Page 1


AT PENN,WE KNOW THAT HISTORY DOESN’T JUST HAPPEN; IT IS MADE. PENN WILL RISE FROM EXCELLENCE TO EMINENCE ON THE COMMITMENT OF EACH AND EVERY ONE OF US TO THE IDEALS OF THIS MAGNIFICENT UNIVERSITY AND OUR SHARED UNDERSTANDING OFTHE IMPERATIVE BEFORE US —TO BUILD A BETTER UNIVERSITY FOR A BETTER WORLD. YEARS FROM NOW, PENN WILL BE THE PREMIER URBAN TEACHING AND RESEARCH UNIVERSITY, ATTRACTING THE MOST EXTRAORDINARY STUDENTS AND FACULTY TO THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, VIBRANT CAMPUS FOR THE MOST NOBLE OF ENDEAVORS: TO CREATE AND USE KNOWLEDGE TO ENRICH THE LIVES OF OUR FELLOW HUMAN BEINGS, AS WELL AS OUR OWN. WE CAN THEN PROUDLY SAY: WE MET THE CHALLENGE. — AMY GUTMANN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA —

No academic vision has proved more far-reaching than that of Benjamin Franklin. By merging the practical with the theoretical, the man who founded America’s first university, the University of Pennsylvania, changed the course of history. ✺ Today, Franklin’s intellectual heirs are doing it again. Here, on Penn’s compact urban campus, this community of bold thinkers and doers is creating a new kind of university: one prepared by perspective and achievement to tackle the pressing problems of the 21st century and to improve the lives of people across the globe. ✺ With our sights set on the future, we launch Making History: The Campaign for Penn — a $3.5 billion effort that will empower Penn to push the frontiers of teaching, research, and service and to redefine what people everywhere can expect from higher education.

JOIN US IN MAKING HISTORY


AT PENN,WE KNOW THAT HISTORY DOESN’T JUST HAPPEN; IT IS MADE. PENN WILL RISE FROM EXCELLENCE TO EMINENCE ON THE COMMITMENT OF EACH AND EVERY ONE OF US TO THE IDEALS OF THIS MAGNIFICENT UNIVERSITY AND OUR SHARED UNDERSTANDING OFTHE IMPERATIVE BEFORE US —TO BUILD A BETTER UNIVERSITY FOR A BETTER WORLD. YEARS FROM NOW, PENN WILL BE THE PREMIER URBAN TEACHING AND RESEARCH UNIVERSITY, ATTRACTING THE MOST EXTRAORDINARY STUDENTS AND FACULTY TO THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, VIBRANT CAMPUS FOR THE MOST NOBLE OF ENDEAVORS: TO CREATE AND USE KNOWLEDGE TO ENRICH THE LIVES OF OUR FELLOW HUMAN BEINGS, AS WELL AS OUR OWN. WE CAN THEN PROUDLY SAY: WE MET THE CHALLENGE. — AMY GUTMANN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA —

No academic vision has proved more far-reaching than that of Benjamin Franklin. By merging the practical with the theoretical, the man who founded America’s first university, the University of Pennsylvania, changed the course of history. ✺ Today, Franklin’s intellectual heirs are doing it again. Here, on Penn’s compact urban campus, this community of bold thinkers and doers is creating a new kind of university: one prepared by perspective and achievement to tackle the pressing problems of the 21st century and to improve the lives of people across the globe. ✺ With our sights set on the future, we launch Making History: The Campaign for Penn — a $3.5 billion effort that will empower Penn to push the frontiers of teaching, research, and service and to redefine what people everywhere can expect from higher education.

JOIN US IN MAKING HISTORY


YROTSIH TAHT WONK EW ,NNEP TA .EDAM SI TI ;NEPPAH TSUJ T’NSEOD TNEMTIMMOC EHT NO ECNENIME OT ECNELLECXE MORF ESIR LLIW NNEP YTISREVINU TNECIFINGAM SIHT FO SLAEDI EHT OT SU FO ENO YREVE DNA HCAE FO DLIUB OT — SU EROFEB EVITAREPMI EHT FO GNIDNATSREDNU DERAHS RUO DNA EB LLIW NNEP ,WON MORF SRAEY .DLROW RETTEB A ROF YTISREVINU RETTEB A EHT GNITCARTTA ,YTISREVINU HCRAESER DNA GNIHCAET NABRU REIMERP EHT ,LUFITUAEB TSOM EHT OT YTLUCAF DNA STNEDUTS YRANIDROARTXE TSOM ESU DNA ETAERC OT :SROVAEDNE FO ELBON TSOM EHT ROF SUPMAC TNARBIV ,SGNIEB NAMUH WOLLEF RUO FO SEVIL EHT HCIRNE OT EGDELWONK .EGNELLAHC EHT TEM EW :YAS YLDUORP NEHT NAC EW .NWO RUO SA LLEW SA — AINAVLYSNNEP FO YTISREVINU EHT FO TNEDISERP ,NNAMTUG YMA —

No academic vision has proved more far-reaching than that of Benjamin Franklin. By merging the practical with the theoretical, the man who founded America’s first university, the University of Pennsylvania, changed the course of history. ✺ Today, Franklin’s intellectual heirs are doing it again. Here, on Penn’s compact urban campus, this community of bold thinkers and doers is creating a new kind of university: one prepared by perspective and achievement to tackle the pressing problems of the 21st century and to improve the lives of people across the globe. ✺ With our sights set on the future, we launch Making History: The Campaign for Penn — a $3.5 billion effort that will empower Penn to push the frontiers of teaching, research, and service and to redefine what people everywhere can expect from higher education.

JOIN US IN MAKING HISTORY 4


YROTSIH TAHT WONK EW ,NNEP TA .EDAM SI TI ;NEPPAH TSUJ T’NSEOD TNEMTIMMOC EHT NO ECNENIME OT ECNELLECXE MORF ESIR LLIW NNEP YTISREVINU TNECIFINGAM SIHT FO SLAEDI EHT OT SU FO ENO YREVE DNA HCAE FO DLIUB OT — SU EROFEB EVITAREPMI EHT FO GNIDNATSREDNU DERAHS RUO DNA EB LLIW NNEP ,WON MORF SRAEY .DLROW RETTEB A ROF YTISREVINU RETTEB A EHT GNITCARTTA ,YTISREVINU HCRAESER DNA GNIHCAET NABRU REIMERP EHT ,LUFITUAEB TSOM EHT OT YTLUCAF DNA STNEDUTS YRANIDROARTXE TSOM ESU DNA ETAERC OT :SROVAEDNE FO ELBON TSOM EHT ROF SUPMAC TNARBIV ,SGNIEB NAMUH WOLLEF RUO FO SEVIL EHT HCIRNE OT EGDELWONK .EGNELLAHC EHT TEM EW :YAS YLDUORP NEHT NAC EW .NWO RUO SA LLEW SA — AINAVLYSNNEP FO YTISREVINU EHT FO TNEDISERP ,NNAMTUG YMA —

No academic vision has proved more far-reaching than that of Benjamin Franklin. By merging the practical with the theoretical, the man who founded America’s first university, the University of Pennsylvania, changed the course of history. ✺ Today, Franklin’s intellectual heirs are doing it again. Here, on Penn’s compact urban campus, this community of bold thinkers and doers is creating a new kind of university: one prepared by perspective and achievement to tackle the pressing problems of the 21st century and to improve the lives of people across the globe. ✺ With our sights set on the future, we launch Making History: The Campaign for Penn — a $3.5 billion effort that will empower Penn to push the frontiers of teaching, research, and service and to redefine what people everywhere can expect from higher education.

JOIN US IN MAKING HISTORY 4


HISTORY STARTS HERE... AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Arts & Sciences • Engineering • Wharton • Penn Nursing • Dental Medicine • PennDesign Penn Law • PENN Medicine • Social Policy & Practice • Penn GSE • Annenberg School Penn Vet • Penn Libraries • Penn Athletics • Penn Museum • Institute of Contemporary Art Annenberg Center • Morris Arboretum At Penn, we make history by shaping the future. Start with the revolutionary ideas, passionate people, and practical pursuits that have always defined Penn. Add to the mix 18 amazing schools and centers on one compact campus, a university-wide culture of collaboration, and a genuine desire to do good, and the result is a university singularly prepared to bring new vision and fresh solutions to the most important issues of our day. Call it the alchemy of achievement.

Universities around the globe now realize what Penn has known from the start: that institutions of higher education have the rare ability — and accompanying responsibility — not only to create knowledge but to use that knowledge to serve humanity and improve lives. Never before has Penn’s philosophy and approach been so relevant — and so replicated. With its enterprising spirit, intellectual energy, and fervent determination, Penn demonstrates daily how to connect theory and practice in service to the world. As the challenges of our time grow more complex and consequential, Penn is poised like no other to innovate and to lead. Revolutionary ideas, passionate people, and practical pursuits. This is Penn. History starts here.

