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EXCLUSIVES Inside the Deer Park Road Building 5 Minutes with CMC’s CEO

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Steamboat’s Spartan Queen

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Heather Gollnick

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NEW DEPT Faces of Steamboat


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FROM THE

EDITOR

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Spring 2017

pring has sprung,

admittedly a little earlier this year than many of us would have liked, and with it, like a perennial coming into bloom, another rendition of our annual Home & Garden issue — or H&G for those in the know. In it you’ll find tips for those pesky tomatoes, how to grow virtually anything on the comfort of your deck, and advice from Steamboat’s own bastion of Master Gardeners, on whom you’ll never find a greener thumb. All this prefaces our annual Home & Garden Show, held at our venerable Community Center Saturday, May 6, where you’ll find Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary’s of all walks displaying their wares and services. But H&G this time around could also stand for Heather Gollnick, the subject of this issue’s cover photo, taken in a fleeting moment of non-training stillness at her home in rural Routt County. A

Chief Operating Officer Suzanne Schlicht

Design Team Manager Afton Pospisilova

Editor-In-Chief Lisa Schlichtman

Art Direction & Design Darin Bliss

Magazine Editor Eugene Buchanan

Design Team Rebecca Fitzpatrick, Madelyn Lybarger, Malisa Samsel

Advertising Director Laura Tamucci Viva La Skiyak! five-time Ironman champion, With this year's Gollnick has now turned her early melt off, attention from triathlons to the it’s just been obstacle-filled world of Spartan that kind of races. (If you think your garden season: Do you ski, paddle, is spartan, that’s nothing or embark compared to her body fat.) on some weird So there you have it, all in combo of both? one nice and tidy—and coincidental — H&G package. Our only regret? There wasn’t room for our new S&M section (Steamboat Matrimony… sheez, get your Head out of the Gutter).



—Eugene Buchanan

Advertising Sales Bryna Sisk Circulation Manager Audrey Dwyer

Photographers Joel Reichenberger, Tom Ross, John Russell, Matt Stensland

1901 Curve Plaza, Steamboat Springs, CO 80477 p: 970-879-1502 f: 970-879-2888 www.steamboattoday.com Steamboat Living is published three times a year, in April, July and October, by the Steamboat Today. Steamboat Living magazines are free. For advertising information, call Bryna Sisk at 970-871-4235. To get a copy mailed to your home, call 970-879-1502. Copyright ©2017. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited.

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Summ er Hi g hl i g ht s Cliburn Gold Medal Winner Orchestras • Principal Players Award-winning Ensembles • Patriotic brass Michael McDonald • Stephen Stills and Judy Collins Mary Chapin Carpenter • Maceo Parker • Asleep at the Wheel


TABLE OF

CONTENTS FEATURES

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28 STEAMBOAT'S SPARTAN RACE STAR, HEATHER GOLLNICK Five years after stepping away from her fivetime-Ironman-Champion triathlete career, Heather Gollnick is pursuing a new passion: Spartan Racing. And there’s not an obstacle she’s not obliterating.

32 INSIDE THE DEER PARK ROAD CORP. OFFICE BUILDING With all the design elements of a high-end custom home, Steamboat’s newest office building has set the standard for work environments in town.

DEPARTMENTS 6 QUICK HITS Free concert series turns 25; a December to remember; Powdercats celebrities; WinterWonderGrass’s rippingest skier; from yoga to books with Nina Darlington; and more. ST E A M B OAT

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16 ARTIST PROFILE Behind the lens with photographer Danielle Zimmerer

18 EVENTS

Faces of Steamboat: Snapshots of last year’s Bust of Steamboat cancer fundraiser at Three Peaks Grill..

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE 36 5 MINUTES WITH Colorado Mountain College CEO Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser

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ON THE COVER

STEAMBOAT HOME & GARDEN EXPO

A special spring primer for planting, including the who, what, where, why and when of the upcoming Home & Garden Expo May 6 at the Community Center.

Ain't no mountain high enough: Steamboat local Heather Gollnick training in her South Routt home. Photo by John Russell

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Future concert musicians and the rock stars they’ll collaborate with.

We develop confidence in our students so they can make their own meaningful contribution to the world. More than music, our K-8 Strings program is one of the many ways we teach students to work hard, and work together as a team.

For a tour or to learn more about us, call (970) 879-8081 or visit emeraldmountainschool.org. Now accepting applications for grades K-8. Tuition assistance is available.


QUICK HITS

SCUTTLEBUTT ‹

VAN CLAN FIRE

For those wondering the fate of the Van Clan (Steamboat Living, Winter 2016/17), its members, Matt White, Nick Simon and Jack “JV” Vanderbeek, are all in college now and doing well. The same can’t be said for the new van Vanderbeek customized to take to college at Oregon’s Lewis and Clark. While his father Bob was driving through Idaho to deliver the wheels to his son at school, an electrical short tore through the dashboard, enveloping the van in fire. “It was a bummer,” says JV. “I put a lot of work into it over the summer. Plus, a lot of my ski equipment and clothes were in there.”

LOCAL LANDS ON NAT GEO COVER Fifteen minutes of fame came in a big way to Steamboatraised Gretchen Burkholder, now a junior at Montana State University in Bozeman. In October, she found herself with friends Erin Bolger, Olivia Bates, Sara McCandless and Kate Rasmussen on the cover of National Geographic, shirtless from behind and arms raised in celebration overlooking a lake and Grinnell Glacier in Montana’s Glacier National Park. The photo goes with the issue’s story on the 100th anniversary of the national park system. “The photographer, Corey Arnold, was looking via Instagram for people our age who like hanging out in national parks,” she says. “He said he was going to be in Glacier and asked

if we could join him, so we packed in the car and headed north. They were super nice … it felt like we were with a bunch of friends, not NatGeo photographers.” As for the semi-risqué pose, she says it came naturally. “My friends and I have always been big on the mountain babes shot and Corey wanted to get a shot of it,” she says. “We figured we'd have a tiny little picture; we never imagined we'd be on the cover.” Adds proud pops Greg Burkholder, “We were totally surprised.”

SMALL WORLD Local Meg O’Connell got a bit of a surprise in Portillo, Chile, this September when the man in the lift line next to her turned out to be none other than Steamboat Springs legend and Olympian Moose Barrows. “I was with some friends from my university in Valparaíso and was about to get on the lift,” she says. “I recognized his face and asked if he was from Steamboat. He said ‘Yes, are you?’ And I said, ‘Yes, I'm an O’Connell’ — which tends to ring some bells for people from Steamboat. He said how he’d been here 50 years ago for a race and wanted to revisit it. I told him I hope I can head back to Portillo in 50 years, too. It was awesome seeing a familiar face down there.”

