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Applied ICT is a vocationally-focused GCE. This means it is a hands-on course where four out of the six assessed units are coursework-based. These units teach you all of the ICT skills that you will need in the world of work and you will learn through work-related examples. There are also two practical externally assessed exams that test skills and knowledge on Spreadsheets and Databases. AS Unit 1 –The Information Age. This unit investigates how the internet has become a source of essential online services and how technology has changed society (Eportfolio) Unit 2 – The Digital Economy. In this unit you will study the new economy with reference to a transactional website. You will develop analytical skills and the ability to describe processes diagrammatically (E-portfolio) Unit 3 – The Knowledge Worker. The focus is about making decisions based on analysis of data. You will be able to create, use and modify Spreadsheet models as well as developing skills in presentation and reporting software. (Practical Spreadsheet Exam) A2 Unit 7 – Using Database Software (Database). This unit builds on the skills developed in Unit 2. You will be taken through the design of a database system from its initial inception through to its implementation. Unit 8 – Managing ICT Projects (E-portfolio) This unit involves Project Management. You will produce a multimedia product in Flash. You will gain the skills needed to ensure that projects achieve their goals within a set timeframe and budget.

Unit 10 – Using Multi Media Software (E-portfolio) Creativity is required in Unit 10. You will develop the skills needed to develop high quality web-based products which interact with multimedia as well as some web-based programming. All units carry equal weighting. This subject links well with Business Studies. ICT goes well with a wide variety of subjects. What can I do with Applied ICT at A-level?  HND Computing with Multimedia  HND in Internet and Web Developer  BSC Computing and Information Technology  BSC Computing with Business or Accountancy  You can use the qualification as a stepping-stone to university entry in a different discipline, where your advanced ICT skills will give you an advantage. What do students of Applied ICT end up working as/possible careers?  IT and telecommunications Project Manager  System Analysis  IT Consultant  Web Developer  Any career where advanced IT skills are valued “I think it's fair to say that personal computers have become the most empowering tool we've ever created. They're tools of communication, they're tools of creativity, and they can be shaped by their user”. Bill Gates


We live in a visual world and our senses are constantly bombarded with visual images, internet, media, fashion, interior design and product design. All of these images and designs need to be generated by creative people, without creativity the world would be a very different place. Creative people learn to think outside the box and many employers regard creativity highly. At A Level you will be introduced to a variety of creative experiences employing a range of media, processes and techniques. Throughout the course you will develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures through a range of projects. Edexcel’s GCE in Art and Design comprises of four units: Year 12 – AS Level There are two parts to the AS course:  Unit 1 Coursework (60% total AS mark)  Unit 2 Externally set assignment (40% total AS mark) Unit 1: Coursework • In this unit, you will generate practical work, ideas and research from primary and contextual sources. • You will experiment with media and processes, and develop and refine your ideas and present your outcomes. • You will submit supporting studies and practical outcome(s) from your personal starting points. Unit 2: Externally Controlled Assignment • The paper will be released from 1st February and consists of one broadbased thematic starting point. • The timed exam is eight hours and will be carried out in controlled conditions.

You will produce supporting studies and practical outcome(s) in response to the given theme. • The work from Units 2 and 3 will be exhibited for external assessment – time will be allocated for this after the 8 hour examination. Year 13 - A2 Level There are two parts to the A2 course:  Unit 3 Coursework & Personal study (60% total A2 mark)  Unit 4 A2 Externally Set Assignment (40% total A2 mark) Unit 3: Coursework/Personal study • This unit incorporates two linked elements, each with separate final outcomes: Practical work and Personal study. • The investigation and development for both the Practical work and Personal study will be shown through supporting studies. • Personal study — will consist of an investigation into a selected aspect(s) of others’ art, craft or design. You may need to consider and select from a range of appropriate forms for the presentation of your written and visual analysis. • The written text must be between 1000 and 3000 words. Unit 4: Externally Set Assignment • The paper consists of one broad-based thematic starting point. • The paper will be given to you in February to provide a preparation period. • The timed element of twelve (12) hours will be carried out in controlled conditions. The work from Units 3 and 4 will be exhibited for external assessment – time will be allocated for this after the 5 hour examination Complementary Subjects: Textiles; for any budding fashion and textile designers a good art background is desirable and ensures that design moves past being purely functional ICT; this course combination will work well for any budding animators or graphic designers Science and Mathematics; for any budding architects, interior designers or engineers English, Drama, music; for those with creative flair Film/Media; for any future art directors Psychology; for those interested in becoming an art therapist

“Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.” Edgar Degas


Biology is the study of all living things. It is taught by specialist biology teachers with a wide variety of experiences. It is also a recognised as a facilitating subject. AS-Level At AS level you will study a variety of biological concepts building on ideas and understanding from GCSE. The course is split into three units: Unit 1: “Biology and Disease” examines the link between the physiology of systems and the effects of disease. Unit 1 is worth:  33.3% of the total AS marks  16.7% of the total A Level marks Unit 2: “The Variety of Living Organisms” builds on concepts developed in Unit 1 and examines the influence genetics and the environment has on variation. It is taught in the spring term, along with Unit 3 practical skills (ISA) Unit 2 is worth  46.7% of the total AS marks  23.3% of the total A Level marks Unit 3: “Investigative and Practical Skills in AS Biology” (ISA) in this unit you are assessed on their understanding of investigative and practical skills. There is also a written internal assessment and this is worth  20% of total AS marks  10% of total A Level marks A-Level At A2 you will apply your understanding to consideration of control mechanisms developing an understanding of the ways in which organisms and cells control their activities. The course is again split into 3 units:

Unit 4: “Populations and the Environment” focuses on the interaction of living organisms within structured communities through which energy is transferred and chemical elements are cycled. It is taught in the autumn term along with Unit 6 practical skills. Unit 4 is worth  16.7% of the total A Level marks Unit 5: “Control in Cells and Organisms” examines how multi-cellular organisms are able to control the activities of different tissues and organs within their bodies. It is taught in the spring term. Unit 5 is worth:  23.3% of the total A Level marks Unit 6: “Investigative and Practical Skills in A2 Biology” (ISA) in this unit pupils are assessed on their understanding of investigative and practical skills. This will be assessed at the end of the autumn term and is worth  10% of the total A Level marks Biology goes well with - Chemistry, Physics, Maths, PE, Psychology, Health and Social Care. Careers & Higher Education - Medicine, Pharmacy, Dietician, Nursing, Physiotherapy, Dentistry, Teaching, Forensic Science, Optometry, Veterinary sciences, Occupational Health, Radiography, Clinical research.

“Biology is now bigger than physics, as measured by the size of budgets, by the size of the workforce, or by the output of major discoveries; and biology is likely to remain the biggest part of science through the twenty-first century” Freeman Dyson.


