery coho beginning Sept. 1 in all four marine areas. More details on these ocean options will be available on PFMC’s website at www.pcouncil.org/. A public hearing on the three options for ocean salmon fisheries is scheduled for March 25 in Westport. Chinook and coho quotas approved by the PFMC will be part of a comprehensive 2013 salmon fishing package, which includes marine and freshwater fisheries throughout Puget Sound, the Columbia River and Washington’s coastal areas. State and tribal co-managers are currently developing those fisheries. The co-managers will complete the final 2013 salmon fisheries package in conjunction with the PFMC process during its April meeting. Meanwhile, several public meetings are scheduled in March to discuss regional fisheries issues. A schedule of public meetings, as well as salmon run-size forecasts and more information about the salmon-season setting process, can be found on WDFW’s North of Falcon website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 There are fewer herring in the water as quotas increase March 9, 2013 Gillnetters and seiners hauled in thousands of tons of herring from the Strait of Georgia this week, but there are fewer fish in the water than last year, even though the quota for the roe herring fishery is higher. That has herring conservationists concerned about the future of stocks, especially as some populations, such as in the Gorge, have all but disappeared while others, such as on the west coast of Vancouver Island, remain too depleted to allow a fishery. “Herring are more valuable in the water feeding the salmon than they are being killed so their eggs can go to sushi bars in Japan,” said David Ellis, a private Vancouver fisheries planner. “They have taken a very large tonnage of herring. It leaves little for the killer whales, marbled murrelets, chinook and coho salmon that are heavily affected by the loss of so much herring at the most critical time in their breeding cycle.” Roger Kanno, herring resource manager for Fisheries and Oceans Canada, said the estimated herring biomass this year in the Strait of Georgia — an assessment area that runs from Campbell River, to Howe Sound and down to Victoria — is 82,952 tons. That is down from 152,613 tons last year. “That population is doing quite well, it is considered to be productive, but it is actually down a bit this year,” he said. Kanno said it is not known why numbers drop. “It’s a very short-lived species and there are a lot of them, so stocks fluctuate,” he said. The quota for the roe herring fishery — fish caught for their eggs — for the Strait of Georgia is 13,005 tons this year, up from 11,500 tons last year, Kanno said. However, that is not the whole picture as there are other herring fisheries — such as the winter food and bait fisheries — in the area, he said. “A maximum of 20 per cent of the forecast biomass is allocated to all the fisheries,” he said. Last year, fishers took only 12 per cent of the allocated quota because of poor market conditions. Kanno has heard anecdotally that more large females are being caught this year. Ellis said that is not good news. “Roe fishing doesn’t work because they are taking all the large female fish. If you take 90 per cent of all the females going back to one bay, it removes that population,” he said. However, Kanno said it is sustainable to take 20 per cent.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! “It is based on science. The Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat approves it every year,” he said. DFO surveys five areas of B.C. for herring fisheries and, this year, only the Strait of Georgia and Prince Rupert are open. “The three other areas, the Central Coast, West Coast of Vancouver Island and Haida Gwaii are below the commercial fishing threshold, so we’re not fishing in those areas,” Kanno said. There has been no fishery on the west coast of Vancouver Island since 2006. Haida Gwaii has been closed since 2003 and the Central Coast since 2008. Ellis wonders whether those populations will ever return. “The Vancouver Island stocks are so over-fished from the past, they can’t go back there,” he said. “They say nature has not provided good ocean survival, but I think that’s a cover-up.” Instead of killing fish for roe, British Columbians should be looking to First Nations, Ellis said. First Nations, many of whom have lost their roe harvest and blame commercial overfishing, traditionally harvested the roe after it had been laid on kelp, leaving the adult fish alive to spawn another year. Meanwhile, Andrew Paine, founder of the Salish Sea Herring Enhancement Society, said few herring have appeared in the Gorge this year, despite efforts to enhance habitat. “It’s really hard to say what is happening with this population and why they are not coming back,” he said. Historic commercial overfishing and creosote pilings — the chemicals can kill the eggs — are the most obvious reasons, Paine said. “I’m not a scientist, but 20 per cent of the whole population seems like an unsustainable amount when you are taking the largest, spawning fish,” he said.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 B.C. places moratorium on salmon farming on North Coast March 27, 2008 A moratorium on salmon farming along British Columbia's North Coast has been put in place because of concerns about the potential impact on wild salmon stocks. The provincial government won't allow any fish farm applications or issue any licences for coastal waters north of Klemtu, which is north of Port Hardy, Agriculture Minister Pat Bell announced Thursday. "This is in response to an urgency around ensuring that part of the province, that has not had finfish aquaculture, is protected until we get this worked out [and] figure out how we move forward," Bell said. Salmon farms in B.C. are concentrated on northern and western Vancouver Island. They remain controversial largely because of the potential impact on wild salmon of parasitic sea lice found in salmon farms. Last year, a legislative committee recommended a ban on fish farming in all coastal waters north of Vancouver Island. 'I consider this a very significant decision. This is not something I took lightly.'— B.C. Agriculture Minister Pat Bell Bell's decision Thursday didn't go that far, but he did suspend all fish farming in areas near the mouth of the Skeena River, where three applications were pending. "I consider this a very significant decision. This is not something I took lightly," he said.

Editorial Comment: In the five years following this moratorium on open pen salmon feedlots sited near the mouth of the Skeena River – there have been no outbreaks of salmon lice nor have there been outbreaks of deadly salmon diseases in the Skeena River system – this is additional, strong evidence that open pen salmon feedlots sited in wild salmon migration routes must be removed immediately and permanently in order to protect extremely valuable wild salmon and steelhead stocks and their ecosystems.

New Democrat MLA Robin Austin said the government's decision is a huge step forward. "This is a victory for everybody who cares about protecting wild salmon and I think it's also a tacit recognition of the fact that fish farms do indeed cause economic or environmental damage to wild salmon," said Austin, the NDP fisheries critic.