WRANGLER WAITERS In November, patrons at Dude and Dan’s downtown got a little faster service than usual — at least when it came to waiters weaving and bobbing between tables. It was the night members of the Steamboat

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Wranglers Junior Hockey Club filled in as wait staff for an evening fundraiser. “They were pretty good,” says coach and co-owner Corey Allen. “If only they could move that quick on the ice.”


PBR CHUG WINS PAIR OF SKIS Rob Illian’s throat-opening skills learned in college paid off in a pair of skis Jan. 6, when Freeskier magazine hosted a party at the T Bar to celebrate its ranking as the top après bar in Steamboat. As part of the celebration, the magazine held a PBR tallboy beer-chugging contest, awarding the winner a pair of RAMP Peacepipe Elevated skis. Illian crushed the competition, and his can, besting five others. "The T Bar is unique in many ways,” says Freeskier Editor Donny O’Neill. “It's located away from the base area, so its patrons really want to be there. It has a massive outside area where people can soak up the sun, and the building and decor reflect a certain 'ski bum chic’ that's quite welcoming, comfortable and laid back."

BY THE NUMBERS

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$1,000 9

degrees of temperature swing between a 39-below reading in the Yampa Valley floor on Saturday, Jan. 7 and the next day’s high of 35.

what normal $300 tickets for WinterWonderGrass were going for on Ticket Hub in January.

feet of snow recorded in North Routt County in a 14-day period at the end of December and early January.

650

pounds of dog waste (940 piles) picked up by Steamboat Digs Dogs during the poop group’s clean-up March 12.

NEW REDS WHITES & BREWS FESTIVAL HITS TOWN JUNE 24 Put Saturday, June 24 on your saveexercise-for-later list, as the Reds Whites & Brews festival comes to Steamboat for the first time after spending five years in the Vail Valley. Held from noon to 5 p.m. on Yampa Street between Fifth and Sixth streets and showcasing the area’s recent street improvements and new Workman Park, the event will feature craft beers, international wines, live music, food and retail vendors. “We’re excited to move Reds Whites & Brews from Vail to Steamboat and feature a brand new event to promote downtown Steamboat Springs,” says event marketing director Lee Sims. “It’s the perfect event to kick off the July Fourth holidays.” Tickets for the event, including VIP, can be purchased at www.redswhitesandbrews.net, with proceeds benefitting the Samantha Remington Angel Heart Foundation.

Thank you FOR YOUR

VOTE STEAMBOAT!

SPRING 2017

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QUICK HITS

AROUND TOWN

December to remember, February to forget, parched March S C H I Z O S E A S O N We’ll admit it: things were looking bleak snowfall-wise with locals mountain biking and golfing in mid-November. But then Mother Nature served up a December to remember and January to jot down, with more than 100 inches up top each month, transforming the mountain from zero to hero. Being Her Fickleself, she then switched gears again, dishing up the thirdworst February in three decades and worst March on record. Read on for a few stats on the season.

Rockin' in the free world.

KEEPING IT FREE 2017

LINEUP

FRIDAY > JUNE 23

TRIBAL SEEDS

FRIDAY > JULY 1

BRUCE HORNSBY FRIDAY > JULY 14

THE RECORD COMPANY

FRIDAY > JULY 28

THE WOOD BROS

SUNDAY > SEPT. 3

FRUITION AND SOUL REBELS*

T

2008-09 Last time the mountain recorded back-to-back 100plus inch months, when it surpassed it in December and January at mid-mountain and summit

Summer Concert Series enters 25th year

wenty-five years is

a lot for anything,

JAN. 5 20 inches reported at mid-mountain

Visit

www.keepinitfree.com to dontate or see the schedule

DEC. 16 JAN. 14 Deepest 30-day period this season, with 109 inches falling at mid-mountain

let alone giving out something free. But that’s the milestone Steamboat’s Free Summer Concert Series reaches this summer, bringing gratis groovin’ to the base of Howelsen Hill for two and a half decades. “Twenty-five years is a heck of a long time to be doing this,” says series board member Scott Fox, noting the only real glitch was last year’s last-second cancellation of the final Bruce Hornsby show due to illness — the first cancellation in the series’ 25-year history. “We couldn’t have done it without the huge support of the community. And this year’s line-up is going to rock.” As part of this year’s festivities, the series, relishing the success of its biggest fundraiser ever at the Chief Theater in April, heralds its best line-up of musical acts yet, while continuing its popular VIP areas instituted last year — including Butcherknife Brewing Company’s Local's Lounge. It’s also planning a special event over Labor Day in September to close out the season.

43.75 Inches of snowfall recorded at mid-mountain in February, the third lowest total in the past 20 years (2016: 40.5 inches; 1997: 36 inches)

—Eugene Buchanan

* Tentative

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TOP: PHOTO BY JOHN RUSSELL BOTTOM: COURTESY OF LARRY PIERCE

a a

24.1 Degrees Fahrenheit of average daily low temperature during first two months of February, obliterating historic average of 6.5 degrees 43.9 Average daily temperature during same period, fourth highest all time since 1893 58 Degrees Fahrenheit of scorching high reached Saturday, Feb. 11 10.25 Inches of snow in March, well off the average 53 and the lowest in nearly three decades of record keeping. Next closest: 21 inches in March 2012 and 24 inches in March 1997


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QUICK HITS

AROUND TOWN

FAMOUS

With last fall’s passing of Steamboat Powdercats founder Carroll Sherwood “Jupiter” Jones, we offer a look back at celebrities who have donned snorkels to ski with the organization on Buff Pass.

FACESHOTS Powdercats celeb sightings

1. Jeremy Bloom: The only male athlete in history to ever ski in the Winter Olympics and also be drafted in the NFL, Bloom took his bump skiing prowess to Buff Pass with Powdercats in the early 2000s.

Story by Eugene Buchanan

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2. James Hetfield: Yes, the lead singer for Metallica, celebrating its 10th album this year with its WorldWired Tour, put down the microphone to shralp the mountains of the Park Range in the late ‘90s while Jupiter Jones was still running the show. Perhaps that prompted the hit song, “Nothing Else Matters.” 3. Rob Squires: Keeping the music theme going, Squires, the bassist for Big Head Todd and the Monsters, joined Powdercats several times in the early 2000s. “When staff member Dave Genchi was injured in 2006, due to Rob’s friendship with him, Big Head Todd and the Monsters played a fundraiser for Dave at the Steamboat Grand,” says Powdercats manager Kent Vertrees. “We raised over $50,000 for Dave at that event.” 4. Jake Ryan: This Green Bay Packers linebacker hit some big lines on Buff Pass with the same aplomb he used to pulverize quarterbacks. “His dad is a long-time repeat guest, bringing a crew every year to us,” says Vertrees. “They have