Higher Education - Degrees in science, Law, medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, education, nursing, forensics, astrophysics, games design, engineering, material science. This facilitating subject will give you access to a wide range of careers – both within the area of science and outside. Along with learning more about chemistry, you will learn valuable skills such as problem solving and logical thinking. Chemistry involves practical skills as well as learning about the patterns in the substances around us.

Careers - Pharmaceutical industry, Doctor, Nurse, Dentist, Research Scientist, Vet, Lawyer, Engineer, Scientific Journalist, Science Teacher, Forensic Scientist, Food Standards Agency, Environmental Companies.

Unit 1 – Foundation Chemistry – Atomic structure, Amount of substance, Bonding, Periodicity, Introduction to Organic Chemistry, and Alkanes.

Chemistry is considered by many Universities and employers to be a difficult A-level and as such is sought after for many academic courses and careers.

Unit 2 – Chemistry in Action – Energetics, Kinetics, Equilibria, Redox Reactions, Group 7 the Halogens, Group 2 The Alkaline Earth Metals, Extraction of Metals, Haloalkanes, Alkenes, Alcohols and Analytical Techniques.

“The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, he's one who asks the right questions.”

Unit 4 – Kinetics, Equilibria and Organic Chemistry – determining rate equations and simple rate equations. Qualitative affects of temperature and concentration on equilibrium. Calculating pH for strong acids and bases. Calculating pH for weak acids and buffered solutions. Isomerism and naming of compounds. An in-depth look at the chemistry of the carbonyl group. Aromatic compounds, amines and proteins. Organic synthesis and structure determination Unit 5 – Energetics, Redox and Inorganic Chemistry – Thermodynamics – enthalpy and entropy. Reactions of period 3 elements. Redox reactions and electrochemical cells. Transition metals, variable oxidation states and complexes. Catalysis and reactions of inorganic compounds. Chemistry goes well with Biology, Physics, Maths, Psychology, and History (if you want to go on to study do Law).

~ Claude Lévi-Strauss, Le Cru et le cuit, 1964


Drama goes well with - Film Studies, English, English Literature, Sociology Based over four units you will learn everything you need to begin your career in Drama. We work closely with the Crescent Theatre, professional set designers, University College Birmingham (UCB) make up department and professional film and television actors. This is a challenging and demanding course and you will be expected to give generously of your time, especially for rehearsals. Theatre trips will also take place and these have included ‘Titus Andronicus’ by the Royal Shakespeare Company and an adaptation of ‘Kindertransport’. This course combines the activities of exploring plays, creating theatre, performing plays and critical analysis. We also work towards whole school productions – our most recent being ‘The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe’ externally at The Crescent Theatre to two sold out audiences! AS Unit 1 – Exploration of Drama and Theatre Comparing two plays and exploring different practical skills and practitioners in multiple ‘off text’ activities. Unit 2 – Theatre Text in Performance Performance of a monologue or dualogue and a group piece of scripted work. A2 Unit 3 – Exploration of Dramatic Practitioners Creating, directing and producing your own piece of theatre to its intended audience. Unit 4 – Theatre Text in Context. A two and a half hour written paper on the study of a particular play.

Careers & Higher Education - BA Drama/Theatre Studies, BA Acting, Actor, Teacher, Primary Teacher, Theatre in Education Worker, Make-up artist, Set designer, Costume/Wardrobe, Drama Therapy, Director, Film and Television Work, Stunts.

“Drama helps us celebrate what we have in common and to understand what tears us apart.” - S.Bizley


This subject goes well with - Film Studies, History, Psychology, Geography, Theology, Sociology. This four-unit specification develops literary and linguistic analysis, enabling you to become critical, independent readers. It is designed to nurture personal responses to literary and non-literary texts, allowing you to play to your strengths. Comparative analysis of texts is core to some units. There is a variety of choice in set texts and options (including prose and drama). Unit 1 - ELLA1 Integrated Analysis and Text Production 50% of AS, 25% of A Level 1 hour 30 minutes examination Two questions on two set texts: one will address literary and stylistic issues; one will be a language production task. Unit 2 - ELLA2 Analysing Speech and Its Representation 50% of AS, 25% of A Level 1 hour 30 minutes examination. Two questions: one on a set text, one an unseen analysis Unit 3 - ELLA3 Comparative Analysis and Text Adaptation 30% of A Level marks 2 hours 30 minutes examination Two questions: one an unseen analysis, one on a set text Unit 4 - ELLA4 Comparative Analysis through Independent Study 20% of A Level Coursework Unit 60 marks One coursework task to be completed on an aspect of two texts (one of which must be poetry) chosen from a list approved by AQA.

Careers & Higher Education - Teaching, Media, Journalism, Personnel, Publishing, Management and Marketing.


Unit 2 - LITB2 Dramatic Genres - Minimum of two texts for study within dramatic genre of Comedy. A portfolio of two pieces of written coursework (one may be recreative) each 1200-1500 words. Unit 3 - LITB3 Texts and Genres - Minimum three texts for study including at least one text 1300-1800. You will choose one topic area for study: Elements of the Gothic. For each topic there will be two sections. You will answer one question from each section.

This specification encourages you to understand how narrative works, to look at genre and to learn about critical approaches to texts. You will discover how central narrative is to the way literary texts work and will be introduced to the different aspects of genre. Encouraging wide and independent reading, the course also considers different types of critical approach and how texts can reflect cultural meanings. At AS you will: • pay close attention to how narrative works in texts • make connections across texts through exploring your narratives • be introduced to notions of genre through the study of drama. At A2 you will, as part of the potential for stretch and challenge: • broaden your understanding of genre and categorisation • extend your independent reading • extend your awareness of critical methods and readings. Unit 1- LITB1 Aspects of Narrative - Four texts for study: two novels (at least one post 1990) and two poetry texts 1800-1945.

Unit 4 - LITB4 Further and Independent Reading - Minimum of three texts for study including one pre-released anthology of critical material. A portfolio of two pieces of written coursework: comparative study of an aspect of two texts (1500-2000 words); an application of an aspect of prereleased critical anthology to a literary text (1200-1500 words). English Literature goes well with - History, Film Studies, Law, Geography, Law, Theology, Psychology and Sociology. Careers & Higher Education - A range of careers including: Teaching, Journalism, Law, Media, Publishing, Civil Service, Personnel & Management.

“Literature offers the thrill of minds of great clarity wrestling with the endless problems and delights of being human. To engage with them is to engage with oneself, and the lasting rewards are not confined to specific career paths.” ― Jonathan Stroud.