“PENN HAS DEVELOPED GREAT MOMENTUM AND IT SEEMS THAT EVERYONE — INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY — RECOGNIZES THIS. BUT THE SUCCESS OF THIS CAMPAIGN IS ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL TO PROVIDING THE RESOURCES THAT WILL SUSTAIN THAT UPWARD TRAJECTORY.” – JAMES S. RIEPE, W’65, WG’67, CHAIR, BOARD OF TRUSTEES

2

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

3


HISTORY STARTS HERE... AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Arts & Sciences • Engineering • Wharton • Penn Nursing • Dental Medicine • PennDesign Penn Law • PENN Medicine • Social Policy & Practice • Penn GSE • Annenberg School Penn Vet • Penn Libraries • Penn Athletics • Penn Museum • Institute of Contemporary Art Annenberg Center • Morris Arboretum At Penn, we make history by shaping the future. Start with the revolutionary ideas, passionate people, and practical pursuits that have always defined Penn. Add to the mix 18 amazing schools and centers on one compact campus, a university-wide culture of collaboration, and a genuine desire to do good, and the result is a university singularly prepared to bring new vision and fresh solutions to the most important issues of our day. Call it the alchemy of achievement.

Universities around the globe now realize what Penn has known from the start: that institutions of higher education have the rare ability — and accompanying responsibility — not only to create knowledge but to use that knowledge to serve humanity and improve lives. Never before has Penn’s philosophy and approach been so relevant — and so replicated. With its enterprising spirit, intellectual energy, and fervent determination, Penn demonstrates daily how to connect theory and practice in service to the world. As the challenges of our time grow more complex and consequential, Penn is poised like no other to innovate and to lead. Revolutionary ideas, passionate people, and practical pursuits. This is Penn. History starts here.

“PENN HAS DEVELOPED GREAT MOMENTUM AND IT SEEMS THAT EVERYONE — INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY — RECOGNIZES THIS. BUT THE SUCCESS OF THIS CAMPAIGN IS ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL TO PROVIDING THE RESOURCES THAT WILL SUSTAIN THAT UPWARD TRAJECTORY.” – JAMES S. RIEPE, W’65, WG’67, CHAIR, BOARD OF TRUSTEES

2

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

3


HISTORY STARTS HERE… WITH REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS At Penn, the goal is not simply to excel — it is to challenge assumptions and discover fresh and better ways of thinking about and doing things. From innovative initiatives to brave new programs, Penn is pushing the boundaries of expectation and opening new opportunities for progress in our classrooms, our neighborhoods, and our world.

REIMAGINING THE CAMPUS AND THE CITY Imagine. A vibrant campus core, with sophisticated new buildings for research, teaching, and residential life … generous open space, dedicated playing fields, and an enhanced athletic facility, all linked together and beautifully landscaped … inviting new walkways, ramps, and promenades that seamlessly connect the University and the city. Penn’s expansion eastward provides the University an unprecedented opportunity to transform its campus.The master plan, Penn Connects:A Vision for the Future, will take three decades to be realized, but it will be set in motion through Making History.The campaign will fund key priorities in Penn Connects and establish the plan’s conceptual framework: strengthening the academic core, creating open space and playing fields, and connecting the campus to the city.

Creating Open Space and Playing Fields With the expansion toward Center City, the Penn campus has grown in size and will grow in beauty as well, eventually gaining 21 percent more green space. Plans include a 14-acre athletic and recreational park that will offer stunning views of the Philadelphia skyline; a new bi-level athletic facility to occupy and enliven the north side of the Franklin Field arcade; and plenty of landscaped alcoves that invite people to relax and socialize.

Connecting the Campus to the City Extending the campus beyond the Palestra and Franklin Field will enhance east-west connections, uniting two vibrant districts and facilitating the flow of people and ideas. Transforming industrial land into a dynamic, walkable neighborhood and developing new facilities for teaching, research, and clinical practice will have a catalytic effect on jobs and development in the region.

4

Strengthening the Academic Core Biomedical research and clinical care at Penn will reach even greater heights with a complex of new medical facilities. Dedicated buildings for nanoscale research and neural and behavioral science will keep Penn at the forefront of emerging fields. Close to it all will be a new home for the Annenberg Public Policy Center and a beautiful residential College House on Hill Square.


HISTORY STARTS HERE… WITH REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS At Penn, the goal is not simply to excel — it is to challenge assumptions and discover fresh and better ways of thinking about and doing things. From innovative initiatives to brave new programs, Penn is pushing the boundaries of expectation and opening new opportunities for progress in our classrooms, our neighborhoods, and our world.

REIMAGINING THE CAMPUS AND THE CITY Imagine. A vibrant campus core, with sophisticated new buildings for research, teaching, and residential life … generous open space, dedicated playing fields, and an enhanced athletic facility, all linked together and beautifully landscaped … inviting new walkways, ramps, and promenades that seamlessly connect the University and the city. Penn’s expansion eastward provides the University an unprecedented opportunity to transform its campus.The master plan, Penn Connects:A Vision for the Future, will take three decades to be realized, but it will be set in motion through Making History.The campaign will fund key priorities in Penn Connects and establish the plan’s conceptual framework: strengthening the academic core, creating open space and playing fields, and connecting the campus to the city.

Creating Open Space and Playing Fields With the expansion toward Center City, the Penn campus has grown in size and will grow in beauty as well, eventually gaining 21 percent more green space. Plans include a 14-acre athletic and recreational park that will offer stunning views of the Philadelphia skyline; a new bi-level athletic facility to occupy and enliven the north side of the Franklin Field arcade; and plenty of landscaped alcoves that invite people to relax and socialize.

Connecting the Campus to the City Extending the campus beyond the Palestra and Franklin Field will enhance east-west connections, uniting two vibrant districts and facilitating the flow of people and ideas. Transforming industrial land into a dynamic, walkable neighborhood and developing new facilities for teaching, research, and clinical practice will have a catalytic effect on jobs and development in the region.

4

Strengthening the Academic Core Biomedical research and clinical care at Penn will reach even greater heights with a complex of new medical facilities. Dedicated buildings for nanoscale research and neural and behavioral science will keep Penn at the forefront of emerging fields. Close to it all will be a new home for the Annenberg Public Policy Center and a beautiful residential College House on Hill Square.


HISTORY STARTS HERE: REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS PASSIONATE PEOPLE PRACTICAL PURSUITS

REDEFINING THEWAY STUDENTS LIVE AND LEARN For Penn’s approximately 24,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students, education takes place outside the classroom as much as it does inside. Living and learning are inextricably linked, and discovery doesn’t stop when the academic day ends. Penn works tirelessly to enrich campus life and to create imaginative new opportunities for learning in the broadest sense, from College Houses that offer dynamic 24/7 learning communities to groundbreaking hubs that bring students from all schools and majors together to explore common interests. Making History will provide Penn with the resources it needs to ensure an ever more robust student life. John J. DiIulio, Jr., Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion, and Civil Society and Faculty Director of the Robert A. Fox Leadership Program How have faith-based organizations responded to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina? That was the question John DiIulio (left) wanted to explore. Thanks to a new Provost’s program called Ideas in Action, that multifaceted inquiry became the basis of Religion and US Public Policy: Faith-Based Initiatives and Post-Katrina New Orleans, one of Penn’s most innovative seminars. The Ideas in Action initiative grounds class work and research in current policy issues, inviting leading policymakers from outside Penn into the classroom to pose a real-world problem. Over the semester, students research and analyze the issue, presenting their findings to the policymaker at the close of class. For the undergraduates in Faith-Based Initiatives and Post-Katrina New Orleans, the seminar spanned the classroom and the world, encompassing readings in constitutional law, ongoing conversations with faith-based and government groups, and a four-day trip to New Orleans to investigate the groups at work on the ground. “Changing how we learned did everything to change what we learned,” says Andrea Collins, C’08. “This is the kind of class that you know you will think about long after you graduate.”

REINVENTING HOW WE CREATE AND USE KNOWLEDGE

Jonathan D. Moreno, David and Lyn Silfen University Professor and Professor of Medical Ethics and of History and Sociology of Science; John L. Jackson, Jr., Richard Perry University Associate Professor of Communications and Anthropology Described as “a catalyst for transforming the University,” Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) is President Amy Gutmann’s initiative to recruit eminent scholars whose teaching and research exemplify intellectual achievement across disciplines. The high-profile program, which is designed to strengthen interdisciplinary dialogue and interaction, aims to recruit 18 distinguished scholars to Penn. Cultural anthropologist and documentary filmmaker John L. Jackson (left) was the first, with academic appointments in the Annenberg School and the School of Arts and Sciences. Renowned biomedical ethicist Jonathan Moreno (above) is one of the most recent to arrive. “This is a truly visionary program,” says Moreno, who has academic appointments in the School of Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences. “Not only is it enabling me to pursue my scholarship unencumbered by artificial disciplinary boundaries, but for students, it is modeling the kind of thinking in which they need to be engaged. Today’s world demands that all of us be bridge-builders.“

7

8

© Jacques-Jean Tiziou / www.jjtiziou.net

Today, all universities talk about the importance of working across disciplines to solve our world’s increasingly complex problems.At Penn, where 12 schools are located on one urban campus, and collaboration is a well-established tradition, the University does much more than just talk. Penn’s proven track record in pioneering and expanding multidisciplinary initiatives means that today it is exceptionally prepared to take interdisciplinarity to a new level. Making History will support pathbreaking programs and initiatives that will empower Penn to build on its success in bridging academic boundaries.