a place at the Christie Club, and he's from Cleveland. Due to my Ohio State connection, we always give each other hell due to the classic football rivalry. One year I had my daughters dress up in their Ohio State cheerleader outfits and come to the office at the end of the day.” 5. Warren Miller: Yes, the person who maintains “I have the best job in the world,” visited Powdercats on the clock throughout the ‘80s and ‘90s, capturing footage that made it into a few of his films. Then the big mountains of Alaska stole the limelight. 6. Claus Obermeyer: This famous ski apparel maker from Aspen also skied with Powdercats on several occasions in the early ‘90s, with his entourage perhaps the best-dressed customers their guides have ever seen. “I think everyone else looked pretty grungy by comparison,” Vertrees says. 7. Martina Navratilova: Voted by Tennis magazine as “the greatest female tennis player for the years 1965 to 2005, Navratilova aced her lines with Powdercats in the late ‘80s, poaching lines until she was up 40-love every run. 8. The Mahre Brothers: Olympians and twins Phil and Steve Mahre took time out from bashing

gates to dodge aspens in softer snow with Powdercats, also in the '80s after retiring from racing in 1984. Phil’s 27 World Cup wins place him third all-time among Americans, behind Lindsey Vonn and Bode Miller, and Steve’s nine World Cup wins (and Olympic silver medal in slalom in 1984, behind Phil’s gold) make him no slouch, either. Rumor has it they made a mean set of figure eights. 9. Glen Plake: This mohawked ski film star joined Powdercats in the ‘90s to strut his stuff near Steamboat. And yes, he had to duck his head to fit his spiked hairdo inside the snowcat door. 10. Jim Cantore: Cloudy with a chance of meatballs. That could well have been the prediction this famous weatherman for The Weather Channel made when he joined Powdercats in the 2000s. And you can bet that his guides were all over him about what it was going to do the next day. 11. Jere Burns: This actor, known for his role as ladies' man Kirk Morris on television’s “Dear John,” and roles in “Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles” and Broadway’s hit musical “Hairspray,” strapped on skis with Powdercats in the ‘90s. And there was no acting at all in the arcs he left behind him on Buff Mountain.


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QUICK HITS

AROUND TOWN

MEET

Mark Morris: WinterWonderGrass's rippingest skier by Eugene Buchanan

A

t this year’s WinterWonderGrass festival, the 25 bands present cranked out great tunes as well as turns on the mountain. No one tackled both better than big mountain skier Mark Morris, guitar player and singer for Rapidgrass. With his third album out this spring, and Rapidgrass Music Festival hitting Idaho Springs June 23-25, we caught up with him for his thoughts on Steamboat and the festival.

Listen to their new album here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/crooked-road/id1019419887

Bluegrass and big mountains: Whether picking strings or ski lines, Morris jams at both.

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Steamboat Living: What'd you think of WonderGrass? Morris: It’s always been a great event, but moving it to Steamboat was a match made in heaven. I’m a festival organizer so I know how hard it is to coordinate all the moving parts. The detail and love put into WWG this year makes it the best winter bluegrass event in the world.

SL: What was it like playing in the cold? Morris: It’s always difficult on hand agility and the instruments. But organizers went the extra mile to keep the temperature bearable on stage. SL: Did you ski while you were here? Morris: I got in two days. The first we skied down to Rendezvous Lodge where we played an SPRING 2017

afternoon set, then I took a lap in Fish Creek with some locals. Then I hit that powder day, which was amazing. Icelantic Skis is one of my sponsors and the whole crew was there to help support Rapidgrass. SL: What do you like about Steamboat? Morris: It’s a great, unique ski town because everything revolves around the resort. I like its layout and the entire vibe. It’s perfect for events like WWG because it’s small enough to capture the mountain town feel while also being a world-class resort. SL: Did you come up here much as a kid? Morris: Growing up I mostly skied Loveland. My first job was at a ski shop in Idaho Springs and every year we had to update our binding certifications, and were rewarded for it with a free day of skiing at Steamboat. So, I looked forward

to getting my certification each year. SL: Tell us about your upcoming third album. Morris: We’re releasing Happy Trails June 24 at the Rapidgrass Festival. It features all original, Colorado-inspired music. The graphics were illustrated by Icelantic’s Travis Parr, featuring the American Kestrel, the smallest North American falcon. It’s our spirit animal because of its beauty and intensity; we’re also fierce and colorful. We’ve produced a lot of fun and virtuosic music but I feel Happy Trails is our breakthrough album; we’ve found our individual voice and style. SL: Is big mountain skiing like playing music? Morris: They definitely have commonalities, especially with the ‘in-the-moment’ energy they produce

and harness. My skiing style is similar to my music: fast and graceful. When everyone is giving 100 percent focus in the band I reach that same level of 'in-themoment' awareness as I do when I’m committed to a big ski line. SL: What's next on the ski front for you? Morris: This winter we did a great ski trip to Alaska for Icelantic and Flylow. Then I joined Team Scarpa for a helicopter photo/video shoot in Canada’s Kootenay Mountains. We skinned some large peaks and got some great content. SL: Looking forward to the next year of music? Morris: This upcoming festival season is going to be great. We’re playing Europe, as well as over 40 dates around the Rockies. I’ve never been more excited about our music and I can’t wait to share it with the world.

TOP AND LEFT: PHOTOS BY DOUG EVANS // INSET: COURTESY OF JEFF CRICCO


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SPRING 2017

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AROUND TOWN

QUICK HITS

FROM LOTUS TO LIBRARY Longtime yoga teacher Nina Darlington retires Story by Eugene Buchanan

N

ext time you say “namaste” to

yoga instructor Nina Darlington,

you might have to hush it down a hair — it might well occur in the library. Darlington, an instructor at the Yoga Center of Steamboat for the past 20 years, taught her last class on Dec. 28, 2016, stepping down to become technical supervisor at the Bud Werner Memorial Library and pursue her master’s degree. Turning her attention from yoga mats to reading materials, Darlington began her yoga career in 1997, teaching at her first official studio, Yoga RX. She later taught at the Bear River Center, founded by Victoria Strohmeyer, which she eventually purchased with partners and turned into the Yoga Center of Steamboat. “She took a chance on me, and I ended up staying there 20 years,” Darlington says. “When we started, there were only a handful of us; now there’s yoga everywhere.” In her two decades of teaching downward dogs and other poses, Darlington estimates she’s taught more than 8,000 people yoga, imparting life-long benefits. “You might touch that person for only a short time, but you have the potential to touch their lives forever,” she says. “It’s kind of the same with the library and learning; they’re parallel but different.”