Section C – US Film Comparative Study

Film Studies is a fast expanding and innovative field. At St Edmund Campion Sixth Form we follow the WJEC syllabus. Our course aims to extend your understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of film; arguably the major art form of the twentieth century. The course aims to study cinema as a medium, as an art form, as an industry and as a social and economic institution. AS Level For your coursework you will explore the micro features of film (miseen-scène, performance, cinematography, editing, and sound) and apply this knowledge in the analysis of film sequences. You will learn how to create a film sequence or short film by studying storyboards and screenwriting and apply this knowledge to your own ideas for a film by developing either an extended step outline, or a photographed storyboard, or produce a film sequence/short film of approximately 2 minutes. For the examination you will study the British and American film industries, specific topics in relation to British film, and undertake a comparative study of American film. Unit 1 – Exploring Film Form (Coursework – 40% of AS) Micro Analysis of a Film Extract Creative Project Unit 2 – British and American Film (2½ examination – 60% of AS) Section A - Producers and Audiences Section B – British Film Topics

A2 Level During this year you will take forward the approaches introduced at AS level. For your coursework you will undertake a small-scale research project, together with a creative project (a film extract or short film of 3-5 minutes in length, a screenplay, or an extended step outline for a documentary). For the examination you will study World Cinema, spectatorship topics, and apply critical approaches to a study of a single film. Unit 3 – Film Research and Creative Projects (Coursework - 50% of A2) Unit 4 – Varieties of Film Experience (2¾ hour examination – 50% of A2) Section A – World Cinema Section B – Popular Film and Emotional Response Section C – Single Film Critical Study Film Studies goes well with: English Literature, English Language and Literature, Drama, ICT, History, Business Careers & Higher Education: A range of careers including: Arts administrator; cinema manager; editorial assistant; film or video producer; journalist; media planner; picture researcher; presenter in TV or radio; teacher - including HE/FE; television researcher.

“Cinema is not only entertainment: it's the art and cultural product of our time. For anyone passionate about history, texts and images – and how to interpret them – film studies is the ideal course. It offers you specialist preparation for jobs in the cinema and media industries, as well as more general training in essential arts skills, from constructing an argument to practical criticism. We’re surrounded by narratives and pictures; film studies will give you the tools to understand and analyse them.” - Stella Bruzzi


Unit 4 (SN4): Reading, Listening and Writing examination (3 hours and 98 marks – 30% of final grade) .

AS and A level Spanish is a varied course that develops many skills. You will build on your knowledge from GCSE and learn more about the structure of the language, thus enabling you to become even more independent and resourceful in Spanish. You will also learn about aspects of Spanish and Hispanic history, geography, literature, culture (traditional and popular) and you will be offered many different scenarios in which to apply and perfect your language skills.

Areas of learning: Environmental Issues, including technology, pollution, global warming, transport, energy, nuclear energy, renewable energies, conservation, recycling, sustainability. Social and Political Issues, including the role of the media, racism, immigration social exclusion and integration, terrorism, world of work (employment, commerce, globalization, etc.) Advance further and consider a degree course in: Law, Leisure & Tourism, Business Studies, Economics, Hospitality, Sport Science, Performing Arts Potential careers include:

AS level: Unit 1 (SN1): Oral examination (12-15 minutes, 60 marks – 20% of final grade if continued into A Level or 40% if only AS level taken) Unit 2 (SN2): Listening, Reading and Writing examination (2.5 hours and 98 marks 30% of final grade or 60% if only AS level taken) Areas of learning: Leisure and Lifestyles, including travel and tourism, sport, hobbies, entertainment, customs, traditions, healthy living – health and nutrition, diet and exercise; unhealthy living drugs, aids, smoking, alcohol, etc.

International Business (sales representatives, accounts assistants, account managers); Journalists, Translators, Interpreters, Education (teachers, lecturers, admissions staff), Tour Operators, Airport staff (pilots, Cabin crew, customs & excise, security staff), Logistics and operations, Fashion (designers, buyers, merchandising), Accountants, Engineering (civil, electronic, chemical)

The Individual and Society, including relationships and responsibilities ,gender issues, youth culture (values, peer groups, fashions and trends etc.),education, vocational training and future

“Language is not only the vehicle of thought, it is a great and efficient instrument in thinking”

A Level:

Sir Humphrey Davy

Unit 3 (SN3): Oral examination (15-20 minutes, 60 marks – 20% of final grade)


At A2, you will undertake two exams, one on the taught units and one on geographical skills.

If you opt to study AS and A2 Geography at St Edmund Campion you undertake the course offered by AQA. Geography is also a facilitating subject for entry to Russell Group Universities. A Level Geography is a varied course that develops many skills. You will build on your knowledge from GCSE, and learn more about the world in which you and seven billion others now live. The course is split into Human and Physical elements as well as fieldwork. Following on from your work at GCSE, we return to rivers and population studies as well as looking at the challenges of feeding everyone today. You will also look at the nature of hazards and ask whether conflict is both inevitable and even necessary. The modern Geographer does not simply describe their world. They attempt to explain what is happening, assess the effects and shape the future. This is what A Level Geography is about. At AS level, you will study 4 topics: Rivers, Floods and Management, Coastal Environments, Global Population Change and Food Supply Issues. You will also undertake a piece of fieldwork. At AS, you undertake two exams, one on the taught units and one on geographical skills. At A2 level, students study an additional four topics: Plate Tectonics and Associated Hazards, Ecosystems; Change and Challenge, World Cities and Contemporary Conflicts and Challenges. You also undertake another piece of fieldwork.

As a humanity subject, and as a Russell Group facilitating subject, Geography goes well many other subjects including History, Economics, Law, English and Sociology. As well as learning about the world you inhabit, the conflicts challenges and issues that we all face, students of geography also develop a wide range of transferable skills. These include but are not limited to essay writing, graphicacy, mapping skills, data management and research and statistical skills. This subject opens up a wide range of university pathways and courses. People who study geography go on to many and varied careers including law, teaching, public service, charity sector, financial services and many, many more.

“Geography brings us all down to Earth. It gives other subjects a sense of place. We create our geography, and yet we are affected by geography. Geography, it's a world thing.� - Terry Portch


What Is Government & Politics? "Politics is the art of the possible." Government & Politics at AS does not require you to have studied History at GCSE. It will be suited to students who enjoy debates and would like to know about how decisions are made to run the country. It doesn’t matter if you do not know much about Politics right now – you can learn that whilst you are on the course. Homework tasks involve watching the news and reading newspapers. You will develop a keen interest in who exactly has power and authority in the British Political System and whether they are accountable for the power they use. You will be familiar with key concepts such as Representation, Power, Authority, Ideology, Constitutions, Pluralism, Separation of Powers and Adversary Politics. You will examine questions such as: "Should people who do not listen to doctors be given free NHS treatment?" "What do the Labour and Conservative Parties stand for?" "How is the government elected?" "Does the Prime Minister have too much power?" "When is it right to start a war?" "What do judges do?" What Skills Will Students Develop When Studying Government & Politics? 

Government & Politics enables you to maturely understand how the UK is governed which will be an asset when working within a business environment.

You will be able to use the political system for your own benefit and will have a healthy grasp of issues that affect your everyday lives.

After completing the subject, you will confidently be able to debate political issues and learn the skills of persuasive argument and counter-argument.

You will develop your essay writing skills during the course and will have to assimilate information and present it in a clear and concise way.

What can you do with a politics qualification? 