Group wants whole North Coast closed to fish farming The T. Buck Suzuki Foundation, a B.C. group that advocates the protection of the environment and fish habitat, also applauded the decision. "The [wild salmon] stocks from the Skeena [River] and the Nass [River] will not be coming into contact with net-cage salmon farms in the region. I think that's quite significant," said foundation spokesman Des Nobles. Nobles said although the moratorium is great news, he wants to see the whole North Coast closed to open-net cage salmon aquaculture. Bell said while the moratorium is in place, his ministry will work with First Nations on a new way to manage fish farming — one that balances the economic and environmental impacts. "This is, I think, a pretty major signal to First Nations, to the environmental community and to the industry that the industry is going to look different down the road," Bell said.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Salmon worthy of official fish status because of its value to B.C February 23, 2013 These days the British Columbia legislature often seems more like a cage fight than a place of thoughtful public policy. On Wednesday, though, the partisanship of the moment was put aside to do something not only important but also uplifting. The Liberal government tabled a bill to make the Pacific salmon the province's official fish. This follows the NDP's support a few years ago for the idea, which I raised in a column in 2009 and was subsequently embraced by former lieutenant-governor Iona Campagnolo, the Fraser River Basin Council, the Pacific Salmon Foundation and millions of British Columbians. Four years later we have a bipartisan agreement. It's now pretty much guaranteed the Pacific salmon - all seven species - will become a B.C. official symbol. It joins the Steller's jay (official bird), the Pacific dogwood (flower), Western red cedar (tree) and the Kermode (Spirit) bear (mammal). Why is making the salmon our official fish important? Simply put, the salmon are iconic, a natural symbol of the province's remarkable environmental blessings and a reminder of our duty to take care of them. Salmon are our canary in the coal mine, an indicator species that tells us how well we are doing in balancing the need for development and the exigency of environmental stewardship. It is no secret there has been some disturbing news on the future of the salmon in recent decades. All along North America's West coast, salmon runs have been in sharp decline. Canada's recently completed Cohen Commission - investigating the catastrophic collapse of the Fraser River's sockeye salmon run in 2009 - raised troubling questions about the efficacy of regulatory systems to manage and protect salmon stocks. British Columbians - and Canadians - ought to be asking hard questions about the future of the salmon. Are we adequately protecting our rivers and creeks? Are we balancing development along watersheds against ecosystem destruction? What is the proper extent of investment in fish farms in a wild, ocean ecosystem? Are we overfishing? Are we doing enough to prevent pharmaceuticals and chemicals from being flushed into our sewer and waste systems, and then into watersheds and coastal waters? Do we have up-to-date strategies to protect our rivers in the age of climate change? These are big questions that necessitate complex responses. Making the Pacific salmon the official fish won't replace well-thought-out federal and provincial regulations, the laws and management systems essential to protecting the salmon and the natural ecosystems sustaining them. But I had a reason for writing that column in 2009. Making the salmon our official fish amounts to a declaration and a powerful moral statement from our legislators that goes something like this: The salmon are woven into the identity of B.C. and its citizens. Our great fish must be protected not only because it is part of our society's collective DNA,

READ ENTIRE VANCOUVER SUN ARTICLE HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Mother Earth’s Magnetism Guides Spawning Sockeye Salmon Home Like GPS: Study February 21, 2013

Salmon are known for their homing skills, returning annually to the streams they hatched in to spawn. What has been something of a mystery, at least until recently, is how they did so. Their journey of thousands of miles across open ocean is undertaken years after they’ve left their rivers of origin. Scientists at Oregon State University (OSU) studied 56 years worth of fisheries data on the sockeye salmon to British Columbia’s Fraser River. They found that the fish chose routes around Vancouver Island that varied based on fluctuations in the geomagnetic field. In other words, Mother Earth is their GPS. “To find their way back home across thousands of kilometers of ocean, salmon imprint on [i.e. learn and remember] the magnetic field that exists where they first enter the sea as juveniles,” said the study’s lead author, Nathan Putman, a post-doctoral researcher at Oregon State University, in a statement. “Upon reaching maturity, they seek the coastal location with the same magnetic field.” Basically, the scientists said, the Earth’s “predictable, consistent geomagnetic field” gets almost imperceptibly weaker the closer one gets to the Equator, subject to geomagnetic field drift, as Smithsonian Magazine said. What set the Fraser River apart in terms of approach was the fact that there are two approaches, both around Vancouver Island, which blocks the river’s entrance. The fish would have had to pick one or the other, and they consistently chose the route that most closely matched the magnetic strength and signature of the Fraser River at the time they left, the researchers said. The theory is that salmon imprint the magnetic field as a waypoint when they leave their home river system, Putman said. It gets them into the general vicinity of the same river system when they return, “and then other, finer cues may take over.” Their results were published in the journal Current Biology on February 7.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Special Recognition  Live from The Sockeyes - Oscar Goes Wild for Salmon! The salmon-studded 'Sockeyes' are taking place this evening in Salmon River - see who's reeled in a fishy Oscar at the 1st Anti-Aquaculture Academy Awards!

The salmon heroes honoured at The Sockeyes are, drum roll please............

READ ENTIRE LIST OF 2013 SOCKEYE AWARD WINNERS HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 “Pants

on Fire” Recognition: Spencer Smith, Vice President-Commercial Services, Pacific Coastal Airlines

Wild game fish conservationists around planet earth believe that some things we hear and read from corporate representatives, natural resources agency professionals and elected officials might not reflect reality. In fact, some associate these “leaders” with those who wear burning pants. The April 2013 recipient of the coveted Wild Game Fish Conservation International “Pants on Fire” honor is: Spencer Smith, Vice President – Commercial Services, Pacific Coastal Airlines. According to Mr. Smith:  I respect and appreciate where you are coming from (re: feedlot salmon promotion in PCA’s in-flight magazine, SOAR.)  Articles in our magazine are not necessarily reflective of our personal or political beliefs.  The article itself was merely intended to be an information article about one of the many diverse businesses that make up the landscape of the province of British Columbia.  In no way are we taking a political position on the realities that make up the current state of our environment.

Editorial Comment: Pacific Coastal Airlines openly supports and promotes British Columbia’s expanding open pen salmon feedlot industry, a problematic industry that is known globally to impact human health, wild salmon and their ecosystems as well as local cultures, communities and economies. Supporting unsustainable businesses is not good for business or communities in the long term, Mr. Smith. .


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Local Conservation Projects

 Documentary: “Salmon Confidential” – two decades in the making

by Twyla Roscovich in collaboration with Salmon are Sacred


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Youth Conservation:  2013 Northwest Youth Conservation and Fly Fishing Academy NWYCFFA on the web

NWYCFFA on Facebook


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

2013 Northwest Youth Conservation & Fly Fishing Academy 2013 Academy Dates: Sun., June 23 - Sat., June 29. Supported by the Washington Council Trout Unlimited and the Washington State Federation of Fly Fishers. Hosted by Olympia Chapter TU, South Sound Fly Fishers and Puget Sound Fly Fishers. Held on Hicks Lake, Lacey, WA. .

ACADEMY FEATURES       

Co-educational, ages 12 – 16. Curriculum focuses on conservation, natural resource stewardship, and fly fishing essentials. Fly fishing classes include fly casting, fly tying, knot tying, reading water, and water safety. Morning and evening fly fishing activities on Nisqually Pond and Deschutes River. On-the-water aquatic macro invertebrate sampling activity. Career discovery opportunities. Faculty and staff include wildlife resource professionals, northwest fly fishing and fly tying professionals and enthusiasts, and local fishing club volunteers.