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At the library, she’ll work full-time acquiring materials and cataloging them to keep them current. It’s a big job, she says, and so is pursuing a master’s degree in library information science online through San Jose State. “It will be a big switch,” she says. “I haven’t written a term paper for 40 years.” As for moving on, she’s ready for the change but already

Poses to prose: Nina Darlington is embracing her new library career with the same energy she brought to teaching yoga.

missing her musings from the yoga mat. “I’m going to miss the people and the relationships I’ve developed,” she says. “Some people have been with me for 20 years. You can’t be a teacher without students, and I’m deeply grateful to everyone who’s supported me. But it’s a small town, so I’ll still see everyone around town.” And she’s as happy as a grinning guru with where she’s landed. “It’s truly an amazing library,” she says. “In terms of a dream job, I feel I’ve won the lottery.”

PHOTO BY SKYLAR LEESON


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ARTIST PROFILE

by Sophie Dingle

PHOTOGRAPHY

Behind the lens with Danielle Zimmerer

I

n a world obsessed with sharing every detail of life through pictures and videos on social media, Danielle Zimmerer, 29, started out the oldfashioned way. “I was a big fan of disposable cameras,” says Zimmerer, who moved to Steamboat in 2010 after graduating from Colorado State University. “I’d take a million pictures in middle school and document my everyday life.” Over the years, she upgraded to film and then digital cameras as her passion for photography grew. Then, about two years ago, she decided to start taking her hobby seriously. “I started posting more images on social media,” she says, “and then I was asked to take pictures for a local restaurant and a family in the same week.” It was then that she realized she could potentially turn her hobby into a career. “I started seriously pursuing photography in the fall of 2014,” she says. “I began to take portraits and landscapes and posted them on social media with a copyright. That made me look more official, I guess, and that’s when people started reaching out to hire me.” But her photography career didn’t come by accident. “I’d say it was sort of destined to happen,” she says. “I took it day by day and continued to market myself. Eventually, I gained some momentum, and it turned into my full-time dream job.” Now, with an established career, Zimmerer photographs anything and everything. “I love shooting a variety of subjects,” she says. “I do portraits for children and adults, weddings and events, sports, culinary, pets, landscape, interior and exterior spaces and lifestyle photography. I love the variety in my daily work schedule.” Often photographing events around town, she’s reluctant to name a favorite, capturing everything from music acts to sports. “Lots of events honor local movers and shakers,” she says. “I enjoy documenting it all. I love candid photography – catching a special moment that people may have forgotten about, or a huge laugh that rolls through the crowd.”

To give back to the community she captures, Zimmerer began doing what she calls the “Gift of Photography” around the holidays. “I noticed that many families would inquire but not book a session due to budget restraints,” she says. “Photography can be an extra expense, but it’s such a wonderful way to commemorate and document seasons of life with family or loved ones. I wanted to give back and organize an annual opportunity for people to get a few free pictures taken.” This past December, she photographed over 70 families, 140 children and 10 dogs. By the end of the two sessions, she had delivered more than 1,000 images to her community. “Steamboat is very special to me, and I appreciate the philanthropic spirit that runs through the community,” she says. “I’m proud to be a part of that, in my own way.” Now that she’s taken Steamboat by storm, what’s her dream for the future? “I’d love to be hired by clients who are planning a destination wedding or a family reunion that I’d need to buy a plane ticket for,” she says. In the meantime, she appreciates the backdrop Steamboat offers. “I love that Steamboat has amazing natural beauty,” she says. “There are endless opportunities here.”

Samples of Zimmerer's work above, and the artist in her element.

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LEFT: PHOTOS BY DANIELLE ZIMMERER // RIGHT: COURTESY OF DANIELLE ZIMMERER


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STEAMBOAT EVENTS

COMMUNITY

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Faces of Steamboat B U S T O F S T E A M B O AT Each fall for the last 15 years, local artists have been invited to submit decorated bras and art to be auctioned to the highest bidder at a live auction and reception called The Bust of Steamboat. This year’s event was held Oct. 21, 2016, at Three Peaks Grill in Steamboat Springs. All the money raised stays in Routt and Moffat counties to help uninsured and under-insured women to pay for mammograms, annual wellness exams and assist in breast cancer treatment costs. From top left to bottom right: 1. Meredith MacFarlane, Julie Fager Frankling and Jen Murphy 2. Toni and Danielle Fasci 3. Will Baker 4. Rebecca Snedecor, Musso and Bill Hamil 5. Jenna Knowles, Hannah Grant and Ashley McKinstry, 6. Rebecca Snedecor, Musso 7. Mikey McGlone and Savanna Boulton McGlone 8. Marlene Horace Fisher and John Fisher, 9. Valerie Stafford, Nicole Curd and Gina Toothaker 10. Bobbi and Lindsey Beall 11. Kelly Anzalone and Debbie Curd-Kinnecom 12. Heidi Meshurel-Jolly, Sarah Rae Schmitt Ruby and Jacqueline Isaksen

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PHOTOS 1-7 BY MICHAEL KINNECOM; PHOTOS 8-12 BY DANIELLE ZIMMERER


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XXXXXXXXXXXX 2017 215520 Curve Plaza | Steamboat Springs, CO |SPRING 970.879.8014 | Mon - Fri 7:30 am- 8 :00 pm | Sat 8 :00 am - 5:30 pm | Sun 9:00 am - 5:00 pm


970-879-8116 • 1880 Loggers Lane unit B • mountainmattress.com Big City PriCes | small town serviCe

Keep Steamboat unique, shop local! Ask about our best price guarantee.

Since opening in 2003, Mountain Mattress and Furniture has been locally owned and operated. Our two story showroom offers an extensive selection of mattresses, bedding and furniture in every budget. We carry the largest selection of mattresses in Northwest Colorado including a line of certified fully organic mattresses. Whether you are furnishing a whole house or just want a great night’s sleep, we can help. Our commitment to outstanding customer service, has allowed us to serve our wonderful community for more than 15 years.

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ST E A M B OAT

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Story by Teresa Ristow

Eager gardeners and residents who love projects around the house can get a jump start on the summer season at the annual Steamboat Home & Garden Expo. More than 40 informational booths and vendors with home and garden products and services are expected to take part in the event, which is likely to draw more than 1,000 guests to the Steamboat Springs Community Center. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 6, and includes a free barbecue provided by Steamboat Pilot & Today, Steamboat Meat and Seafood Co. and local 4-H volunteers. The expo will feature chicken poop bingo and a petting zoo, along with a visit from a baby buffalo named Cherry Bomb and baby chicks. KBCR will broadcast live from the event, where a $500 Weber Spirit gas grill from Ace Hardware and a $150 grillers meat bundle from Steamboat Meat and Seafood Co. will be given away. A variety of venders ready to help with projects and yard and garden work inside and out will include Revelation Roofing, Master Carpet Care, Willow Creek Craftsman, Yampa Valley Sustainability Council and many others. “This definitely starts our busy season,” said Heidi Neeley, who co-owns The Lawn Lady, along with her husband Jeff. Neeley said at last year’s expo her company’s booth gave out seed pods and had a waterfall on display, and will have Frisbees and lawn chairs out this year, weather dependent. Neeley said her booth would also have giveaways and help attendees with ideas for summer gardening projects. “It’s a great event to get out and see friendly faces,” Neeley said. Event organizer Steamboat Pilot & Today has teamed up with Steamboat Springs Farmers Market vendors, who will be at the event previewing some of their summer products. Event sponsor Ace Hardware manager Bridget Kelly said the springtime home and garden busy season started early in 2017, thanks to mild late winter weather. “It was about mid-March this year,” Kelly said. Expo booths will be both outside and inside at the Steamboat Springs Community Center, with free parking at the Steamboat Springs Transit Center.

