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Nationally recognized for problem-solving care. The only hospital ranked in north central Florida.

UF Health Shands Hospital and UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital were ranked in 12 specialties, according to U.S. News & World Report. This designation reflects our unwavering dedication to providing high-quality care for patients and validates the work of physicians, scientists, nurses and staff at UF Health.

Learn how we solve problems every day at ProblemSolvingCare.org. G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 3


Contents F E AT U R E S

51

Photography We would like to thank the following for their photography contributions:

12

Erica Brough

Dawn McKinstry

City of Alachua

Gabby Miller

City of Gainesville

Susannah Peddie

City of High Springs

Anibal Rodriguez

City of Newberry

Santa Fe College

City of Waldo

John Sloan

City of Hawthorne

Trimark Properties

Gib Coerper

UF Health

Jay Collins

UF Warrington College of Business

Steffanie Crockett Megan DeGance Allison Durham Gainesville Health & Fitness Center Gainesville Community Redevelopment Association Gainesville Regional Airport — Steve Johnson David Johnston — Nathalie McCrate

University of Florida Photography — Bernard Brzezinski — Nick Burchell — Tim Casey — Lyon Duong — Kristen Grace — Betsy Hansen — Jesse S. Jones — Tyler Jones — Mindy C. Miller — Jim Mneymneh — Hannah Pietrick — Eric Zamora

Contributing Writers

152

224

12

City of Alachua, a wealth of small-town charm

51

Listing of Incubators and Co-Work Spaces in Greater Gainesville

152 224

The CRA’s Work in Gainesville: Reinvesting in our community Gainesville: An Award-Winning Community

About the Cover For 2019, the cover to the Guide to Greater Gainesville showcases an aerial view of Gainesville’s beautiful historic downtown, filled with activities and opportunities available to residents and visitors alike. 4 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

We would like to thank the following for their contributions: Nadia Alcide Ellen Andreu Sofia Arriaga Dr. Catherine Atria Natalya Bannister John Barli Michelle Bizet Eugenia Blaubach Tara Blythe Charles Ryan Boisseau Deborah Bowie Star Bradbury Alyssa Brown Dr. Naima Brown Magen Brubaker Bud Calderwood John Carmean Ann Carney Rory Casseaux Joe Cirulli Marcia Conwell Brian Cook Margaret Crawford Susan Crowley Susan Davenport Coleen DeGroff Mary Katherine Delegal Deidra Dodd Bryan Eastman

Savannah Edgens Sara Emmanuel Bianca Favata Brittany Ferguson Dr. W. Kent Fuchs Kayla Gaines Rhina Garcia Eric Godet Stephanie Gonzalez Traci L. Gresham April Griffin Luisa Guaracao Nancy Halbrook Joe Hancock John Hartnett Hannah Hoffman Sherry Houston Amy Howard Mollee Jakubisin Edward Jimenez Sean Jones Dug Jones Jasmine Jones Brian Jose Kathleen Joseph Duncan Kabinu Sophia Karnegis Debbie Kinman-Ford Joe Lowry Agapitus Lye Anthony Lyons

Hannah Mahdavi Amber McClave Taylor McLamb John Mitchell Kevin Monroe Lee Nielsen Isabella Nino Barzella Papa Rebecca Papilsky Palak Patel Lauren Poe Kathey Porter Melanie Prescott Kayla Price Alyssa Ramos April Rubin Deborah Rubin Dr. Jackson Sasser Lauren Smith Steve Spurrier Brooke Steinberg Brinn Strange Laurel Swiderski Wade Swikle Joanna Grey Talbot Tiffany Thomas Kayla Thurber Melanie Venuto Keith Watson Mike White Mary Wise


RELOCATING TO GREATER GAINESVILLE?

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DESIGN • INSTALL • MAINTAIN home

~Serving Alachua County since 1995~ 352.333.9661 • www.TheCottageGardener.com

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 5


Contents SECTIONS

WELCOME

PRODUCED BY

9

Map of Municipalities pg. 10

120

Greater Gainesville Municipalities pg. 11 — Alachua pg. 12 — Archer pg. 22 — Gainesville pg. 24 — Hawthorne pg. 26 — High Springs pg. 28 — La Crosse pg. 36 — Micanopy pg. 38 — Newberry/Jonesville pg. 40 — Waldo pg. 42

176

Publisher: Scott Costello Director of Operations: Erica Brown –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Editorial BUSINESS

45

Incubators and Co-Work Spaces pg. 51

Managing Editors: Albert Isaac, Elisha Young Editor-in-Chief, HOME: Albert Isaac Editor-in-Chief, Business: Scott Costello Senior Writers: Chris Eversole, Tracy Wright

The Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce pg. 52

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Top 30 Private Employers in Greater Gainesville pg. 46

Business, Brains and Beauty pg. 58

E D U CAT I O N

Creative Creative Director: Anibal Rodriguez Art Director: Mack Hough –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

64

Advertising

List of Educational Institutions pg. 68

Advertising Strategist: Jennifer Siorek Client Relations Coordinator: Laura Heffter

Maps of Public Schools pg. 80

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

86

Admitted Students Profile pg. 88 Spotlight on Research pg. 90 International Flavor and Hometown Traditions pg. 92

223

Informing Our Community pg. 94 Preparing a Qualified Workforce pg. 96 Innovation Destination pg. 97 Showcasing the Arts pg. 100

S A N TA F E C O L L E G E

105

History of Santa Fe College pg. 106 Hands-On Training pg. 108 Locations pg. 110 A Global Focus pg. 112

118

List of Hospitals, ERs and Urgent Care pg. 120 More About Area Hospitals pg. 122 Pediatric Care pg. 126 Public Health Services in Alachua County pg. 128 Senior Health Care Options pg. 130 Pet Health Care Options pg. 132

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Guide to Greater Gainesville Advisory Board Frank Avery, Nick Banks, Deborah Bowie, Adam Boukari, Ed Braddy, John Carmean, Susan Crowley, Susan Davenport, Rose Fagler, Ian Fletcher, John Hartnett, Grace Horvath, Ed Jimenez, Joe Lowry Sr, Susannah Peddie, Ed Poppell, Rick Staab, Robert Woody, Matthew Webster, Craig Wilburn, Sarah Vidal-Finn ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– P.O. Box 357322, Gainesville, FL 32635 352) 372-5854 | www.guidetogreatergainesville.com

Elevating the Arts pg. 114

H E A LT H C A R E

243

Distribution Manager: Steffanie Crockett Distribution: Bruce Bleasdale, Michael Collins –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Chair: Tara Blythe

Bridging Health Gaps pg. 98

228

Business

The Guide to Greater Gainesville is published and distributed annually by Advantage Publishing, Inc. For advertising information, please call 352-372-5854. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Although every attempt is made to be as comprehensive and accurate as possible, Advantage Publishing, Inc. is not responsible for any misprints, errors, omissions, deletions, or the accuracy of the information in the publication. Advantage Publishing, Inc. does not accept responsibility for any loss, injury, or inconvenience sustained by anyone using this publication. ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Advantage Publishing, Inc. 2019 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise, without the written permission of the Publisher.


G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 7


Contents SECTIONS

*

U F H E A LT H

136

A Note From the President pg. 138

Have Your Own “Why Greater Gainesville?” Our goal is to create an informed picture of our community – and your voice is part of that. Do you have a “Why Greater Gainesville” letter to share for consideration in 2020? Email scott@ advantagepublishinginc.com.

Welcome to the Heart of Florida Athletics pg. 186 List of Fitness Centers, Gyms and Athletic Activities in Greater Gainesville pg. 192 Map of Outdoor Hotspots pg. 202

Among the Elite pg. 139

Outdoor Activities Abound pg. 204

UF Health: By the Numbers pg. 140

Natural Springs pg. 206

MyUFHealth pg. 140

List of Parks and Recreation Areas pg. 208

Best Hospital Rankings pg. 141

Your Local Libraries pg. 213

UF Health Shands pg. 142 Bringing Care to the Community pg. 143

10 Destinations Within Driving Distance pg. 214

Training Tomorrow’s Health Care Providers pg. 145 9 Research Centers and Institutes pg. 147

R E A L E STAT E

151

QUALITY OF LIFE

223

Gainesville: An Award-Winning Community pg. 224 Religion in Greater Gainesville pg. 227 Community Supported Agriculture pg. 228

Reinvesting In Our Community: The CRA’s Work in Gainesville pg. 152

Why Retire in Greater Gainesville? pg. 232 Senior Resources & Activities pg. 234 History of Alachua County pg. 236

C U LT U R E , L E I S U R E & R E C R E AT I O N 163 Activities in Every Season pg. 164 Arts in Greater Gainesville pg. 172 Dining Out in Greater Gainesville pg. 176 Shopping pg. 180 Athletics in Greater Gainesville pg. 184

GETTING SETTLED

243

Moving Tips for Sellers pg. 244 Alachua County DMV Services pg. 253 Emergency Contacts Numbers pg. 254 Voter Information and Civic Engagement pg. 255 Pet Services in Greater Gainesville pg. 257

Why Greater Gainesville? We’d like to thank the many community members who took time to thoughtfully compose welcome letters describing why they love calling the Greater Gainesville area home.

Alcide, Nadia pg. 62 Founder, Simply Sociable Barli, John pg. 241 Regional Director, Catholic Charities Cirulli, Joe pg. 221 Owner and President, Gainesville Health & Fitness Crowley, Susan pg. 62 Assistant Vice President-Community Relations, University of Florida Dodd, Deidra pg. 241 Council Director, Girls on the Run of Alachua County Ferguson, Brittany pg. 221 Rebel Support Leader, Nerd Fitness

Godet, Eric pg. 63 President/CEO, Greater Gainesville Chamber of Commerce

Martin Nagy, Rebecca pg. 242 Director Emerita, Harn Museum of Art, UF

Jimenez, Ed pg. 134 CEO, UF Health Shands

McClave Baldwin, Dr. Jamie pg. 62 President, Info Tech Consulting

Jones, Dug pg. 63 Associate Vice President for Economic Development, Santa Fe College

Papa, Barzella pg. 241 President and CEO, Community Foundation of North Central Florida

Jose, Brian pg. 220 Director, University of Florida Performing Arts

White, Mike pg. 191 Head Coach, University of Florida Men’s Basketball

Joseph, Kathleen pg. 220 Owner, Kathleen Joseph & Associates, LLC

Wise, Mary pg. 221 Gator Volleyball Head Coach

Kabinu, Duncan pg. 63 Founder, Gainesville Dev Academy Lawson, Eric pg. 135 CEO, North Florida Regional Medical Center

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Welcome to Greater Gainesville —

10

Map of Municipalities

11

Greater Gainesville Municipalities

12

Alachua

— 22 — Archer

— 24 — Gainesville

“World-class teaching, amazing support and an environment where people from all walks of life can feel like they are finally home — that’s what I tell people about living here and why I do not see myself living anywhere else.” —DEBORAH BOWIE, President/CEO United Way of North Central Florida

— 26 — Hawthorne

— 28 — High Springs

— 36 — La Crosse

— 38 — Micanopy

— 40 — Newberry/Jonesville

— 42 — Waldo

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 9


Welcome LaCrosse

High Springs

Alachua

Newberry

Archer

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ALACHUA COUNTY

Municipalities Waldo

Gainesville

Hawthorne

Micanopy G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 1 1


Welcome

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Alachua City Website:..........................................................cityofalachua.com Population:........................................................................................ 9,982 City Hall Address: 15100 NW 142 Terr., Alachua, FL 32615 Mayor:....................................................................................Gib Coerper City Manager:................................................................ Adam Boukari Contact:............................................................. (386) 418-6100

Located in the heart of North Central Florida, the City of Alachua has a wealth of small-town charm, recreational facilities and a cuttingedge biotech industry. Alachua is a historic Greater Gainesville municipality and home to a scenic main street, a bundle of locally owned restaurants and frequent festivals. The city also boasts a collection of bioscience, technology and life-research companies. Known as “The Good Life Community,” Alachua’s connection to commerce is served by U.S. Route 441 and Interstate 75. The city’s access and transportation connections have greatly enhanced employment opportunities, ranging from life-sciences research and development to logistics and distribution. Alachua also offers some outdoor adventure, most notably the San Felasco Preserve State Park. With one of the few remaining mature forests in Florida, the preserve connects residents and visitors to over 7,000 acres of hiking, biking and horseback trails. Bobcats, white-tailed deer, gray foxes, turkeys and many species of songbirds live in the 18 natural communities found in the preserve. Residents can enroll their children in four public schools: W.W. Irby Elementary (K-2), Alachua Elementary (3-5), A.L. Mebane Middle (6-8) and Santa Fe High (9-12). The University of Florida and Santa Fe College are both situated just minutes away, with Santa Fe College also offering a satellite campus in Alachua. With UF in near proximity, residents and visitors can enjoy a wide variety of arts, captivating museums, collegiate sporting events and everything in between. Special events in Alachua include the Fourth of July celebration, Spring Festival, Harvest Festival, Christmas Parade and the new Third Thursday on Main, a monthly event sponsored by the City’s Community Redevelopment Agency that includes live music, artists and bands, street performances and

unique shopping and dining experiences, all in a festive atmosphere on Main Street. Residents have convenient access to health care with local physicians and other medical specialists practicing in the city. UF Health Shands Hospital and the North Florida Regional Medical Center are just a 15-minute drive. Visitors and residents alike can enjoy the city’s Welcome Center, which houses both the Alachua Historical Society and the office of the Chamber of Commerce. The Welcome Center, which was formerly a post office and then a police station (with a jail), opened in 2014 after an extensive overhaul. The Center provides information on local businesses and also features displays and exhibits from the Alachua Historical Society. Alachua is also home to Progress Park, a 204-acre private corporate park. Established by UF, the park has 35 companies and over 1,100 employees, making it the thirdlargest concentration of bioscience companies in the state of Florida. Some city highlights include the new Legacy Park at the Hal Brady Recreation Complex, a host site for the Babe Ruth Softball World Series; Alachua Towne Centre, a restaurant and shopping hub featuring numerous shopping and dining opportunities in addition to professional and service-oriented businesses; and Main Street, a winding road lined with boutiques and eateries in the heart of the city. Coming soon is the environmentally friendly Tech City, which will be located near the San Felasco State Park.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 1 3


Welcome

Progress Park Progress Park is home to many bioscience, technology and professional services companies, conveniently located five minutes from I-75 with easy access to UF and the Gainesville Regional Airport. According to the Park’s website, in the early 1980s, Dr. Robert Marston, then-president of the University of Florida, envisioned an office and research park where university technology projects and private startup companies could co-locate for mutual benefit. Two-thirds of the more than 30 Park businesses are bioscience or technology companies. Nearly 1,200 people now work in the Progress Park. The Park’s tenants include the following:

The Charles R. and Nancy V. Perry Center for Emerging Technologies is Santa Fe College’s newest satellite campus.

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• The University of Florida’s Sid Martin Biotechnology Institute • RTI Biologics, a surgical implant company • The UF Center of Excellence for Regenerative Health Biotechnology • NCCER (originally The National Center for Construction Education and Research), which provides a standardized training and credentialing program for the construction industry The InterMed Group – a service, training and medical equipment sales company formally located in Progress Park – recently moved into the former Sabine building on 441.


Charles R. and Nancy V. Perry Center for Emerging Technologies Across from the Park is Santa Fe College’s newest satellite campus, the Charles R. and Nancy V. Perry Center for Emerging Technologies. The campus promotes training and education in the life sciences and offers an Associate of Science degree in Biotechnology Laboratory Technology and a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Clinical Laboratory Science.

Sid Martin Biotechnology Institute The Sid Martin Biotechnology Institute is a worldrecognized leader in biotechnology business incubation with well-equipped laboratories and a strong network of mentors, advisors and collaborators. The incubator, which the University of Florida operates, has graduated more than 50 companies that have generated more than $1.5 billion in revenues and other funding. The International Business Innovation Association named it the Incubator of the Year in 2013 and 2017.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 1 5


Welcome

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During 2016, the incubator welcomed 10 additional companies, bringing it to 95 percent of its capacity. The new companies include the following: During 2016, the incubator welcomed 10 additional companies, bringing it to 95 percent of its capacity. The new companies include the following: • Assembly Biosciences, Inc., which has developed new oral treatment for hepatitis B • Curtiss Healthcare, Inc., which is developing a salmonella vaccine • AlphaChem Innovations, Inc., which markets an insecticide for the mites that kill honeybees • Amend Surgical, which is developing and marketing a group of bone graph substitutes “These companies, with game-changing technologies, have come to the right place,” said Director Mark Long. “Our incubator is an innovation engine able to offer entrepreneurs and inventors the tremendous resources of the University of Florida.”