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

9


HISTORY STARTS HERE: REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS PASSIONATE PEOPLE PRACTICAL PURSUITS

REDEFINING THEWAY STUDENTS LIVE AND LEARN For Penn’s approximately 24,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students, education takes place outside the classroom as much as it does inside. Living and learning are inextricably linked, and discovery doesn’t stop when the academic day ends. Penn works tirelessly to enrich campus life and to create imaginative new opportunities for learning in the broadest sense, from College Houses that offer dynamic 24/7 learning communities to groundbreaking hubs that bring students from all schools and majors together to explore common interests. Making History will provide Penn with the resources it needs to ensure an ever more robust student life. John J. DiIulio, Jr., Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion, and Civil Society and Faculty Director of the Robert A. Fox Leadership Program How have faith-based organizations responded to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina? That was the question John DiIulio (left) wanted to explore. Thanks to a new Provost’s program called Ideas in Action, that multifaceted inquiry became the basis of Religion and US Public Policy: Faith-Based Initiatives and Post-Katrina New Orleans, one of Penn’s most innovative seminars. The Ideas in Action initiative grounds class work and research in current policy issues, inviting leading policymakers from outside Penn into the classroom to pose a real-world problem. Over the semester, students research and analyze the issue, presenting their findings to the policymaker at the close of class. For the undergraduates in Faith-Based Initiatives and Post-Katrina New Orleans, the seminar spanned the classroom and the world, encompassing readings in constitutional law, ongoing conversations with faith-based and government groups, and a four-day trip to New Orleans to investigate the groups at work on the ground. “Changing how we learned did everything to change what we learned,” says Andrea Collins, C’08. “This is the kind of class that you know you will think about long after you graduate.”

REINVENTING HOW WE CREATE AND USE KNOWLEDGE

Jonathan D. Moreno, David and Lyn Silfen University Professor and Professor of Medical Ethics and of History and Sociology of Science; John L. Jackson, Jr., Richard Perry University Associate Professor of Communications and Anthropology Described as “a catalyst for transforming the University,” Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) is President Amy Gutmann’s initiative to recruit eminent scholars whose teaching and research exemplify intellectual achievement across disciplines. The high-profile program, which is designed to strengthen interdisciplinary dialogue and interaction, aims to recruit 18 distinguished scholars to Penn. Cultural anthropologist and documentary filmmaker John L. Jackson (left) was the first, with academic appointments in the Annenberg School and the School of Arts and Sciences. Renowned biomedical ethicist Jonathan Moreno (above) is one of the most recent to arrive. “This is a truly visionary program,” says Moreno, who has academic appointments in the School of Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences. “Not only is it enabling me to pursue my scholarship unencumbered by artificial disciplinary boundaries, but for students, it is modeling the kind of thinking in which they need to be engaged. Today’s world demands that all of us be bridge-builders.“

7

8

© Jacques-Jean Tiziou / www.jjtiziou.net

Today, all universities talk about the importance of working across disciplines to solve our world’s increasingly complex problems.At Penn, where 12 schools are located on one urban campus, and collaboration is a well-established tradition, the University does much more than just talk. Penn’s proven track record in pioneering and expanding multidisciplinary initiatives means that today it is exceptionally prepared to take interdisciplinarity to a new level. Making History will support pathbreaking programs and initiatives that will empower Penn to build on its success in bridging academic boundaries.

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

9


HISTORY STARTS HERE… WITH PASSIONATE PEOPLE Penn faculty, students, and alumni are distinguished not only by uncommon vision, but also by a relentless drive to follow through on the things they care about. By force of mind and body, Penn’s men and women are fueling a rich world of possibilities on campus and beyond.

OPENING DOORS TO THE BEST AND THE BRIGHTEST Realizing the links among a socioeconomically diverse student body, equity, and academic excellence, the University has made ensuring access to a Penn education its highest priority. By opening its doors to students of talent and high potential regardless of their financial circumstances, Penn not only helps these men and women achieve their promise as individuals, but also creates an academic community that expands the perspectives of all who are a part of it. Making History will fulfill what President Amy Gutmann has called “our sacred trust” by significantly building Penn’s undergraduate, graduate, and professional student aid resources. Catrina King, School of Veterinary Medicine and School of Medicine; Edgar Lopez Ramirez, Wharton School Catrina King, GR’11, V’12, a graduate student in veterinary medicine and cell and molecular biology, grew up in North Philadelphia, not far from Penn. Edgar Lopez Ramirez, W’09, an undergraduate from Omaha, Nebraska, never even saw the campus until the day he moved in. Though separated by geography and academic interest, Catrina and Edgar share a powerful bond: neither could have made it to Penn without generous scholarship support. “This scholarship is a dream come true,” writes Edgar in a letter to the donor who funded his scholarship. “You have forever changed my life for the better,” continues the first-generation Mexican-American who serves as vice chair of Penn’s Latino Coalition. For Catrina, fellowship support has meant access to Penn as well as freedom to follow her dreams after she graduates. “When I finish my degree, my passion — not the need to repay enormous student loans — will dictate the career I pursue. That is a tremendous gift.”

11


HISTORY STARTS HERE… WITH PASSIONATE PEOPLE Penn faculty, students, and alumni are distinguished not only by uncommon vision, but also by a relentless drive to follow through on the things they care about. By force of mind and body, Penn’s men and women are fueling a rich world of possibilities on campus and beyond.

OPENING DOORS TO THE BEST AND THE BRIGHTEST Realizing the links among a socioeconomically diverse student body, equity, and academic excellence, the University has made ensuring access to a Penn education its highest priority. By opening its doors to students of talent and high potential regardless of their financial circumstances, Penn not only helps these men and women achieve their promise as individuals, but also creates an academic community that expands the perspectives of all who are a part of it. Making History will fulfill what President Amy Gutmann has called “our sacred trust” by significantly building Penn’s undergraduate, graduate, and professional student aid resources. Catrina King, School of Veterinary Medicine and School of Medicine; Edgar Lopez Ramirez, Wharton School Catrina King, GR’11, V’12, a graduate student in veterinary medicine and cell and molecular biology, grew up in North Philadelphia, not far from Penn. Edgar Lopez Ramirez, W’09, an undergraduate from Omaha, Nebraska, never even saw the campus until the day he moved in. Though separated by geography and academic interest, Catrina and Edgar share a powerful bond: neither could have made it to Penn without generous scholarship support. “This scholarship is a dream come true,” writes Edgar in a letter to the donor who funded his scholarship. “You have forever changed my life for the better,” continues the first-generation Mexican-American who serves as vice chair of Penn’s Latino Coalition. For Catrina, fellowship support has meant access to Penn as well as freedom to follow her dreams after she graduates. “When I finish my degree, my passion — not the need to repay enormous student loans — will dictate the career I pursue. That is a tremendous gift.”

11


HISTORY STARTS HERE: REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS PASSIONATE PEOPLE PRACTICAL PURSUITS

CULTIVATING EMINENT SCHOLARS FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW On this campus of engaged and active learners, Penn’s faculty is a defining force. Their enthusiasm for and commitment to scholarship and teaching have made Penn one of the most intellectually vibrant universities today. Through their teaching and research, outstanding faculty advance knowledge, contribute to social progress, and deepen our understanding of every dimension of the human experience.They are also essential to creating the next generation of scholars, attracting talented men and women to Penn and nurturing their academic development once here. Making History will substantially strengthen Penn’s ability to attract and retain world-class faculty by growing endowment to support professorships as well as directorships and visiting scholar programs. Steven Hahn, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of History When Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Steven Hahn (below) moved to Penn four years ago, he was drawn by the high caliber of the American History program, which he considers “top in the country.” Equally powerful was the sense that at Penn “teaching and research are integrally connected.” An expert in the history of the American South, Hahn explains, “I am a better teacher when I teach material that I am actively involved in researching, and here I have the freedom to do that. At Penn, faculty are teaching what they are excited about, and that makes all the difference in creating a really energetic academic community.” Hahn notes, too, that the high level of faculty engagement at Penn is a key factor in achieving what he sees as one of higher education’s most significant goals: instilling in students a passion for thinking of the familiar in new ways. “One of the most important aims of both my research and my teaching,” says Hahn, “is to show students that the process of discovery is open to them.”