Scenes from the 2016 Home & Garden Expo.

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IF YOU GO What: Steamboat Home & Garden Expo When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 6 Where: Steamboat Springs Community Center, 1605 Lincoln Avenue

PLANNING FOR YOUR SUMMER GARDEN Colorado State University’s Routt County extension agent Todd Hagenbuch said gardeners of any ability level should come to the Steamboat Home & Garden Expo prepared with questions for some of the area’s master gardeners. “The master gardeners are there to provide consultation and advice about gardening, so bring your questions,” Hagenbuch said. Hagenbuch recently wrapped up another session of classes for a new batch of apprentice master gardeners, who must volunteer 50 hours of sharing their knowledge over the next two years to earn the official designation as a master gardener. Hagenbuch said as of early April it was still to early to predict what the gardening and agriculture season might be like in Routt County, with agriculture dependent on springtime rain totals and when to start gardening always a tricky decision. “People are temped to start planting, but history proves that we still have pretty decent chance of frost until mid-June,” Hagenbuch said. Hagenbuch said that some plants can be started indoors as seedlings to extend growing time, but others transplant poorly. “People just need to pay attention to what they’re planting,” Hagenbuch said. Find more gardening tips at extension.colostate.edu. —TR


ST E A M B OAT

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10 am to 2 pm, Saturday, May 6th where: Steamboat Springs Community Center

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DOOR PRIZES - FREE TO THE PUBLIC! home | garden | flooring | furniture | window treatments | livestock kitchen | roofing | summer farmer’s market preview and so much more! FREE BBQ provided by the Steamboat Pilot & Today, Steamboat Meat & Seafood Co, and local 4-H volunteers.

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Ace Hardware and Steamboat Meat & Seafood Co. have teamed up with us to offer a $500 Weber Grill + $150 Meat and Griller Bundle! Enter the Home & Garden Grill Giveaway online at SteamboatToday.com/contest. Winner announced live at the Expo.

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Petting Zoo & Chicken poop Bingo! “We’re Not Clowns” will be on hand juggling torches and swords (among other things) and telling really bad jokes! Baby Buffalo & Live remote by KBCR

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Home &

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in diameter with the bottom anchored to the ground and top extending above the soil. Fill the bottom of the raised bed with compostable materials. Start with a layer of cardboard on the soil surface. Then alternate four- to six-inch layers of brown and green materials just as you would a compost pile. Use twigs, straw, dried leaves, paper, cardboard and other carbon-rich materials for your browns. Include grass clippings, manure, kitchen scraps and other nitrogen-rich materials for your greens. Add kitchen scraps and garden debris to the compost basket throughout the growing season. Continue layering until three-fourths of the raised bed is filled. Top it off with compost-rich soil for plants to root and grow. Slope the surface so the highest point is next to the compost basket. Allow the planting area to settle for several days, then plant your favorite vegetables. Leave just enough space between plants so they can mature. Water new plantings thoroughly. Mulch the soil with shredded leaves, evergreen needles or other organic material to conserve moisture and continue to add organic matter to the soil. Check the soil moisture and water as needed. Keyhole gardening lets you to grow abundant produce and compost plant-based kitchen scraps in one raised garden plot.

Keyhole gardening by Melinda Myers

Keyhole gardening lets you harvest and compost all in one bed, increasing productivity in a smaller space, while using less water and fertilizer. They open up new opportunities for local backyards, growing produce while composting in one raised garden plot. HOW IT WORKS Grow plants in the outer ring of a circular, six-foot diameter or larger raised bed. Create an inner circle for composting. Design a small pie

shape notch in the circular bed. This provides easy access to the inner composting circle and gives the bed its distinct keyhole appearance. Build the sides of the raised bed from stones, cement blocks, bamboo or other suitable material. Select a height that makes planting, tending and harvesting easy. (Or purchase the Cedar Keyhole Garden kit from www.gardeners.com.) Once the walls are built, create an inner compost basket with chicken wire or similar material that allows moisture and nutrients to move from the compost basket into the surrounding soil. It should be at least 12 inches

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Pictured: Hunter Douglas Designer Roller Shades with Custom Wood Valences

Steamboat's Colorado Master Gardener program by Eugene Buchanan

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There are gardeners and then there are Colorado Master Gardeners, who rise above others like the crops they sow. A registered service mark of Colorado State University Extension, CMGs, of which there are 35 in Routt County, are graduates of the nationwide Master Gardener training system, enabling them to help the gardening public solve problems to foster successful, sustainable gardening. CMG volunteers assist CSU Extension staff in delivering gardening information. Annually, 1,500 CMG volunteers serve 36 counties and donate $1.2 million in volunteer time, including answering gardening questions; staffing diagnostic clinics; teaching classes; writing articles; volunteering at local farmers’ markets; and mentoring community gardening projects. Becoming a CMG volunteer requires 60 hours of training and 50 hours of volunteer service the first year, with 24 volunteer hours and 12 hours of continuing education required each following year. The program offers training every-other year, on the odd year. Training is also available without a volunteer commitment (classroom training only) for a higher fee as a Colorado Gardener Certificate Student (CGC). Training for each (CMG and CGC) is offered around the state, with classes featuring in-person and distance-education formats. The curriculum includes 60 hours of classroom instruction in botany, soils, entomology, plant identification, plant pathology, mountain and native plants, weed management, vegetable growing and more. info:

(970) 879-0825, www.cmg.colostate.edu


Tips from

STEAMBOAT'S MASTER GARDENERS DIANE SANTOS

STEAMBOAT FAMILY & AESTHETIC DENTISTRY ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS, CALL TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT 970-879-3565

“Be kind to your worms! To prepare your soil, obtain a soil test from the Extension Office, aerate by adding compost and any other amendments recommended, and in general, get the garden ready for seed.”

EILEEN GROVER “Start with the soil. All soils are different, and it's important to know what you’re working with. Soil samples can be sent to CSU for testing to determine the soil type and the nutrients available. Soil sample jars can be obtained at the Routt County Extension Office. Also, group plants with like needs together. How much water do they need? Do they need full sun, shade or a combination? Are the plants zoned for our area, zones 3-4?”