Tech City: Alachua’s New Live-Work-Play Development Mitch Glaeser and Rich Blaser aren’t millennials, but they have the enthusiasm of ones these days. Glaeser, the CEO of Emory Group Companies, and Blaser, the CEO and co-founder of Infinite Energy, are excited about San Felasco Tech City – a visionary livework-play community that they’re developing in Alachua. Glaeser is tapping into his experience as a longtime Greater Gainesville business leader and the insight he’s gained by listening to millennials as the host of the “Startup Talks” podcasts. Blaser, also a lifelong resident of Gainesville, has mentored several successful startups.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 1 7


Welcome

“San Felasco Tech City is about keeping talent here locally and providing jobs at every skill set in a live-work sustainable environment,” Blaser said. Tech City will provide the minimalist and collaborative lifestyle that many millennials desire while keeping costs low. Affordability and success are key to the concept. “Our lease rates will be about half the cost of other options around the Gainesville area,” Glaeser said. The buildings are one story, making them considerably more affordable than multiple-story buildings. Without the low rent and other attractions of Tech City, Greater Gainesville could have lost Fracture, a startup that has grown to 55 employees and now looks to double in size. Fracture will occupy one of the two 30,000-square-foot commercial buildings on the campus of the new Tech City. “With this move, we won’t have to think twice about doubling if we need to,” said co-founder and CEO Abhi Lokesh. The company, which has developed a nationwide niche in printing photographs on glass, has outgrown its space near Innovation Square.

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“We’re bursting at the seams,” Lokesh said. “It’s a good problem to have, and I’m grateful for it, but there comes a time when it limits your ceiling.

Emphasis on Environment, Health On his podcasts, Glaeser consistently hears that millennials strongly value protecting the environment and being healthy. Tech City meets these needs. Solar panels over pedestrian areas, solar roofs and even “solar trees” are expected to generate more than 1 megawatt of power, which should cover most of Tech City’s power needs. The project is still evolving its residential component. Smaller and more sustainable homes are among the concepts that the founders and tenants are exploring.


Tech City is across the street from the San Felasco Hammock Preserve State Park, a 7,200-acre mecca for hiking and biking with over 30 miles of trails, and it will have a pedestrian overpass to the park. Glaeser credits the City of Alachua with helping the project. “The city has been phenomenal to work with to achieve the kind of performance that we need to keep these rapidly growing companies here,” he said. He’s excited about this venture because it provides an opportunity for young people to stay in Greater Gainesville. “What I get excited about is keeping our families together,” Glaeser said. “There’s no reason our youth can’t go to college, earn a world-class education and then stay in this community and produce lifechanging companies.”

San Felasco Parkway On February 6, 2018, the City of Alachua received some good news that could be a game-changer for the City and Progress Park. Then Florida Governor Rick Scott announced that the City of Alachua had been awarded a $6.75 million grant through the Florida Job Growth Grant Fund f or the construction of the San Felasco Parkway and related utilities. The portion of the San Felasco Parkway project that is being funded by the grant connects County Road 241 to Progress Boulevard (connecting at the southern-most end of Progress Park) through a 280-acre, vacant and unimproved site owned by the University of Florida Foundation. The Parkway is designed as a two-lane, divided roadway with bicycle lanes and sidewalks. The project will also provide for the construction of water and wastewater utility infrastructure along the new roadway. “The announcement from the Governor exemplifies the strong reputation the City of Alachua has for promoting economic development and job growth,” Mayor Gib Coerper said. “It also demonstrates our continued commitment to create an environment in which businesses can thrive.” The San Felasco Parkway project will provide a shovel-ready site of nearly 300 acres, establishing the connection to Progress Park. The project is poised to help create more than 1,100 new jobs in Alachua during the next decade.

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Welcome

Legacy Park On November 29, 2018, the City of Alachua held a groundbreaking ceremony for Phase 2 of Legacy Park, continuing the city’s commitment to further recreation and culture opportunities for its citizens. Just 17 months earlier, City staff and other dignitaries were cutting the ribbon to unveil Phase 1 of the project, the 40,000 square foot $8 million Legacy Park Multipurpose Center. Phase 2, which is slated to be complete in the summer of 2019, includes an outdoor amphitheater, a concessions and restroom building, two multipurpose playing fields, a 150-spot parking lot and a connecting network of sidewalk. The property, now known as Legacy Park, was originally planned for a large subdivision with more than 200 homes. However, in conjunction with the downturn in the economy, the City acquired the property for a fraction of the $4 million asking price.

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“Visionaries see opportunities where others see obstacles,” City Manager Adam Boukari said during the groundbreaking for Phase 2. “I can recall at least a dozen times when the easy way out would have been to walk away from this opportunity, but our City was relentless and we refused to give up.” Recreation, sports tourism, cultural arts and other events attract visitors are vital to the community, Mayor Gib Coerper said. And with that in mind, a wide variety of events take place in Alachua, including the Babe Ruth World Series tournaments and the “Largest Small-Town Fireworks Display in America,” the Fourth of July celebration that attracts approximately 30,000 people, all located near the Hal Brady Recreation Complex. The Complex also offers a splash park, skate board park and several multipurpose fields. And, in its short, less than two-year life, the Legacy Park Multipurpose Center has already generated quite a bit of visitors and tourism dollars for the area, hosting several large sporting events and tournaments, as well as fashion shows and professional ballet events. More of the same is expected from Phase 2, affording the City further recreational opportunities, not to mention expanding the cultural arts exposure for its citizens with the new outdoor amphitheater.


From the President

BY BUD CALDERWOOD, CURRENT PRESIDENT, AND JOE HANCOCK, PAST PRESIDENT OF THE CITY OF ALACHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The first two phases of Legacy Park are just a continuation of the Master Plan that has been a more than a decade in the making. “The Legacy Park Master Plan creates a welcoming, flexible park that provides a full spectrum of sports activities, open space and passive recreation for the residents of Alachua,” states the City’s website. The park will be developed in phases that will address residents’ most immediate recreational and cultural needs, while staying true to the park’s design principles: • Increase passive and active recreation levels of service and cultural opportunities for City of Alachua residents • Seek opportunities to integrate Legacy Park with the existing Hal Brady Recreation Complex in such a manner that both become ‘one park’ • Provide for continued event and tournament use, such as the Fourth of July festivities and Babe Ruth Softball World Series • Design for the most flexible, multipurpose use • Preserve the site’s natural character and neighborhood feel “Legacy Park is a shining example of how our community continues to raise the bar for future generations,” Boukari said.

On behalf of The City of Alachua Chamber of Commerce, we would like to invite you to visit the city and experience the welcoming and walkable atmosphere of our small town with the convenience and sophistication of a much larger city. Alachua has a great history of being a very businessfriendly community while still maintaining its small-town charm. This strategy has attracted businesses from all over the world to call Alachua home, providing a wide diversity of job opportunities and a laid-back, comfortable lifestyle. There is so much to enjoy within Alachua and its surrounding communities, from historical walks, crystal clear springs, and our beautiful downtown district, to sporting events, festivals, shopping and dining. Since its inception, the City of Alachua Chamber of Commerce has been recognized and respected for its continued cooperation with the city and community. With its record of extraordinary economic and community development throughout the years, the Chamber has earned its position as an advocate for our community and local businesses. We are an active chamber that looks to advance its members’ growth and prosperity and provide increased opportunities and value for its membership. The Chamber advocates for and unites the business community, conveys business interests to policy-makers and advances the region’s economic health. To carry out this mission, the Chamber serves as the voice of business and involves the public sector in community leadership. In addition to vibrant committee work in Advocacy, Community Engagement, Services and Membership Development, the City of Alachua Chamber provides unique opportunities for its members. This includes our special events, such as the Annual Banquet, monthly membership meetings, the Sportsfest Golf Tournament, the Alachua Car Show, Scarecrow Row and the Christmas Parade. This year, we have started a Farmers Market on the Chamber’s property. The Market is open every Thursday from 4 p.m. till 7 p.m., weather willing and crops available. We only have venders that grow local fresh products. Our other regular events include business after-hours, business before-hours, ribbon cuttings and luncheons.

Welcome from the City of Alachua Chamber of Commerce!

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Welcome

Archer City Website:.............................................................cityofarcher.com Population: ...........................................................................................1,191 City Hall Address: 16870 SW 134th Ave., Archer, FL 32618 Mayor: .........................................................................................Iris Bailey City Manager: .................................Charles A. “Tony” Hammond Contact: .......................................................................(352) 495-2880

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*

The City of Archer began as a frontier village in the 1840s in the southwest corner of Alachua County on gently rolling hammock land. In 1859 the railroad came to the city making Archer an important railroad town from the end of the Civil War through the 1930s. The city is named after James T. Archer, Florida’s first Secretary of State, but was founded by Kamren D. Fort. In 1905, William Emory “Hitup” Maddox started Maddox Foundry & Machine Works, and his descendants still operate the businesses, which is Archer’s main employer. Just over 1,000 people call Archer’s 6.9 square miles of space home. Santa Fe College’s satellite campus provides higher education opportunities to both Archer and southwest Alachua County residents. The city boasts the Archer Railroad Museum and the Community Center, a variety of stores line Main Street, as well as historic homes dating back to late 19th century. Archer maintains its small-town charm, historic character and memories of the railroad that connected the city to commerce and opportunity.


Restaurants

Bars

Shopping Centers Activities

DEE’S SANDWICH INN

THE MUSTANG GRILL AND BAR

SAVE-A-LOT

Location: 13682 FL-45 Archer, FL 32618 Phone: (352) 495-9222 Cuisine: Sandwich shop for quick bites. Quiet and casual

Location: 13232 FL-45 Archer, FL 32618

Location: 12859 FL-45 Archer, FL 32618

Phone: (352) 495-3100

FAMILY DOLLAR

Cuisine: American barbecue, burgers and multi-cuisine

Location: 520 N University Ave. Archer, FL 32618

THE ARCHER COMMUNITY CENTER Location: 16671 SW 137 Ave. Archer, FL 32618 ARCHER HISTORICAL SOCIETY RAILROAD MUSEUM

LOS AVINA MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Location: 16994 SW 134th Ave. Archer, FL 32618

Location: 201 SW Archer Rd. Archer, FL 32618

Hours: Saturdays: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Phone: (352) 495-1314 Cuisine: Mexican

ARCHER LIBRARY BRANCH Location: 13266 FL-45 Archer, FL 32618 Hours: Monday – Thursday: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Sunday: 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. HOLLY HILLS TOT LOT PARK Location: 504 Hillside Ave. Archer, FL 32618

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Welcome

Restaurants EMBERS WOOD GRILL

City of Gainesville Charting a Course toward a New American City

City Website:................................. www.cityofgainesville.org Population:..........................................................................132,249

Location: 3545 SW 34th St, Gainesville, FL 32608 Cuisine: High-end chophouse serves surf ‘n’ turf & a broad wine list with a full bar & outdoor seating. Hours: Open from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. (Monday - Thursday) and 5 to 11 p.m. Saturday. Closed Sunday DRAGONFLY SUSHI Location: 201 SE Second Ave. #104, Gainesville, FL, 32601 Cuisine: Japanese

City Hall Address: 200 E University Ave, Gainesville, FL 32601

Hours: Open from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Thursday-Friday), 5 to 10 p.m. (Sunday-Thursday), 5 to 11 p.m. (Friday-Saturday)

Mayor:............................................................................ Lauren Poe Contact:...............................................................(352)-334-5015

ALPIN BISTRO Location: 15 SW Second St., Gainesville, FL 32601

Situated in North Central Florida, Gainesville is the county seat and largest city in Alachua County, spanning an area of 62.4 square miles. Home to the University of Florida, the Gainesville community has much to offer, from fine dining to family-friendly recreational facilities, from great entertainment to arts and culture. Additionally, the city is not only close to the most popular Florida beaches but also has many world-class springs. Gainesville is defining a new kind of city – a New American City – that aspires to become a model for other communities. The city seeks to solve critical issues through collaboration and intentional design. More important, planners strive to create a new and inspiring experience for the people who call Gainesville home. The city of Gainesville, aligned with its community partners, will become a lab for

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the exploration of pressing social and legacy challenges. To seek the greater good, Gainesville will bring great minds with different viewpoints together to solve its toughest challenges. Creating a New American City is not a task for your government alone. It is a shared responsibility as a community of citizens interested in making Gainesville a leader in quality of life. This citizenled initiative will only find success through your continued involvement and engagement. What is your big idea for Gainesville? The city invites you to be part of this cutting-edge movement to become the iconic example of the next New American City. Share your big ideas and inspire others to do the same! Drop a line at comments@ cityofgainesville.org to share your thoughts.

Cuisine: French Hours: Open from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. (TuesdayWednesday), 5 p.m. to 12 a.m. (Thursday - Saturday), 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (Saturday) PUBLIC & GENERAL Location: 1000 NE 16th Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601 Cuisine: Self-service restaurant, bar and neighborhood grocery Hours: Open from 12 to 10 p.m. (Tuesday -Thursday) and 12 to 11 p.m. (Friday-Saturday)


MANUEL’S VINTAGE ROOM

THE DIME

Location: 6 S Main St., Gainesville, FL 32601

Location: 4 E University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601

Activities

Cuisine: Italian

Hours: Open from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. (Monday-Saturday) and from 1 to 11 p.m. (Sunday)

ART WALK GAINESVILLE

Hours: Open from 5 to 10 p.m. (Tuesday-Saturday), 5 to 9 p.m. (Sunday)

THE BULL Location: 18 SW First Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601

Bars

Hours: Open from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. (Monday-Saturday)

Description: A free self-guided tour that combines exciting visual art, live performance and events in Downtown Gainesville. Hours: Every last Friday of the month from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. CRAFT FESTIVAL

LILLIAN’S MUSIC STORE Location: 112 SE 1st St. Gainesville, FL 32601 Hours: Open Monday Saturday from 2 p.m. - 2 a.m., closed on Sundays LOOSEY’S Location: 120 SW 1st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 Hours: Open from 11 a.m. - 12 a.m. (Sunday – Wednesday.), from 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. (Thursday –Saturday) WHISKEY HOUSE Location: 60 SW Second St., Gainesville, FL 32601 Hours: Open from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. (Sunday-Tuesday) and 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. (Wednesday-Saturday) HOUSE OF BEER Location: 19 W University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601 Hours: Open from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. (Monday-Friday) and from 8 to 2 a.m. (Saturday-Sunday)

Markets

Location: Stephen O’Connell Center, 250 Gale Lemerand Dr., Gainesville, FL 32611 Hours: Dec. 2 and Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

UNION STREET FARMERS MARKET Location: Bo Diddley Plaza, 111 E University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601 Hours: Every Wednesday from 4 to 7 p.m. in Downtown Gainesville HAILE FARMERS MARKET Location: SW 91st Ter., Gainesville, FL 32608 Hours: Every Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.

DOWNTOWN FESTIVAL AND ART SHOW Location: 200 E University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601 Hours: Nov. 11 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m and Nov. 12 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. SANTA FE COLLEGE TEACHING ZOO Location: 3000 NW 83rd Street, Bldg. Z, Gainesville, FL 32606 Hours: Open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily FLORIDA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY Location: 3215 Hull Rd., Gainesville, FL 32611 Hours: Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Monday-Saturday), 1 to 5 p.m. (Sunday)

MORNINGSIDE NATURE CENTER AND LIVING HISTORY FARM Location: 3540 E University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32641 Hours: Open from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. daily (November-April), 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily (May-October); Living History Farm open 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (Monday Saturday year-round) PAYNES PRAIRIE PRESERVE STATE PARK Location: 100 Savannah Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667 Hours: 8 a.m. to sundown daily. Cost: $6.00 per vehicle (limit 2-8 people), $4.00 for a singleoccupant vehicle and $2.00 for pedestrians or cyclists SANTA FE CANOE OUTPOST Location: 21410 US-441, High Springs, FL 32643 Hours: Open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Monday-Friday), 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Saturday) and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Sunday) ICHETUCKNEE SPRINGS STATE PARK Location: 12087 US-27, Fort White, FL 32038 Hours: Open from 8 a.m. to sundown daily. DEVIL’S MILLHOPPER GEOLOGICAL STATE PARK Location: 4732 Millhopper Rd., Gainesville, FL 32653 Hours: Open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Wednesday-Sunday)

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Welcome

Hawthorne City Website:......................................................cityofhawthorne.net Population:......................................................................................... 1,525 City Hall Address: 6875 SE 221st St., Hawthorne, FL 32640 Mayor:....................................................................... Matthew Surrency City Manager:......................................................................Ellen Vause Contact:......................................................................... (352) 481-2432

Nestled among the lakes and forests of eastern Alachua County, tiny Hawthorne is a fishing, hunting, hiking and bicycling mecca. Settled in 1834, the town was incorporated in 1881 and now has a population of 1,500 people, including generations of residents who would never want to live anywhere else. Notable neighbors in the past have included Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, whose book “The Yearling” put Cross Creek on the map, and rock-n-roll legend Bo Diddley. The Hawthorne-to-Gainesville biking and hiking trail, the region’s many lakes – including bassfilled Lake Lochloosa – ample hunting areas and the 1,300-acre Little Orange Creek Nature Park will appeal to the active visitor, while those seeking a quieter experience may enjoy the Hawthorne Historical Museum and Cultural Center. Civic amenities include a handsome public library, a well-appointed health and wellness center, a Cultural Center in the former and historic City Hall, two major schools – Shell Elementary and Hawthorne Middle High School – and local restaurants, where home cooking and Southern hospitality are on the menu.