HARNESSING THE POWER OF ALUMNI “Our signature in the world,” is how President Amy Gutmann describes Penn Alumni, now 290,000 strong. The intellectual energy and entrepreneurial spirit that define these men and women is what today’s world needs and what allows Penn to pursue its ambitious vision with confidence.When drawn together in common cause, Penn alumni are a formidable force for good, using their talents and connections to strengthen the University, support each other, and better the world. Making History will broaden and deepen Penn’s most important relationships by expanding opportunities for engagement in all aspects of University life and growing the number of alumni who participate in annual giving and securing Penn’s future strength. Marc Platt, C’79, and Julie Beren Platt, C’79 For many students, their interests are what drew them to Penn — and for many alumni, it is their interests that draw them back. Marc and Julie Beren Platt are among those who have found, as alumni, fertile ground at Penn for their current passions. “Because student life at Penn is so rich, there are many opportunities for alumni to be involved in something they care deeply about,” says Julie, an Alumni Trustee who is active in the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies and, along with her husband, serves as a Penn Fund Class Gift Chair and a member of the Parents Council. Marc, an award-winning producer of movies, television, and theater, whose hits include Legally Blonde and Wicked, cultivated his love of performing arts while an undergraduate. These days, he is helping to open that arena to Penn students. A frequent speaker on campus, he is also actively engaged in helping students find internships in the entertainment industry. “I tell students to dream big, and I’m happy to do what I can to fuel that,” says Marc. It’s a commitment that became even more visible last year with the opening of the Platt Student Performing Arts House. Made possible in part by a lead gift from the Platts, the space has given the entire student performing arts community a place from which to dream.

12

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

13


HISTORY STARTS HERE: REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS PASSIONATE PEOPLE PRACTICAL PURSUITS

CULTIVATING EMINENT SCHOLARS FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW On this campus of engaged and active learners, Penn’s faculty is a defining force. Their enthusiasm for and commitment to scholarship and teaching have made Penn one of the most intellectually vibrant universities today. Through their teaching and research, outstanding faculty advance knowledge, contribute to social progress, and deepen our understanding of every dimension of the human experience.They are also essential to creating the next generation of scholars, attracting talented men and women to Penn and nurturing their academic development once here. Making History will substantially strengthen Penn’s ability to attract and retain world-class faculty by growing endowment to support professorships as well as directorships and visiting scholar programs. Steven Hahn, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of History When Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Steven Hahn (below) moved to Penn four years ago, he was drawn by the high caliber of the American History program, which he considers “top in the country.” Equally powerful was the sense that at Penn “teaching and research are integrally connected.” An expert in the history of the American South, Hahn explains, “I am a better teacher when I teach material that I am actively involved in researching, and here I have the freedom to do that. At Penn, faculty are teaching what they are excited about, and that makes all the difference in creating a really energetic academic community.” Hahn notes, too, that the high level of faculty engagement at Penn is a key factor in achieving what he sees as one of higher education’s most significant goals: instilling in students a passion for thinking of the familiar in new ways. “One of the most important aims of both my research and my teaching,” says Hahn, “is to show students that the process of discovery is open to them.”

HARNESSING THE POWER OF ALUMNI “Our signature in the world,” is how President Amy Gutmann describes Penn Alumni, now 290,000 strong. The intellectual energy and entrepreneurial spirit that define these men and women is what today’s world needs and what allows Penn to pursue its ambitious vision with confidence.When drawn together in common cause, Penn alumni are a formidable force for good, using their talents and connections to strengthen the University, support each other, and better the world. Making History will broaden and deepen Penn’s most important relationships by expanding opportunities for engagement in all aspects of University life and growing the number of alumni who participate in annual giving and securing Penn’s future strength. Marc Platt, C’79, and Julie Beren Platt, C’79 For many students, their interests are what drew them to Penn — and for many alumni, it is their interests that draw them back. Marc and Julie Beren Platt are among those who have found, as alumni, fertile ground at Penn for their current passions. “Because student life at Penn is so rich, there are many opportunities for alumni to be involved in something they care deeply about,” says Julie, an Alumni Trustee who is active in the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies and, along with her husband, serves as a Penn Fund Class Gift Chair and a member of the Parents Council. Marc, an award-winning producer of movies, television, and theater, whose hits include Legally Blonde and Wicked, cultivated his love of performing arts while an undergraduate. These days, he is helping to open that arena to Penn students. A frequent speaker on campus, he is also actively engaged in helping students find internships in the entertainment industry. “I tell students to dream big, and I’m happy to do what I can to fuel that,” says Marc. It’s a commitment that became even more visible last year with the opening of the Platt Student Performing Arts House. Made possible in part by a lead gift from the Platts, the space has given the entire student performing arts community a place from which to dream.

12

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

13


HISTORY STARTS HERE… WITH PRACTICAL PURSUITS Endowed by its founder with a commitment to education that links the theoretical with the practical, for over 250 years Penn has led the way in applying leading-edge knowledge to real-world problems. Here, putting ideas into action — swiftly and effectively — is a way of life.

POWERING THE POTENTIAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE The promise of science and medicine today is breathtaking; its potential to improve the quality of our lives truly amazing. But making scientific and medical progress a reality requires investment — direct and sustained — in modernized facilities, exceptional faculty and staff, innovative research, and breakthrough technology. Making History will enable science and medicine at Penn’s schools and institutes to expand and flourish. Dr. Stephen M. Hahn, Chair and Henry K. Pancoast Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Abramson Cancer Center Combine the most advanced cancer treatment with the patient-centered approach that has long defined Penn’s cancer care, and the result is the new Roberts Proton Therapy Center. Located adjacent to the Raymond and Ruth Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, Penn’s state-of-the-art home for outpatient care, the Roberts Center will be the first such facility in the world to be fully integrated with a renowned cancer center: the Leonard and Madlyn Abramson Cancer Center. “This is a tremendous benefit to our patients with solid tumors — half of whom require both chemotherapy and radiation therapy — as it enables them to get the most up-to-date treatments in one building,” says Roberts Center Director Stephen Hahn. Unlike traditional radiation therapy, proton therapy precisely targets cancer tumors, sparing surrounding tissue from high doses of radiation. “At Penn, we never stop exploring and perfecting the latest techniques and innovative approaches,” notes Hahn. “That’s why we are able to deliver the future of medicine today.”

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

15


HISTORY STARTS HERE… WITH PRACTICAL PURSUITS Endowed by its founder with a commitment to education that links the theoretical with the practical, for over 250 years Penn has led the way in applying leading-edge knowledge to real-world problems. Here, putting ideas into action — swiftly and effectively — is a way of life.

POWERING THE POTENTIAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE The promise of science and medicine today is breathtaking; its potential to improve the quality of our lives truly amazing. But making scientific and medical progress a reality requires investment — direct and sustained — in modernized facilities, exceptional faculty and staff, innovative research, and breakthrough technology. Making History will enable science and medicine at Penn’s schools and institutes to expand and flourish. Dr. Stephen M. Hahn, Chair and Henry K. Pancoast Professor of Radiation Oncology at the Abramson Cancer Center Combine the most advanced cancer treatment with the patient-centered approach that has long defined Penn’s cancer care, and the result is the new Roberts Proton Therapy Center. Located adjacent to the Raymond and Ruth Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, Penn’s state-of-the-art home for outpatient care, the Roberts Center will be the first such facility in the world to be fully integrated with a renowned cancer center: the Leonard and Madlyn Abramson Cancer Center. “This is a tremendous benefit to our patients with solid tumors — half of whom require both chemotherapy and radiation therapy — as it enables them to get the most up-to-date treatments in one building,” says Roberts Center Director Stephen Hahn. Unlike traditional radiation therapy, proton therapy precisely targets cancer tumors, sparing surrounding tissue from high doses of radiation. “At Penn, we never stop exploring and perfecting the latest techniques and innovative approaches,” notes Hahn. “That’s why we are able to deliver the future of medicine today.”

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

15


HISTORY STARTS HERE: REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS PASSIONATE PEOPLE PRACTICAL PURSUITS

CREATING THE ARCHITECTURE OF INNOVATION Today’s most significant advances rarely occur in yesterday’s buildings. Keeping Penn at the forefront of discovery and the university of choice for top faculty and students requires academic spaces that foster innovation. Making History will fund the specialized new facilities demanded by the fields that are revolutionizing our lives: medicine, neural and behavioral science, and nanoscale research. It will also enable myriad enhancements to existing structures such as Claire Fagin Hall (Penn Nursing), the Music Building (SAS), Roberts Hall (Law), Main Clinic (Dental Medicine), the University Museum, and libraries across campus — renovations that will position Penn to lead the way in research and teaching. Dawn Bonnell, Trustee Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Director of the Center for Science and Engineering of Nanoscale Systems It is a small world for Dawn Bonnell, whose work in nanotechnology involves studying particles 10,000 times thinner than a human hair. “Below a certain size, things behave differently,” Bonnell explains, “a fact that can be exploited, leading to smaller devices that are, among other things, more cost and energy efficient.” Experts estimate that nanotechnology will add $2 trillion annually to the American economy and impact sectors from national defense to health care. Inherently interdisciplinary, nanoscale research flourishes in Penn’s rich mix of scientists, engineers, and clinicians. But the exacting science demands state-of-the-art buildings that are temperature-controlled and free of vibration and dust. “A new building will give us that environment,” says Bonnell. “Penn is already an intellectual leader in nanotechnology. With the right tools, we have the potential to define its future.”