Lots of universities look favourably on a Politics qualification and offer courses to further your understanding of the topic.

Students who study Politics have a wide range of possible career prospects including: politics, civil service, lawyer, teaching, journalism, accountancy, local government and many more.


History is at the crossroads of many subjects but is particularly well suited to study alongside English Literature, Government and Politics, Economics, Theology Overall, History is a broad and academic subject that can open up a whole host of opportunities to those who choose to study it at A level. History is a facilitating subject that is recognised by the Russell group of universities as opening up a wide range of courses at degree level. AS and A Level History is a varied course that develops many skills. At AS you will study two modules. The first examines how Britain declined from being a great power in the early 20th Century and charts its fortunes in the World Wars. The second uses historical sources to examine Germany from the rise of the Nazis through to its revival after the Second World War. At A2 we delve further back in time to examine the power of France in the 17th Century as well as a research study of the exciting history of the USA between the wars. At Campion we have developed a fascinating and challenging A Level Course which has been consistently successful. At AS Level we study: 1) A Document Study: Democracy and Dictatorship; Germany 1919-1963 2) A Period Study: Britain 1919-1951 At A2 Level we study: 1) A Thematic Study: the Ascendancy of France, 1610-1715 2) Independent Investigations: America Between the Wars What Qualifications Do I Need? You do not require History at GCSE but you must be able to demonstrate good reading and writing skills.

As well as the more obvious professions like teaching and research, History graduates are sought after in the Civil Service, journalism and the law as well as a host of management positions where the ability to understand complex information and argue a substantiated case are vital job skills. In the novel Waterland, Graham Swift posed a question: “..All History classes ask, what is the point of History? Why history? Why the past... Your “Why?” gives the answer. Your demand for an explanation provides an explanation. ... As long as we have this itch for explanations we will carry round with us this precious bag of clues called History. “


A-Level Maths has modules in several different types of maths. ASLevel Maths consists of compulsory units in core mathematics and application units in Mechanics, Statistics or Decision Maths. Core Mathematics consists of algebra, functions, coordinate geometry, sequences and series, differentiation, integration and trigonometry. Mechanics looks at the mathematics of the real world by studying forces and equations of motion. You will also get the chance to study Statistics in more depth, or a module in Decision Maths. Decision Maths is the kind of maths which can be useful in business, studying problems such as finding the shortest route in a network. There will also be the chance to study Further Mathematics, which can offer you an extra AS-Level or A-Level in mathematics. All modules are taught in house by specialist mathematicians. Maths is recognised as a facilitating subject. Entry requirements: The course is demanding of time and effort. A thorough knowledge of Higher level GCSE work is assumed and therefore you should have achieved grade A in GCSE maths to study mathematics and grade A* to study Further Mathematics. All AS and A2 units consist of 1 written examination paper lasting 1 hour 30 min. All units allow the use of a calculator with the exception of C1. All units carry equal weighting i.e. 33.3% for AS units and 16.67% for A2 units. Courses are made up of the following units: AS Maths – C1, C2, S1 A2 Maths – C1, C2, C3, C4, S1, M1 AS Further Maths – FP1, D1, D2 A2 Further Maths – FP1, FP2, FP3, D1, D2, S2

Maths goes well with - Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, Accountancy, Geography, Psychology. Mathematics is an excellent subject to have as part of any A level portfolio. It is an extremely valuable subject to have if going on to study Architecture, Science, Medicine, Finance, Social Science and Engineering. University admissions tutors in Arts subjects also value mathematics A level as evidence of logical thought and an ability to handle the abstract.

“Mathematics is the language with which God created the Universe.” – Galileo Galilei


Entry Requirement: Minimum of grade C at GCSE Music What can I do with A Level Music Technology? A level Music Technology can prepare you for the study of Music Technology and related subjects at a Higher Education level. It is both academic and vocational in nature and will equip you with a range of practical skills that can be applied in a range of employment sectors. A wide range of Music Technology and related courses are offered by universities and higher education providers. These include degree courses in Music Technology and media-related subjects such as Sound Production or Music Broadcasting. Careers which the study of Music Technology could lead into include:  Media production  Broadcasting (TV and radio)  Live event production  Sound engineering and recording  Music education Did you know...? The music industry is one the UK’s biggest and most culturally significant creative industries. It is a major contributor to the national economy. It employs around 130,000 people and contributes nearly £5 billion annually to the national economy. How do I know if it is for me? You will need a theoretical knowledge of sound and recording techniques and some keyboard skills. However, these skills can be rapidly acquired with dedication and practice and they form part of the general skill-set of any serious musician.

You will gain a broad knowledge of popular music and should you have an extensive knowledge to begin with, this is a definite advantage. You will be recording your friends and creating the best possible quality recordings so a keen pair of ears and a perfectionist attitude are vital. You will also need to have a creative side as some of the practical tasks require you to compose and arrange music. For those who love music, the satisfaction of creating and re-creating great songs can be deeply rewarding. This course teaches you to exploit the amazing possibilities of technology to bring your music to life. How is A level Music Technology assessed? All units are externally assessed. AS level: Unit 1: Portfolio of practical work – 3 tasks. 70% AS / 35% of total A level Unit 2: Exam: Listening and Analysing 30% AS / 15% of total A level A2: Unit 3: Portfolio 2 – 3 further practical tasks. 60% A2 / 30% of total A level Unit 4: Exam: Analysing and Producing 40% A2 / 20% of total A level


physical education and sport. When studied in conjunction with other relevant AS/A2 qualifications, it provides the ideal platform for further study at degree level. P.E. students often advance into Biomechanics, Anatomy & Physiology, Sports Psychology or Sports Sociology as part of a Sports Science/ Sports Studies Degree course. You will have the chance to take on the roles of ‘performer’, ‘leader’ or ‘official’ at AS, before focusing on one of these roles at A2. In the context of your chosen role(s), you will: 

Through coursework completion, review your current participation in physical activity, identify opportunities locally, nationally and internationally to enable you to advance your participation in physical activity.

Create a development plan and a life plan for your participation in physical activity.

AS: Unit 1: Participation In Sport & Recreation- Examination Unit2: The Critical Sports Performer-Coursework A2: Unit 3: Preparation For Optimum Sports Performance- Examination Unit 4: The Developing Sports Performer- Coursework PE goes well with - AS/A2: Biology, Physics, Sociology and Psychology

Physical Education at Advanced GCE in Physical Education seeks to develop your knowledge, understanding, skills and application for

“I have failed over and over again, the experience of failure is why I succeed.” – Paula Radcliffe


AS Level. Unit 1 – PHYA1 Particles, quantum phenomena and electricity Written Examination 40% of the total AS marks 20% of the total A Level marks Physics is a challenging and interesting subject which will help you to understand the world and universe around you! A-level Physics is also an important qualification for many careers. It is also a facilitating subject.