Fishing a Local Pond

Cost, including food and lodging: $275 Application deadline: April 15, 2013

Fly Casting Instructions

For additional information: Please visit website: www.nwycffa.com Email: nwycffa@comcast.net Telephone: Mike Clancy (360) 753-1259 Macro Invertebrate Sampling Activity

Jim Brosio (360) 943-9947


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Academy Application

APPLICATION Name: _________________________________________________________ Date of Birth: ___________________Age as of June 23, 2013_____________ Address: ________________________________________________________ City: _____________________________State: _________ Zip: ___________ Telephone: Res:_____________________ Cell:_______________________ E-mail: _____________________________________ T-shirt Size: _________

Applicants must also provide the following: • A written essay on why you would like to attend the Academy and what you expect to learn from it. • A brief letter of recommendation from your school science teacher or counselor including an address and telephone number. Application and recommendation may be sent via postal mail or e-mail. The Academy is limited to 24 qualified youths, ages 12 through 16. Applicants must not have reached their 17th birthday by April 15, 2013. A committee shall make selections based upon a candidate’s written essay and recommendation from science teacher or counselor. Tuition fee, including food and lodging is $275. Candidates should not send tuition until notified of selection. Notifications will be sent out by May 10, 2013. ACADEMY DATES: JUNE 23-29, 2013

Application must be received by April 15, 2013 Editorial Comment: Print this application page, complete, and send to: Northwest Youth Conservation & Fly Fishing Academy C/O Mike Clancy 2531 Simon Lane N.E. Olympia, WA 98506

Wild Game Fish Conservation International is proud to endorse the 2013 Northwest Youth Conservation & Fly Fishing Academy – a truly unique

Or e-mail with all required information to: nwycffa@comcast.net

opportunity for maturing girls and boys to learn more about natural resources

For additional information e-mail to the above address or contact either: Mike Clancy: (home) 360-753-1259, (cell) 253-278-0061; or Jim Brosio: (home) 360- 943-9947

stewardship while learning the science and art of fly fishing from local and regional experts.

2013 NORTHWEST YOUTH CONSERVATION & FLY FISHING ACADEMY


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Conservation-minded businesses – please support these fine businesses

 Bravo Restaurant and Lounge - 46224 YALE ROAD, CHILLIWACK BC

Since opening Bravo Restaurant & Lounge in June of 2004, our vision was to provide a top-quality dining experience in a sophisticated yet relaxed room that would be of the standard expected by fine diners in any urban centre in North America. Our vision was to create a casually elegant cosmopolitan restaurant, with a top-quality innovative menu from the area we live (Pacific West Coast Cuisine), in particular to harvesting foods and growing our own herbs to season the experience. Bravo's unique style is reflected in our ambience, service & menu, and is reinforced by a consistent attention to detail. Our customers enjoy the intimate yet social atmosphere and can relax knowing that they will be well taken care of. We take pride and commitment in our product, whether it be harvesting our own chanterelle mushrooms in season or smoking our own salmon. Caring for our own herb garden helps us connect with the flavors we use to blend recipes from all of our cultural backgrounds, creating an ever changing menu. We believe in, and actively support community causes locally and within the Lower Mainland. Each year Bravo participates and regularly organizes and is involved in fundraising events such as Dining Out For Life. Bravo uses local produce and accesses only wild and sustainable products from our suppliers whenever possible. We take pride in serving you.

environmentally


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Jackson Steak and Grill House 5725 Vedder Road, Chilliwack BC


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Ponoi River Co.

Ponoi was the first Kola river to be held on a ten-year lease (our current lease far exceeds that), thus ensuring longevity and continuity of operations and giving the Ponoi River Co the incentive to make long-term investments in equipment and personnel. All remote beats have access to river tents with stoves for lunches, warmth and safety. Ponoi has the largest Atlantic salmon scientific project in the world, tagging more Atlantic salmon each season than any other river. This is the result of a joint effort by Ponoi River Co, PINRO and the Atlantic Salmon Federation. Consistency of the fishing throughout the season - many other Kola rivers have a very narrow primetime window, and then the fishing deteriorates dramatically. No pollution - the water is pure, radiation levels have been measured and readings have been uniformly negative, and there is no mining or deforestation in the area. A service-oriented, English-speaking international guide pool, anxious to put their expertise to work for you - real guides who know the river and can communicate.

READ MORE ABOUT PONOI RIVER CO. HERE


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Deep Sea Charters, Inc.

Click Here to Check Availability and Make Reservations Online

The crew at Deep Sea Charters takes pride in its 62 year history of providing exceptional charter boat services to Westport’s visitors and citizens alike. Some may say that the proof is in the winning, since a lot of the winning derby fish are caught by Deep Sea Charter’s customers. Physical Address: 2319 N Westhaven Drive, Westport WA. 98595 Mailing Address: PO Box 1115 Westport, WA. 98595 Military discount: We offer a military discount of 10% active duty or retired military personnel and has ID to prove such. This discount is not extended to spouses or dependants who have not served. This discount will be valid on any trip except, directed halibut trips, and albacore tuna trips. This discount is not retroactive and available only upon request at the time of check-in.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Pacific Salmon Charters


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Hook-Em Up Fishing Guide Service (360) 880-0102

Hook Em Up is a full fishing and guide service. Spring chinook, fall kings, summer and winter steelhead. Any age, any experience. There is fun to be had by all.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Idaho River Adventures

Idaho River Adventures is the culmination of a lifetime spent in Idaho’s wild places. As a fifth generation Idahoan, I come from a family with a long and rich history of farming, ranching, logging, and recreating in Idaho. Some of my earliest memories are of my family fishing, hiking, and exploring wild places on or near the very streams where the voyages of Idaho River Adventures take place. During my college years I was introduced to guiding as a way to make a living, but I soon realized it was my life’s calling. The ability to share what I have known all my life with diverse groups of people—to show them what makes Idaho special, namely our world class wilderness rivers—remains my passion. I feel very lucky to have had the opportunity to work with some of the most highly regarded outfitters and guides in the industry. Through these experiences I am able to bring all of the knowledge I have gleaned over the last twenty years together to provide you with what I truly believe to be one of the best and most memorable trips of your life. Your safety is our number one priority, but your enjoyment is also a priority. Idaho River Adventures guides are some of the most experienced in Idaho, and it is common for the guide crews on any of our trips to have collectively over one hundred years of experience guiding on Idaho’s wilderness rivers. Our guides bring to all of our trips a level of enthusiasm for Idaho’s Salmon River that is infectious. Our sincere hope is that lifetime friends are made on each of our trips, among guests traveling with us as well as with our guide crew, and that a feeling of being part of one big river family will prevail. All of our guides have extensive training in Wilderness First Aid as well as Swift Water Rescue training. In addition to being very safety minded, our guides will dazzle you with their storytelling, their knowledge of canyon history and flora and fauna as well as their culinary prowess as riverside chefs. Whether you are a first-time river runner or a seasoned white water enthusiast, we invite you to experience the Salmon River with Idaho River Adventures.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 El Salto Adventures

Basselsalto Lodge

At Lake El Salto, our Lodge is nestled right at the Foot Hills of Sierra Madre (Rocky Mountains). Our location is only 76 miles from MZT International Airport, and Northwest of Lake El Salto Shore. This is cozy and very clean with daily maid service, All rooms have a King & Queen Beds, AC + Ceiling Fan / 110 American electric connector, TV, Internet & more.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Cabo Sails