CONNECTING RESEARCH AND TEACHING TO REAL-WORLD ISSUES Academic programs and resources that link learning to real-world issues can be found in every corner of Penn’s campus.The University’s success in developing these innovative initiatives is the result not only of an institutional commitment to bringing knowledge to bear on pressing problems, but also of a unique population of students and faculty eager to do the hard — but fulfilling — work that it entails. Making History will empower Penn to continue to develop and implement new and effective ways to apply its intellectual capital in service to the world. Ian C. MacMillan, Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Director of the Sol C. Snider Entrepreneurial Research Center The bigger the problem, the greater the challenge, the more substantial the reward — personally and, in many cases, monetarily. As Ian MacMillan (above, second from right) explains: “Many social issues, if looked at through an entrepreneurial lens, are in effect business opportunities and can generate profit for creative investors and better lives for those who suffer.” MacMillan’s pathbreaking philosophy inspired the School’s Societal Wealth Program that now engages faculty and students from across campus in developing businesses that address urgent problems. For Peng Chen, W’10, a food shortage in Malawi is the real-world issue and he has spared no energy in trying to solve it: researching the culture of the country, exploring solutions used in other regions, and creating business plans that can be implemented by local entrepreneurs. A similar challenge in another African country led to the creation of a highly productive and effective chicken feed plant that uses techniques developed in conjunction with Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine. “We’re all so passionate about our work here,” says Peng. “Knowledge is great, but it’s knowledge with impact that is really exciting.”

16

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

17


HISTORY STARTS HERE: REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS PASSIONATE PEOPLE PRACTICAL PURSUITS

CREATING THE ARCHITECTURE OF INNOVATION Today’s most significant advances rarely occur in yesterday’s buildings. Keeping Penn at the forefront of discovery and the university of choice for top faculty and students requires academic spaces that foster innovation. Making History will fund the specialized new facilities demanded by the fields that are revolutionizing our lives: medicine, neural and behavioral science, and nanoscale research. It will also enable myriad enhancements to existing structures such as Claire Fagin Hall (Penn Nursing), the Music Building (SAS), Roberts Hall (Law), Main Clinic (Dental Medicine), the University Museum, and libraries across campus — renovations that will position Penn to lead the way in research and teaching. Dawn Bonnell, Trustee Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Director of the Center for Science and Engineering of Nanoscale Systems It is a small world for Dawn Bonnell, whose work in nanotechnology involves studying particles 10,000 times thinner than a human hair. “Below a certain size, things behave differently,” Bonnell explains, “a fact that can be exploited, leading to smaller devices that are, among other things, more cost and energy efficient.” Experts estimate that nanotechnology will add $2 trillion annually to the American economy and impact sectors from national defense to health care. Inherently interdisciplinary, nanoscale research flourishes in Penn’s rich mix of scientists, engineers, and clinicians. But the exacting science demands state-of-the-art buildings that are temperature-controlled and free of vibration and dust. “A new building will give us that environment,” says Bonnell. “Penn is already an intellectual leader in nanotechnology. With the right tools, we have the potential to define its future.”

CONNECTING RESEARCH AND TEACHING TO REAL-WORLD ISSUES Academic programs and resources that link learning to real-world issues can be found in every corner of Penn’s campus.The University’s success in developing these innovative initiatives is the result not only of an institutional commitment to bringing knowledge to bear on pressing problems, but also of a unique population of students and faculty eager to do the hard — but fulfilling — work that it entails. Making History will empower Penn to continue to develop and implement new and effective ways to apply its intellectual capital in service to the world. Ian C. MacMillan, Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Director of the Sol C. Snider Entrepreneurial Research Center The bigger the problem, the greater the challenge, the more substantial the reward — personally and, in many cases, monetarily. As Ian MacMillan (above, second from right) explains: “Many social issues, if looked at through an entrepreneurial lens, are in effect business opportunities and can generate profit for creative investors and better lives for those who suffer.” MacMillan’s pathbreaking philosophy inspired the School’s Societal Wealth Program that now engages faculty and students from across campus in developing businesses that address urgent problems. For Peng Chen, W’10, a food shortage in Malawi is the real-world issue and he has spared no energy in trying to solve it: researching the culture of the country, exploring solutions used in other regions, and creating business plans that can be implemented by local entrepreneurs. A similar challenge in another African country led to the creation of a highly productive and effective chicken feed plant that uses techniques developed in conjunction with Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine. “We’re all so passionate about our work here,” says Peng. “Knowledge is great, but it’s knowledge with impact that is really exciting.”

16

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

17


MAKING HISTORY

BUILDING A BETTER UNIVERSITY…

FOR A BETTERWORLD

Revolutionary, passionate, and eminently practical. That’s Penn.

What was once a uniquely American university is today inextricably linked to the world. From Botswana to Peru to the Maldives, Penn’s men and women are harnessing academia’s vast potential and making the greatest possible difference in their communities, their countries, and the world.

As the world calls out for answers to questions more complex than ever before, Penn is catalyzing change, delivering solutions, and innovating for today and tomorrow. In this inspired place, where every field of learning is in close proximity to every other, we are showing the world that a great university is not only relevant but integral to addressing the important issues of our day. On campus and around the globe, Penn people are building a new kind of university, one prepared to tackle the pressing problems of the 21st century and to redefine what people everywhere can expect from higher education.

LEARNING THE LESSONS In addition to lending hearts and hands in the immediate wake of Hurricane Katrina, Penn has made a long-term commitment to rebuild the city and learn from the disaster. University-sponsored conferences, Katrina-focused classes, a large spring break service program, and initiatives linking the schools of Arts & Sciences (Fox Leadership Program), Medicine, Nursing, Veterinary Medicine, Engineering, Education, and Design with the recovery effort are making Penn one of the most active universities working in New Orleans today.

RAISING EXPECTATIONS Inspiring lower-income city high school students to see higher education as an achievable goal is the aim of the Penn Summer Mentorship Program. This University-Philadelphia School District initiative offers local students a chance to attend a summer session at one of six Penn Schools: Medicine, Law, Nursing, Dental Medicine, Education, or Engineering.

✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺

✺ ✺ ✺

✺ ✺

Philadelphia

✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺

New Orleans

✺ ✺

Malé, Maldives

✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺

✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺

Lima, Peru

Gaborone, Botswana

SEEING A DIFFERENCE Using digital imagery and the power of the internet, Penn ophthalmologist Graham Quinn and his students are part of an international team developing a remote screening process that enables experts from around the world to diagnose serious Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) in Lima’s neonatal population. Success here has led the group to help develop detection and treatment workshops in Lithuania, Jamaica, Vietnam, and India, where ROP — already one of the leading causes of treatable childhood blindness worldwide — is on the rise.

PARTNERING FOR LIFE In 2001, four Penn physicians traveled to Botswana, where HIV affects close to one-third of the population, to help facilitate care. What started as a collaboration between them and a single hospital in Gaborone now encompasses schools across Penn’s campus, all contributing their expertise to the challenges — medical, social, economic, and legal — that the epidemic has brought to this country.

CREATING THE CODE Made up of Penn Law faculty and students, Penn’s Criminal Law Research Group is leading the way in rewriting the criminal code for the Maldives, a Muslim island nation working to reform its traditional criminal justice system. The ongoing project, sponsored by the United Nations, is yielding impressive documents that synthesize Islamic law and international standards on human rights.

18

Penn’s reach expands every year. Featured here are just some of its programs with world-wide impact.