Unit 2 – PHYA2 Mechanics, materials and waves Written Examination 40% of the total AS marks 20% of the total A Level marks Unit 3 Investigative and practical skills in AS Physics PHA3T, Centre Marked Route T – 50 marks Practical Skills Assignment (PSA – 9 raw marks) Investigative Skills Assignment (ISA – 41 raw marks)

Some students go on to study Physics at university. This may lead to a career in research and development, either in a university or in industry. High temperature semiconductors, a better understanding of sub atomic particles and more efficient ways of storing energy for cars are just three areas of research being pursued at the moment.

A2 Unit 4 – PHYA4 Fields and further mechanics Written Examination Section A is 25 multiple choice questions, each worth one mark. Section B is a written paper of 4/5 structured questions and consists of 50 marks. 20% of the total A Level marks.

Perhaps the majority of those who study A-level Physics do so in order to apply their physics knowledge in another subject area at university. Examples of this are the many branches of engineering, electronics and meteorology. For these careers, A-level Physics is essential.

Unit 5 – One of Units PHA5A, PHA5B, PHA5C, PHA5D Written Examination Section A: Nuclear and Thermal Physics – 40 marks – Compulsory section 4/5 structured questions Section B: one of the following options. Each paper has 4/5 structured questions and 35 marks. Options: A – Astrophysics B – Medical Physics C – Applied Physics D – Turning Points in Physics 20% of the total A Level marks (Section A 10%, Section B 10%) Option by cohort consensus. PHA6T, Centre Marked Route T – 50 marks Practical Skills Assessment (PSA – 9 marks) Investigative Skills Assignment (ISA – 41 marks)

Another group of students choose to study Physics because they feel that it will be useful even if not essential for their career. Those intending to follow a career in medicine or biochemistry fall into this category. The remainder are going to follow a career in a completely unrelated area such as law or accountancy. This group of students may have chosen Physics simply because they enjoy it or because they know that it is highly regarded by universities as a test of problem-solving ability and logical thought. A level Physics has been successfully implemented at St Edmund Campion for four years. The current Physics course followed is AQA Physics A. This is comprised of the following units.


The A-level course has been designed to provide a broad introduction to the scope and nature of Psychology as a science. It aims to include up-to-date content in the field as well as covering essential and popular features of the subject area. There is an emphasis on applying knowledge and understanding which allows you to relate what you learn to your own experiences and real-life situations. AS Unit 1- Cognitive and Developmental Psychology with Research methods. This unit covers topics of Memory and Attachments and how psychologists conduct research using varied methodologies. In studying Memory you will explore different explanations for how memory works as well as looking at why we forget things. Real-world applications for this topic include Eyewitness Testimony and its accuracy and techniques that can be used to improve memory. The topic of Attachments covers questions like- Why do we need attachments? Do all infants have the same attachments? What happens if we don’t form an attachment? Unit 2- Biological Psychology, Social Psychology and Individual Differences This unit covers the topics of Stress, Obedience and Conformity and Defining Psychological Abnormality. In the topic of stress, you will learn about the processes in the body involved in stress reactions and ways to reduce stress through stress management techniques. Real-world applications include workplace stress and the effects of stress on immune functioning. In studying Social Psychology, you will learn about reasons why people conform and obey and factors that affect the likelihood of these behaviours and how individuals can resist negative influences. Real-world applications include looking at Jury behaviour and exploring how social change occurs through the process of Minority Influence. The topic on Individual Differences looks at

ways in which psychological abnormality and also looks at treatments used for abnormality in disorders such as Depression and Schizophrenia. A2 Unit 3- Topics in Psychology The selected topics for this unit are Biological Rhythms and Sleep, Relationships and Aggression. In studying Biological Rhythms, you learn about the physiological processes in the brain and body that regulate behaviour, for example sleeping, and how these can be adjusted by external influences. The Relationships topic looks at theories as to why we are attracted to certain people according to different psychological perspectives and why some relationships are maintained whilst others breakdown. Factors such as our childhood experiences and our culture and their influence on our relationships are also explored. Unit 4- Psychopathology, Psychology in Action and Research Methods In the Psychology in Action topic you will study about Media Psychology, which explores areas such as - Why are we interested in celebrities? What leads to extreme fandom (stalking)? Why is TV advertising effective? Do computer games lead to increased aggressive behaviour? Can TV encourage us to show more positive behaviour? The Psychopathology topic being studied is Schizophrenia where you will learn to outline the clinical diagnosis criteria for the condition and biological and psychological explanations for its development. Psychology goes well with: Sociology, History, English Literature, Biology, and Maths Higher Education could include: BSc Psychology, BSc Psychology and Criminology, BSc Neuroscience with Psychology, BSc Biology and Psychology, BSc Joint Honours Psychology and selected languages, BA/BSc Joint Honours Psychology and Creative Writing, BA/BSc Joint Honours Psychology and History, BSc Joint Honours Psychology and Sociology, MA Behavioural Studies, MA Counselling Psychology, MA English and Psychology, MA Forensic Psychology. Possible careers could include: Marketing, Human Resources Officer, Counselling, Management, Clinical Psychologist, Educational Psychologist, Teaching, Community Service and Care Assistant

“Studying Psychology has opened my mind to human behaviour” - Alice Woolfenden – Year 13


The A-level Sociology course is designed to enable you to acquire the essential knowledge and understanding of central aspects of sociological thought and methods, together with the application of a range of skills. It has also been designed to allow the integration of sociological themes, such as socialisation, culture and identity, and social differentiation, power and stratification. The course lays an appropriate foundation for further study of Sociology and related subjects in higher education. The A-level Sociology course consists of four units- two at AS and two at A2. All units are externally assessed through examination. Unit 1: Families and Households This unit covers an introduction to different theoretical perspectives in sociology such as Marxism, feminism and Functionalism. Demographic changes in aspects of society such as marriage, divorce and birth-rates are also explored and analysed. The unit also looks at experiences within childhood and how these change across time and culture. Unit 2: Education and Research methods This unit builds on understanding and application of theoretical perspectives. The purposes of education are explored and academic performance of different social groups are analysed for example,

gender and ethnicity. This unit also focuses on studying how research is conducted within Sociology through learning about different research methodologies and being able to evaluate these. Unit 3: Beliefs in Society This unit explores different religious practices and the functions they serve in society. Topics covered include Cults, Sects, New-age Movements and Fundamentalism. This unit also looks at comparing different social groups and their religious practice on aspects such as age, gender and ethnicity. Unit 4: Crime and Deviance with Research Methods This unit allows you to explore theoretical debates between different perspectives in more depth. It also looks at social distribution of crime across different groups for example age, culture and gender. Topics such as Green Crime, Media Influence on Crime and Suicide are also covered. This unit builds further on your knowledge of research methods from Unit 2 at AS and analyses different methodologies in more depth. Sociology goes well with: Law, Psychology, Government and Politics, History and Film Studies. Careers and Higher Education: BSc Sociology, BA Media, Culture and Society, BA Social Science, BA Sociology and Criminology, BA Sociology and Philosophy, BA Sociology and Political science with a year abroad, BSc Sociology and Psychology (Joint Honours), BA Sociology and History (Joint Honours), MA Behavioural Studies and Sociology, MA Economics and Sociology, Many other Joint Honours and Masters courses are available. Career opportunities include areas such as: The Criminal Justice Systemworking in the Police Force, Counter Terrorism, Forensics and Probation services, Business- aspects such as management and Human Resources, Teaching, Charities- working for non-profit organisations at corporate and community levels, Research Analysis- for Local Authorities and Government. “Sociology has given me a greater understanding of all aspects of society and how it functions� - Poppy Whitcombe- Year 13