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Attention Conservation-minded Business Owners Many businesses around planet earth rely on healthy populations of wild game fish. This is true for fishing guide/charter services, resort and hotel owners, fishing tackle and boat retail stores, clothing stores, eco/photo tours, grocery stores, gas stations and many more. In fact, wild game fish are the backbone of a multi-billion dollar per year industry on a global scale. This is why we at Wild Game Fish Conservation International offer complimentary space in each issue of “LEGACY” for business owners who rely on wild game fish populations to sustain your business. An article with one or more photos about your business and how it relies on wild game fish may be submitted for publication to LEGACY PUBLISHER. Please include your business website and contact information to be published with your business article. Selected submissions will be published each month. Healthy wild game fish populations provide family wage jobs and balanced ecosystems while ensuring cultural values. They also provide a unique, natural resourcesbased lifestyle for those fortunate to have these magnificent creatures in our lives. Conservationists working together with the business community effectively protect and restore planet earth’s wild game fish for this and future generations to enjoy and appreciate. This i our LEGACY. WGFCI endorsed conservation organizations:  American Rivers  Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture  LightHawk  Native Fish Society  Salmon Are Sacred  Salmon and Trout Restoration Association of Conception Bay Central, Inc  Save Our Salmon  Sierra Club – Cascade Chapter  Sportsman’s Alliance For Alaska  Steelhead Society of British Columbia  Trout Unlimited  Wild Salmon First


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Featured Artists:

 Holly Arntzen and Kevin Wright - The Wilds

Artist recommendation from Leanne Hodges “Holly Artzen and Kevin Wright ... Check out the www.artistresponseteam.com.... These two are amazing ! Recently working with children in Haida Gwaii ...”


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Featured Fishing Photos and Fishing/Conservation Trips:

 Video: Fly Fishing for Ponoi River Atlantic Salmon “The Incomparable Ponoi”

The Ponoi River of Russia is deeply remote. North of the Arctic Circle, Ponoi River Atlantic salmon fishing doesn’t get much “press” in the fly fishing world merely because a trip to the Ponoi is such a venture that not many make it so far. Gin Clear Media did happen to make it that far, and they have documented fly fishing for Ponoi Atlantic salmon in “The Incomparable Ponoi.” From the filmmakers: “The Ryabaga Camp on the Ponoi River epitomizes all that we love about a remote fishing experience: the excitement of a true wilderness location yet an oasis of comfort; hospitality and fine cuisine; a totally wild Atlantic salmon population that is thriving – where the efforts to care for the stocks really do show positive results; and a team of people whose attitudes to service, work ethic and team spirit are second to none.”


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Join Save Our Wild Salmon this August for a wild trip down the Middle Fork of the Salmon River! SOS is excited to announce a partnership with Idaho River Adventures in 2013 - and to invite you to join a trip this summer down the fabled Middle Fork of the Salmon River in central Idaho. The Middle Fork is one of the original eight rivers designated as Wild under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. It winds through the heart of the Lower 48's largest continuous wilderness area - the Frank Church River of No Return. Central Idaho is the historic home of millions of wild salmon and steelhead. Today, largely as a result of downstream dams on the lower Snake, only a small number these fish return each year. SOS is working with others to remove these four dams and reconnect our iconic fish with the largest, highest, wildest, and best protected chunk of salmon and steelhead habitat remaining in the Lower 48. For river rats everywhere, the Middle Fork is among the most treasured trips anywhere in the United States - a holy grail! AND - when you sign up for this trip, owner (and great guy and great friend) Dustin Aherin will donate $400 of the trip cost to SOS! Learn more about Dustin and Idaho River Adventures here: http://sows.convio.net/site/R?i=M1z0jw2-maZZjgdtM3oaMg Here are the Save Our wild Salmon/Middle Fork Trip details: 6 days and 5 nights on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River launching August 23, 2013. The trip begins in Stanley, ID with a 45-min plane ride to the put-in (as part of this special package, IRA will cover this cost). The trip will end six days later with a 1.5 hour bus ride from the take-out to the town of Salmon, ID. IRA provides an all-inclusive vacation with everything provided for. IRA supplies sleeping bags, fullsized sleeping pads, tents, dining tables and chairs, all food from lunch on Day 1 to lunch on Day 6. IRA uses a large cargo-hauling raft called a sweep boat that carries all of the camping gear. It runs ahead of the main group each day to set up the evening camp including tents. The IRA staff prepare excellent made-from-scratch meals using as much locally-sourced foods as possible - cooking over an open fire, in Dutch ovens and with propane. This trip is great for people of all experience levels. The Middle Fork is a fantastic place to hike and visit historic sights. Fishing is fantastic: the Middle Fork is a Blue Ribbon fishery with world-class dry fly fishing for native West slope Cutthroat Trout; IRA will provide the flies and rod/reel as necessary. You can also simply relax, and enjoy the company of family/friends that are traveling with you and new friends you will make while on the trip. Kids as young as 8 are welcome (though younger experienced campers are welcome too). The total cost is $1950 per participant: * $400 of which you donate directly to SOS (100% tax-deductible); * $300 deposit is due soon to reserve each space; and * $1250 balance due May 15th. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Dustin Aherin www.idahoriveradventures.com http://sows.convio.net/site/R?i=0joowdoa8A6VGbKMkI_onQ dustin@idahoriveradventures.com 888.994.9490 Joseph Bogaard Save Our Wild Salmon Coalition


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

  “Tequila” then “Slammer” - Introducing the new “Slammer” (photos courtesy of Captain Rhett Weber – Owner/Operator - “Slammer”)

Charter Recommendation: Jim Wilcox As an avid ocean angler, I’ve enjoyed many memorable fishing outings originating from the Westport boat basin; in my own boats and on several of the charterboats based in this worldfamous community. These days, my solid favorite to go with is Rhett Weber who owns and operates “Slammer” in association with Deep Sea Charters. As the photos on this page show, Rhett has been busy full time the past several months giving “Slammer” a total facelift – his dedication has truly paid off.

Rhett Weber: “This is what the boat looked like when I bought it in 1995.”

“Slammer” is recognized by many as the queen of the Westport fleet. She, with her able captain and crew, will provide her guests with countless hours of fishing excitement for many years to come – and many memories to be shared as only fishermen can. I, like many, look forward to multiple trips on “Slammer” with family and friends in 2013. You and your fishing partners would be smart to book your 2013 trips on “Slammer” at your earliest convenience – you don’t want to be left dockside. Look for the Deep Sea Charters ad in this issue of Legacy.

Rhett Weber’s “Slammer” – Anxiously awaiting the 2013 seasons

FISH ON!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Cabo adventure 2013 aboard Ursula IV and Cabo Sails Jim Wilcox