Aceh, Indonesia GSE—International Rescue Committee partnership Azabu, Japan Vet School partnership with Azabu University Beijing, China Penn-Tsinghua TC Chan Center Bellagio, Italy Penn IUR Urban Research Conference

Budapest, Hungary Annenberg School’s Center for Global Communication Studies Cape Town, South Africa Lima, Peru Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Wharton Global Alumni Forums Chile, China, Colombia, India, Israel, Peru Wharton Global Consulting practicum Cochabamba, Bolivia Dental Medicine externship Costa Rica Vet School student volunteer program Dublin, Ireland ICA Traveling Exhibition

Guangdong, China SEAS-Hong Kong Polytechnic University prosthetic and orthotic project Hancock County, MS SP2 Feldman Inititiave (Katrina relief) Iraq Annenberg School research on media infrastructure Kharkiv, Ukraine Fels Institute advising local government Kob and Tudig, Cameroon Terreritos, Honduras Penn Engineers Without Borders sites

Laguna Beach, CA Dublin, Ireland Penn Literacy Network sites Lanzhou, China Beijing, China Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia Morris Arboretum plant collecting expeditions Luang Prabang, Laos Middle Mekong Archaeological Project Malmö, Sweden Oslo, Norway Men’s Squash Team training and competition Mdantsane, South Africa Kingston, Jamaica Penn Nursing research on HIV/AIDS interventions

Miami, FL Tulsa, OK New York, NY Urban Nutrition Initiative replication sites Morocco Jordan United Arab Emirates Penn Libraries computerized cataloguing training Moscow, Russia Moscow Festival Ballet at Annenberg Center New Delhi, India University of Pennsylvania Institute for the Advanced Study of India San Francisco, CA Wharton West

Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala Guatemala Health Initiative Switzerland Russia New Zealand Penn Nursing research on nurse shortages and migration Turkey Granicus River Valley Archaeological Survey Project Uganda Zambia GSE research on HIV prevention in youth Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Llanos de Moxos, Bolivia Penn Museum research sites


MAKING HISTORY

BUILDING A BETTER UNIVERSITY…

FOR A BETTERWORLD

Revolutionary, passionate, and eminently practical. That’s Penn.

What was once a uniquely American university is today inextricably linked to the world. From Botswana to Peru to the Maldives, Penn’s men and women are harnessing academia’s vast potential and making the greatest possible difference in their communities, their countries, and the world.

As the world calls out for answers to questions more complex than ever before, Penn is catalyzing change, delivering solutions, and innovating for today and tomorrow. In this inspired place, where every field of learning is in close proximity to every other, we are showing the world that a great university is not only relevant but integral to addressing the important issues of our day. On campus and around the globe, Penn people are building a new kind of university, one prepared to tackle the pressing problems of the 21st century and to redefine what people everywhere can expect from higher education.

LEARNING THE LESSONS In addition to lending hearts and hands in the immediate wake of Hurricane Katrina, Penn has made a long-term commitment to rebuild the city and learn from the disaster. University-sponsored conferences, Katrina-focused classes, a large spring break service program, and initiatives linking the schools of Arts & Sciences (Fox Leadership Program), Medicine, Nursing, Veterinary Medicine, Engineering, Education, and Design with the recovery effort are making Penn one of the most active universities working in New Orleans today.

RAISING EXPECTATIONS Inspiring lower-income city high school students to see higher education as an achievable goal is the aim of the Penn Summer Mentorship Program. This University-Philadelphia School District initiative offers local students a chance to attend a summer session at one of six Penn Schools: Medicine, Law, Nursing, Dental Medicine, Education, or Engineering.

✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺

✺ ✺ ✺

✺ ✺

Philadelphia

✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺

New Orleans

✺ ✺

Malé, Maldives

✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺ ✺

✺ ✺ ✺ ✺✺

Lima, Peru

Gaborone, Botswana

SEEING A DIFFERENCE Using digital imagery and the power of the internet, Penn ophthalmologist Graham Quinn and his students are part of an international team developing a remote screening process that enables experts from around the world to diagnose serious Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) in Lima’s neonatal population. Success here has led the group to help develop detection and treatment workshops in Lithuania, Jamaica, Vietnam, and India, where ROP — already one of the leading causes of treatable childhood blindness worldwide — is on the rise.

PARTNERING FOR LIFE In 2001, four Penn physicians traveled to Botswana, where HIV affects close to one-third of the population, to help facilitate care. What started as a collaboration between them and a single hospital in Gaborone now encompasses schools across Penn’s campus, all contributing their expertise to the challenges — medical, social, economic, and legal — that the epidemic has brought to this country.

CREATING THE CODE Made up of Penn Law faculty and students, Penn’s Criminal Law Research Group is leading the way in rewriting the criminal code for the Maldives, a Muslim island nation working to reform its traditional criminal justice system. The ongoing project, sponsored by the United Nations, is yielding impressive documents that synthesize Islamic law and international standards on human rights.

18

Penn’s reach expands every year. Featured here are just some of its programs with world-wide impact.

Aceh, Indonesia GSE—International Rescue Committee partnership Azabu, Japan Vet School partnership with Azabu University Beijing, China Penn-Tsinghua TC Chan Center Bellagio, Italy Penn IUR Urban Research Conference

Budapest, Hungary Annenberg School’s Center for Global Communication Studies Cape Town, South Africa Lima, Peru Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Wharton Global Alumni Forums Chile, China, Colombia, India, Israel, Peru Wharton Global Consulting practicum Cochabamba, Bolivia Dental Medicine externship Costa Rica Vet School student volunteer program Dublin, Ireland ICA Traveling Exhibition

Guangdong, China SEAS-Hong Kong Polytechnic University prosthetic and orthotic project Hancock County, MS SP2 Feldman Inititiave (Katrina relief) Iraq Annenberg School research on media infrastructure Kharkiv, Ukraine Fels Institute advising local government Kob and Tudig, Cameroon Terreritos, Honduras Penn Engineers Without Borders sites

Laguna Beach, CA Dublin, Ireland Penn Literacy Network sites Lanzhou, China Beijing, China Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia Morris Arboretum plant collecting expeditions Luang Prabang, Laos Middle Mekong Archaeological Project Malmö, Sweden Oslo, Norway Men’s Squash Team training and competition Mdantsane, South Africa Kingston, Jamaica Penn Nursing research on HIV/AIDS interventions

Miami, FL Tulsa, OK New York, NY Urban Nutrition Initiative replication sites Morocco Jordan United Arab Emirates Penn Libraries computerized cataloguing training Moscow, Russia Moscow Festival Ballet at Annenberg Center New Delhi, India University of Pennsylvania Institute for the Advanced Study of India San Francisco, CA Wharton West

Santiago Atitlan, Guatemala Guatemala Health Initiative Switzerland Russia New Zealand Penn Nursing research on nurse shortages and migration Turkey Granicus River Valley Archaeological Survey Project Uganda Zambia GSE research on HIV prevention in youth Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Llanos de Moxos, Bolivia Penn Museum research sites


PENN’S MOMENT

THE STARS OF READINESS AND OPPORTUNITY ARE ALIGNED

Competitive in nature and world-class in stature, we attract the brightest students, gather the greatest minds, and shape the boldest innovations. Superb stewardship and the strategic use of resources have fashioned a university that works smart as well as hard. Add to that the once-in-a-century opportunity to expand our beautiful campus to the east, and you can easily see the exciting future that awaits us. Penn in 2012 will be an intellectually vibrant community whose power and promise project the spirit and ingenuity of Franklin into the 21st century.

• We will have grown our faculty — rising stars and superstars — who will create new knowledge, collaborate across disciplines, and engage the great issues of our time. • We will have a stronger, more diverse, more international student body than ever before. These exceptional undergraduate, graduate, and professional students will choose Penn for our unsurpassed opportunities for learning, leadership, and service. • We will have an expanded campus that radiates from a contiguous academic core to encompass open green spaces and a new College House. • We will have modernized and expanded existing teaching and research space, ensuring that the learning experience at Penn remains dynamic and cutting-edge. • We will have built new facilities to support the creative and collaborative work that advances the swiftly evolving fields of translational research, nanoscale research, and neural and behavioral science. • We will have fueled Penn’s powerful medical and scientific engine in ways that enable us to stop disease before it starts and revolutionize the delivery of care. • We will have expanded partnerships — and created new ones — in communities as close as West Philadelphia and as far away as Botswana, China, and India.

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

21


PENN’S MOMENT

THE STARS OF READINESS AND OPPORTUNITY ARE ALIGNED

Competitive in nature and world-class in stature, we attract the brightest students, gather the greatest minds, and shape the boldest innovations. Superb stewardship and the strategic use of resources have fashioned a university that works smart as well as hard. Add to that the once-in-a-century opportunity to expand our beautiful campus to the east, and you can easily see the exciting future that awaits us. Penn in 2012 will be an intellectually vibrant community whose power and promise project the spirit and ingenuity of Franklin into the 21st century.

• We will have grown our faculty — rising stars and superstars — who will create new knowledge, collaborate across disciplines, and engage the great issues of our time. • We will have a stronger, more diverse, more international student body than ever before. These exceptional undergraduate, graduate, and professional students will choose Penn for our unsurpassed opportunities for learning, leadership, and service. • We will have an expanded campus that radiates from a contiguous academic core to encompass open green spaces and a new College House. • We will have modernized and expanded existing teaching and research space, ensuring that the learning experience at Penn remains dynamic and cutting-edge. • We will have built new facilities to support the creative and collaborative work that advances the swiftly evolving fields of translational research, nanoscale research, and neural and behavioral science. • We will have fueled Penn’s powerful medical and scientific engine in ways that enable us to stop disease before it starts and revolutionize the delivery of care. • We will have expanded partnerships — and created new ones — in communities as close as West Philadelphia and as far away as Botswana, China, and India.