renewable energies, conservation, recycling, sustainability. Social and Political Issues, including the role of the media, racism, immigration, social exclusion and integration, terrorism, world of work (employment, commerce, globalization, etc.) AS and A level Spanish is a varied course that develops many skills. You will build on your knowledge from GCSE and learn more about the structure of the language, thus enabling you to become even more independent and resourceful in Spanish. You will also learn about aspects of Spanish and Hispanic history, geography, literature, culture (traditional and popular) and you will be offered many different scenarios in which to apply and perfect your language skills. AS level: Unit 1 (SN1): Oral examination (12-15 minutes, 60 marks – 20% of final grade if continued into A Level or 40% if only AS level taken) Unit 2 (SN2): Listening, Reading and Writing examination (2.5 hours and 98 marks 30% of final grade or 60% if only AS level taken) Areas of learning: Leisure and Lifestyles, including travel and tourism, sport, hobbies, entertainment, customs, traditions, healthy living – health and nutrition, diet and exercise; unhealthy living drugs, aids, smoking, alcohol, etc. The Individual and Society, including relationships and responsibilities, gender issues, youth culture (values, peer groups, fashions and trends etc.),education, vocational training and future careers. A Level: Unit 3 (SN3): Oral examination (15-20 minutes, 60 marks – 20% of final grade) Unit 4 (SN4): Reading, Listening and Writing examination (3 hours and 98 marks – 30% of final grade) Areas of learning: Environmental Issues, including technology, pollution, global warming, transport, energy, nuclear energy,

Spanish goes well with - Degree courses in Law, Leisure & Tourism, Business Studies, Economics, Hospitality, Sport Science, Performing Arts. Potential careers include:  International Business (sales representative, accounts assistant, account manager)  Journalist  Translator  Interpreter  Education (teacher, lecturer, admissions staff)  Tour Operator  Airport staff (pilot, Cabin crew, customs &excise, security staff)  Logistics and operations  Fashion (designer, buyer, merchandising)  Accountant  Engineering (civil, electronic, chemical)

“The limits of my language means the limits of my world” - Ludwig Wittgenstein


Textiles goes well with: GCE Art and Design – Art. EDEXCEL AS/A2.

At A Level you will be introduced to a variety of textiles experiences employing a range of medias, processes and techniques from fabric dying, printing to hand/machine embellishments. Throughout the course you will develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures through a range of projects. You are encouraged to reflect on your own work and on the work of other textiles’ artists and fashion designers. Edexcel’s GCE in Art and Design (Textiles Design) comprises four units and contains an Advanced Subsidiary subset of two AS units. The Advanced Subsidiary GCE is the first half of the GCE course and consists of Units 1 and 2. Year 12 – AS level There are two parts to the AS course: Unit 1 - Coursework (60% total AS mark) Unit 2 - Externally Set assignment (40% total AS mark) The full Advanced GCE award consists of the two AS units (Units 1 and 2), plus two A2 units (Units 3 and 4) which make up the other 50 per cent of the Advanced GCE. Year 13 - A2 Level There are two parts to the A2 course: Unit 3 - Coursework & Personal study (60% total A2 mark) Unit 4 - A2 Externally Set Assignment (40% total A2 mark) Students wishing to take the full Advanced GCE must, therefore, complete all four units.

Careers and Higher Education: Art and Design, teaching, interior design, textiles and fashion.

“Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky,in the street. Fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live,what is happening” - Coco Chanel.

“Creativity is contagious, pass it on” - Albert Einstein.


T

Aims The aims of the course are to encourage you to:  develop your interest in, and enthusiasm for, a rigorous study of religion and relate it to the wider world  treat the subject as an academic discipline by developing knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to a specialist study of religion  adopt an enquiring, critical and reflective approach to the study of religion  reflect on and develop your own values, opinions and attitudes in the light of your learning. Knowledge and Understanding This Advanced Subsidiary and Advanced GCE specification requires you, within the chosen areas of study, to acquire knowledge and understanding of:  the key concepts (for example religious beliefs, teachings, doctrines, principles, ideas and theories), including how these are expressed in texts, writings and/or other forms and practices  major issues and questions (for example issues of commonality and diversity, the role of dialogue, methods of study, relevance to contemporary society)  the contribution of significant people, traditions or movements  religious language and terminology  the relationship between the areas of study and other aspects of human experience. Unit Structure AS Unit 1: Foundations (AS) You study philosophical arguments about the existence of God and selected problems in the philosophy of religion. The ethics element comprises a study of ethical concepts and dilemmas.

Philosophy  The Teleological argument  The Cosmological arguments  The Problem of Evil  Miracles Ethics The relationship between morality and religion Utilitarianism Situation Ethics Sexual Ethics

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Unit 2: Investigations (AS) This unit has an enquiry–based approach to teaching and learning and provides for a balance of teacher-directed and more independent student enquiry. This will enable you to study independently and to use, and evaluate, a wide range of source material. You can chose to investigate a controversial medical ethical dilemma. You are expected to research case studies and apply the ethical knowledge that you have learnt as part of Unit 1.


 

How a particular belief or value could affect other people, either for good or ill How other people’s lives might be affected if a certain belief were widely held or a certain value widely applied.

A2 Unit 3: Developments (A2) Philosophy of Religion in this unit comprises further study of philosophical arguments about the existence of God and selected problems in the philosophy of religion. Ethics comprises further study of ethical concepts and problems and the critiques of ethical theories and approaches.

Theology goes well with - Law, English Literature, Government and Politics, History. Students who study Theology at A-level could also consider studying the following subjects at degree level: Theology, Philosophy, History, Sociology, English, and Theology with Education.

Philosophy  Religious experiences  The Ontological Argument  Atheism and critiques of religious  Life and death  Religious Language    

Ethics Critiques of the relationship between religion and morality Ethical Theory (Natural Moral Law, Deontology, Virtue Ethics) Objectivity, subjectivism and relativism Justice, law and punishment

Unit 4: Implications (A2) In the Implications paper, you will be given a piece of text from an anthology and are asked one question concerning the implications in terms of how far particular beliefs and values might affect people’s understanding or awareness, including your own, of religion and human experience. You will consider, examine or discuss:  The consequences of holding certain opinions, views or beliefs, including your own

“A man without ethics is a wild beast loosed upon this world.” Albert Camus


Unit 4: Business Communication The focus of this unit will show how the collection and management of business information, and the successful communication of that information throughout a business, is critical for the future prosperity.