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Olympia Chapter Trout Unlimited 16th Annual Sturgeon Trip Pacific Salmon Charters Ilwaco, Washington Saturday – June 22, 2013 One boat - the Westwind (Capacity 17 Fishers) Cost - $113.19 per person (includes tax) (Does not include $5.00 tip for deckhand) Deadline - April 24th (Membership Meeting) Contact person: Terry Turner: (360) 491-2024 Payment must be paid prior to signing up Make checks payable to Terry Turner Send to: Terry Turner 6703 Shincke Rd. NE Olympia, WA 98506 Better take advantage of this year’s sturgeon trip because starting in 2014 there will no longer be a catch and keep season for sturgeon on the Columbia River. That rule will continue to be in effect indefinitely. The new rule taking effect in 2014 is due to the fact of the continuing decline in the number of white sturgeon in the river. WDFW has drastically reduced the retention allotted to the recreational fishery between 28% to 30% every year for the last 3 years. This year’s retention rule for sturgeon is 41 to 54 inches (fork tail measurement), one sturgeon per day. Last year was tough catching sturgeon largely due to the extremely large snow pack and late cold spring run off. The huge run off from the immense snow pack caused an unusual high river flow and coldwater temperature. Both conditions cause sturgeon to be lethargic and not feed very much. This year should be better fishing in that the snow pack is much more normal and also it is a better tide than last year As always, signup will be done on a first come first serve basis. Send me your check at the above address, or you can pay me at the April Chapter membership meeting. However, available space on the boat goes fast once this notice is put out, so, don’t procrastinate. Some did last year and missed out. Cost for the trip is the same as last year. Make your motel/hotel reservations today. Every year many of us stay at Heidi’s Motel in Ilwaco, 360-6422387. There are other motels available in Ilwaco, Seaview, and Long Beach. Most of us go to dinner at Doogers restaurant in Long Beach Friday evening around 6:00 PM, hope you will join us. Rods, reels, tackle, and bait are provided on board. You must be on board the Westwind by 5:30 a.m. the morning of Saturday June 22nd. Make sure to purchase your 2013 fishing license (don't forget to ask for a sturgeon punch card). You will NOT have time to purchase it on the morning of the 22nd. Don’t forget to bring your raingear, a lunch, $5.00 for the deckhand tip, and $2.00 for the pool for the first legal fish caught and the longest legal fish caught. At the end of the day, fish cleaning is available for a nominal fee. Join us this year for a great time and camaraderie as always. See you there!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Community Activism, Education and Outreach:  Leave this world better than when you found it


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Flooding the Inboxes for Wild Salmon!

It will take a united effort to drive the salmon farming industry out of the oceans and away from wild salmon. Think of the way hundreds of mosquitoes can send a grown man running, or how small birds work together to drive away large predator birds from the nests. One email may not have an impact, but hundreds, thousands of emails cannot be ignored.

No Compromise in the Defense of Wild Salmon! www.wildsalmonfirst.org


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Speak for the Salmon

At last, the BC-wide Campaign to SPEAK FOR THE SALMON is launched. The next few months will be an exciting time. From the emails received it is clear that the Campaign to preserve salmon and their habitats is supported by a lot of dedicated people. Holding politicians’ feet to the fire is a necessity. Challenge the candidates to come clean and then vote for the candidate whose stated position about SPEAK FOR THE SALMON rings truest to your ear. But, the real power of citizens is the VOTE There is a Provincial election in May of this year. It is essential to get messages to candidates. There are so many sitting members not running again that the official list of MLA’s is a poor reference. Better to keep your eyes out for the candidates who are running in your riding. Here is what you can do: 1. Get the names of candidates in your home riding - pass the information around to others who might consider joining the Campaign. 2. Fan out to your friends and neighbours and encourage them to get involved. Also, others in your constituency who are active members of the SPEAK FOR THE SALMON Campaign may be wiling to work with you and others and thus ease the load as well as improving effectiveness. 3. Send emails to each candidate asking questions about where they stand on conservation of salmon and protection of their habitats. 4. Attend election meetings and ask the same question of each and every candidate. If you can attend several meetings in different parts of your home riding, ask the same questions -- a good way at times to see if a candidate is just ‘winging it’. 5. Push the candidates to give answers about what they would DO to conserve and protect salmon and their habitats. It isn’t enough for a candidate to say “I support salmon” - the test is what will they commit to do to conserve and protect salmon and their habitats. Remind them that if elected, they will be held accountable if pre-election promises are forgotten.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! 6. Use email if you have the addresses of local candidates, or, write letters, phone or visit candidates’ offices. 7. For those with internet social media skills, this is a great cause to support. Get the message out over and over again. 8. Encourage those who don’t have computers to attend candidate meetings and ask questions, or, write a brief letter to candidates that simply asks the question, “If elected, what will you do to protect salmon and their habitats? 9. Don’t let up on the pressure. 10. Don’t forget municipal Councils - keep salmon and their habits on their agenda. 11. VOTE when the time comes. If enough voters Speak for the Salmon in Municipal, Provincial and National elections, those who are elected will have no choice but to recognize how important salmon are to the people of B.C. Some things to remember: 1. Above all else, remember that you are SPEAKING FOR THE SALMON because the salmon can’t speak for themselves. 2. To be successful, we must join together in fighting for the survival of salmon. 3. Keep politics out of your message, we are not for any Party or against any Party. We just SPEAK FOR THE SALMON and will support those who support salmon. 4. SPEAK FOR THE SALMON - LET THE SALMON SPIRIT BE YOUR INSPIRATION AND GUIDE. 5. Try to get local media involved over and over again - newspapers, radio, television, newsletters, whatever will get the word out that salmon’s future is at stake. 6. If enough communities throughout B.C. are seen to be committed to fight to save our salmon heritage, a provincial Legislature elected in May might abide by words spoken to me by DFO Minister the Honourable Romeo LeBlanc when we were developing the Salmonid Enhancement Program in the 1970’s. Over and over again he said: “keep the message apolitical; you can do it by briefing all MP’s from BC and keeping the focus on salmon”. In other words, the ideal result would be to have a BC Legislature that will be united on the issue of saving the salmon and their habitats. It is important to elect MLA’s who are willing to work together to that end. 7. Don’t stand down too soon after the BC election - a watching brief on MLA behaviour in respect of salmon is essential. There is no doubt in my mind that MLA’s will need a poke once in a while. 8. Also, a federal election is not all that far off, relatively speaking. Let the BC election be a dress rehearsal for the BIG CHALLENGE: getting a National Government to honour its constitutional and legal obligations to conserve salmon and protect and renew their habitats. 9. A final point, the ultimate prize for a successful campaign in BC is the creation of a lot of pressure on members of Canada’s House of Commons to learn to SPEAK FOR THE SALMON and in doing so, to radically change federal political attitudes to the point that the conservation ethic eventually becomes an integral part of Canadian culture.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Don’t

want to risk eating ISA diseased fish? – Don’t buy open pen farmed Atlantic salmon

In the wake of news that ISA-diseased salmon is being processed for human consumption, Eastern Shore residents have launched a bold new billboard campaign designed to educate consumers about the possible health risks associated with eating open pen farmed salmon. In January 2013 the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) cleared Cooke Aquaculture to process fish with Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) for human consumption, despite the fact that this is an internationally reportable disease that has required the wholesale destruction of the fish in every other jurisdiction. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2013/01/19/nb-quarantined-salmon.html Cooke Aquaculture confirmed that it would not be separating or otherwise marking fish from the disease site at the consumer sale end. Sobeys grocery stores have said that they would not knowingly sell diseased fish—we congratulate them for this stance; not all grocers have taken it—but in fact, it is impossible to determine whether the salmon you buy in the stores are from the disease site or not, since the diseased fish were not, apparently, labeled as such. http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/636034-cooke-anemia-infected-fish-can-be-sold-like-otherfarmed-salmon