Restaurants BURGER BARN Location: 6505 SE US Hwy 301 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-4655 Cuisine: Serving lunch & dinner DIANNE’S OLD TIME BARBECUE Location: 6707 SE Hwy 301 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-3305 Cuisine: Casual family barbecue JUDY’S PIZZA Location: 6005 SE Hawthorne Rd. Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-2232 Cuisine: Italian & pizza PJ’S CAFÉ & CATERING Location: 6005 SE Hwy 301 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-4801 Cuisine: Breakfast & lunch served daily SOUTHERN BUTTS BBQ Location: 6850 SE US Hwy 301 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (386) 684-1414 Cuisine: Barbecue cuisine and food truck

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Kinnan Rawlings lived and worked in the tiny community of Cross Creek including her cracker style home and farm where she wrote “The Yearling.”

THE YEARLING RESTAURANT Location: 14531 E CR 325 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 466-3999 Cuisine: American and southern

Shopping Centers Activities BLUE STAR NURSERY Location: 8115 SE US Hwy 301 Hawthorne, FL 32640

COWBOY EDDIE’S ARENA Location: 22107 E County Rd. 1474 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (321) 288-1790 Description: Family-owned and operated rodeo, bull riding and team sorting venue GAINESVILLE-HAWTHORNE STATE TRAIL Location: 3400 SE 15th St Gainesville, FL 32641 Hours: 8 a.m. until sundown, 365 days a year Description: Enjoy 16 miles of paved trail from the city of Gainesville through Hawthorne – perfect for biking, walking and horseback riding HAWTHORNE CHAMBER OF HORRORS Location: 6000 SE 205th St. Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 363-5125 Time: Final Saturday in October from 7:30 p.m. – 10 p.m.

HAWTHORNE HISTORICAL MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER Location: 7225 SE 221 St. Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-4491 Hours: Saturdays: 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. Description: The Hawthorne Historical Museum and Cultural Center holds artifacts and paintings from Hawthorne’s past. Included are a series of paintings by Francis Moore, an artist known locally as “Hawthorne’s Grandpa Moses,” and a large quilt that incorporates images of 20 historic homes in Hawthorne. Magnesia Springs bottles are on display. ISLAND GROVE WINE COMPANY TASTING HOUSE Location: 21848 S CR 325 Island Grove, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-1012 Hours: Monday – Friday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sunday: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

LITTLE ORANGE CREEK NATURE PARK Location: 24115 SR 20 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (353) 481-2432, (352) 359-2603 Hours: Open dawn to dusk every day Description: Public trails for hiking, bicycling and horseback riding. Dogs on leash welcome. LOCHLOOSA WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA Description: More than 11,000 acres of pine plantations and water oak and live oak ridges that provide a natural habitat for bald eagles, osprey and wading birds. Eighteen listed species live within the area including the Florida black bear, fox squirrel, eastern indigo snake, wood stork and sandhill crane. Enjoy fishing, hiking, horseback riding, canoeing and boating.

LAKE LOCHLOOSA

MARJORIE KINNAN RAWLINGS HISTORIC STATE PARK

Location: Five miles south of Hawthorne

Location:18700 S CR 325 Cross Creek, FL 32640

Description: 6,000 acres in area – surrounded by Lochloosa Wildlife Management Area. Public boat ramp, popular fishing site for bluegill, redear sunfish and warmouth

Phone: (352) 466-3672

Phone: (352) 481-3300 Hours: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Description: Garden Center BUFFALO EXCHANGE TRADING COMPANY Location: 6065 SE US Hwy 301 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-0010 Hours: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Description: Specializing in antiques, vintage painted furniture and collectibles HAWTHORNE SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER Location: 6005 US Hwy 301 Hawthorne, FL 32640 ISLAND GROVE WINE COMPANY Location: 21848 S CR 325 Hawthorne, FL 32640 Phone: (352) 481-1012 Hours: Monday – Friday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sunday: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Hours: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily Description: Visitors can tour 1930s farm life where Marjorie

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Welcome

High Springs City Website:..................................................................highsprings.us Population: ........................................................................................ 5,941 City Hall Address: 110 NW 1st Ave., High Springs, FL 32643 Mayor: ...............................................................................Scott Jamison City Manager: ..........................................................................Ed Booth Contact: ........................................................................(386) 454-3120

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Few communities can claim the uniqueness of High Springs — this is a city where history, nature and education meet arts, culture and community. Businesses and residents alike embrace the City’s charming and inviting personality and welcome visitors from all over the world to appreciate the beauty of a city centered around a vibrant, walkable historical downtown. G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 2 9


Welcome

Celebrating History Beginning in the 1800s, High Springs was a core part of the Plant System rail yard and roundhouse. High Springs grew into a busy town because of the railroad and the phosphate mining industries that the trains supported. In 1888, the Plant System Railroad built a railroad center, which consisted of three branches of rails converging in a huge roundhouse. By the end of the 19th century the town was booming with two airports, three theaters, repair shops and a two-story district hospital. But as the railroads dissipated, miners and workers left as well. High Springs, however, is dedicated to preserving its history and embracing its past. The High Springs Museum is open on select weekends of the month and is dedicated to preserving the history of “The Railroad Center” and the life and times of the 1800s to early 1900s. The museum features railroad memorabilia as well as Native American artifacts, clothing and items from the original general store. “High Springs is blessed in so many ways,” said Kristina Wright, Director of the High Springs Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA). “We have so many specialized niche markets within our community that other areas cannot match. Our history with the railroad underpins our story and continues today with the renovation of the historical Depot building that houses the CRA office and we are eager to implement the High Springs to Newberry Rail Trail.” The High Springs CRA is spurring the development of several projects while encouraging visitors to experience what sets High Springs apart as the gateway to the springs – the high-quality shops and eateries featured in its historical downtown, the self-guided walking tour that highlights the murals within the Florida Quilt Trail and the history and culture of this former railroad hub. The Rail Trail will feature 13 miles of abandoned CSX rail corridor between High Springs and Newberry, which will be converted to a paved, multi-use recreational trail.

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Welcome

Top Notch Schools Another major attractor to the High Springs area is the quality of the High Springs Community School, which serves 893 students in grades Prekindergarten-8th grade. The High Springs Community School placed in the top 30 percent of all schools in Florida for overall test scores in math and reading proficiency for the 2015-2016 school year. “First and foremost, contributing towards growth and economic development is the quality of our schools within proximity to our walkable, historical downtown,” Wright said. “We consistently have A-rated schools in our community, and that is something of which we are all proud of in High Springs.”

Come for Nature, Stay for Culture A major draw to the area is the beautiful springs, all within 30 minutes of the city. These include Poe Springs, Blue Springs, Ginnie Springs and O’Leno State Park. Florida’s springs and rivers have long been known as premiere natural vacation destinations, bringing hundreds of millions of dollars to the local economy. No matter how hot the summers get, the water in any of Florida’s hundreds of freshwater springs is never warmer than 75 degrees. Most spring water ranges from a refreshing 68 to 72 degrees year-round. The most local spring to High Springs, Poe Springs, is listed as one of the major springs in Florida. The Florida Springs Institute is located in High Springs and represents all of Florida’s springs. The Institute is committed to conserving Florida’s springs through science and education and has spent the past eight years monitoring water quality of springs throughout Florida. The Institute hosts several charity events to benefit Florida’s springs as well as educational programs for adults and children who want to learn more. The springs also attract divers from around the world. Cave County Dive Shop is happy to welcome and educate these visitors. “We are centrally located within 30 minutes to several world-class natural springs,” said Kristi Bernot, manager of Cave County Dive Shop. “Many divers from all over the world travel here to visit, dive in, and enjoy our springs and caves.” Cave County Dive Shop offer fills, repair, gear rental, service and diving courses, from basic open water up through instructor, cave and rebreather training. The shop’s professional staff can handle all diving needs. Although it may attract global customers, the local community atmosphere is what makes the employees at Cave County so happy to pursue their “labor of love.” “We love the small-town feel; our customers are like family and we enjoy all the wonderful outdoor activities to be found in the area,” Bernot said. While the springs may attract visitors, the unique vibe and culture of High Springs is what entices them to explore. There is a thriving

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arts scene in the town that has been developed and grown by a group of committed local artists and art enthusiasts. Tina Corbett, owner of Lanza Art Gallery, organized the original art co-op of 21 local artists, jewelers, potters and painters. “Of course, a lot of the art that is popular in the gallery are [paintings and] photos surrounding the springs, because that is what attracted people to the area in the first place,” Corbett said. “We have people who come here from far-off places from around the world, even as far as Lithuania.” Corbett’s store is also part of the Quilt Mural Trail, which was created to join with Trenton’s Mural Trail. A quilt trail is a series of quilt squares – painted wood or metal, hung or free-standing – installed at various locations along a route, emphasizing significant architecture and/or aesthetic landscapes. The other locations in High Springs include River Run Olive Oil, the Antique Center, the High Springs Historical Museum and Bennett’s True Value Hardware. These High Springs merchants and places embraced the quilt trail to attract more visitors to High Springs and enhance the arts culture in the city. Merchants and the CRA have also embraced the First Friday’s events where downtown merchants, such as Lanza Art Gallery, antique shops, unique craft stores and restaurants like The Great Outdoors and Bambi’s Café stay open late with live music to accompany the ambience. In fact, Bambi’s has begun hosting fivecourse meals throughout the evening and frequently sells out. The self-guided walking tour highlights the quilt murals, and there is often music, sampling, discounts, and giveaways. Lanza Gallery even hosted a sidewalk chalk event during the event as well, which was a huge success that they hope to continue on an annual basis. “High Springs is growing, and I would love for the arts scene to continue to grow with it,” Corbett said. “We host the Santa Fe Springs Plein Art Paint Out, which is an annual event with over 20 artists painting the beautiful North Florida Springs for several days.” The City, Chamber of Commerce, and community partners host several popular festivals, including Pioneer Days, a family-friendly event featuring handmade art and crafts, pony rides, costume contests and a reenacted shoot-out twice daily. Each summer the city is filled with music with Folk in the Springs, a series of performances that showcase several venues throughout the High Springs Historic Downtown District.


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Welcome

Small Town Feel and Community Vibe The High Springs population is estimated to be about 6,000 people, growing by 66 percent in the last 15 years. There are about 600 businesses with most being small, unique shops that give High Springs its small-town charm. In the center of downtown High Springs is the Priest Theatre, the oldest operating movie theater in the state. Opened in 1910, the Priest Theatre has been a constant in the community throughout the past 118 years, where community members gather and families meet. “The Theatre is such an important part of High Springs to its residents,” said Janet Alligood, who owns and operates the theatre with her husband; her parents ran it for 28 years prior to that. “It feels like home to so many people and has a lot of historical significance. Now we have adults who went there as children whose grandchildren and great-grandchildren also were patrons.” The theatre includes a balcony, a large, open lobby and an auditorium that seats 240 people. Two great columns flank the stage with stairs on each side that had originally led to the actors’ dressing rooms. All of these features still exist, and most are functional. In the beginning, the venue was host to vaudeville and traveling acts. There were many impressive performances on stage at the Priest such as Smiley Burnett, who worked with Gene Autry, Roy Rogers and his horse, Trigger, as well as on television’s Petticoat Junction. By the 1950s, the Priest Theatre screened up to five different movies each week. Parents never worried when their children visited the Priest Theatre because Alligood’s mother was famous for telling teenagers to “mind their manners,” Alligood said. That family-friendly environment continues today. The Priest Theatre now hosts a new film every weekend at a deeply discounted price, as well as special events, field trips and summer programs. Alligood said she would like it to become more of a live performance venue during the week if she can find the right partner who would be willing to manage that side of it. “A strong sense of community and a well-established historical downtown, in addition to the natural springs, all attract people to our area,” Wright said. “High Springs has such a special ambiance and our niche creative, recreational and environmental markets complement these treasured, pristine springs.” Another hidden gem is Camp Kulaqua, which offers lodge-style rooms, cabins, banquets, cookouts, seminar rooms, outdoor activities like horseback rides and zip lining, as well as an extensive water park. River Ranch Water Park is an aquatics facility that provides a safe atmosphere with a 15,000 square-foot wave pool, a 600-foot-long lazy river, water slide, sand volleyball courts and covered picnic areas. River Ranch is open from mid-April till the end of August. It’s available by reservation only, except during Community Event Days, when the water park is open to the public. No reservations are required, and you can pay at the front gate upon arrival.

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Stay and Play The Grady House Bed and Breakfast is a significant High Springs’ destination. Located in the heart of downtown, this B&B recognizes that the main attractions to the area are the beautiful springs and rivers. “As businesses, we join together to meet the needs of visitors with our downtown area, our antique shops, restaurants like The Great Outdoors and historical attractions like our bed and breakfast,” said owner Bobbie Sabo. Bobbie and her husband are the fourth owners of the 101-yearold home. Born out of the need for housing for people working on the railroad, the home began as a boarding house and evolved into a bakery and apartment. As a bed and breakfast, there are six beautifully decorated rooms, each painted and named after a different color. Guests can enjoy a gourmet breakfast and relax with a cup of tea or coffee in one of the sitting areas. A previous Grady House owner purchased the 122-year-old Easterlin House next door and transformed it into Skeet’s Cottage, a beautiful two-story Victorian home. With two spacious bedrooms upstairs and one bathroom downstairs it also features a clawfoot tub with a shower. Guests have access to a full kitchen, a family room, a parlor and a spacious dining area. One of the Sabo’s major undertakings is renovating the gardens, so they are a more accessible and beautiful experience for guests. This will help the business as it moves into what will be one of its next ventures: making the Grady House a venue for couples to get married.


“We go all-out for our guests, based on their needs. If that means fresh flowers in the bedrooms or champagne and chocolate-covered strawberries to meet them in the evening,” Sabo said. “We also can work with guests to recommend local businesses and vendors who can help with their wedding or vacation needs.” Sabo said there is truly no busy season and business can be affected by many things. “If the rivers or springs are too high, we may have less visitors,” Sabo said. “The performance of the UF football team even affects people attracted to the area. If a hurricane affects another part of the state, we may get traffic from people who are leaving the storm. It’s variable depending on the year.”

The Future… High Springs continues to flourish and grow, and the Community Redevelopment Agency is creating and implementing plans that will achieve and advance the vision of the community. One element of these plans is to create more workforce and affordable housing and solid plans are in place for the near future. The CRA is eager to embrace the construction of the Market Pavilion with funding provided through a grant obtained from the USDA. Within the next year, downtown will begin an aesthetic transformation that will further promote and enhance this exceptional community to further attract commerce while embracing and enhancing the quality of life for residents and guests. “We are growing and need additional quality development, including workforce and affordable housing, to better address the needs of ‘the missing middle.’ So many are attracted to our community and want a simple, high-quality lifestyle where it is possible to walk and bike to town and even out to the Springs,” Wright said. “We are putting plans in place to best achieve these goals.” In addition to providing housing, the CRA is seeking to assist a non-profit organization to expand community resources into a larger center to help make it possible to provide additional services for those in need. In the future, the hope is to implement a model of expanded services similar to the Tri-county Community Resource Center in Chiefland or the Southwest Advocacy Group (SWAG) Family Resource Center. Wright said their hope is to eventually build an even larger multi-purpose facility to include a Boys and Girls Club or a similar facility for the youth in the area. One of the major development projects on the horizon is the construction of the High Springs Market Pavilion, which will be funded by a $199,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The CRA also intends to create a master plan that will feature professional landscaping and architectural and landscape lighting and irrigation. Other improvements could include a marquee, a fountain, extra lighting, outdoor seating, a café and play spaces. “We are in the midst of developing our city center to showcase and enhance all of the amazing things that we have in High Springs, including our unique history and a number of well-designed programs and future economic development,” Wright said. “We truly are a special community and a true hidden gem, and we are developing to best support our community while embracing the future.”

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Welcome

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LaCrosse City Website:........................................................townoflacrosse.net Population:............................................................................................390 City Hall Address: 20613 N State Road 121, LaCrosse, FL 32658 Mayor:...........................................................................Dianne Dubberly Town Clerk:............................................................................. Lee Forzly Contact:........................................................................ (386) 462-2784

Activities FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Location: 5700 NW 203 Pl., LaCrosse, FL 32658 Phone: (352) 258-4076 Description: Established in the 1800s

LaCrosse, also known as the “Potato District,” is just over 15 miles north of Gainesville. The area was settled in the 1860s, and the town became a part of Alachua County in 1957. This rural town consists of 4.4 square miles of farmland mostly dedicated to agriculture, including vegetables, cattle and potatoes. Natives and tourists have made the Packing Shed, a hub of fresh fruit and vegetables, one of the most popular areas in LaCrosse. The town is also known for its small businesses. The town offers recreational activities including the LaCrosse Recreational Park that has a halfcourt basketball court, tennis court, playground area and picnic pavilions. LaCrosse takes pride in its fire department, which offers rural firerescue services to county residents within an approximate 86-square-mile area surrounding the town. It is also a part of the weekly bookmobile stop from the Alachua County Library District.

CELLON OAK PARK Location: Follow SR 121 North from Gainesville towards LaCrosse. A small brown sign points the way (left turn) down NW 169th PL to the park, open dawn until dusk. Description: Home of the Largest Live Oak (in terms of crown spread). STEVEN DAVIS FARMS Location: 20915 North State Rd. 121, LaCrosse, Florida 32658 Phone: 386-418-0511 Description: Citizens can flock to this farm to purchase fresh farm vegetables and other produce in a traditional setting of a packing shed. The farm is well-known for its famous field peas.