CAMMIE DOWNING “Overwhelmed by the garden climate in Steamboat Springs? My advice is to visit the CSU Extension Office or the website at extension.colostate.edu. It has the answers!”

GEORGIANNE NELSON “Aerate your lawn in the spring. For the best results, aerate when the lawn has been watered or after rain or snow.”

HEALTHY TEETH, HEALTHY BODY, HEALTHY MIND ANDY KENNEDY “Be water-wise. Water is absorbed through the roots only, and sprinkler-watering in full sun will dry and can even burn the foliage. Using a drip system is more efficient for the plant’s intake. Setting up a timer on the drip adds to that efficiency, and makes life easier – whether you travel or work out of the home, watering in the early morning and evening gives the plants the consistency they need to grow, and the timer ensures that. And add a rain gauge to minimize the use of city water.”

ONES OVER ALL HEALTH IS DIRECTLY RELATED TO ORAL HEALTH CHECK US OUT TODAY

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“Our goal is to provide you with the highest quality dental care possible in a relaxed & comfortable environment.”

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STEAMBOAT’S SPARTAN RACE STAR

STORY BY JOEL REICHENBERGER

HEATHER GOLLNICK Heather Gollnick learned plenty in her career as a professional triathlete. And the lessons she picked up en route to becoming a five-time Ironman champion still stick with her, from training her body to win to tricking her mind into carrying on. She became efficient in the water, powerful on the bike and swift on the run. But she didn’t learn the first thing about throwing a spear. Five years after stepping away from her pro triathlete career, that’s one thing she wishes she was better at — because it’s a key feature of her new passion: the Spartan Race. To practice it, she and her husband, Todd Gollnick, built their own version of a Spartan Race obstacle course behind their Routt County home, including three different spear throwing sections. “That’s my personality,” says Gollnick. “If I’m going to do something, I’m going to do it 110 percent.” That’s certainly what she did when she moved to Steamboat in 2013 from Florida with her husband, Todd, and their three children — twins Josh and Jordan, now 19, and Zachary, now 16. The move was partly a result of a shift in her personal life and partly so her teens could grow up in a place she loves — she lived in Steamboat from the sixth through eighth grades and her family regularly vacationed here. “We weren’t at peace with where we were living,” she says. “It was rougher. I wouldn’t let them go out on their bikes.” Gollnick grew up an athlete in Wisconsin, eventually attending Valparaiso on a gymnastics scholarship. After

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AT 47, GOLLNICK STANDS OUT. MANY OF HER FELLOW PRO TEAM MEMBERS ARE IN THEIR MID-20S.

graduation, she started working for General Electric in its corporate fitness center. The company sponsored a triathlon fitness challenge, and she was hooked. “I had competed so many years as a gymnast, and I felt that competition void,” she says. She quickly started collecting top results, turning pro in 1999. “With young kids, we recognized that it would have to be a real team effort,” Todd says. “We realized she had an incredible amount of talent, so we thought we should see where it led. And it’s led to some awesome things for us.” Gollnick made her pro debut in 2002, at Ironman Wisconsin. But after the 2.4-mile swim and 112-mile bike ride, she hit a mental block; her legs didn’t want to move, and she thought about quitting. But a glance over to Jordan, who suffers from cerebral palsy, changed the race and eventually her career.

LEFT: PHOTO BY JOHN RUSSELL // RIGHT: COURTESY OF HEATHER GOLLNICK

“I looked to the sideline, and she was sitting in a wheelchair,” she says. “I said, ‘OK, she’d give anything to just walk in a marathon.’” Twenty-six miles later, Heather had won her first Ironman. She went on to win the Ironman Coeur d’ Alene and repeated her win in the Ironman Wisconsin in 2003. She also won Ironman Arizona and Ironman Louisville in 2007. Now, after spending the past few years running Iron Edge Coaching and the outreach program for the Steamboat Christian Center, she’s set her sights on Spartan Races — obstacle-course events that test racers with unique and brutally difficult challenges. Gollnick has quickly warmed to them, bringing the same passion she had for Ironmans to the Spartan world. And she’s already making waves after only one year competing. In October, she won the women’s championship in the elite masters division. Her performances have so impressed race directors that she was recently selected to the Spartan Pro Team and cast for season 2 of NBC’s “Spartan Ultimate Team Challenge” as an elite coach. “It was definitely a surprise,” she says. “I never expected to find another sport where I would want to compete at this level, but I’m really enjoying it. It’s great to be on the pro team and racing with everyone.” At 47, Gollnick stands out. Many of her fellow pro team members are in their mid-20s. A few can’t even buy a beer to celebrate after a race. “I’m thankful my body’s still healthy enough to be able to do this,” she says. “I’ve done so much in athletics; it’s great my body’s still in one piece.” And that body is still able to learn new tricks, like throwing a spear. An accurate throw requires patience, focus and a steady hand — all difficult to SPRING 2017

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"I'M THANKFUL MY BODY'S STILL HEALTHY ENOUGH TO BE ABLE TO DO THIS."

muster during a race. She’s also had to learn how to slow her heart rate to get an accurate shot, which she admits “is nothing like a triathlon.” At first, she was only able to connect on about 10 percent of her spear tosses. While still not her strong suit, now she’s up to about 60 percent. “I haven’t completely figured it out yet,” she says, “but I’m getting better.” On this year’s pro team, Gollnick plans to hit at least one weekend of Spartan racing per month, which can range from one to two races. And as long as she’s having fun, she plans to keep at it. “Spartan Races are definitely different than triathlons,” she says. “But that’s why it’s fun; it’s a challenge.” And it’s one she’ll tackle with 110 percent effort — including a little help from her now snow-free backyard obstacle course.

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PHOTO BY JOHN RUSSELL


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Inside the Deer Park Road Corp. Building RAISING THE BAR ON LOCAL OFFICE BUILDINGS STORY BY EUGENE BUCHANAN

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W

ith all the design elements of a high-end custom home, Steamboat Springs’ newest office building has set a new standard for work environments in town — even if you ignore its location a snowball’s throw from Wildhorse gondola and the slopes of the ski area. The headquarters for hedge fund company Deer Park Road Corp. — and its CEO and building brainchild Michael Craig-Scheckman — its craftsmanship and attention to detail make it a home within an office. Throw in the ability for employees (and clients) to lay tracks when not analyzing stock graphs, and your own cubicle pales in comparison. “We were in three different locations at the Torian and had outgrown them,” Craig-Scheckman says. “We couldn’t function as an organic unit. We wanted something so all our departments could be together and access to the ski area was important.” As for its design, he adds he wanted something warm and welcoming, yet modern. “I didn’t want something sterile or cookie-cutter,” he says. “And while we weren’t trying to make an architectural statement with the building, we do have investors from all over the world come and visit. They don’t want to see you working out of a closet, but they also don’t want you spending hand over fist. So it’s a balance. While from Steamboat’s standpoint it might be high-end, from that of the rest of the world it’s in the middle.” That said, it’s as nice an office building as you’ll likely find in Routt County. “Custom homes may have this kind of attention to detail, but this is a Class A office building that’s unique to Steamboat,” says Brandt Vanderbosch, owner of Vertical Arts, which led the building’s design team. “Nothing like this has been done for an office building in town before. It’s elevated the office building standard for Steamboat and architecture in general and is one of the most fulfilling collaborative projects we’ve been part of.”