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! We find it ironic and deeply disturbing that the CFIA requires significant protective regulations for the processing of these fish, that they warn against using “finfish that were bought in a grocery store as bait for catching finfish or other aquatic animals,” and suggest wearing protective footwear and garb around finfish, but still declare that processed ISA diseased fish is fit for us to eat. http://www.inspection.gc.ca/animals/aquatic-animals/diseases/reportable/isa/factsheet/eng/1327198930863/1327199219511 We think we’d rather not risk it. We don’t know how bad ISA could be for us—the research on that really hasn’t been done-- but we do know that it is dangerous, even deadly for the wild herring, cod and salmon that swim by diseased, quarantined salmon feedlots—the Cohen Commission in BC has amply demonstrated that. http://salmonconfidential.ca/ Put simply, diseased or not, open pen salmon isn’t good for you. Treated with dyes, pesticides and antibiotics and raised in pens treated with various heavy metals, open pen farmed salmon may contain contaminants that can cause serious health risks for humans. Consumption of more than one meal of open pen farmed salmon per month could pose unacceptable cancer risks according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s methods for calculating fish consumption advisories. See http://www.albany.edu/ihe/salmonstudy/ NOTE: All “Fresh Atlantic salmon,” or “farmed salmon” for sale in restaurants or grocery stores, whole or in fillets, anywhere in North America, is open pen farmed salmon. “Wild” salmon is always some variety of wild Pacific salmon. WHAT CAN YOU DO?  DON’T BUY and DON’T EAT OPEN PEN FARMED SALMON! 

   

http://www.salmonfeedlotboycott.com/ Write to or call Premier Dexter demanding a halt to open pen finfish farming in Nova Scotia. Toll-free Message Line: 1-800-267-1993 E-mail Address: premier@gov.ns.ca Address: Office of the Premier PO Box 726 Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2T3 Sign our petition: http://www.change.org/petitions/stop-open-pen-finfish-farming-on-nova-scotia-sshore DONATE to help us continue this battle. Join our Facebook group: Eastern Shore Residents Against Open Salmon Farming Inform yourself and others. Watch Salmon Wars and Salmon Confidential and check out our website and other links provided here. Share what you find out with family and friends.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Fish farm foes add sign to campaign March 11, 2013

An Eastern Shore group opposed to ocean salmon farming has added a prominent downtown Halifax billboard to its campaign. “We had a terrific response to our advertising on Metro Transit buses and felt this was another effective way to share our concerns with Halifax-area residents,” Marike Finlay, president of the Association for the Preservation of the Eastern Shore, said Monday. The full-size billboard on Barrington Street, on the water side of the street north of Halifax Shipyard, features Atlantic salmon flesh colours and a warning against eating fish afflicted with infectious salmon anemia, or ISA virus. The association mounted similar signs on Metro Transit buses Monday. It is a reference to a continuing dispute between opponents of ocean salmon farming and a Canadian Food Inspection Agency decision in January to allow Cooke Aquaculture to process fish quarantined due to the virus.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! “The CFIA declared the fish safe for human consumption as an alternative to the cost of having to pay to have it eradicated,” Finlay said. The association she heads has about 300 members opposed to ocean fish farming on the Eastern Shore. Finlay said the association sees the bus and billboard advertising as a means to raise awareness and support in Halifax about its opposition to ocean fish farms. The inspection agency has never released any scientific evidence to support its contention the infected salmon is safe for human consumption, she said. Bruce Hancock, with the Aquaculture Association of Nova Scotia, contacted at the International Boston Seafood Show, said he was a bit reluctant to comment on the bus and billboard sign campaign because the issue does not directly affect his members. “We represent small and medium-sized aquaculture businesses and not Cooke Aquaculture Inc., which has been dealing with the ISA issue,” Hancock said. It was unfortunate the association was employing the infectious salmon anemia issue as a “scare tactic” to raise the profile of their misguided campaign against ocean aquaculture, he said. “Federal regulators would not clear salmon for human consumption if there was a risk, not to mention, a rigorous inspection prior to processing would see any diseased or unsuitable fish removed. “The inspection process for seafood is the same as it would be for livestock and for plant foods in this regard.” Nell Halse, with Cooke Aquaculture, said she was reluctant to comment on a bus and billboard advertising campaign. “Since we don’t have any salmon farms on the Eastern Shore, I don’t think it would be appropriate for us to comment specifically on this community’s anti-salmon farming campaign,” Halse said. “We have worked closely with the communities where we do business and would be happy to discuss those areas and our relationship with our neighbours in places like Shelburne, Digby and Meteghan.”

Editorial Comment: Actually, as reported in this article, and in this and past issues of Legacy, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency irresponsibly declared that ISA-infected salmon are safe for human consumption (without and human testing!). This unethical strategy was employed to 1. reduce compensation payments to salmon feedlot operators when government orders to destroy diseased salmon were issued and 2. to ease health concerns of consumers who unknowingly purchase infected salmon.. This strategy has backfired bigtime – just as the placement of salmon feedlots in marine environments has – unfortunately, wild salmon suffer due to this blatant greed and corruption

Editorial Comment:

Who is kidding who? Since when does Cooke Aquaculture not have salmon farms on Canada’s Eastern Shore?


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!  Colourful and noisy fish-farm protesters march on DFO officers March 1, 2013 A noisy and colourful crowd of protesters braved a downpour Friday to demand an end to open-water salmon feedlots, what they call a “menace” to B.C. coastal waters. Marching from the edge of the Downtown Eastside to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans office on Burrard St., the chanting crowd was an all-ages mix of Idle No More protesters, First Nations groups, fisheries activists, and curious bystanders. Leanne Hodges joined the protest because she worked as a contracted fisheries guardian until she says she noticed increases in disease, sea lice infestation and death among young salmon stocks. Told to “stand down” when she brought her concerns to superiors at the DFO, Hodges said she left the farm to became an activist for wild salmon issues. Little has been done by the DFO to address these issues, she said. “We’ve been ignored for years.” While she has no problem with land-based fish farms, Hodges says the real worry lies in traditional open-water nets along wild salmon migration routes that allow water to flow freely, carrying in fresh water and ridding cages of waste. Findings of the Cohen Commission back up her concern over open-water farms.

The October 2012 report investigated the decline of Fraser River sockeye and offered warnings if the industrial open-water farm industry continues. “As long as DFO has a mandate to promote salmon farming, there is a risk that it will act in a manner that favours the interests of the salmon farming industry over the health of wild fish stocks,” Commissioner Bruce Cohen said. Fish farms employ 6,000 people and generate $800 million in annual revenues, according to BC Salmon Farmers Association media representative, Colleen Dane. She said fish farmers support the findings of the Cohen Commission but “are still waiting for direction from the DFO and federal government based on the recommendations.” Farmed salmon have a 95 per cent survival rate because farms are “highly regulated and very closely reviewed,” Dane said.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Action Alert: Support a Proactive Solution to Protecting Oregon's Wild Fish