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Welcome

Micanopy City Website:.......................................................micanopytown.com Population:............................................................................................605 City Hall Address: 706 NE Cholokka Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667 Mayor:....................................................................................... Tim Parker Town Administrator:...............................................Debbie Gonano Contact:.......................................................................... (352) 466-3121 Email:....................................................... micanopytown@gmail.com

Voted one of “the cutest towns in America” by the Huffington Post, Micanopy is a charming community chock-full of antique stores, small cafés and gorgeous nature attractions. Just a little south of Gainesville, the 187-yearold town is home to around 600 people. The city was founded in 1821 – the year that Spain ceded its Florida land to the United States. Micanopy is believed to be the oldest inland town in Florida by the Florida Historical Society. If this history intrigues you, you can learn more by visiting the Micanopy Historical Society Museum. Antiquers come from all over Florida to search for treasures in the shops along Cholokka Boulevard. Additionally, Micanopy’s annual fall festival attracts visitors from all over Central Florida. If outdoor activities are more your cup of tea, Micanopy offers paddle boarding, rock climbing and disc golf at Lake Wauburg. Micanopy is also home to Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park, which offers beautiful nature trails and outlooks, wild bison, horses, alligators, deer and hundreds of species of birds. Visitors can also explore nature trails and wetland areas in Micanopy’s Barr Hammock Preserve and Price’s Scrub State Park. The town’s unique character attracts many visitors each year and has been captured in several movies, including “Doc Hollywood,” “Cross Creek” and “Miracle Child.” Micanopy is located between U.S. 441 and I-75 in the southern part of Alachua County.

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PEARL COUNTRY STORE & BARBECUE

REDDICK BROTHERS HARDWARE

MICANOPY FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL

Location: 106-A NE Hwy US 441, Micanopy, FL 32667

Location: 16217 Hwy 441 S, Micanopy, FL 32667

Location: Downtown Micanopy

Phone: (352) 466-4025

Phone: (352) 466-3740

Hours: Monday – Sunday: 6 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Description: Hardware equipment

Phone: (352) 591-4141

Cuisine: American breakfast, lunch and dinner

SHADY OAK GALLERY

Hours: Closed Mondays and Tuesdays, Wednesday – Thursday: 4 p.m. – 9 p.m. Friday – Saturday: noon – 10 p.m., Sunday: noon – 7 p.m.

THE DEPOT SPORTS BAR & PIZZERIA

Restaurants ANTONIO’S MADE IN ITALY Location: 22050 N US Hwy 441, Micanopy, FL 32667

Cuisine: Italian cuisine and signature dishes BLUE HIGHWAY, A PIZZERIA Location: 204 NE Hwy 441, Micanopy, FL 32667 Phone: (352) 466-0062

Location: 22060 US 441, Micanopy, FL 32667 Phone: (352) 591-0145 Hours: Closed Mondays, Tuesday – Thursday: 4 p.m. – 9 p.m., Friday – Saturday: noon – 10 p.m., Sunday: 2 p.m. – 8 p. m. Cuisine: Fresh wings, sandwiches, beer and wine

Hours: Monday – Saturday: 11:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. Sunday: noon – 8 p.m. Cuisine: Local chain eatery serving pizzas, paninis and Mediterranean small plates in a casual atmosphere MOSSWOOD FARM STORE AND BAKEHOUSE

Location: 205 NE Cholokka Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667

Location: 703 NE Cholokka Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667

Phone: (352) 466-0010

Hours: Monday – Sunday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Cuisine: Bakehouse, coffeehouse and bookstore with a passion for environmentally friendly practices

Phone: (352) 466-3476

Description: Antique store

Description: Crafts, artists, live music, delicious food and baked goods

Description: Shopping & Retail, Art Gallery

MICANOPY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM & ARCHIVES

WINTERS PAST

Location: 607 NE Cholokka Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667

Location: 116 NE Cholokka Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667

Phone: (352) 466-3200

Phone: (352) 545-7009

MICANOPY HISTORIC CEMETERY

Description: Vintage Store

Shopping Centers Activities MICANOPY OUTPOST

Phone: (352) 466-5002

Location: 201 NE Cholokka Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667

Time: Typically held the last weekend of October, Saturday from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sunday, from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Check website for details. www.micanopyfallfestival.org

COON HOLLO FARM Location: 22480 N US Hwy 441, Micanopy, FL 32667 Phone: (352) 318-9258 Description: Visit a working farm and enjoy a corn maze in the fall, flower picking in the spring and u-pick veggies www.coonhollocornmaze.com

Location: 4412 NW 76th Terr., Micanopy, FL 32667 Description: The first recorded burial dates from 1826 PAYNES PRAIRIE PRESERVE STATE PARK Location: 100 Savannah Blvd., Micanopy, FL 32667-3475 Phone: (352) 466-3397 Description: More than 20 distinct biological communities, more than 300 species of birds, eight trails for hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, and fishing on Lake Wauburg

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Welcome

Newberry/ Jonesville City Website:...................................................www.ci.newberry.fl.us Population:........................................................................................ 5,942 City Hall Address: 25440 W Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 Mayor:............................................................................Jordan Marlowe City Manager:......................................................................... Mike New Contact:.........................................................................(352) 472-21611 Email: ................................................................. info@ci.newberry.fl.us

Spanning an area of 55 square miles, the town of Newberry is located in Alachua County, west of Gainesville on Newberry Road (State Route 26). Newberry is a beautiful and vibrant community that draws visitors for its recreation facilities and dining experiences. Businesses are attracted by its diverse mix of industries, access to rail and talented labor force. The city is developing sports tourism through the Easton-Newberry Olympic Archery Center, which trains archers — including Olympic contenders — and the 16-field Champions Park, which hosts youth baseball tournaments for teams from throughout the Southeastern U.S. Held in mid-May, the Newberry Watermelon Festival is the longestrunning watermelon festival in the country, attracting visitors from across Central Florida. The festival includes free locally grown watermelons, a beauty pageant, plus contests for seed-spitting, hog calling, pie and cake baking. In the Newberry area is the Town of Tioga in Jonesville, a modern town with gorgeous houses and premier shopping and restaurants. The Tioga Town Center offers both dining and shopping, and often hosts events for people of all ages such as a concert series and the annual Holiday Festival and Tree Lighting in December.

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Restaurants VILLAGGIO PIZZERIA Location: 179 SW 250 St. Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 472-5855 Cuisine: Italian, Pizza COUNTRY KITCHEN Location: 25335 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 472-2221 Cuisine: Serves breakfast all day and other American comfort fare in a casual space LOS AVINA MEXICAN RESTAURANT Location: 25461 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 354-8060 Cuisine: Mexican RED WOK Location: 2211, 24204 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 472-3288 Cuisine: Chinese

NEWBERRY PIZZA

GREEN TREE

Location: 120 SW 250 St, Newberry, FL 32669

Location: 14236 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669

Phone: (352) 472-4446

Phone: (352) 331-9920

Cuisine: Italian

Cuisine: Chinese

TOWN OF TIOGA

O SOLE MIO CUCINA ITALIANA

BLUE HIGHWAY A PIZZERIA

Location: 105 SW 128th St # 200, Newberry, FL 32669

Location: 14230 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669

Location: Tioga Town Center, 13005 SW 1 Rd #141, Jonesville, FL 32669

Phone: (352) 332-0916

Phone: (352) 505-6833

Cuisine: Thin-crust slices & pies and other Italian favorites.

Cuisine: Pizzas, Panini & Mediterranean small plates

MAMA LUCY’S BAR-B-Q

TOP HOG

Location: 17010 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669

Location: 14128 W Newberry Rd suite 10, Newberry, FL 32669

Phone: (352) 363-4607

Phone: (352) 331-6035

Cuisine: Slow cooked BBQ with made-from-scratch sauce, cooked-to-order burgers and home style sides.

Cuisine: Barbecue

CILANTRO TACOS Location: Tioga Town Center, 12921 SW 1 Rd Suite #103, Newberry, FL 32669

Cuisine: Seafood market

Location: 140 SW 128th St building 5 suite D, Newberry, FL 32669

Cuisine: Hamburgers and Entrees

Cuisine: Barbecue

Phone: (352) 333-3298

COPPER MONKEY WEST

Location: 102 NW 1st Ave, Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 354-8100

Location: Tioga Town Center, 13005 SW 1 Rd Ste. 135, Newberry, FL 32669

MAPLE STREET BISCUIT COMPANY- TIOGA

Phone: (352) 363-6338

FUJI SUSHI Location: 14218 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 332-9888 Cuisine: Japanese, Sushi rolls & Sashimi

Activities EASTON NEWBERRY ARCHERY CENTER Location: 24880 NW 16 Ave., Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 472-2388

Cuisine: Mexican

WOODYARD GRILL

Description: Enjoy open air shopping at Tioga Town Center and browse for the latest trends and styles.

NORTHWEST SEAFOOD

Phone: (352) 472-1300

Location: 14209 W Newberry Rd, Newberry, FL 32669

Shopping Centers

CHAMPIONS PARK Location: 24309 SW 30th Ave, Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 472-2388 DUDLEY FARM HISTORIC STATE PARK Location: 18730 W Newberry Rd., Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 472-1142

Phone: (352) 363-6060 Cuisine: Biscuit sandwiches & Southern sides for breakfast & lunch DAVE’S NEW YORK DELI

M2 BATTLESPORTS NEWBERRY Location: 24880 NW 16th Ave., Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (386) 965-5832

Location: Tioga Town Center, 12921 SW 1 Rd., Newberry, FL 32669 Phone: (352) 333-0291 Cuisine: Deli Sandwiches, Burgers, Soups, Salads & Sides

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Welcome

Waldo City Website:..................................................................... waldo-fl.com Population: ........................................................................................1,030 City Hall Address: 14655 Kennard St., Waldo, FL 32694 Mayor: .....................................................................................Louie Davis City Manager: ..................................................................... Kim Worley Contact: .........................................................................(352) 468-1001

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*

In a place where trains hustled in and out of the station and a sense of rush was always in the air, the town of Waldo now remains a calm, quiet town just north of Gainesville. Founded in 1820, Waldo is one of the oldest towns in Alachua County. In its prime, Waldo was home to swanky hotels, the El Toney cigar factory, an opera house and two theaters. Nowadays, mementos from the past still sit in some parts of town. Two adjacent businesses attract visitors to Waldo – the Waldo Flea Market and Waldo’s Antique Village. The antique village, owned by Rosanna and Carl Smith, accommodates 65 vendors. Many visitors from Central Florida come to spend a day hunting for the perfect antique. Today, the old red caboose in Waldo’s city park is the biggest symbol of the past. The caboose is a reminder that Waldo is a great place to live and raise a family. Its proximity to other places in Alachua County attracts newcomers who prefer to live quietly on the outskirts while working in a big town. Waldo is located on U.S. 301 and is the gateway to Alachua County.


ALACHUACOUNTY.US

Restaurants

Shopping Centers Activities

RANDY’S RIB SHACK

WALDO FARMERS AND FLEA MARKET, THE OLDFASHIONED FLEA MARKET

Location: 14805 Waldo Road, Waldo, FL 32694 Phone: (352) 468-1345

Location: 17805 US Hwy 301 Waldo, FL 32694

Cuisine: American, seafood and barbecue

Phone: (352) 468-2255

EL MOLINO MEXICAN RESTAURANT Location: 14985 NW US Highway 301, Waldo, FL 32694 Phone: (352) 468-1300 Cuisine: Family-friendly Mexican cuisine with all you can eat tacos Tuesdays/Wednesdays CLASSIC CAFÉ

Description: 20,000-square-foot mall with a huge selection of items ranging from jewelry to knick-knacks Hours: Monday – Friday: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Saturday/ Sunday: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Flea Market open Saturday/ Sunday: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Antique Mall open Saturday/ Sunday:9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

DIXIELAND MUSIC AND RV PARK Location: 17500 NE US Hwy 301 Waldo, FL 32694 Phone: (352) 468-3988 M2 BATTLESPORTS TACTICAL OUTDOOR LASER TAG Location: Waldo Farmers and Flea Market Hours: Open Fridays only

THE OLD RED CABOOSE – ON DISPLAY IN THE CITY PARK Location: 14705 NE Waldo Rd. Waldo, FL 32694 Tours by appointment: Please call (352) 468-1910

Phone: (352) 468-3214

Description: The symbol of the town’s history. Currently being used as the Waldo Historical Railroad Museum, sponsored by Waldo Area Historical Society

Cuisine: American breakfast, lunch & dinner

WALDO MOTORSPORTS

Location: 17500 NW US Highway 301 Waldo, FL 32694

Location: 16258 NE US Hwy 301 Waldo, FL 32694 Phone: (352) 284-4280

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Two words can sum up the business climate of Greater Gainesville: collaboration and leadership. The area’s companies, schools of higher learning and local officials work diligently to develop a healthy business climate. The Gainesville Chamber’s preeminent mission is to make the area a global hub for talent, innovation and opportunity. Major business sectors in Greater Gainesville include advanced manufacturing, education, health care, life sciences, IT, logistics, technology and agriculture.

Business in Greater Gainesville — 46 — Top 30 Private Employers in Greater Gainesville

51

Incubators and Co-Work Spaces

— 52 — The Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce

— 58 — Business, Brains and Beauty

Led by incubators like the Sid Martin Biotechnology Incubator and the Innovation Hub, Greater Gainesville has evolved into a region fueled by entrepreneurial drive. Today, companies such as Applied Genetic Technologies Corp., Novabone, Axogen and RTI Surgical are thriving. Another local biotech company making waves is Exactech, which employs 475 people and has averaged about 19 percent growth since 2015. San Felasco Tech City – a visionary live/work/play community – is in the works in Alachua and is slated for completion in April of 2019. Greater Gainesville not only helps startups flourish, but it is also a viable option for companies that want to relocate. The region draws businesses with its available and affordable land, organized municipalities and elements of cooperation, innovation, focus, growth mindset, vision and its highly educated workforce. When choosing a new home for a startup, or relocating a business, Greater Gainesville presents the opportunity to make an altruistic impact on the community. Business leaders shape the local economy by helping develop policy and encouraging smart growth. Business is a part of the Greater Gainesville story that has only begun to crest the threshold of opportunity and innovation. There is a place at the table for new businesses and a welcoming network waiting to help your business succeed. G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 4 5


Business

Top 30

Private Employers in Greater Gainesville Top 30 Private Employers NUMBER OF BUSINESS EMPLOYEES

UF Health Shands.........................................................................................13,461 North Florida Regional Medical Center............................................ 2,238 Wal-Mart Distribution Center................................................................... 962 Nationwide Insurance...................................................................................900 Publix Super Market.......................................................................................831 Meridian Behavioral Healthcare.............................................................. 545 RTI Surgical.........................................................................................................531 Exactech, Inc......................................................................................................475 Invivo Diagnostic Imaging........................................................................... 450 North Florida Evaluation & Treatment Center................................. 403 Tower Hill Insurance Group.......................................................................400 Infinite Energy Inc........................................................................................... 322 InfoTech .............................................................................................................. 242 Agency for Persons with Disabilities.................................................... 230 AvMed................................................................................................................... 227 The Village at Gainesville............................................................................ 224 Hometown Supermarkets LLC................................................................200 Florida Mechanical Crane Rental............................................................180 Bear Archery......................................................................................................170 Naylor LLC...........................................................................................................170 SiVance Milliken................................................................................................155 Gainesville Health Care Center................................................................153 Sharpspring.........................................................................................................138 Nanotheraputics ..............................................................................................130 Crom Corporation............................................................................................130 Brammer Bio.......................................................................................................126 Sandvik.................................................................................................................. 119 Axogen................................................................................................................... 119 Emerald Waste Services.............................................................................. 110 Allan Spear Construction Co.....................................................................105

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1 UF HEALTH SHANDS 1600 SW Archer Rd Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 265-0111

Nearly 900 expert UF College of Medicine and community physicians along with more than 9,000 skilled Shands nursing and support staff provide comprehensive highquality patient care, from primary care and family medicine to subspecialty tertiary and quaternary services for patients with highly complex medical conditions. The hospital network includes both UF Health Shands Cancer Hospital and UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital.

2 NORTH FLORIDA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 6500 W Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 415-4442 | Nfrmc.com

The North Florida Regional Medical Center is equipped with 432 beds, full service medical equipment and surgical acute care. Employing 1,300 people in the Gainesville area, the center is certified as a Comprehensive Stroke Center and has been recognized as a Quality Top Performer by the Joint Commission for four consecutive years.

3 WAL-MART DISTRIBUTION CENTER

18815 NW 15th Ave. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418-5900 | Corporate.walmart.com Employees at the distribution centers work tirelessly to send products to over 200 million customers. Nine hundred and sixty-two of these employees are in Gainesville. There are a total of 172 Wal-Mart and Sam’s club distribution centers nationwide.


4 NATIONWIDE INSURANCE

7

10

RTI SURGICAL

NORTH FLORIDA EVALUATION & TREATMENT CENTER

3300 SW Williston Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 377-8500 | Nationwide.com

11621 Research Circle Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418-8888 | Rtix.com

Named Fortune’s “World’s Most Admired Company,” Nationwide Insurance has become one of the largest insurance and financial service companies in the world. Nine hundred of their employees are in Gainesville. Nationwide made $43 billion in total sales during 2016. They are the eighth largest health insurer and the No. 1 total small business insurer.