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The Building With its shed-form roof, gables, beetle-kill wood embedded into exposed structural steel, Telluride Goldstone base, patina steel siding, metal fascia and more, the Green Globe-certified building blends elements of Steamboat’s history with a modern feel, says project manager Nick Doro. “It’s more modern industrial than agrarian but melds features of each,” he says, noting the lot’s unique “L” shape let them prioritize different view corridors and natural lighting. “We tried to use all-natural materials to create a softer palette in a sophisticated-yet-regional modern office building.” The pedestrian level also employs a warm, mixeduse feel to embrace the nearby Wildhorse gondola and walkway. “It’s not stuck in time, nor a replica of anything else in Steamboat,” he says. “It’s looking forward, creating quite the experience for the user.” PHOTOS BY JOHN RUSSELL

Lobby

A

A natural slate floor, reclaimed oak paneling, patina steel and Goldstone carries the exterior’s theme inside through a covered Porte-cochèr, creating a cohesive design. A modern, linear fireplace features an open corner, allowing the space to breathe, abutting a six-panel, 3-D bronze sculpture crafted by local artist Sandy Graves, depicting a skier (modeled after a photo of Craig-Scheckman on Soda Mountain) busting through Steamboat Champagne. On the walls hang wilderness photography by Thomas Mangelsen. “It’s a natural, warm homey feel as soon as you step inside,” says designer Sarah Tiedeken O’Brien, who worked on it with Michele McCarthy.

“A lot of the office personnel are skiers, so the sculpture was commissioned as a regional ode to their love of the outdoors.”

Stained glass

B

The curved steel reception desk is flanked by a giant, backlit stained glass crafted by artist Jorge Torella. Set within a wood wall and beneath hanging barnwood slats forming an internal trellis, it’s a map of Colorado, surrounded by 14 stained-glass icon panels reflecting CraigScheckman’s outdoor loves: kayaking, skiing, wildlife, hot air ballooning, a train and even the Denver Broncos. (Look closely and you’ll see South Park characters in the kayaking icon.) “It took a lot of detailing SPRING 2017

to accommodate the lightbox, which was specified to create ‘early morning light,’” says Doro. Adds Vanderbosch, “It’s a great backdrop to the reception area and connotes a cool connection to the outdoors. And it blends in well with the reclaimed oak paneling.”

Locker/ski room

C

Every office of envy includes a ski locker, and Deer Park’s is one to drool over with its custom tuning bench, private lockers, racks full of skis and snowboards, a sink, snack and sunscreen station and the coup de grâce: a fleet of E-bikes for booking around town and the mountain. “Most of our employees use it,” says CraigScheckman. “It’s a nice amenity.”

Furniture If the building is custom, so is the furniture. Made from reclaimed wood, rift white oak and patina steel, the trading and executive offices’ desks were all custom-designed and built by Vertical Arts and Stel House and

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Floor facts total square footage 26,000 (plus 3,100 outdoor decks)

basement/garage 8,428 square feet (19-space parking garage)

Level 1: 5,383 square feet (lobby, ski/bike room, Brick restaurant, tenant rental suite)

Level 2: 5,382 square feet (marketing suite, private offices, open studio, business suite, conference room)

Level 3: 3,979 square feet (private offices, conference room, open studio, IT room)

Level 4: 3,120 square feet (large conference room, lounge, kitchen, gym, showers/steam room, roof deck with fireplace lounge/grill)

At a glance Architect/ Interior Design/ Furnishings Vertical Arts www.vertical-arts.com

Custom Furniture Fabrication Stel House + Home www.Stelhouse.com

General Contractor

HLCC Construction www.hlccconstruction.com

Structural Engineer Engineering Designworks 970-879-4890

Shading/Lighting Lacroux Streeb www.lacrouxstreeb.com

Owner's Representative

Resort Ventures West www.resortventureswest.com 34

Home, as were the two large conference room tables on the second and fourth floors, both employing built-in, state-of-theart AV componentry. “It feels really integrated as opposed to just slapping a desk in the corner,” says Tiedeken O’Brien. Another nice touch: Integrated lighting within a concealed track tile ceiling to dampen acoustics.

Atrium stairs

E

Echoed throughout each floor are reclaimed slat walls that allow filtered light into the rest of the offices from an atrium window, while creating semi-private screens. “It’s like having a old barn siding wall inside your house, that light filters through,” Doro says. “Again, it conveys regionality while respecting privacy.” It also fits with the interior’s natural lighting concept. “With the building shape and orientation, we were able to capture light from all over and carry it through the open SPRING 2017

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D

Anchoring the interior’s open feel, a glass-railing stairway — with reclaimed oak treads, exposed steel and wood handrail — seamlessly links the three primary office floors together while letting southern light permeate the entire building. Hanging from the third-floor ceiling and cascading through the next three levels is a giant, custom light element, with perforated steel cylinders that emit a warm, rich glow. “We wanted a strong floor-tofloor sculptural connection that weaves through the stairs, playing on the light coming in from the large adjacent vertical window,” says Vanderbosch.

Slat walls

D

F

G

and transparent interiors of the building,” Vanderbosch says. Glass office partitions featuring floor-to-ceiling windows, broken up with rift white oak door and wall elements, enhance the natural lighting. “The whole interior has a lot of different finishes and elements — wood vs. steel, hard vs. soft — but we married them all to make it feel rich and complementary,” says Tiedeken O’Brien.

high-gloss cabinetry. A door leads to an outside roof deck, steel bar, rock-walled, glassbead fireplace and barbecue overlooking Mount Werner.

Conference room Kitchen

F

Comprising the southeast corner of the fourth floor, a full kitchen is used for employees and catering parties. A Bahia Blue granite countertop (hand-picked by Craig-Scheckman) ties into a parabolic-shaped 3-D glassrelief-tiled backsplash from Mexico. Above the sparkling backsplash hangs sapphire turret pendant lighting, reflecting off utilitarian, stainless steel appliances and vertically oriented, lacquered-veneer,

F

The main conference room features all the high-tech communication features you could ask for, including HD TVs inset into a wood-tile wall and full black-out roller shades over a NANA wall door system, which accordion apart to open up the entire room to the roof deck and mountain view. Overhead, below the indoor/outdoor steel ceiling, hangs a Vibia Rhythm wave-shaped light fixture floating over a 20-foot custom marble and reclaimed wood conference table. PHOTOS BY JOHN RUSSELL


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Sons, depicting clouds, birds and a blue sky. (“We have a lot of Seret in our home as well,” says Craig-Scheckman.) Its motif plays well with the bathroom’s travertine walls and custom vessel sink/vanity made from reclaimed antique furniture.