BTEC National Level 3 Business Studies is one of the few qualifications that will help you succeed in your future career no matter what you go on to do. The principles of Business that you will learn here underpin every organisation, from presenting positive marketing messages and developing effective interpersonal skills to operating within a legal framework and accurate accounting. Unit 1: Exploring Business Activity The aim of this unit is to you the fundamental knowledge of a range of business organisations, and the many factors that shape the nature of organisations operating in an increasingly complex business world. Unit 2: Investigating Business Resources This unit develops your knowledge of the range of human, physical, technological and financial resources required in an organisation, and how the management of these resources can impact on business performance. Unit 3: Introduction to Marketing The purpose of this unit is to give you an understanding of how marketing, research & planning and the marketing mix are used by all organisations

Unit 5: Business Accounting The unit will enable you to understand the purpose of accounting, and the associated processes and its role in the managing of a business. You will develop the skills and knowledge needed to understand financial information. Unit 13: Recruitment and Selection in Business You will be introduced to recruitment and the importance of ensuring that the best people are selected to work in organisations. You will study selection and recruitment techniques and will set up, and take part in, a selection interview. All units are assessed by coursework. Units 1, 2 and 3 in year 12 and Units 4, 5 and 13 in Year 13. This subject links well with ICT. Business Studies goes well with a wide variety of subjects. What can I do with BTEC Level 3 in Business? There are a wide variety of University and professional qualifications which can be accessed with this qualification, namely:- BA/BSc Economics, Economics HND/HNC, ACCA Accountancy Qualifications, CIMA Accountancy Qualifications, AAT Accountancy Qualifications, BA Accountancy, BA/BSc Business, Business HND/HNC.

“The secret of business is to know something that nobody else knows.� - Aristotle Onassis


The Level three course aims to provide a specialist, work-related qualification in the vocational sector of Health and Social Care. It will give you the knowledge, understanding and skills that you need to prepare for employment. The BTEC qualifications in this specification provide much of the underpinning knowledge and understanding for the National Occupational Standards for the sector. The course is made up of six units to complete the Subsidiary Diploma. If you only complete the Year 12 year, you can still be awarded a Level 3 Certificate by completing three units. All units are assessed through coursework. The Units studied are: Year 12  Unit 1: Developing Effective Communication  Unit 2: Equality, Diversity and Rights  Unit 4: Development through the Life stages Year 13   

Unit 3: Health, Safety and Security Unit 5: Anatomy and Physiology Unit 21: Nutrition in Health and Social Care

Each unit is designed to cover a different aspect of Health and Social Care work and allows you to develop essential skills and knowledge. In Unit 1-Communication, you will learn how to demonstrate effective communication and potential barriers that could occur and ways to resolve these. Unit 2-Equality, Diversity and Rights outlines key legislation and guidelines to ensure non-discriminatory practice.

Unit 4 - Development through the Life stages will enhance your knowledge of different areas of development (physical, intellectual, emotional and social) and how these can be affected by various factors. Unit 3-Health, Safety and Security outlines further practical guidelines and laws to ensure safe and effective work within the sector. Unit 5-Anatomy and Physiology will inform you about functions within the body and give you biological background knowledge for medical circumstances. Unit 21-Nutrition for Health and Social Care informs you of healthy eating and planning effective dietary plans for the specific needs of individuals. Health & Social Care goes well with - Psychology, Sociology, Sport, Law. Higher Education could include - BA Health and Social Care, BA Health and Social Care and Criminological Justice, BA Health and Social Care and Management, BA Health and Social Care and Sociology, HND Health and Social Care, HND Applied Social Studies, BA Children and Integrated Professional Care, BSc Social Work, BA Criminology and Substance Misuse Interventions, BSc Dentistry Potential careers include Environmental Health Officer, Osteopath, Speech Therapist, Physiotherapist, Social Worker, Health Visitor, Midwife, Youth Worker and Counsellor. “We all like being healthy, being sociable is good and it’s essential to be caring! Health and Social Care allows us to demonstrate all of these in a professional context.” - Yazmine Hinds – Year 13


The BTEC National ICT has been specially developed for the IT sector to give education and training. It should allow full-time learners the opportunity to enter employment in the IT sector or to progress to higher vocational qualifications. It gives you the opportunity to develop a range of skills and techniques, personal skills and attributes essential for success in the IT industry. Unit 1: Communication an Employability Skills for IT The aim of this unit is to ensure that you understand both the personal attributes valued by employers and the principles of communicating effectively whist developing effective communication skills and addressing your own personal development needs. Unit 2: Computer Systems This unit is to enable you to understand the components of computer systems and develop the skills needed to recommend appropriate systems for business purposes and set up and maintain computer systems. Unit 3: Organisation System Security The focus here is to enable you to understand potential threats to IT systems and the organisational issues related to IT security, and know how to keep systems and data secure from these threats. Unit 8: E-commerce You will be introduced to the technologies involved in e-commerce, understand the impact of e-commerce on organisations and on society, and be able to plan e-commerce strategies.

Unit 18: Database Design The aim of this unit is to ensure you understand the features of relational databases and to develop the skills necessary to design, create, populate and test a relational database incorporating advanced features. Unit 28: Website Production The focus of this unit is to enable you to understand web architecture and the factors that affect its performance. You will also be able to design and create interactive websites. This subject links well with Business Studies. ICT goes well with a wide variety of subjects.

What can I do with BTEC Level 3 in ICT? HND Computing with multimedia HND in Internet and Web Developer. BSC Computing and Information Technology BSC Computing with Business or Accountancy

Possible Occupations IT and Telecommunications Project Manager. System analysis IT Consultant Web Developer Computer Hardware Engineer Any career where advanced and relevant IT skills are valued. You can use the qualification as a stepping stone to University entry in a different discipline, where their ICT skills will give you an advantage.


attitude are vital. You will also need to have a creative side as some of the practical tasks require you to compose and arrange music. For those who love music, the satisfaction of creating and re-creating great songs can be deeply rewarding. This course teaches you to exploit the amazing possibilities of technology to bring your music to life.

How is A level Music Technology assessed? All units are externally assessed.