A leading global surgical implant company, RTI Surgical distributes biological, metal and synthetic implants. Their headquarters are located in Alachua, Florida with locations across the United States from Michigan to Texas. RTI implants are used in general surgery and also sports medicine, spine, orthopedic and trauma surgeries.

Since 1976, the North Florida Evaluation and Treatment Center has evaluated and treated people with mental illnesses who are involved in the criminal justice system. Their facility has 193 beds open for residents who are incompetent to proceed to trial or were found not guilty by reason of insanity.

8

11

EXACTECH, INC.

TOWER HILL INSURANCE GROUP

5 PUBLIX SUPER MARKET 15 Locations in Gainesville (800) 242-1227 | Publix.com

More than 25,000 Publix associates have been with the company for at least 10 years. Publix was ranked No. 3 for best job security by Indeed.com in 2017. For its student employees, the company offers tuition reimbursement for a variety of classes and majors.

6 MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE

2311 NW 66th Ct. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 371-8682 | Exac.com For 30 years, Exactech has been engineering innovative solutions for knee, hip, shoulder and spine surgery. Exactech distributes their products in over 35 countries, and their global headquarters are in Gainesville. They have over 700 employees worldwide and more than 475 of those employees are residents of Gainesville.

9 INVIVO DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

4300 SW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (800) 330-5615 | Mbhci.org

3545 SW 47th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 336-0010 | Invivocorp.com

Meridian is a private non-profit organization designed to promote health and recovery of people impacted by mental illness and substance abuse. Meridian treated 20,796 people last year during 326,431 direct care visits.

Invivo provides disease-oriented clinical solutions to doctors, including solutions regarding breast screening, neurological screenings and lung cancer screenings. Invivo has created 450 jobs in the Gainesville community.

1200 NE 55th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 375-8484

7201 NW 11th Pl. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 332-8800 | Thig.com

One of the largest residential property insurers in Florida, Tower Hill Insurance Group is represented by over 850 insurance agencies in the state. More than 1.7 million Floridians are insured by Tower Hill.

12 INFINITE ENERGY, INC.

7001 SW 24th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 331-1654 | Infiniteenergy.com Infinite Energy provides natural gas and electricity service to customers in Florida, Georgia, New York, New Jersey and Texas. With two $2,500 scholarships in Alachua County, Infinite Energy aims to make longterm impacts by supporting education within the communities they serve.

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Business

13

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INFO TECH

THE VILLAGE AT GAINESVILLE 8000 NW 27th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 373-4032 | thevillageonline.com

BEAR ARCHERY

4600 SW 41st Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (800) 694-9494 | Beararchery.com

Entering its 40th year, Info Tech, Inc. consists of two core businesses. Info Tech Systems provides software solutions that advance and automate construction while Info Tech Consulting provides expert statistical and econometric litigation consulting services and support. With a diverse workforce, and a collaborative, relaxed environment, Info Tech, Inc. is a thriving, Gainesville-born pioneer of innovation, committed to its family of employees, customers and community.

A not-for-profit senior living community, The Village at Gainesville offers seniors a rental retirement community while also employing 224 people in the Gainesville area. The 104acre campus offers a fitness center, a flexible dining plan, housekeeping services and scheduled transportation.

A manufacturer and marketer of bows and archery equipment, Bear Archery employs 170 people in the Gainesville area. They provide traditional bows, compound bows and even bows designed for young archers.

17

NAYLOR, LLC

2970 SW 50th Ter. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 381-4400 | Infotechfl.com

14 AGENCY FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES 1621 NE Waldo Rd. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352)955-5000 | Apd.myflorida.com

The Agency for Persons with Disabilities works specifically to serve the needs of Floridians with developmental disabilities. The agency strives to increase the number of individuals with developmental disabilities in the workforce and improve their access to community-based service and treatment. They serve more than 50,000 Floridians with disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida and Down syndrome.

15 AVMED

4300 NW 89th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 372-8400 | Avmed.org One of Florida’s oldest and largest not-forprofit health plans, AvMed aims to inspire its 315,000 members to live a healthy and active lifestyle. AvMed provides coverage in South Florida, Orlando, Gainesville and Jacksonville.

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HOMETOWN SUPERMARKETS, LLC

10 Locations in North Central Florida (386) 462-2284 | Myhitchcocks.com Hometown Supermarkets, LLC operates and manages Hitchcock’s Market. The first Hitchcock’s Market opened in 1945 and has been serving North Central Florida for 67 years. Hitchcock’s recognized the need for rural towns in Central Florida to have clean, well-stocked, quality products and servicedriven food stores. Hitchcock’s is proud of the training of their employees and the standards they set in the workplace.

18 FLORIDA MECHANICAL CRANE RENTAL 2425 NE 19th Dr. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 367-4531 | Flmech.com

Florida Mechanical Crane Rental provides heavy construction equipment rentals to the Gainesville area. For approximately 16 years, Florida Mechanical Crane Rental has been supplying the community with cranes and aerial lift equipment. They also have provided 180 jobs locally.

20 5950 NW 1st Pl. Gainesville, FL 32607 (800) 369-6220 | Naylor.com For 50 years, Naylor has been providing solutions to associations within the marketplace. They provide services and solutions to over 1,800 associations across 110 industries.

21 SIVANCE MILLIKEN

4044 NE 54th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (800) 910-5592 Millikenchemical.com/ sivance A leader in the silicone industry, SiVance develops and manufactures specialty silicone technologies. They contribute to the Gainesville area by providing rapid process development and scale-up capabilities while employing 155 people locally. SiVance offers many products within the silicone supply chain including silanes, siloxanes and silazanes.


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GAINESVILLE HEALTH CARE CENTER

CROM CORPORATION

4842 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 376-8821 Gainesvillehealthcarecenter.com

With 180 beds designed for short-term rehabilitation, long-term care and hospice care, Gainesville Health Care Center has been serving the Gainesville community by providing people with the care they need. The center’s rehabilitation services include occupational therapy, speech therapy and physical therapy.

23 SHARPSPRING

550 SW 2nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (888) 428-9605 | Sharpspring.com A homegrown company, SharpSpring connects and provides marketing automation for businesses. Their headquarters is located in Gainesville, which has opened up even more local opportunities for employment. They currently provide jobs for 138 Gainesville residents.

24 NANOTHERAPEUTICS

13200 Nano Court Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-9663 | Nanotherapeutics.com A leading contract development and manufacturing organization, Nanotherapeutics provides expertise regarding biopharmaceuticals and preclinical and clinical development. With their 183,000-squarefoot facility, they have been able to serve commercial and government customers.

28 AXOGEN

250 SW 36th Ter. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 372-3436 | Cromcorp.com

2153 SE Hawthorne Rd. Gainesville FL 32641 (352) 334-7278 | Axogeninc.com

For 60 years, CROM has built over 4,100 high quality and effective pre-stressed concrete liquid containment tanks. CROM builds tanks specifically for portable water storage, waste water and thermal energy.

A leading medical technology company working to provide surgeons with solutions for peripheral nerve repair, AxoGen serves many people internationally with their nerve repair solutions. In Gainesville specifically, they have employed 119 people and provided their customers with their nerve protectors, nerve connectors, nerve grafts and offered their clinical research to local surgeons.

26 BRAMMER BIO

13859 Progress Blvd. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418 8199 | Brammerbio.com As a contract development and manufacturing organization, Brammer Bio has served the Gainesville community by hiring 126 residents. Their goal is to assist companies working to develop and commercialize cell and gene therapies. Brammer’s 64,000-square-foot campus in Alachua contains viral vector and cell therapy processing areas and designated production suites for early phase clinical trials.

27 SANDVIK

13500 NW County Rd. 235 Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-4100 | Home.sandvik With about 43,000 employees, Sandvik is a high-tech and global engineering group. As a world-leading developer and manufacturer of stainless steel and the world’s No.1 supplier of cutting tools and tooling systems, Sandvik provides 119 jobs to the Gainesville area.

29 EMERALD WASTE SERVICES 5002 SW 41st Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 377-0800 | Emeraldwaste.com Emerald Waste works to provide waste removal services in the Gainesville area. Their services contribute to the prevention of water contamination, soil contamination and pollution. Emerald provides solutions for a better environment while providing jobs for the community.

30 ALLAN SPEAR CONSTRUCTION CO.

2225 NW 66th Ct. Gainesville, FL 32653 352-337-0773 | Allanspearco.com Headquartered in Gainesville, Allan Spear Construction is a leading contractor for concrete and masonry work. They provide services for local and international clients.

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2 0 1 9

List of Incubators and Co-Work Spaces GAINESVILLE TECHNOLOGY ENTREPRENEURSHIP CENTER (GTEC) 2153 SE. Hawthorne Road, Suite 101 Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 393-6000 www.sfcollege.edu/cied/incubators/ gtec-incubator CENTER OF INNOVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AT SANTA FE COLLEGE 530 W. University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 395-5053 sfcollege.edu/cied

NEWBERRY MAIN STREET ORGANIZATION MAIN STREET INCUBATORS 25435 W. Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-2112 newberrymainstreet.com SID MARTIN BIOTECHNICAL INSTITUTE 12085 Research Dr. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-0880 sidmartinbio.org

STARTER SPACE CO-WORKING SPACE INSIDE UF INNOVATE |THE HUB Gainesville, FL 32601 starterspace.com

WORKING FOOD 219 NW 10th Ave Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 260-4458 workingfood.org

UF INNOVATE |THE HUB 747 SW. 2nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 294-0885 floridainnovationhub.ufl.edu

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Business

The Greater Gainesville Chamber of Commerce Facilitating Economic Opportunity, Business Success and Community Progress

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Since 1924, the Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce had been the voice of business for the region, working on multiple fronts to increase the region’s businessfriendliness, competitiveness and quality of life — in short, to make Gainesville greater. This ultimate goal was acknowledged in 2018 when the organization announced its new name. Today, the Greater Gainesville Chamber of Commerce enjoys a new look and a new outlook for the community.

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Business

“Gainesville is a global hub of talent, innovation and opportunity,” said Eric Godet, who was named President/CEO of the Chamber in late 2018. “We have worldclass cultural amenities, some of the nation’s top educational institutions, and a business infrastructure that rivals cities twice our size. While there’s still a lot of work to be done — and the Chamber’s workforce, economic development and policy teams are on top of it all — we’re proud of the amazing community we’ve built here, and we’re ready to tell the world about it.” Accredited by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce as a five-star Chamber, ranking in the top 1 percent of Chambers nationwide and serving more than 1,300 members that employ more than 80,000 people, the Greater Gainesville Chamber works via four lines of business — Business Development, Economic Development, Education & Talent Alignment and Public Policy — to advance its vision by executing a daily mission, to facilitate economic prosperity, business growth and community progress. The Chamber’s lines of business are designed to address the diverse concerns of its equally diverse membership, enabling the collaboration needed to achieve its common goals. Thanks in part to the efforts of the Chamber’s Economic Development Committee and the investors in the Transforming Greater Gainesville economic development plan that wraps up this year, the region is enjoying a new era of prosperity through the creation of new jobs, growing salaries and capital investment. In advancing its vision of Greater Gainesville as a global hub of talent, innovation and opportunity, the Chamber also advances the interests of the region’s business community at large — whether or not they are Chamber members — creating new opportunities for companies and their employees to flourish.

Increasing Business Leadership and Success through Business Development The Chamber offers its members a wide range of opportunities to address individual day-to-day concerns, stay connected, educated and motivated to succeed. With a variety of workshops, councils and connections

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Gainesville’s Five Key Industrial Sectors

Advanced Logistics

Advanced Materials

Advanced Manufacturing

Biotechnology/Life Sciences

offered each year, the Greater Gainesville Chamber is the region’s premier business development and leadership entity. By joining the Chamber, businesses are immediately connected with thousands of business leaders, potential customers and vendors in the Greater Gainesville region, increasing their ability for business growth and success. The Chamber offers a host of programs specific to the needs of all members of the business community. The group’s five “signature events” are spread throughout the year offering numerous visibility opportunities. The year is bookended by the Annual Meeting in January and the Business Awards in November. In between, the Chamber hosts the Member Appreciation Party, a new Veterans Appreciation Luncheon and a new Business Conference. Other membership engagement opportunities exist for business people at all levels, including quarterly Chamber 101 events, monthly structured before-business networking and unstructured after-business networking, regular Lunch & Learn programs for members, a regular CEO Insights leadership series, small business roundtables and mastermind groups.

Agricultural Sciences

Software/Information Technology

Member companies representing key industry clusters have formed several industry councils addressing the interests and concerns of areas including advanced logistics, advanced materials, agricultural sciences, biotechnology/life sciences and software/information technology. The Chamber also focuses heavily on advanced manufacturing, which is an element of all of the region’s key industry sectors. Additionally, the Chamber advocates for business in different ways at all levels of government, from establishing positions on key issues that affect the business community at-large to connecting members to the government solutions they need to address concerns quickly and re-focus on what is important — innovating, serving customers and growing their businesses. The Chamber also offers leadership development programs to sharpen the leadership capacity of the region, including Leadership Gainesville, the fourth longest-running leadership development program in the nation and the oldest in the state of Florida.


Transforming Greater Gainesville through Economic Development Through the work of its Economic Development Committee, the Chamber is the lead economic development entity for the Greater Gainesville region. With a focus on creating jobs and strengthening our economy, the Chamber leads economic development efforts that include assisting new businesses through the startup phase and helping existing businesses expand. The Chamber also works to recruit new companies, and the jobs and capital investment that come with them, to Greater

Gainesville. Our economic development outreach strengthens employment opportunities and community vitality, and facilitates collaboration between business, government and higher education entities. International trade and presence is key to business and economic growth, which is why the Chamber initiated its Export Gainesville program to help regional businesses begin exporting or improve existing efforts to export. They partner with Enterprise Florida and the U.S. Commercial Service to offer international trade consulting services in Gainesville and a connection to the many export promotion services in the region. On average, sales grow faster, more jobs are created and employees earn more

in exporting companies than in nonexporting companies. Also, international trade helps most companies ride out potential uctuations in our domestic economy, making success more likely. In 2015, the Chamber began the work of the Transforming Greater Gainesville Five-Year Economic Development Strategy that aggressively supports economic and community development. 2019 marks the last year of that strategy. Research and planning for the 2020-2025 economic development strategy began in 2018, and the Chamber is leading the fundraising efforts in 2019 to bring the Chamber’s vision for economic development into reality.

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Business

Transforming Opportunity through Education & Talent Alignment Companies invest enormous resources to find, develop and keep good employees. On average, businesses spend $4,129 and 42 days to find one new employee. Once they have brought that new hire on board, they will in turn spend even more money training them. According to Forbes 2014 Corporate Learning Factbook, US spending in 2013 on corporate training exceeded $70 billion. Surely that number has gone nowhere but up. The Greater Gainesville Chamber works with partners in business and education to offer a full range of talent pipeline and workforce development resources to connect members with an ample supply of high-quality talent. In particular, the Chamber supports the development of workers proficient in STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) fields. And it does most of this at little or no cost to the employer or the employee. Among the Chamber’s most important talent and education initiatives is the Alachua County Education Compact, which represents the first time in history that leaders in business, education, government and the community at-large have united behind an effort to transform opportunities available to Alachua County students. Signed by 28 regional leaders, the Compact has created a collaboration that is mobilizing the community around education to better prepare students for higher education and sustainable careers. The Compact is creating new opportunities to tell the Greater Gainesville story of talent pipeline innovation, garnering statewide and international attention and developing a framework to benchmark and measure success via the following six goals: all students graduate from high school, have access to and are prepared for college and/or career success, have access to pathways to sustainable jobs and careers and develop an appreciation for the arts, healthy lifestyle habits and a sense of social responsibility. Examples of how the Compact is already touching its ultimate beneficiaries — students — include Career Discoveries Day, collectively connecting more than 1,000 students and

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parents with opportunities to learn about careers in target industries directly from employers. Through this initiative as well as others, including efforts to increase the number of high school students who apply for federal aid to make college affordable, and other efforts to raise money to support local teachers and schools, the Compact has touched more than 1,200 people. To help to meet the business community’s workforce needs, the Chamber partners with CareerSource North Central Florida

(CSNCFL). CSNCFL is part of the statewide CareerSource Florida network of careerdevelopment professionals who work directly with Florida employers to identify and cultivate the ready-to-go skills and experience businesses seek. CSNCFL offers a wide array of talent resources that provides employers with opportunities to provide customized training to new or existing staff members, often at no cost. In assisting employers seeking skilled talent, CSNCFL also connects workers with


opportunities to secure employment or advance in their careers. The Chamber also works closely with our nationally leading college and university to attract and retain talent and to create a bridge between talent seeking work and our regional employers seeking employees. For instance, Chamber support for the University of Florida’s Preeminence initiative to become an international educational leader is written into its economic development strategy, as is supporting Santa Fe College’s efforts as a nationally leading institution. Both institutions are making measurable progress toward these goals — in 2015 the prestigious Aspen Institute ranked Santa Fe College No. 1 in the nation and in 2018, the University of Florida rose to No. 8 in the Nation by U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges ranking.