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

21


JOIN US

IN MAKING HISTORY

CAMPAIGN AT-A-GLANCE Overall Goal: $3.5 billion

Poised for eminence, the University of Pennsylvania is ready to shape the future of higher education — and to make history once again.

OVERALL GOALS BY PURPOSE

OVERALL GOALS BY PRIORITY AREA

We have the leadership and the vision.We have the strengths and strategic advantages of place, of purpose, and of momentum. And we have the people — alumni, parents, faculty, staff, and friends who feel deeply connected to Penn’s mission and whose hopes for the University are both bold and practical.

Endowment 50% 1.75 billion

Buildings & Renovations 26% 924 million

Current Use 26% 826 million

Faculty 18% 623 million

The magnitude of our goal reflects the monumental breadth of our aspirations: to offer an extraordinary educational experience with unprecedented reach and impact.

Capital 24% 924 million

Programs & Research 26% 909 million Undergraduate Scholarships 10% 350 million

We ask all who love and value Penn to join us at this historic moment for this historic opportunity. Together, we will create a magnificent future for the University of Pennsylvania.

Graduate & Professional Aid 9% 323 million Unrestricted 11% 371 million

“THIS IS A PIVOTAL MOMENT FOR PENN. AT A UNIVERSITYWHERE AMBITION HAS NEVER BEEN IN SHORT SUPPLY,THIS CAMPAIGN GIVES US THE RARE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE SO MANY OF OUR HIGHEST ASPIRATIONS A REALITY. IT ISWITHIN OUR POWER TO BUILD A UNIVERSITY MOREVIBRANT, MORE DYNAMIC, AND MORE INVESTED IN THEWORLD THAN ANY OTHER INSTITUTION OF HIGHER EDUCATION TODAY. THE FUTUREWILL BEWRITTEN BY ALL OF US.” – GEORGE WEISS, W’65, CAMPAIGN CHAIR

22

SCHOOL, CENTER, AND UNIVERSITY LIFE GOALS

NON-FINANCIAL AND ENGAGEMENT GOALS

Annenberg School Arts & Sciences Dental Medicine Penn Engineering Penn Law PENN Medicine Penn Nursing PennDesign Penn GSE Social Policy & Practice Penn Vet Wharton

There are many opportunities for Penn alumni, students, parents, and friends to participate in Making History. Beyond the financial targets are specific goals for engagement that represent Penn’s commitment to broadening and cultivating its most important relationships. These goals include:

47 million 500 million 37 million 150 million 175 million 1,000 million 75 million 20 million 52 million 33 million 125 million 550 million

Annenberg Center Institute of Contemporary Art Morris Arboretum Penn Athletics Penn Libraries Penn Museum

9.8 million 17 million 50 million 112 million 47 million 74 million

University Life

426 million

• Strengthen campus and regional activities that engage alumni, students, parents, and friends and that provide access to Penn’s vast academic resources. • Build on the success of class-based and affinity-based programming, creating new ways for alumni to connect with each other. • Expand career networking opportunities for alumni and students. • Grow the number of alumni who support Penn’s commitment to educational excellence through their annual gifts. • Increase the number of individuals dedicated to Penn’s future through their planned gifts and membership in the Harrison Society. • Deepen student involvement in the full range of development and alumni relations activities.


JOIN US

IN MAKING HISTORY

CAMPAIGN AT-A-GLANCE Overall Goal: $3.5 billion

Poised for eminence, the University of Pennsylvania is ready to shape the future of higher education — and to make history once again.

OVERALL GOALS BY PURPOSE

OVERALL GOALS BY PRIORITY AREA

We have the leadership and the vision.We have the strengths and strategic advantages of place, of purpose, and of momentum. And we have the people — alumni, parents, faculty, staff, and friends who feel deeply connected to Penn’s mission and whose hopes for the University are both bold and practical.

Endowment 50% 1.75 billion

Buildings & Renovations 26% 924 million

Current Use 26% 826 million

Faculty 18% 623 million

The magnitude of our goal reflects the monumental breadth of our aspirations: to offer an extraordinary educational experience with unprecedented reach and impact.

Capital 24% 924 million

Programs & Research 26% 909 million Undergraduate Scholarships 10% 350 million

We ask all who love and value Penn to join us at this historic moment for this historic opportunity. Together, we will create a magnificent future for the University of Pennsylvania.

Graduate & Professional Aid 9% 323 million Unrestricted 11% 371 million

“THIS IS A PIVOTAL MOMENT FOR PENN. AT A UNIVERSITYWHERE AMBITION HAS NEVER BEEN IN SHORT SUPPLY,THIS CAMPAIGN GIVES US THE RARE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE SO MANY OF OUR HIGHEST ASPIRATIONS A REALITY. IT ISWITHIN OUR POWER TO BUILD A UNIVERSITY MOREVIBRANT, MORE DYNAMIC, AND MORE INVESTED IN THEWORLD THAN ANY OTHER INSTITUTION OF HIGHER EDUCATION TODAY. THE FUTUREWILL BEWRITTEN BY ALL OF US.” – GEORGE WEISS, W’65, CAMPAIGN CHAIR

22

SCHOOL, CENTER, AND UNIVERSITY LIFE GOALS

NON-FINANCIAL AND ENGAGEMENT GOALS

Annenberg School Arts & Sciences Dental Medicine Penn Engineering Penn Law PENN Medicine Penn Nursing PennDesign Penn GSE Social Policy & Practice Penn Vet Wharton

There are many opportunities for Penn alumni, students, parents, and friends to participate in Making History. Beyond the financial targets are specific goals for engagement that represent Penn’s commitment to broadening and cultivating its most important relationships. These goals include:

47 million 500 million 37 million 150 million 175 million 1,000 million 75 million 20 million 52 million 33 million 125 million 550 million

Annenberg Center Institute of Contemporary Art Morris Arboretum Penn Athletics Penn Libraries Penn Museum

9.8 million 17 million 50 million 112 million 47 million 74 million

University Life

426 million

• Strengthen campus and regional activities that engage alumni, students, parents, and friends and that provide access to Penn’s vast academic resources. • Build on the success of class-based and affinity-based programming, creating new ways for alumni to connect with each other. • Expand career networking opportunities for alumni and students. • Grow the number of alumni who support Penn’s commitment to educational excellence through their annual gifts. • Increase the number of individuals dedicated to Penn’s future through their planned gifts and membership in the Harrison Society. • Deepen student involvement in the full range of development and alumni relations activities.


WE HAVE LOWERED THE BARRIERS THAT SEPARATE DEPARTMENTS AND SCHOOLS SO THAT DISCIPLINE CAN REACH ACROSS TO DISCIPLINE. EVERY DAY, WE BUILD BRIDGES THAT SPAN OUR 12 SCHOOLS AND OUR CAMPUS — BRIDGES THAT LEAD TO A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF OURWORLD AND A FULLER APPRECIATION OF OUR COMMON HUMANITY. — AMY GUTMANN, PRESIDENT —

AT PENN,YOU DO NOT SIMPLY RECEIVE AN EDUCATION —YOU LIVE IT. — RYAN WEICKER, C’08 —

THINGS WE DO LOCALLY — THE PROGRAMS WE DEVELOP, THE APPROACHES WE TAKE,THE DIFFERENCES WE MAKE — ARE RELEVANT GLOBALLY AND HAVE BECOME MODELS FOR UNIVERSITIES, PARTICULARLY URBAN UNIVERSITIES, AROUND THE WORLD. — IRA HARKAVY, DIRECTOR, NETTER CENTER FOR COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS —

MAKING HISTORY THERE IS A UNIVERSAL FEELING HERE OF PEOPLE WANTING TO HELP EACH OTHER, AND IT REALLY GIVES YOU A SOLID FOUNDATION ON WHICH THE REST OF YOUR LIFEWILL BE BUILT. — CHRYSTA IROLLA, ENG’08 —

PASSION IS PALPABLE EVERYWHERE AT PENN: IN THE WRITERS EXPLORING MODERN POETRY AT KELLY WRITERS HOUSE, THE FUTURE MANAGERS DEBATING CONSUMER BEHAVIOR IN AWHARTON CLASS, THE CHEMISTRY MAJORS UNCOVERING NEWWORLDS IN LABS. NO MATTER WHEREYOU ARE ON CAMPUS, YOU CAN PRACTICALLY FEEL PENN’S HEARTBEAT PULSING THROUGH ITS STUDENT BODY. — ARIEL HORN LEVENSON, C’02 —

THERE’S NO SENSE OF RESTING ON OUR LAURELS HERE, NO SENSE OF COMPLACENCY, JUST A FERVENT DETERMINATION TO DO BETTER. — RONALD DANIELS, PROVOST —