Support a Proactive Solution to Protecting Oregon's Wild Fish

Click the button below to view and send your comments to the Oregon House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee Threat to the Health of Native Fish Stocks The farming of Atlantic or genetically engineered salmon poses a serious threat to our native Pacific salmon. The potential for escapement would put this invasive species in competition for food and space. They also could breed with wild stock, spreading undesirable genes and diluting the genetic makeup of our wild stock. Genetically engineered salmon can also grow much larger than native salmon, raising concerns that the super-sized fish would out compete wild salmon if they were released or escaped into open streams and waterways. Farmed fish are also vectors for disease, which jeopardize the survival of our wild salmon stock, their habitat, the food sources and the economy they represent. What is particularly alarming is that genetically engineered salmon would be difficult and perhaps even impossible to eradicate (similar to invasive species) because genetically engineered organisms are modified to enable them to withstand wider ranges of disease, salinity and temperature. Solution Take a proactive approach to protect wild Pacific salmon and steelhead from the farming of genetically engineered and Atlantic salmon. Support Oregon House Bill 2530 which protects our native species by prohibiting the importation, cultivation, and release of genetically engineered or Atlantic salmon in Oregon's waters. The bill is sponsored by Representative Paul Holvey and Representative Deborah Boone. This bill is supported by a diverse group of partners including:  Native Fish Society  Oregon Salmon Commission  Trout Unlimited  Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon  Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Community of Oregon  Association of Northwest Steelheaders  Tualatin Riverkeepers Comments will be accepted until March 21, 2013 so act now! It will only take 2 minutes! Please click the button below to read over the comments and support a proactive solution to the risks Atlantic and GE salmon farming pose to Oregon's wild, native fish

Thank you for your support of wild fish!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Petition: Salmon Feedlot Boycott


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Petition: United Declaration for Wild Salmon


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Petition: Urge Washington Governor Inslee to support salmon solutions


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Action request: Let Pacific Coastal Airlines know that recreational fishermen oppose open pen salmon feedlots (e-mail: Susan Lundy lundys@shaw.ca) The following salmon farming promotion is in the February-March 2013 issue of “Soar”

Alexandra Morton: “The Pacific Coastal Airlines, who makes a lot of money flying sportfishermen into BC lodges gave the salmon farming industry a two-page spread in their in-flight magazine "Soar." It features a photo of a young First Nations woman and the quote "farmed in the wild." The article is lobbying for longer-term leases.... in First Nation territories... hence the picture (page 16). The lundys@shaw.ca

editor

is

Susan

Lundy

The BC salmon farming industry knows exactly where to apply pressure. http://www.flipdocs.com/showbook.aspx?ID=1 0001957_880443&P=16”

Editorial Comment: Ms. Lundy, I'm writing as an avid recreational fisherman and wild game fish conservationist to share my utter disappointment and frustration with you and Pacific Coastal Airlines for stooping so low as to promote expansion of open pen salmon feedlots sited in BC's wild salmon migration routes. Conservationists around the world can only assume that you are ignorant regarding the known adverse impacts of open pen salmon feedlots on human health, wild Pacific salmon (and steelhead), their ecosystems and businesses that rely on them; including Pacific Coastal Airlines which caters to recreational fishermen, hunters and eco-tourists and to others who care deeply about BC's magnificent wildlife. Of course, in this day and age, ignorance is no excuse. Pacific Coastal Airlines, the communities you visit and the clients you cater to would be far better served by educating your clients as to the importance of conserving BC's wildlife. In the meantime, I for one will travel elsewhere to spend my time and money while enjoying fishing with family and friends for wild game fish. Thank you, Ms. Lundy.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Responses

to Pacific Coastal Airlines’ promotion of open pen salmon

feedlots Angela Koch: I'm applying for a job at Pacific Coastal Airlines. Wow...Did I hear correctly and you folks are doing FISH FARM tours now! How much do you charge for them, and do you need a tour guide to tell all your passengers how the viruses and sea lice from the farms are infecting all our wild salmon?....I'd love to apply for this job as I know a lot about the filthy fish farm industry...my resume includes a voluntary course I took by attending the Cohen Commission where I learned that BC's fish farms are full of European strain diseases., but not to worry, even though there's been no human testing done, apparently all these viruses are safe for us to consume...which makes one feel confident when we find out our government just dumped a half million PRV virus infected farmed salmon into open net pens...growing diseased flesh for our dinner plates while this highly contagious disease infects our precious wild salmon! This way if your customers can't catch any more wild salmon (they are slowly disappearing) then they can always eat some pharmed salmon...except for my friends...as friends don't let friends eat farmed salmon! And for your in-flight viewing pleasure may I suggest...http://www.salmonconfidential.ca/ Leanne Hodges to Pacific Coastal Airlines My name is Leanne Hodges. I am a former DFO Fisheries guardian, eco-tourism guide, sport fisher and wilderness artist. I value the wild. I found your recent two page spread in your in-flight magazine, Soar featuring the salmon farm/feedlot industry highly offensive to wilderness tourism operators, sportfishing tourism, the indigenous and anything associated to being wild… …Characterizing an industry that is known to impact wild salmon and marine ecosystems around the world, as something associated to being wild is reprehensible. Based on my 'boots on the ground' first hand witnessing and reporting of multiple violations to the Fisheries Act and the subsequent decades of research done by Dr Alexandra Morton, as well as many laudable scientists and professionals I suggest you realize the long term impacts on tourism values. Tourism and sport fishing is threatened on this coast, because of impacts made by salmon farm detriment. Between sport fishing and wilderness tourism over $2 billion in revenue is brought into British Columbia. Why risk this sustainable industry with far more growth potential over a hand full of jobs, that could be easily transitioned to land. Perhaps you should look further into this diabolical industry, such as the unsustainable practices of rendering forage fish for fish meal, drug resistant blooms of sea lice killing wild smolts, blood money for sanctioned and unsanctioned sea lion, seal and river otter kills, pesticides that are known to impact crustaceans, like lobster, prawn and crab, under water acoustical devices displacing Orca from traditional migratory and foraging areas, a grizzly was shot also for being drawn into morts on the beach, and worst of all we now have three known foreign, scandinavian originated viruses in our wild salmon.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon! Streams I floated found escaped Atlantic salmon in Pacific salmon habitat, displacing Pacific salmon from their own specific breeding/feeding requirements. When hailing the commercial fleet we would have unreported Atlantic escapements caught in nets by the thousands, when we gutted the fish wild forage fish were in their guts. Is this the kind of industry you want to promote in the context of Beautiful British Columbia? Shame.

Leonard Ellis: Over the years a very large part of the foundation of Pacific Coastal Airlines enterprise has been built on service to Sportfishing Lodges and Commercial Fishermen up and down the Coast. Wild Fish has certainly put the company where it is, in the last few decades. To support the Farmed salmon industry by advertising their questionable product is unfortunately, in my opinion, quite a departure in ethics and foremost not in the best interest of the sensitive Fish and Wildlife on this Coast.

James Harris: Totally irresponsible article on Farmed Salmon. Next time get your facts right. It is an unsustainable industry and needs to be put onshore where it belongs.

Brian Silversides Fishing McKinlay: A BIG Booooo for promoting despicable salmon farming in BC. An industry that is killing sport fishing and a huge economy. My clients will no longer fly with you.