Elevating Business Friendliness and Lowering Business Costs through Public Policy A key goal of the Chamber is to create and maintain an ecosystem that fosters

economic growth and opportunity. The Chamber does this by creating initiatives and forging partnerships focused on advocacy for a stronger business climate. The Chamber’s Public Policy Committee is composed of leading members of Greater Gainesville’s business community, and is charged with researching issues, collecting input from membership and then advising the Chamber Board of Directors on specific action items if needed. The Public Policy Committee also educates elected officials and the public of the business community’s concerns. Participation is open to all members in good standing. The Chamber Board of Directors makes the final decision on adopting any public policy position. In the event that no position is taken, the Chamber may still distribute educational information to its membership. The Chamber represents the interests of the business community on city, county, regional and state levels. Through its public policy efforts, the Greater Gainesville Chamber of Commerce facilitates business-climate improvements, and influences policies and outcomes to protect the interests of its members and the community at-large. On local, state and federal levels, the Chamber works directly with elected officials to advocate for policy decisions that increase business friendliness and reduce business and living costs. Chamber advocacy areas include transportation, energy, small business issues, innovation and more.

The Greater Gainesville Chamber’s policy team also organizes regular Distinguished Speaker Luncheons, which bring prominent business and political leaders to speak to and interact with Chamber members. These distinguished leaders – which have included GRU General Manager Ed Bielarski and City of Gainesville Mayor Lauren Poe – have provided Chamber members perspectives on a variety of issues, including utility rates and City and County efforts to make Gainesville the most citizen-centered city in the world. For information on upcoming luncheons, email vicki@gainesvillechamber.com.

Can We Help You? Through its four lines of business, the Greater Gainesville Chamber of Commerce works strategically to make its vision of Greater Gainesville as a global hub of talent, innovation and opportunity a reality. However, every business and individual in the region is a part of this vision. If you are a business seeking to get connected, an individual considering entrepreneurship or believe the Chamber can answer your questions about doing business or living in Greater Gainesville, contact us at (352) 334-7100 or gainesvillechamber.com.

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Business

Business, Brains and Beauty PRESENTED BY:

®

For a company with a 40+ year history in Gainesville, innovation isn’t a lofty goal; it’s essential to growth and survival. After all, it’s the exchange and promotion of exciting new ideas that led Info Tech to where they are today. There’s no riding on past successes — it’s a long-term vision for the future that matters. With roots as a consultancy started by two UF professors, Info Tech has grown to employ nearly 300 employees across two distinct businesses. Info Tech Consulting offers expert statistical and econometric litigation consulting services and Info Tech Systems is one of the country’s leading infrastructure construction software solution providers.

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Info Tech’s sustained success is made possible by teams of forward-thinking employees. Whether it’s the annual hackathon or the ongoing Project LAUNCH, employees at all levels are encouraged to bring their ideas to the table and are given the support to make them thrive. As pioneers in offering flexible schedules, Info Tech enables employees to find the schedule that’s right for them and their family. Pair that flexibility with a modern workplace and it’s no wonder Info Tech is one of the most exciting companies in town.


G

reater Gainesville is blessed with much natural beauty. Surrounded by prairies, springs, forests and beautiful rivers, Gainesville’s beautiful natural environment is unmatched in Florida. The region offers recreational options that include paddling, diving, hiking, biking and much more.

Gainesville also boasts a lot of brainpower. It has long been known as the state’s premier destination for higher education — a reputation that was only bolstered when Santa Fe College won the prestigious Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, and reinforced again when the University of Florida entered U.S. News’ top ten public university rankings in 2018 (it is currently ranked #8). But Gainesville isn’t just all brains and beauty. The Gainesville region has built out a sophisticated and extensive infrastructure that supports businesses of varying sizes and industries, and is becoming even better known for what’s happening off-campus and after graduation. The best part about living, working and playing in Gainesville is how these three critical elements – business, brains and beauty – work together to create an “innovation ecosystem” that is driving new jobs, creating new businesses and attracting industry leaders and talent to the region.

Gainesville’s Innovation Economy It all starts with K-12 education. Through programs like the Alachua County Education Compact, the region’s business leaders work closely with educators to improve systemic outcomes in education by aligning efforts to prepare students for the workforce with career opportunities in emerging industries. Thanks to the close cooperation between industry and educators, Alachua County’s high school graduates can plan for success whether the enter directly into the workforce, receive additional technical training, or look to four or more years of college. And if they are looking to college, two worldclass institutions are right here. Graduates of UF and Santa Fe College have many opportunities, both in Greater Gainesville and well beyond. But Gainesville is giving its college graduates more and more reasons to “stay in the swamp.” Industries like health care, biotechnology, high tech,


Business

manufacturing, logistics and agricultural science continue to grow in the region, and are successfully challenging the city’s reputation as just a “college town.” In fact, the job outlook is so strong in Gainesville that career placement firm Zippia just named the area Florida’s best place to start a career. Prospects are not only strong for entry level positions; these same industries are also looking to attract midlevel and senior managers to the area to help accelerate their plans for growth. At the same time that these educational institutions are creating and nurturing tomorrow’s workforce, they are also helping create tomorrow’s businesses. Multi-million dollar businesses are formed in places like the University of Florida’s many research institutes and centers. UF Innovate, the University’s top-ranked technology transfer office, helps commercialize the many ideas generated on campus, matching the technology with the entrepreneurial team or company that can best take the idea to market. The region’s many incubators (like the Sid Martin Incubator, named the nation’s best incubator in 2017) help these young startups accelerate growth. While the area’s culture of innovation has been a defining characteristic of its economy, businesses and overall identity for the past two decades, Greater Gainesville’s trail of innovation was first blazed just over 50 years ago when Gatorade made the commercial leap from the lab of then-UF professor of renal medicine Dr. J. Robert Cade to retail shelves. But the region has come a long way since then. Since the commercialization of Gatorade, the University of Florida has set the tone for entrepreneurship, strengthened by its prowess in garnering research funds – in 2016, UF brought in a record $791 million – as well its affinity for building partnerships that encourage the transfer of its research to market. UF Innovate | The Hub, which has incubated more than 60 companies resulting in more than 960 jobs and $67 million in private investment – recently completed a second phase that will accommodate an additional 45 companies, including a womenowned business center. The expansion was funded by an $8 million award from the Economic Development Administration of the U.S. Department of Commerce. And UF is not alone in fostering businesses. The Gainesville Technology Entrepreneurship Center (GTEC) – led by Santa Fe College and the City of Gainesville – is currently incubating more than 20 companies, and has a long

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Job outlook is so strong in Gainesville that career placement firm Zippia just named the area Florida’s best place to start a career. roster of successful alumni companies, including Optym, which completed its second major expansion in 2017. The City of Gainesville is working closely with UF and various technology providers to create groundbreaking municipal programs including autonomous vehicles, smart traffic signal management (complete with predictive mobile apps), new smart 911 systems, and a solar power generation system that positioned the city as a world leader in solar installed per capita as far back as 2012. The result has been an ecosystem fueled by a steady proliferation of innovative businesses, state-of-the-art products and services, and world-class incubators to nurture the companies that produce them. The upward trajectory of opportunity in the Gainesville Metropolitan Area is demonstrated by its increasing gross domestic product, which in 2018 reached $12.9 billion, up nearly $1.5 billion since 2014.

Room to Grow These high-growth industries tend to create virtuous cycles of employment. As businesses add mid- and senior-level talent, they’re able to bring on even more entry-level talent from both UF and Santa Fe College. As their workforce needs diversify and expand, Gainesville area companies can draw from many other sources of talent, both homegrown (through sophisticated high school job readiness and university graduate programs) and transplanted (attracted to the region for its educational opportunities, great hospital network, natural beauty and growing industry segments like biotechnology, advanced

manufacturing, high tech, logistics and agricultural sciences). When these businesses in turn are ready to move out to their own offices, retail spaces and labs, they can take their pick from dozens of development projects around the region, and take advantage of the many streamlined services offered by the many municipalities in the area, like the City of Gainesville’s Department of Doing. The availability of Class-A office space continues to grow, meeting a true need for high-end, state-of-the-art office facilities. Info Tech – a leader in fraud-detection software, computerized methods for detecting collusive behavior in sealed bid markets, and more – moved its operations and almost 250 employees into a new, 65,000-squarefoot facility in Celebration Pointe, which has a plethora of additional office space in development, some of which will soon be claimed by companies including the tech company SharpSpring. Innovation Square is also home to several of these new luxury office facilities, including 800 Second, which broke ground in late 2017, and Ingenuity, a 50,000-square-foot contemporary space that was fully leased nearly a year prior to completion, and others. The 55-acre San Felasco Tech City development just outside Gainesville will include a mix of work space, living space and recreational areas. With over 42,000 square feet of office space already under agreement, the live/work/play multi-use development is designed to attract businesses to the site’s lower infrastructure costs and strong talent base, and residents to the inspirational setting that connects up with 7,200 acres of nature and 30 miles of bike paths. This “live/work/play” theme can also be seen at Celebration Pointe, which in addition to its Class-A office space also features residences, a high-end hotel, a movie theater, restaurants and retail shops, all built around a vibrant “main street” concept dubbed City Walk. Butler Town Center is bringing a similar vibe just to the other side of I-75 with a brand new Whole Foods, P.F. Chang’s and more retail and residences to come.

Key Industries & Employers Greater Gainesville’s key industries include advanced logistics, advanced materials, agricultural sciences,


biotechnology/life sciences and software/ information technology. In particular, a portfolio of businesses and talent resources comprise a robust biotechnology sector, which includes companies such as Ology (formerly Nanotherapeutics), AGTC, Brammer Bio, RTI Surgical, NovaBone, Captozyme, and others. Adding to region’s ability to grow biotechnology businesses is access to a ready supply of relevant talent produced by sources such as the University of Florida, Santa Fe College and CareerSource North Central Florida, which collaborate to tailor skills of graduates and trainees to meet the needs of local industry. The region’s advanced manufacturing industry is anticipated to grow, as evidenced by several local companies’ projection of a collective $292 million in new capital investment (as noted in responses to a 2015 survey of regional manufacturers). Greater Gainesville’s advanced manufacturing industry ranks among Florida’s top third in size for manufacturing industry clusters. The Gainesville Area Chamber of Commerce has created and nurtured councils in the five key industries to increase cohesion and provide businesses with industry-specific connections, resources and guidance.

Greater Gainesville has a diverse offering of career fields from pharmaceutical to corporate to agriculture.

Increasing in Notoriety, Quality of Life and Opportunity Beyond the accolades for the University of Florida, Santa Fe College, the Sid Martin biotechnology incubator and others already discussed here, Greater Gainesville has received significant additional recognition. Much of this recognition speaks to the positives of living, working, playing and doing business in the Greater Gainesville area. In the last five years, the region has received numerous rankings and recognitions, including being named the best city in Florida to start a career by Zippia (2018), one of the top six most affordable Florida Cities by Livability.com (2017), the top three college towns for a weekend getaway by U.S. News Travel (2016), the No. 2 Leading Metro for Economic and Job growth (Area Development magazine, (2014), the best Florida City for Jobs and Careers (Forbes, 2012), and the No. 1 City on the Rise (NerdWallet, 2013). Situated in the heart of a region known for its beautiful springs and other natural

resources, Gainesville isn’t just a great place to work or grow your business; it’s a great place to live and play too. Its thriving cultural scene — which includes a national ballet company, museums, a worldclass symphony orchestra and delectable, international dining options — serve as additional economic drivers for the region. Between the city’s quaint downtown and historic districts, filled with Victorian charm and grandiose moss-covered oak trees, and the many sophisticated live/work/play developments bringing in high-end retail, grocery and entertainment experiences

just on the other side of campus, Greater Gainesville manages to bring out the best of both worlds, creating an experience that is certainly unique to Florida, if not the country. Greater Gainesville is an ideal lifestyle destination for cutting-edge companies and smart people who thrive in a culturally rich, naturally beautiful environment that spawns innovation.

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Business

Why Greater Gainesville?

Nadia Alcide Founder, Simply Sociable

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CAME TO GAINESVILLE IN 2007 MOVED AWAY FOR 3 YEARS AND RETURNED IN 2015

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What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? As a family, we love all that Gainesville has to offer. It has a mix of local flair with a distinct culture and unique academic opportunities for those who are interested. In addition to these attributes, we appreciate its proximity to nature and encouragement to maintain an active lifestyle. Last but not least, it’s the right size for our family. We can visit the bigger cities whenever we please but just knowing how comfortable Gainesville feels, we’ve parked ourselves right here. What is your favorite local food? My guilty pleasure is definitely sweets and a lovely dinner. I love going to the farmers market for a Gruyere croissant at Vine’s booth. I love Sweet Dreams Ice Cream, especially their Grape Nut. My favorite local dinner food is from the Top, their Brussel sprouts and mashed potatoes are amazing. Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. An ideal day: Hitting the gym at GHFC, then going for breakfast at a local spot, usually Emiliano’s. After that, a stroll down to Depot Park for some family time. Once we are done there, we’d stop by Sweet Dreams for a late afternoon treat.

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Dr. Jamie McClave Baldwin President, Info Tech Consulting

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BORN AND RAISED IN GREATER GAINESVILLE

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What is your favorite local food? My husband, Geno, is an amazing cook, so we love to shop at the Haile Farmers Market and cook at home. Veggies from Swallowtail, steaks from Florida Fresh and some dessert from SaraFay Farm. There’s nothing better! What is your favorite time of year and/or favorite weather conditions? My favorite time of year is that first cool night after a long summer. It always takes me by surprise – you start to think it might never come! For us, it means friends gathered around the fire pit telling stories and making memories. Where do you go to escape into nature? My backyard! I live in an older neighborhood off Millhopper Road -- my kids say we live in the jungle. We spend most of our evenings on the back porch; it’s my favorite place to be. What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? Gainesville is my home, and there really is no place like home. You really get the best of all worlds – a college town with amazing sports, a rich cultural environment with artists of every medium, great restaurants, live music and incredible nature parks.

Susan Crowley

Assistant Vice President-Community Relations, University of Florida

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CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE IN 1970 FOR COLLEGE

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What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? I was choosing where to go to college from a distance. I had gone to high school for one year in Alaska and was still in my last year of high school in the Philippines. I had a number of choices for schools, but felt drawn to the University of Florida as my father’s degrees were from there. His strong connection to the school and to the Gators had been evident throughout my life. There is something about UF that engenders deep loyalty across generations. My children have followed in that tradition. What is your favorite time of year and/or favorite weather conditions? The fall is by far my favorite season, certainly because of the cooler weather but also for the seasonal celebrations that involve being with my family and friends. Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. An ideal day for me would involve my family – my children and my grandchildren. I love cooking big breakfasts to start our day. We would visit the Florida Museum of Natural History and swing by the stadium for Gator themed pictures. We would pick a childappropriate restaurant like Ballyhoo or One Love Café for lunch, then head to the Santa Fe Zoo or Depot Park. Then, leaving three tired little children at home, we would head to dinner – probably Mildred’s or Leonardo’s 706.


Why Greater Gainesville?

Dug Jones

Associate Vice President for Economic Development, Santa Fe College

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CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE IN 1979

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What is your favorite local food? There are lots of great places, but Ballyhoo is probably my favorite. What is your favorite time of year and/or favorite weather conditions? Despite the problems with traffic, I love the beginning of the fall semester because of the energy. I also enjoy graduation week because of the sense of accomplishment so many people are feeling. We are blessed to have both good weather and great sports year-round. When friends or family come to visit, where is the first place you take them? That depends on their interests. Alachua Sink, Ichetucknee Springs, butterfly garden. Way too many choices to choose one. Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. Grilled chicken in my backyard after a great time at a Gator sporting event.

Duncan Kabinu

Eric Godet

Founder, Gainesville Dev Academy

President/CEO, Greater Gainesville Chamber of Commerce

CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE TO ATTEND WHAT WAS AND STILL IS THE BEST ENGINEERING COLLEGE, AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE IN 1993

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What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? I was looking for a college that offered specifically a computer engineering program and UF ranked in the top 10 of colleges. But as I refined my search I was considering that I was tired of living in snowbound and cold areas. I was tired of layering up. So naturally the Sunshine State stood out from all the other potential areas. So this was a major win — a top 10 engineering college and great weather year-round. What is something you wish you knew before moving here? I wish I knew about the area sooner so that I could have moved even sooner. There’s not much that has caught me by surprise that I wished I knew before. I have enjoyed this area so much and even went through a denial event, where I have left Gainesville five times and each time ended right back here....so I guess this is home. Where do you go to escape into nature? Jump on bike with a group of friends and find random routes while putting in 30 or so miles. You get to see and discover places you didn’t even know existed. Hawthorne trail (among others) is gorgeous to walk or bike through. Paynes Prairie affords you some wild animals, such as alligators, wild horses, etc. Being an avid photographer, it’s great to have the ability to get to these amazing locations that are so close to Gainesville.