Owner’s office J

Employee/ Investor lounge

Exercise room F

When it’s time for some R&R or entertaining clients, employees head to the fourth-floor lounge, set in a warm environment of steel panels, wood rafters and colorful, eclectic furnishings. A giant flatscreen resides in a recessed niche above a builtin linear gas fireplace, abutting comfy Minotti sofas and large coffee table atop an antique rug. Roosting above are two red-and-gold, hand-crocheted pendant chandeliers. The kitchen is just a paper football flick away, as is the main conference area, reached via a room-width sliding door, with matching blue tones. PHOTOS BY JOHN RUSSELL

G

With an airplane propshaped fan overhead to keep its users cool, the gym — to keep the company’s traders in top shape — features weights, barbells, exercise machines, medicine balls, cycles and more. It’s capped by a steam room to let users sweat even more, all overlooking Mount Werner.

Floors, headers and structural exposure The top three floors employ “floating” engineered oak floors, designed so the wood can shift and move as opposed to being glued in place. Headers throughout are made from reclaimed oak, adding another

dose of rustic elegance. Blending with this are exposed structural components. “On most office buildings you don’t see any of the structure,” Doro says. “We wanted the inside to have some structural/ material expression.”

Artistic commodes

H

Attention to detail was even given to the lavatories, with heated Japanese toilets, custom paper holders, unique fixtures and finishes and remote-activated lights throughout. The bathroom on the fourth floor features the crème de la crème: a custom ceiling tile mosaic from Santa Fe, New Mexico’s Seret & SPRING 2017

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In the northeast corner of the fourth floor, overlooking the Wildhorse gondola and ski area, Craig-Scheckman’s office is custom built around pieces of prized furniture sourced from Seret & Sons, including a custom-built casework wall with niches harboring two intricately carved, built-in bureaus and personal art collected from around the world. A guitar rests in a stand in the far corner, while his cherished inlaid wood, glass-topped coffee table, made from an old 18th century door from India, centers a sofa and soft chairs. All this lies beneath a series of circularshaped chandeliers.

Brick

J

This wood-fired pizzeria and bar is housed on the northeast corner of the first floor. The décor follows that of the rest of the building, featuring exposed steel, stonework and reclaimed wood carrying from the outside firepit to the interior. A custom, white-andblue Spanish tile bar lends the atmosphere an Italian feel, complementing a large, blue glass chandelier and booths adorned with blue upholstery (from owner Lee Demusis’s favorite soccer team). Rounding it out are custom high-top tables, hanging metal liquor racks and a statuette of Saint Michael slaying a dragon on the wall.

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5 MINUTES WITH COLORADO MOUNTAIN COLLEGE CEO

DR. CARRIE BESNETTE HAUSER With a master’s and Ph.D. degree from UCLA and a resume spanning executive roles in higher education institutions, private foundations and the public policy arena, Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser is well qualified to head Colorado Mountain College’s 11 locations throughout the Rockies. But she’s also an avid outdoorswoman, summiting Mt. Kilimanjaro, climbing to the Mt. Everest base camp and guiding rafts down the Grand Canyon. Behold her take on town, CMC’s Alpine Campus in Steamboat and the college’s future.

The first time I ever visited Steamboat was in 1999 to play a doubles volleyball tournament. It seems like yesterday.   Each of our 11 campuses is unique in its own way, as are the communities they serve. Although several are a stone’s throw from excellent ski areas – including Aspen, Vail and Breckenridge – the Steamboat campus is the only one that actually overlooks the local ski mountain. It retains a lot of its original Yampa Valley College flavor.   Its programs are different. How many small, public colleges can boast an award-winning astro-photographer like Jimmy Westlake? It’s also our only campus where we offer ski and snowboard business (I ski on a pair of skis designed by one of our students), as well as hotel and resort management. And it’s the home of our CMC Ski Team.   Our new academic and student services building still takes my breath away. It was designed to bring the community into the heart of the campus, which it’s done well. The Dining Center offers the best views in town; community members grab a cup of coffee and meet their friends here. The Allbright Family Auditorium has drawn numerous speakers and performers, and the Yampa Valley Entrepreneurship Center supports local startups and small businesses.

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"OUR IN-DISTRICT STUDENTS GET THE THIRD-MOSTAFFORDABLE BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN THE COUNTRY"

CMC is for everyone, whether you want to learn English or cross-country skiing or want to earn a certificate, associate or bachelor’s degree. I like that we are driven to try new things, to test something at one campus and, if it works, roll it out more broadly.   Our communities face a great challenge, as employers increasingly desire higher levels of education. We need to connect with more students to ensure they get the education they need to be prepared for the jobs of today and the future. I love every season, but summer’s my favorite time in Steamboat. I love the unique blend of Western culture, ranching lifestyle, outdoor adventure and serious local pride.

My outdoors and coaching background helps me lead CMC. Bringing disparate individuals, or 11 campuses, together in sometimes uncomfortable or competing situations to work toward a common goal as a team is like running a river with a group of people or climbing a mountain or playing a basketball game. The more in sync everyone is, the better. We’re fortunate to have support from our local property taxpayers, especially with state revenues for higher education falling. We’ve been able to keep tuition low — our in-district students get the third-most-affordable bachelor’s degree in the country — but we need to remain innovative and nimble. The Yampa River through Dinosaur is one of my favorite stretches of river anywhere. The Yampa is one of the last major free-flowing rivers in the Colorado River Basin; it’s special and I hope it always stays that way. I serve on the board of American Rivers, which does great work to protect endangered rivers like it and the Colorado.   My husband and I love the trail and county road system near Hahn’s Peak — for biking, cross-country skiing, backcountry touring, snowmobiling and hiking. It’s beautiful, with a ton of great outdoor options. As for lift-served skiing, Steamboat’s glades and trees are hard to beat, especially on a fresh dump of Champagne powder. COURTESY OF COLORADO MOUNTAIN COLLEGE


E XC E L L E N C E IN ORTHOPAEDIC MEDICINE Eric VErploEg, M.D.

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HEnry Fabian, M.D.

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anDrEas sauErbrEy, M.D.

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MicHaEl sisk, M.D.

• World Class Patient Treatment Outcome • Care for Wide Range of Orthopaedic Conditions & Injuries • Affordability of Care • Excellence in Patient Access • Leading Edge Technology • Comfortable Treatment Setting

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SPRING 2017

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Steamboat Living Spring 2017  

Steamboat Living Spring 2017

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