Jim Wilcox: I'm writing as an avid recreational fisherman and wild game fish conservationist to share my utter disappointment and frustration with you and Pacific Coastal Airlines for stooping so low as to promote expansion of open pen salmon feedlots sited in BC's wild salmon migration routes. Conservationists around the world can only assume that you are ignorant regarding the known adverse impacts of open pen salmon feedlots on human health, wild Pacific salmon (and steelhead), their ecosystems and businesses that rely on them; including Pacific Coastal Airlines which caters to recreational fishermen, hunters and eco-tourists and to others who care deeply about BC's magnificent wildlife. Of course, in this day and age, ignorance is no excuse. Pacific Coastal Airlines, the communities you visit and the clients you cater to would be far better served by educating your clients as to the importance of conserving BC's wildlife. In the meantime, I for one will travel elsewhere to spend my time and money while enjoying fishing with family and friends for wild game fish.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

March 11, 2013

 Re: Feedback email regarding Salmon Farming The recent article in our in-flight magazine regarding Salmon Farming has stirred some reaction from some being critical of us being offensive and irresponsible by showing our support for a particular industry that some feel is detrimental to the health and wellbeing of the marine ecosystem. Articles in our magazine are not necessarily reflective of our personal or political beliefs. The article itself was merely intended to be an information article about one of the many diverse businesses that make up the landscape of the province of British Columbia. There have been, and will continue to be, many articles in our magazine on a wide variety of business’ and initiatives that speak to a broad range of topics reflecting the province we live in; including: ecotourism, industry development, animal protection, aboriginal tourism and community events, to name a few. In no way are we taking a political position on the realities that make up the current state of our environment. It is merely our intention to share all that we can about what is going on in our back yard and we apologize to anyone that may take offense to an article or interpret an article as a reflection of our beliefs as an organization or the individuals that work within it. Sincerely, Spencer Smith Vice President, Commercial Services Leanne Hodges: LOL! We got the same one! What is missing is corporate responsibility and choosing values that reflect a company with environmental integrity!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

 Action – Send message to

President Obama: Stop tar sands pipeline!


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

OLYMPIA CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED March 27, 2013 at 7:00PM NORTH OLYMPIA FIRE STATION 5046 BOSTON HARBOR ROAD NE

 CUTTHROAT

TROUT FISHING IN PUGET SOUND AND FLY FISHING FOR BROWN TROUT IN EASTERN OREGON

Program: The public is invited to the March 27th meeting of the Olympia Chapter of Trout Unlimited for a presentation by Chester Allen fishing guide, writer and seminar discussion leader. The evening program will explore the world-class wild cutthroat fishery right here in South Sound. Chester will also share some thoughts about the lights out brown trout fishery in eastern Oregon. His color slides will cover up-to-date information on fishing techniques with the fisheries resources. Ask questions about where and how your hook-ups can happen. Light refreshments will be provided and all attending can participate in the fishing equipment raffle.

Bio: Chester Allen was the outdoor columnist for The Olympian newspaper from 2003 to the first week of January 2010. He spent 14 years at the paper, and he spent many days fly fishing Puget Sound for sea-run cutthroat. Chester started fly-fishing at 8 years of age -- but some of his best days were spent chasing tides and learning beaches right here in South Sound. His book, "Fly Fishing for Sea-Run Cutthroat", published in January 2012, is a success. He is working on his second book. Chester's second book will take readers on fishing road trips throughout the west, and each chapter will explore new water and the special techniques used to pester the fish in that spot. Chester splits his time between homes in Portland and Hood River, Oregon, and still makes it up to Puget Sound several times a month to chase cutthroat and resident coho. Chester's looking forward to a monster pink salmon run this year.


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

OLYMPIA CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED April 24, 2013 7:00PM NORTH OLYMPIA FIRE STATION 5046 BOSTON HARBOR ROAD NE

 SPRING CHINOOK FISHING ON THE CHEHALIS AMD COWLITZ RIVERS

Huntley (l) with Spring Chinook

Steelhead Fish-in on Cowlitz

Program: The public is invited to the April 24th meeting of the Olympia Chapter of Trout Unlimited for a presentation by Dawn Huntley II, refreshments, and fishing equipment raffle. Dawn’s presentation is on up-to-date fishing techniques for Spring Chinook in the Chehalis and Cowlitz rivers. He will share information and experiences including time of year, water conditions, methods, colors, scent, UV light and gear. Dawn will also be relating to similarities in methods that result in the ‘by-catch’ of steelhead. So bring a pen and a note pad! You will not want to forget any information or training you will receive.

Bio: Dawn Huntley II Dawn has fished Western Washington and Idaho most of his life. Steelhead, salmon, and sturgeon – he calls them “super fish” – are the focus of his “Hook-Em Up” fishing guide service. He has developed techniques over the years that are successful at catching all the “super fish”. When you find yourself on a HOOK EM UP boat, you will see and practice with the different conditions and how they directly affect your fishing trip. Dawn feels his job is not only to help you catch fish, but to teach you how to catch fish so all of your fishing excursions are great. Fishing the Cowlitz and Chehalis rivers have produced many fish for his clients. “So keep your nets wet and your rods bent.”


Legacy – April 2013 Wild Game Fish Conservation International 2013 – Year of the Wild Salmon!

Video Library – conservation of wild game fish Aquaculture Salmon Confidential: (69:15) The Fish Farm Fight; (6:51) Salmon Wars: Salmon Farms, Wild Fish and the Future of Communities (6:07) The Facts on Fish Farms (60:00+) “Algae culture fish farm” (6:40) Vegetarian Fish? A New Solution for Aquaculture (7:32) Everyone Loves Wild Salmon – Don’t They? - Alexandra Morton (2:53) Atlantic salmon feedlots - impacts to Pacific salmon (13:53) Farmed Salmon Exposed (22:59) Salmon farm diseases and sockeye (13:53) Shame Below the Waves (12:37) Occupy Vancouver, BC - Dr. Alexandra Morton (6:18) Farming the Seas (Steve Cowen) (55:53) Farming the Seas (PBS) (26:45) Cohen Commission – Introduction (9:52) Deadly virus found in wild Pacific salmon (1:57) A tribute by Dr. Alexandra Morton (5:35) Green Interview with Dr. Alexandra Morton (6:06) Closed containment salmon farms (8:15) Don Staniford on 'Secrets of Salmon Farming' (7:50) Greed of Feed: what’s feeding our cheap farmed salmon (10:37) Land-based, Closed-containment Aquaculture (3:14) Hydropower Undamming Elwha (26:46) Salmon: Running the Gauntlet - Snake River dams (50:08) Mining Pebble Mine: “No Means No” (1:15) Locals Oppose Proposed Pebble Mine (7:23) Oil: Extraction and transportation Tar Sands Oil Extraction: The Dirty Truth (11:39) Tar Sands: Oil Industry Above the Law? (1:42) SPOIL – Protecting BC’s Great Bear Rainforest from oil tanker spills (44:00) H2oil - A documentary about the Canadian tar sand oil (3:20) From Tar Sands to Tankers – the Battle to Stop Enbridge (14:58) Risking it All - Oil on our Coast (13:16) To The Last Drop: Canada’s Dirty Oil (22:31) Seafood safety Is your favorite seafood toxic? (6:06)

Legacy - April 2013  

Journal of Wild Game Fish Conservation This issue features: Seafood consumption - Risks and benefits Open Pen salmon feedlots - impacts Ener...