Entry Requirement Minimum of grade C at GCSE Music What can I do with A Level Music Technology? A level Music Technology can prepare you for the study of Music Technology and related subjects at a Higher Education level. It is both academic and vocational in nature and will equip you with a range of practical skills that can be applied in a range of employment sectors. A wide range of Music Technology and related courses are offered by universities and higher education providers. These include degree courses in Music Technology and media-related subjects such as Sound Production or Music Broadcasting. What is the A level Music Technology course like? The course combines hands-on practical skills in music production with a theoretical knowledge of sound and recording techniques. You will need good musical skills and the ability to adapt these. Some keyboard skills are essential for success in this subject but these skills can be rapidly acquired with dedication and practice and they form part of the general skill-set of any serious musician. When successful, you will gain a broad knowledge of popular music, and having an extensive knowledge to begin with is a definite advantage. You will be recording your friends and creating the best possible quality recordings so a keen pair of ears and a perfectionist

AS level: Unit 1: Portfolio of practical work – 3 tasks. 70% AS / 35% of total A level Unit 2: Exam: Listening and Analysing 30% AS / 15% of total A level A2: Unit 3: Portfolio 2 – 3 further practical tasks. 60% A2 / 30% of total A level Unit 4: Exam: Analysing and Producing 40% A2 / 20% of total A level Careers which the study of BTEC Level 3 Music could lead into:  Media production  Broadcasting (TV and radio)  Live event production  Sound engineering and recording  Music education Did you know...? The music industry is one the UK’s biggest and most culturally significant creative industries. It is a major contributor to the national economy. It employs around 130,000 people and contributes nearly £5 billion annually to the national economy.


Unit 32: Forensic evidence collection and analysis.

Science goes well with - Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Maths, PE, Psychology, Health and Social Care. The BTEC qualifications are designed to provide highly specialist, work-related qualifications in a range of vocational sectors. They will give you the knowledge, understanding and skills that you need to prepare for employment. The course in entirely coursework based and will be assessed by the subject teachers Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Certificate – 30 credits The 30-credit BTEC Level 3 Certificate offers a specialist qualification that focuses on particular aspects of employment within the appropriate vocational sector. The BTEC Level 3 Certificate is a qualification which can extend your programme of study and give vocational emphasis. The BTEC Level 3 Certificate is broadly equivalent to one GCE AS Level. All 3 units studied for the 30-credit BTEC Level 3 Certificate are mandatory units: Unit 1: Fundamentals of science Unit 2: Working in the science industry Unit 4: Scientific practical techniques Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma – 60 credits The 60-credit BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma extends the specialist work-related focus of the BTEC Level 3 Certificate qualification and covers the key knowledge and practical skills required in the appropriate vocational sector. The BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma offers greater flexibility and a choice of emphasis through the optional units. It is broadly equivalent to one GCE A level. 3 optional units have been selected for study in year 13, to provide the additional 30 credits required for the Subsidiary Diploma. Unit 11: Physiology of Human Body Systems Unit 18: Genetics and Genetic Engineering

Scientists work in Industry, the Health Service, Government establishments and Educational Institutions. Fields of work include research and development and scientific analysis, and there are job opportunities in almost every industry, from food and drink to pharmaceuticals. The BTEC Level 3 Certificates and Diplomas in Applied Science offer the opportunity to specialise in areas ranging from forensics to medicine. “Genius is 1% inspiration and 99% percent perspiration.” - Thomas Edison


“I learnt teaching from teachers, athletics from coaches, I experienced achievement from my own hard work and commitment” – Jessica Ennis Choosing to study for your BTEC Level 3 National is a great decision to make for a number of reasons. More and more people are accessing the sports industry day by day. As the industry grows, so too does the demand for relevantly qualified people to work within it. As a country we are looking to encapsulate the sporting boom embodied in the Olympics and Paralympic games in London. As the ‘Olympic Legacy’ takes shape even more opportunities will evolve within the field of sport and recreation. The course consists of three mandatory units (Anatomy & Physiology, Fitness Testing for Performance and Health & Safety in Sport) alongside an optional unit of your choice. Altogether, this qualification requires the completion of 30 credits.

BTEC Level 3 National Subsidiary Diploma (Yr 12 & 13) Encompasses 3 units in addition to those studied during Yr 12. You will study; Sports Coaching, Leadership in Sport and Sports Nutrition providing a total of 60 credits. BTEC Sport goes well with - BTEC Level 3 Science, BTEC Level 3 ICT, AS/A2 Biology, Physics or Sociology. Your BTEC Level 3 National will give you the knowledge, understanding and competency needed when considering entering employment or advancing your studies further within the sport industry. You will gain the essential skills and broad fundamentals of the course, giving you the opportunity to undertake higher education qualifications in sport at university. The qualification is designed to enable you to study other subjects alongside your BTEC Level 3 to broaden your educational options in the future.


Level 3: A study of Medical Ethics A comprehensive study of the differing religious perspectives and ethical debates concerning current medical ethical issue. In the Sixth Form you will study General RE, alongside your other ALevel or BTEC qualifications. This course is accredited and is assessed at Level 2 in Year 12 and Level 3 in Year 13. This qualification will enable you to identify diverse religious beliefs and explore your own position on faith through thinking about your experiences of life and the values of contemporary culture. This qualifications is suitable for individuals from any faith tradition, or none, and allows you the role of religious tradition within community life. You will learn about what it means to be a human being and to develop a sense of fairness and religious acceptance. The qualifications will also allow you to develop and articulate your own points of view about religion. You will learn about respect and what to do if they find themselves in a situation which you perceive to be neither just nor fair. Level 2: Module 1 – Global Justice Module 2 – Around the World in 6 Faiths Module 3 – Faith in Action

Assessed by timed essay reviewing a current dilemma and applying ethical and religious perspectives.

This qualifications will ensure succession from prior learning and the formation of citizens committed to the building of the ‘common good’. You will learn how to build just communities and be able to transfer or use such skills in the world of employment. “Sometimes it falls on a generation to be great. YOU can be that great generation.” Nelson Mandela


Subject

Minimum Grade Requirement

To study in our Sixth Form, you must have 5 A*-C grades (inc English and Maths). In exceptional cases we will accept 4C grades (inc English) for students on a purely BTEC programme and following BTEC courses that they have studied (or are similar to) subjects that they have studied at Level 2. Please be aware that higher grades for some subjects are required. See table for further details.

Please note that, our curriculum/subject offer is subject to change and is dependent upon student numbers each year.

Minimum

Subject

Grade Requirement

Applied ICT

C in ICT or Merit at Level 2

Music

C in English Language plus a C in Music

Art

C in Art GCSE

PE

C in PE and outside commitment to a sports team

Biology

B in Sciences

Physics

B in Sciences

Chemistry

B in Sciences

Psychology

B in Maths or C in GCSE Psychology

Drama

C in English Language

Sociology

C in English Language

English Lang/Lit

B English Language

Spanish

C in Spanish

English Literature

B in English Literature

Textiles

C in Art/Textiles

French

C in French

Theology

B in R.E

Geography

C in English Language

BTEC Business

C or a Merit a Level 2

Gov. & Politics

C in English Language

BTEC H & S Care

C or a Merit a Level 2

History

B in English Language

BTEC ICT

C or a Merit a Level 2

Film Studies

C in English Language

BTEC Science

C or a Merit a Level 2

Maths

A Maths GCSE

BTEC Sport

C or a Merit a Level 2

Further Maths

A* Maths GCSE

Sixth Form Subject Information Guide 2014-15  
Sixth Form Subject Information Guide 2014-15  
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