24


WE HAVE LOWERED THE BARRIERS THAT SEPARATE DEPARTMENTS AND SCHOOLS SO THAT DISCIPLINE CAN REACH ACROSS TO DISCIPLINE. EVERY DAY, WE BUILD BRIDGES THAT SPAN OUR 12 SCHOOLS AND OUR CAMPUS — BRIDGES THAT LEAD TO A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF OURWORLD AND A FULLER APPRECIATION OF OUR COMMON HUMANITY. — AMY GUTMANN, PRESIDENT —

AT PENN,YOU DO NOT SIMPLY RECEIVE AN EDUCATION —YOU LIVE IT. — RYAN WEICKER, C’08 —

THINGS WE DO LOCALLY — THE PROGRAMS WE DEVELOP, THE APPROACHES WE TAKE,THE DIFFERENCES WE MAKE — ARE RELEVANT GLOBALLY AND HAVE BECOME MODELS FOR UNIVERSITIES, PARTICULARLY URBAN UNIVERSITIES, AROUND THE WORLD. — IRA HARKAVY, DIRECTOR, NETTER CENTER FOR COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS —

MAKING HISTORY THERE IS A UNIVERSAL FEELING HERE OF PEOPLE WANTING TO HELP EACH OTHER, AND IT REALLY GIVES YOU A SOLID FOUNDATION ON WHICH THE REST OF YOUR LIFEWILL BE BUILT. — CHRYSTA IROLLA, ENG’08 —

PASSION IS PALPABLE EVERYWHERE AT PENN: IN THE WRITERS EXPLORING MODERN POETRY AT KELLY WRITERS HOUSE, THE FUTURE MANAGERS DEBATING CONSUMER BEHAVIOR IN AWHARTON CLASS, THE CHEMISTRY MAJORS UNCOVERING NEWWORLDS IN LABS. NO MATTER WHEREYOU ARE ON CAMPUS, YOU CAN PRACTICALLY FEEL PENN’S HEARTBEAT PULSING THROUGH ITS STUDENT BODY. — ARIEL HORN LEVENSON, C’02 —

THERE’S NO SENSE OF RESTING ON OUR LAURELS HERE, NO SENSE OF COMPLACENCY, JUST A FERVENT DETERMINATION TO DO BETTER. — RONALD DANIELS, PROVOST —

24


SLOOHCS DNA STNEMTRAPED ETARAPES TAHT SREIRRAB EHT DEREWOL EVAH EW EW ,YAD YREVE .ENILPICSID OT SSORCA HCAER NAC ENILPICSID TAHT OS TAHT SEGDIRB — SUPMAC RUO DNA SLOOHCS 21 RUO NAPS TAHT SEGDIRB DLIUB RELLUF A DNA DLROW RUO FO GNIDNATSREDNU REPEED A OT DAEL .YTINAMUH NOMMOC RUO FO NOITAICERPPA — TNEDISERP ,NNAMTUG YMA —

.TI EVIL UOY — NOITACUDE NA EVIECER YLPMIS TON OD UOY,NNEP TA — 80’C ,REKCIEW NAYR —

EW SEHCAORPPA EHT ,POLEVED EW SMARGORP EHT — YLLACOL OD EW SGNIHT SLEDOM EMOCEB EVAH DNA YLLABOLG TNAVELER ERA — EKAM EW SECNEREFFID EHT,EKAT .DLROW EHT DNUORA ,SEITISREVINU NABRU YLRALUCITRAP ,SEITISREVINU ROF — SPIHSRENTRAP YTINUMMOC ROF RETNEC RETTEN ,ROTCERID ,YVAKRAH ARI —

YROTSIH GNIKAM DNA ,REHTO HCAE PLEH OT GNITNAW ELPOEP FO EREH GNILEEF LASREVINU A SI EREHT .TLIUB EB LLIW EFIL RUOY FO TSER EHT HCIHW NO NOITADNUOF DILOS A UOY SEVIG YLLAER TI — 80’GNE ,ALLORI ATSYRHC —

NREDOM GNIROLPXE SRETIRW EHT NI :NNEP TA EREHWYREVE ELBAPLAP SI NOISSAP REMUSNOC GNITABED SREGANAM ERUTUF EHT ,ESUOH SRETIRW YLLEK TA YRTEOP SDLROW WEN GNIREVOCNU SROJAM YRTSIMEHC EHT ,SSALC NOTRAHW A NI ROIVAHEB LEEF YLLACITCARP NAC UOY ,SUPMAC NO ERA UOY EREHW RETTAM ON .SBAL NI .YDOB TNEDUTS STI HGUORHT GNISLUP TAEBTRAEH S’NNEP — 20’C ,NOSNEVEL NROH LEIRA —

,YCNECALPMOC FO ESNES ON ,EREH SLERUAL RUO NO GNITSER FO ESNES ON S’EREHT .RETTEB OD OT NOITANIMRETED TNEVREF A TSUJ — TSOVORP ,SLEINAD DLANOR —

26

www.makinghistory.upenn.edu Development and Alumni Relations Campaign Office 700 Franklin Building 3451 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-6285 Phone: 215.898.7922 Fax: 215.898.1802 Email: makinghistory@upenn.edu

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

Produced by Penn Campaign Communications with Steege/Thomson Communications; Design by GHI Design; Photography by Kyle Cassidy, Candace diCarlo, Lisa Godfrey, Tommy Leonardi, Peter Olson, Catherine Tighe, Stuart Watson

27


SLOOHCS DNA STNEMTRAPED ETARAPES TAHT SREIRRAB EHT DEREWOL EVAH EW EW ,YAD YREVE .ENILPICSID OT SSORCA HCAER NAC ENILPICSID TAHT OS TAHT SEGDIRB — SUPMAC RUO DNA SLOOHCS 21 RUO NAPS TAHT SEGDIRB DLIUB RELLUF A DNA DLROW RUO FO GNIDNATSREDNU REPEED A OT DAEL .YTINAMUH NOMMOC RUO FO NOITAICERPPA — TNEDISERP ,NNAMTUG YMA —

.TI EVIL UOY — NOITACUDE NA EVIECER YLPMIS TON OD UOY,NNEP TA — 80’C ,REKCIEW NAYR —

EW SEHCAORPPA EHT ,POLEVED EW SMARGORP EHT — YLLACOL OD EW SGNIHT SLEDOM EMOCEB EVAH DNA YLLABOLG TNAVELER ERA — EKAM EW SECNEREFFID EHT,EKAT .DLROW EHT DNUORA ,SEITISREVINU NABRU YLRALUCITRAP ,SEITISREVINU ROF — SPIHSRENTRAP YTINUMMOC ROF RETNEC RETTEN ,ROTCERID ,YVAKRAH ARI —

YROTSIH GNIKAM DNA ,REHTO HCAE PLEH OT GNITNAW ELPOEP FO EREH GNILEEF LASREVINU A SI EREHT .TLIUB EB LLIW EFIL RUOY FO TSER EHT HCIHW NO NOITADNUOF DILOS A UOY SEVIG YLLAER TI — 80’GNE ,ALLORI ATSYRHC —

NREDOM GNIROLPXE SRETIRW EHT NI :NNEP TA EREHWYREVE ELBAPLAP SI NOISSAP REMUSNOC GNITABED SREGANAM ERUTUF EHT ,ESUOH SRETIRW YLLEK TA YRTEOP SDLROW WEN GNIREVOCNU SROJAM YRTSIMEHC EHT ,SSALC NOTRAHW A NI ROIVAHEB LEEF YLLACITCARP NAC UOY ,SUPMAC NO ERA UOY EREHW RETTAM ON .SBAL NI .YDOB TNEDUTS STI HGUORHT GNISLUP TAEBTRAEH S’NNEP — 20’C ,NOSNEVEL NROH LEIRA —

,YCNECALPMOC FO ESNES ON ,EREH SLERUAL RUO NO GNITSER FO ESNES ON S’EREHT .RETTEB OD OT NOITANIMRETED TNEVREF A TSUJ — TSOVORP ,SLEINAD DLANOR —

26

www.makinghistory.upenn.edu Development and Alumni Relations Campaign Office 700 Franklin Building 3451 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-6285 Phone: 215.898.7922 Fax: 215.898.1802 Email: makinghistory@upenn.edu

M A K I N G H I S T O RY: T H E C A M PA I G N F O R P E N N

Produced by Penn Campaign Communications with Steege/Thomson Communications; Design by GHI Design; Photography by Kyle Cassidy, Candace diCarlo, Lisa Godfrey, Tommy Leonardi, Peter Olson, Catherine Tighe, Stuart Watson

27


UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI RELATIONS 600 FRANKLIN BUILDING 3451 WALNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA 19104-6285

28

UPenn Making History brochure  

University of Pennsylvania Making History Campaign Brochure

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you