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What is your favorite local food? I seem to spend a lot of time at Mojo’s now that I work so close. But for me, it’s really between Taste, Mojo and Crane Ramen. When someone comes to town for a visit and we want to show off the city, though, we’ll take them to Dragonfly. Where do you go to escape into nature? There are a lot of trails near my home, but the San Felasco trails are by far my favorite. I love being out there early in the mornings, when you can stumble across deer, turkey and other wildlife. Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. Game days in the fall are just perfect here. I start the day at Gainesville Health & Fitness, where I work down the guilt I’ll feel at my next visit, which is to Cracker Barrel for their amazing pecan pancakes. Then I’ll get ready for the tailgate, and of course watch the Gators win. We tend to be one of the last to leave our tailgate section, so most game days end there. We know how to have a good time win or lose, but these days, with a lot more wins than losses, the end of the day might just be even sweeter than the pancakes I enjoy at the beginning.

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Education

Education in Greater Gainesville — 68 — List of Educational Institutions

— 80 — Maps of Public Schools

— 86 — University of Florida

— 106 — Santa Fe College

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Greater Gainesville boasts public and private schools within a high-ranking and award-winning school district, meeting the needs of its diverse student population. The various programs and accommodations for students of all backgrounds reflects the growing culture and diversity that the area has to offer. With competitive test scores and a community willing to put students first, our area is a premier destination for students seeking bright futures. Greater Gainesville is home to one of the most prestigious public universities in the southern U.S., the University of Florida. It also has the 2015 No. 1 community college in the nation, Santa Fe College. Alachua County’s primary and secondary education is held in equal esteem thanks to its dedicated educators and focus on student well-being.

Alachua County Public Schools The Alachua County Public Schools system (ACPS) is comprised of 22 elementary schools, 10 middle schools and eight high schools. Through award-winning approaches, the district has dedicated its efforts to create an inclusive and nurturing environment for students, faculty and parents. In 2016, ACPS won the prestigious “What Parents Want” Award from SchoolMatch, one of the nation’s top school consulting firms. It is awarded to only 16 percent of the nation’s school districts, given to schools for meeting both parent and student needs including small class size, access to library resources and instructional expenditures. In 2017, the school district became one of eight districts to win the Florida Healthy School Gold Award for the 2017-2019 period. The award honors school districts that promote a healthy learning environment. Alachua was recognized for its expansive food and nutrition programs, its health and physical education and its system of care for children and families in crisis. ACPS has also been lauded for constantly challenging its students. Two of its public high schools, Eastside High School and Buchholz High School, have been ranked in Newsweek’s Top Public High Schools in the Nation. Eastside earned a spot in the top 10 two years in a row. Through rigorous programs, various high schools have been able to send students to competitions nationwide. In 2017, the district sent students to the USA Mathematical Olympiad and the National HOSA Competition. Students in Greater Gainesville have been accepted to elite universities, including Columbia, Harvard, Cornell, Georgetown and Johns Hopkins.

Private Schools and Special Centers There are 23 private schools in Gainesville, several of which have religious affiliations. Most notable, however, are its special education programs. With a rich historical background and a penchant for helping students in need, the A. Quinn Jones Exceptional Student Center has been helping students with socio-emotional learning for several years. Originally Lincoln High School, the center began as a segregated high school for black students. Principal A. Quinn Jones A. Quinn Jones advocated for the progression of black students into higher education, and in 1970, the center was the site of a boycott protesting the segregation of schools in Florida. Today, Lincoln High School has been renamed the A. Quinn Jones Center, and Jones’s home was turned into a museum to honor the principal. The center serves students with social or behavioral issues and integrates a curriculum on social and emotional healing, as well as focusing on mediation and conflict resolution. The center has also seen a spike in family partic-

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Education

ipation in recent years, being awarded for its proactive volunteer programs and community service.

Test Scores

A-Graded Public Schools 2017-2018 School Year Buchholz High School 5510 NW 27th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 955-6702 High Springs Community School 1015 N Main St. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-1958 Hidden Oak Elementary School 2100 Fort Clarke Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-2801 Meadowbrook Elementary School 11525 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-2828 Talbot Elementary School 5701 NW 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 955-6716 Oak View Middle School 1203 SW 250 St. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-1102

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Through rigorous programs and ever-expanding resources, Alachua County Public Schools has positioned itself as a national leader in test scores. In 2015, the average SAT score ranked higher than both the national and state averages. Florida’s average score in 2015 was 1434, while the national average was 1490. Compared to Alachua County’s 1620 average, the schools in our district are well on their way to becoming top performers. Students with high test scores on the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/ NMSQT) qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Award, in which these students are awarded college scholarships. Only a little over 1 percent of test-takers receive this award nationally. In 2017, 23 Alachua County students were recognized with the award for both their test scores and high-achieving academic status in their respective schools. A variety of Advanced Placement courses are available to high school students. These courses are designed to increase the student’s understanding of the subject matter while also earning college credit. Alachua County’s passing rate of 63 percent puts it well above the nation’s 56 percent passing rate in 2016. One of the three students in the entire United States who received a perfect score on the AP Statistics exam in 2016 was an Alachua County Public Schools student.

Magnet, ESOL and ESE Programs There are many special programs in the district designed to aid, enhance and develop students’ skills and abilities. Three schools offer English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) programs, where nonnative English speakers can learn and practice the language through

oral communication in small classrooms and integration with other students. The Exceptional Student Education department ensures that students with special needs are accommodated. The department has a variety of teachers, specialists and supervisors who work with parents to accommodate the needs of students, who range in age from 3 to 22. Other notable programs include the district’s various academic magnet programs, designed to provide a curriculum of challenging courses for gifted and advanced students. These programs are often specialized in several subjects ranging from fine arts to STEM education. Eastside High School hosts the district’s only International Baccalaureate (IB) program, where high school students can earn an IB diploma in addition to their high school diploma, earning college credit similar to AP courses. Other


2018 SAT Score Averages In 2018, the average SAT score in Alachua County was 75 points above the national score average and 129 points above the state score average.

United States:

1068

programs include Gainesville High School’s Cambridge Program, adult education and GED classes and various early childhood education programs for younger children.

Higher Education Gainesville’s prominent leader in higher education is the accredited University of Florida, home of the Florida Gators. The university offers various high-ranking research programs and the nation’s most dominant athletics program. Ranked No. 8 in U.S. News & World Report’s best public universities, UF is also home to the prominent teaching hospital, UF Health Shands Hospital. With 16 academic colleges and over 150 centers for research, UF has placed itself among the most prestigious public universities in the nation. Gainesville is also home to Santa Fe College, which was named the winner of the 2015 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence by the Aspen Institute. SF was named No. 1 of over 1,000 institutions nationwide and has been in the top 10 of U.S. community colleges since 2012. With 16 accredited programs and over 70 A.A. Advisement tracks, SF also offers nine bachelor’s degrees in various subjects.

Florida:

1014

Alachua County:

1143

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 67


Education

2 0 1 9

List of Educational Institutions within Greater Gainesville

Greater Gainesville offers a wide variety of educational opportunities often nestled within scenic natural settings.

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Higher Education CITY COLLEGE GAINESVILLE CAMPUS 7001 NW 4th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 415-4497 citycollege.edu SAINT LEO UNIVERSITY GAINESVILLE CENTER 4650 NW 39th Place, Suite B Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 367-1192 (352) 800-7163 saintleo.edu SANTA FE COLLEGE 3000 NW 83rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 395-5000 sfcollege.edu UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 201 Criser Hall P.O. Box 114000 Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 392-3261 ufl.edu

Trade-specific Higher Education ACADEMY FOR FIVE ELEMENT ACUPUNCTURE 305 SE. 2nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 335-2332 acupuncturist.edu DRAGON RISES COLLEGE OF ORIENTAL MEDICINE 1000 NE 16th Ave., Bldg. F Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 371-2833 dragonrises.edu FLORIDA SCHOOL OF MASSAGE 6421 SW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-7891 floridaschoolofmassage.com

THE FLORIDA SCHOOL OF TRADITIONAL MIDWIFERY 810 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 338-0766 midwiferyschool.org

Early Childhood Education A&M 4 KIDS INC. 2207 NW 10th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 271-0301 A CHILD’S ACADEMY LOCATION 1: 3401 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 371-3360 LOCATION 2: 5240 NW 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 548-4899 achildsacademy.com A CHILD’S DELIGHT AT EDEN PARK 1340 NE 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 672-6249 A CHILD’S DREAM GAINESVILLE PRESCHOOL 4127 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-8900 againesvillepreschool.com A CHILD’S PLACE 6200 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 375-8900 ABACUS LEARNING CENTER 5205 SW 91st Drive Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 376-1492 abacuslearningcenter.com

THE ACADEMY AT THE FAMILY CHURCH 2022 SW. 122nd St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 642-1290 facebook.com/TheAcademySchool A HIDDEN CHILD’S WORLD 3237 SW 41st Place Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-6343 ahiddenchildsworld.com ANGELS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY LLC 1907 SE Hawthorne Road Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 374-8521 GREENFIELD PRESCHOOL 21805 W Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-7977 A WORLD OF ANGELS 1119 NW 42nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 381-0080

Did You Know 10 FUN FACTS ABOUT UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA — 1 — UF ranked No. 8 out of 132 public universities according to the 2019 U.S. News and World Report

— 2 — In 2018, UF received 837.6 million dollars in research awards, setting a new record for itself

—3 — For the 2014-2015 school year, UF ranked No. 1 among AAU institutions for the number of master’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students and No. 2 for the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students

—4 — Gatorade was invented at UF in 1965 by scientists at the UF College of Medicine

— 5 — B’NAI ISRAEL COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL 3830 NW 16th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-1508, ext. 110 bnaiisraelcds.org BABY GATOR CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH CENTER babygator.ufl.edu LAKE ALICE 793 Corry Circle Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 392-2330 NEWELL DRIVE 1244 Newell Drive Gainesville, FL 32610 (352) 273-8000 DIAMOND VILLAGE 305 Diamond Village Road, #17 Gainesville, FL 32603 (352) 294-2243

The University of Florida McGuire Center hosts one of the largest butterfly and moth specimen collections in the U.S.

—6 — The Gator was chosen as the official mascot after a merchant began selling pennants with an alligator on them. It became popular among students and so UF adopted the Gator mascot

— 7 — According to study.com, UF’s Journalism school stands as one of the top 10 in the nation

—8 — University of Florida has the world’s largest occupied bat houses

—9 — UF has several Heisman Trophy winners including Tim Tebow, Danny Wuerffel and Steve Spurrier

— 10 — According to thebestschools. org, University of Florida’s “The Independent Florida Alligator” has one of the largest student-run newspapers in the country

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 6 9


Education

BHAKTIVEDANTA ACADEMY 17414 NW 112th Blvd. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2886 bhaktischool.org

FLOWERS MONTESSORI 3111 NW 31st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-4700 flowersmontessori.com

IMAGINE LEARNING CENTER 4840 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 371-5450 imaginelearningcenter.com

BRENTWOOD SCHOOL 1111 NW 55th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 373-3222 gobrentwoodschool.com

FUMPERS PRESCHOOL AT FIRST UNITED METHODIST 419 NE 1st St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 372-8523 fumcgnv.org

ABIDING SAVIOR LUTHERAN PRESCHOOL 9700 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 331-7770 abidingsavior.info

GAINESVILLE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL gainesvillecountrydayschool.org

IT’S ABOUT KIDS 24621 Karelas Drive Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-5437

CHERRY TREE LEARNING ACADEMY 715 NW 10th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 336-8128 THE CHILD’S GARDEN 1497 NW 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 374-8586 thechildsgardenpreschool.com CUDDLY KIDS ACADEMY 1023 SE 4th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 336-3200 passageministries.org EDUCATION STATION & PRESCHOOL 2411 NW 41st St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 335-0026 educationstationandpreschool.com SPIRIT OF FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER CHURCH GAINESVILLE 7510 NW 4th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 505-0192 facebook.com/FaithAcademySF FIRST PRESBYTERIAN PRESCHOOL 106 SW 3rd St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 376-1818 1stpc.org

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24TH AVENUE CAMPUS 6801 SW 24th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-7783 TOWER ROAD PRESCHOOL 2304 Tower Road Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-9032 GRANNY D’S LEARNING CENTER 1300 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 872-5852 HAND N HAND CHRISTIAN CHILD CARE CENTER 1936 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 335-9622 HOLY TRINITY EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF GAINESVILLE 301 N Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 377-2290 htesgnv.org IGNITE LIFE CENTER 404 NW 14th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 378-0078 ignitelifecenter.org

KINDERCARE LEARNING CENTER 10 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-4182 kindercare.com KRISTIE’S LEARNING CENTER 1127 NW 7th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 373-7918 LA PETITE ACADEMY 2755 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 371-0720 lapetite.com

JUST A BLESSING CHILD CARE 7510 NW 4th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 331-3075 justablessingearlylearningcenter.com

LEE’S FUN TO LEARN DAYCARE 125 SE Douglas St. High Springs, FL 32643 (352) 454-5568

KIDDIE ACADEMY 6476 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 264-7724 kiddieacademy.com

LEE’S PRESCHOOL & NURSERY CENTER 14017 NW 166th Place Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2109

KIDWORKS kid-works.com

LIL’ SCHOLARS LEARNING ACADEMY 3520 NW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 519-5552

MILLHOPPER 3003 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 335-1335 TIOGA TOWN CENTER 120 SW 130th Terrace, Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 331-3833 THE KIDZ HOUSE 4232 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 371-6269 thekidzhouse.com

LITTLE ANGELS CHILD CARE & LEARNING CENTER 13400 Martin Luther King Hwy, Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418-2211 LITTLE FOXXES DAY CARE CENTER 730 SW 5th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 376-4987


LOVE N CARE CHRISTIAN LEARNING CENTER WESTWOOD HILLS CHURCH OF GOD 1520 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 378-5190 LOVE-N-CARE PRESCHOOL 12440 NW US Highway 441 Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418-0404 MARTIN-ROCHELLE LEARNING CENTER 13645 FL-45 Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-9346 MILLHOPPER MONTESSORI SCHOOL 8505 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 375-6773 millhopper.com MORNING MEADOW PRESCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN 813 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 375-2197 morningmeadow.com MY SCHOOL CHILD CARE CENTER 2720 SW 2nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 373-1328 campuscofc.org O2B KIDS o2bkids.com SUPERCENTER 6680 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 332-5500 ALACHUA 14400 NW 152nd Lane Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-0092

ARCHER ROAD 3989 SW 37th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-8838 HUNTERS CROSSING 4929 NW 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 371-4202 MIDTOWN 1555 NW 23th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 374-2202 OAK HALL LOWER SCHOOL 7715 SW 14th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-1452 oakhall.org OPEN ARMS CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER 1823 NW 5th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32603 (352) 373-5856 flcgainesville.org/openarms PERSIMMON EARLY LEARNING ACADEMY 1121 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 505-0144 persimmonela.com PINEWOOD SCHOOL 1704 NE 9th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 372-3343 pinewoodschool.net PUMPKIN PATCH DAY CARE CENTER 6105 SE 205th St. Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-2709 QUEEN OF PEACE CATHOLIC ACADEMY 10900 SW 24th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-8808 qopacademy.org

THE ROCK SCHOOL 9818 SW 24th Ave., Suite B Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 331-7625 therocklions.com

THE SUNSHINE HOUSE 2530 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-4765 sunshinehouse.com

SANTA FE COLLEGE LITTLE SCHOOL 3000 NW 83rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 395-5597 sfcollege.edu/little-school

SUPERIOR CHILD CARE & LEARNING CENTER 1645 NE 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 372-5523

SMALL WORLD DAYCARE AND LEARNING CENTER 1214 NW 4th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 376-0917 swdc.co SMOKEY BEAR KIDDY COLLEGE 2500 NE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 792-6404 SONSHINE DAY PRESCHOOL AT WESTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 10000 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-0017 westsidebaptist.org/sonshineday.html STEP BY STEP CHILDCARE AND LEARNING CENTER 2211 NW 40th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 373-6988 stepbysteplearningcenter.com STEPPING STONES PRESCHOOL AT TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 4000 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 416-3025 trinitygnv.org/steppingstones

TINY BLESSING LEARNING CENTER 811 NW 4th Place Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 359-6832 YES I CAN KIDS ACADEMY 1734 SE Hawthorne Road Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 371-5554

Public Elementary ALACHUA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 13800 NW 152nd Place Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-1841 alachua.sbac.edu ARCHER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 14533 SW 170th St. Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-2111 archer.sbac.edu GLEN SPRINGS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2826 NW 31st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 955-6708 glensprings.sbac.edu

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Education

LAWTON M. CHILES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2525 School House Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 333-2825 chiles.sbac.edu

SHELL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 21633 SE 65th Ave. Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-1901 shell.sbac.edu

HAWTHORNE MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOL 21403 SE 69th Ave. Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-1900 hawthorne.sbac.edu

HIDDEN OAK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2100 Fort Clarke Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-2801 hiddenoak.sbac.edu

LITTLEWOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 812 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 955-6712 littlewood.sbac.edu

STEPHEN FOSTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3800 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 955-6706 foster.sbac.edu

HIGH SPRINGS COMMUNITY SCHOOL 1015 N Main St. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-1958 highsprings.sbac.edu

HIGH SPRINGS COMMUNITY SCHOOL 1015 N Main St. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-1958 highsprings.sbac.edu

MEADOWBROOK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 11525 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-2828 meadowbrook.sbac.edu

TALBOT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 5701 NW 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 955-6716 talbot.sbac.edu

HOWARD BISHOP MIDDLE SCHOOL 1901 NE 9th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 955-6701 bishop.sbac.edu

IDYLWILD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4601 SW 20th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 955-6709 idylwild.sbac.edu

METCALFE Elementary School 1250 NE 18th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 955-6713 metcalfe.sbac.edu

TERWILLIGER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 301 NW 62nd St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 955-6717 terwilliger.sbac.edu

KANAPAHA MIDDLE SCHOOL 5005 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 955-6960 kanapaha.sbac.edu

IRBY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 13505 NW 140th St. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-5002 irby.sbac.edu

NEWBERRY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 25705 SW 15th Ave. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-1100 newberryelementary.sbac.edu

WILES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4601 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 955-6955 wiles.sbac.edu

NORTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2200 NW 45th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 955-6765 norton.sbac.edu

JOSEPH WILLIAMS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1245 SE 7th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 955-6719 williams.sbac.edu

RAWLINGS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3500 NE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 955-6715 rawlings.sbac.edu

Middle School

Public Elementary (cont.)

J.J. FINLEY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1912 NW 5th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32603 (352) 955-6705 finley.sbac.edu LAKE FOREST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4401 SE 4th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 955-6710 lakeforest.sbac.edu

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FORT CLARKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 9301 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-2800 fortclarke.sbac.edu

LINCOLN MIDDLE SCHOOL 1001 SE 12th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 955-6711 lincoln.sbac.edu MEBANE MIDDLE SCHOOL 16401 NW County Road 241 Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-1648 mebane.sbac.edu OAK VIEW MIDDLE SCHOOL 1203 SW 250th St. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-1102 oakview.sbac.edu WESTWOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL 3215 NW 15th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 955-6718 westwood.sbac.edu


High School

Charter Schools

BUCHHOLZ HIGH SCHOOL 5510 NW 27th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 955-6702 buchholz.sbac.edu

ALACHUA LEARNING ACADEMY 1100 W. State Road 235 Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418-2080 alachualearningacademy.org/

EASTSIDE HIGH SCHOOL 1201 SE 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 955-6704 eastside.sbac.edu GAINESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 1900 NW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 955-6707 gainesville.sbac.edu HAWTHORNE MIDDLE & HIGH SCHOOL 21403 SE 69th Ave. Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-1900 hawthorne.sbac.edu NEWBERRY HIGH SCHOOL 400 SW 258th St. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-1101 newberryhigh.sbac.edu PROFESSIONAL ACADEMIES MAGNET AT W. TRAVIS LOFTEN HIGH SCHOOL 3000 E. University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 955-6839 loften.sbac.edu SANTA FE HIGH SCHOOL 16213 NW US Highway 441 Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-1125 santafe.sbac.edu

BOULWARE SPRINGS CHARTER SCHOOL 1303 NE 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 244-9732 boulwarecharter.com CARING AND SHARING LEARNING SCHOOL 1951 SE 4th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 372-1004 caringandsharingschool.com THE EINSTEIN SCHOOL, INC. 5910 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 335-4321 emschool.org EXPRESSIONS LEARNING ARTS ACADEMY 5408 SW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 373-5223 expressionsacademy.org FLORIDA SIATECH 7022 NW 10th Place Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 333-7952 siatechgainesville.org/ GENESIS PREPARATORY SCHOOL 207 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 379-1188 Genesisprepcharter.com

HEALTHY LEARNING ACADEMY, INC. 13505 W. Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 372-2279 healthylearningacademy.com MICANOPY AREA COOPERATIVE SCHOOL, INC. 802 NW Seminary St. Micanopy, FL 32667 (352) 466-0990 macschool.us ONE ROOM SCHOOL LITTLE SCHOOL (VPK-1): 4180 NE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 376-4014 BIG SCHOOL (2-6): 3930 NE 15th St. orsh.net RESILIENCE CHARTER SCHOOL 1717 NE 9th St., Building A Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 226-8675 www.resiliencecharter.org/

Private Schools ACADEMY PRESCHOOL AT THE FAMILY CHURCH 2022 SW 122nd St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-6459 | (352) 642-1290 facebook.com/TheAcademySchool BHAKTIVEDANTA ACADEMY 17414 NW 112th Blvd. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2886 bhaktischool.org

BRENTWOOD SCHOOL 1111 NW 55th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 373-3222 gobrentwoodschool.com CHRISTIAN LIFE ACADEMY 12000 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 495-3040 claofgainesville.org CORNERSTONE ACADEMY 1520 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 378-9337 cornerstone.st COUNTRYSIDE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 10926 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 332-1493 myccs.net FIRST CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 24530 NW 199th Lane High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-1641 fcahighsprings.org FOREST GROVE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 22575 NW 94th Ave. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-3921 forestgrovebaptistchurch.org/ GAINESVILLE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL gainesvillecountrydayschool.org 24TH AVENUE CAMPUS 6801 SW 24th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-7783 EARLY CHILDHOOD ENRICHMENT CENTER 2304 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-9032

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Education

“It doesn’t feel like a lecture; it’s a lot more fun when you’re being taught by a fellow student who’s in your place.” —

TESSA BRANT SENIOR AND PRESIDENT OF MU ALPHA THETA AT GAINESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

Most math teams have dedicated teachers, and sometimes even hire professionals to coach. At GHS, the coaching is done by students who excelled in geometry and moved up to Algebra II. Students learn to manage time and write lesson plans to teach their peers after school, while educators help those struggling in the actual math classes.

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G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 75


Education

Private Schools (cont.) HEART PINE WALDORF SCHOOL 1001 NE 16th Ave. Building C Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 260-6552 heartpineschool.org JORDAN GLEN SCHOOL 12425 SW 154th St. Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-2728 jordanglen.org LIVING SPRINGS ACADEMY 23901 NW 212th Ave. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-2777 MILLHOPPER MONTESSORI SCHOOL 8505 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 375-6773 millhopper.com NEWBERRY CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY SCHOOL 3536 NW 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 363-6322 newberryccs.org OAK HALL SCHOOL 1700 SW 75th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-3609 oakhall.org PASSAGE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 5121 E. University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 336-8983 passageministries.org/index.php/ schools/pca-home

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QUEEN OF PEACE CATHOLIC ACADEMY 10900 SW 24th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-8808 qopacademy.org ST. FRANCIS CATHOLIC ACADEMY 4100 NW 115th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 376-6545 sfcawolves.org ST. PATRICK INTERPARISH SCHOOL 550 NE 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 376-9878 stpatrickschoolgnv.org Z L SUNG ADVENTIST ACADEMY 2115 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-6040 zlsung22.adventistschoolconnect.org THE ROCK SCHOOL 9818 SW 24th Ave., Suite B Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 331-7625 therocklions.com TRILOGY SCHOOL 8700 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 332-8802 trilogyschool.org WINDSOR CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 918 SE County Road 234 Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 375-7316 windsorbaptistchurch.com

Homeschooling CLASSICAL CONVERSATIONS classicalconversations.com COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN HOMESCHOOLERS cchweb.org CORNERSTONE ACADEMY 1520 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 378-9337 cornerstone.st FLORIDA VIRTUAL SCHOOL (800) 374-1430 flvs.net HOMESCHOOL RESOURCE CENTER (352) 219-7447 homeschoolgainesville.com O2BKIDS (352) 332-5500 o2bkids.com SUN COUNTRY R.E.C.E.S.S. PROGRAM suncountrysports.com/homeschool/ SUN COUNTRY SPORTS – WEST 333 SW 140th Terrace Jonesville, FL 32669 (352) 331-8773 suncountrysports.com SUN COUNTRY SPORTS – MILLHOPPER 4010 NW 27th Lane Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 378-8711 suncountrysports.com

TAPESTRY OF GRACE HOMESCHOOL FORUM tapestryforum.wixsite.com/thforum

After School Programs and Full-Time Care 21ST CENTURY LEARNING (ALACHUA COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS) (352) 955-7300 sbac.edu A CHILD’S DREAM 4127 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-8900 againesvillepreschool.com A CHILD’S ACADEMY 3401 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 371-3360 achildsacademy.com AIKIDO OF GAINESVILLE 4424 SW 35th Terrace, Suite 4 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 494-7816 aikidoofgainesville.com ACES IN MOTION 1303 NE 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 514-9975 acesinmotion.org APEX MARTIAL ARTS AND CAPOEIRA ACADEMY 606 N Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 494-7323 capoeiraacademyofgainesville.weebly.com


Florida Virtual School (FLVS) sudent, Chance Cash, working on one of this online courses

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 7 7


Education

After School Programs and Full-Time Care (cont.) BOYS & GIRLS CLUB 2661 NW 51st St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 373-6639 myboysandgirlsclub.com EXTENDED DAY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM (ALACHUA COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS) 620 East University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 955-7300 sbac.edu FAITH ACADEMY OF GAINESVILLE 7510 NW 4th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 333-3005 facebook.com/faithacademysf/ GIRL’S PLACE, INC. 2101 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 373-4475 girlsplace.net IKIDS AT IGNITE LIFE CENTER 404 NW 14th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 378-0078 ignitelifecenter.org KINDERCARE’S “CATCH THE WAVE” AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM 10 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-4182 kindercare.com

7 8 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

KRISTIE’S THE CARING PLACE LEARNING CENTER 1127 NW 7th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 373-7918

MARTIN-ROCHELLE LEARNING CENTER 13645 SW State Road 45 Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-9346

STAR MARTIAL ARTS 500 NW 60th St., Suite A Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 374-4950 star-tkd.com

LA PETITE ACADEMY 2755 Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (888) 670-8861 lapetite.com

O2B KIDS o2bkids.com

THE SUNSHINE HOUSE 2530 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-4765 sunshinehouse.com

LEE’S FUN TO LEARN DAYCARE & TUTORING 18129 Douglass St. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-5568 www.leesfun2learn.com/ LEE’S PRESCHOOL CENTER 14017 NW 166th Place Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2109 LITTLE ANGELS CHILD CARE & LEARNING CENTER 13400 Martin Luther King Highway Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418-2211

OKITO AMERICA AFTER-SCHOOL MARTIAL ARTS PROGRAM 6900 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 338-7262 okitoamerica.com PINEWOOD SCHOOL 1704 NE 9th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 372-3343 pinewoodschool.net PUMPKIN PATCH DAY CARE CENTER 6105 SE 205th St. Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-2709 pumpkinpatch-childcare.com

TWINKLE TOES NANNY AGENCY (352) 538-2012 twinkletoesnanny.com YMCA AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM 5201 NW 34th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 374-YMCA ncfymca.org


Language Classes and ESOL Programs

INTERNATIONAL LEARNING CENTER AT PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 3403 NW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 378-2606 myilc.org

ALACHUA COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT ESOL - HEADQUARTER LIBRARY 401 E. University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 334-3929 aclib.us/literacy

GAINESVILLE LANGUAGE EXCHANGE Weekly events to bring people together, practice foreign languages, learn about foreign culture, and drink great beer facebook.com/gainesvilleexchange

ALACHUA BRANCH LIBRARY 14913 NW 140th St. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2592 aclib.us/literacy

LATINA WOMEN’S LEAGUE MILLHOPPER LIBRARY 3145 NW 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 378-9787 latinawomensleague.org

TOWER ROAD BRANCH LIBRARY 3020 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 333-2840 aclib.us/tower-road

FUN LANGUAGES 2616 NW 37th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 372-6885 funlanguages.org

YUCAI CHINESE 4426 SW 35th Ter. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 559-2226 usyucai.com

LA ESCUELA SPANISH LEARNING CENTER 5318 SW 91st Ter., Ste. A Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 514-4409 Laescuelaspanishcenter.com

ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE DE GAINESVILLE – THE SUN CENTER EAST 101 SE 2nd Place, Ste. 201-L Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 301-4767 afgainesvillefl.com

ÉCOLE FRANÇAISE 520 NW 2nd Place Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-8198 sites.google.com/site/frenchfunfood

THE INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING IN RETIREMENT OAK HAMMOCK CAMPUS 5100 SW 25th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 548-1009 ilr352.org/

SANTA FE COLLEGE – ESOL PROGRAM 3000 NW 83rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 381-7046 www.sfcollege.edu/adult-education/ esol/index

ALACHUA COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS - ESOL 620 E. University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 955-7035 sbac.edu ENGLISH CORNER – UF CHRISTIAN CAMPUS HOUSE 1810 NW 1st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32603 (352) 258-9367 Ufcch.jimdo.com/english-corner/ ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 1405 W University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 392-2070 eli.ufl.edu

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 7 9


Education

Elementary Schools I N

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS: 1. High Springs 2. Alachua 3. Irby 4. Talbot 5. Norton 6. Foster 7. Rawlings

GROVE

8. Lake Forest 9. Shell 10. Idylwild 11. Archer 12. Newberry 13. Meadowbrook 14. Glen Springs

15. Finley 16. Metcalfe 17. Williams 18. Littlewood 19. Terwilliger 20. Wiles 21. Chiles 22. Hidden Oak

Legend !

e

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8 0 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

0

2.5

5

10 Miles


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MIDDLE SCHOOLS: 1. Fort Clarke 2. Hawthorne 3. High Springs 4. Howard Bishop 5. Kanapaha 6. Lincoln 7. Mebane

LAKE SANTA FE

ORANGE HEIGHTS

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8. Oak View 9. Westwood

Legend !

e

Middle School

j k

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Gainesville Regional Airport

Alachua County Lakes

0

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G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 81


Education

Public High Schools I N

A L A C H U A

C O U N T Y

j k SANTA FE

LaCROSSE CR 231

HIGH SPRINGS

§ ¦ ¨

!

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1

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j HAGUE k

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HIGH SCHOOLS:

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1. Buchholz 2. Eastside 3. Gainesville 4. Hawthorne 5. Newberry 6. Loften 7. Santa Fe

Legend !

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High School

j k

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Alachua County Lakes

82 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

0

2.5

5

10 Miles


Why Greater Gainesville? Dr. Jackson Sasser President, Santa Fe College

––––––––

The spirit of a people defines a place. When I arrived in Gainesville almost 16 years ago, I was immediately impressed by the warmth and energy of its residents. The people of this city and surrounding region possess an indomitable sense of optimism that never fails to inspire me. They proudly devote themselves to intellectual pursuits and enthusiastically embrace an ethos of community service. Their spirit is the force that propelled Santa Fe College as it grew into one of the most successful community colleges in the nation. Santa Fe College was a leader in higher education long before it won the 2015 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence as the nation’s number one college. Back in 1968, just two years after opening its doors, Santa Fe was one of a dozen colleges to establish the League for Innovation in the Community College, a select group of institutions nationwide that set the standard for accomplishment in higher education. Most of Santa Fe’s founders were also members of the community, so it became a joint vision. We wanted to provide opportunities for people from all backgrounds to thrive, raise healthy families and lead productive, fulfilling lives. Santa Fe was created with that purpose in mind and we have lived up to our promise. Our students receive an outstanding education, whether they are pursuing a degree, enhancing their job skills or seeking personal growth. We graduate citizens who are engaged in their careers and communities, making meaningful and enduring contributions. We serve lifelong education needs even as the pace of change in our society continues to accelerate. Like the community, Santa Fe is constantly reinventing itself to provide students with new opportunities that include bachelor’s degrees, articulation agreements allowing transfer to more state universities and comprehensive international educational experiences essential for today’s global economy. Santa Fe’s high expectations and commitment to student success serves graduates well, no matter what their path. Many choose to remain

right here in this community. No college has closer relationships with our great partner in higher education, the University of Florida. Our graduates who transfer to UF perform superbly at Gainesville’s world-class university and go on to pursue careers that are professionally and personally rewarding. They become educators, artists, hardworking

public servants and leaders in engineering and information technology. They continue to confirm the values and vision embodied by Santa Fe’s earliest leaders when they established what truly has become our community’s college.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 8 3


Education

Why Greater Gainesville? Dr. W. Kent Fuchs President,University of Florida

––––––––

If this is a coincidence, it is certainly a happy one. In September of 2018, U.S. News & World Report ranked UF No. 8 in its 2019 list of the best public universities in the nation. Two days later, Livability.com released its 2018 list of 10 Best College Towns, and there was Gainesville at No. 9. It seems the momentum is in place, and that’s exciting. Our goal is to reach even higher for a spot in the top five. UF’s remarkable faculty and staff continue to do the heavy lifting that is required to make the university a place the state, the nation and the world turn to for leadership. We extend our thanks to the Legislature, Governor Rick Scott and the Board of Governors for their ongoing support of our efforts. We are also grateful for the support of UF alumni and students. To keep the momentum going, UF is in the midst of hiring 500 new faculty members over and above the 300 to 400 we normally hire each year to replace those who retire or leave the university. The addition of 500 new faculty positions was created to address two primary university goals: to reach top-ranked status by strengthening various research disciplines and to improve the university’s student-faculty ratio, a widely recognized metric in determining an institution’s educational excellence and stature. Half of those 500 have already been hired and the remaining half are expected to be in place by fall of 2019. The new hires are in addition to the more than 125 new faculty positions created in the past four years with funding the Legislature has provided as part of UF’s designation as a preeminent university. On the research front, there is more good news: UF received a record $838 million in research awards in fiscal year 2018, surpassing the previous record set in fiscal 2016 by $114 million, or nearly 16 percent. This significant increase was largely due to increased funding from the federal government, reaching a record high of $561 million, a nearly 23 percent increase over last year.

8 4 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

And on the fundraising front there is even more good news: In August of 2018, we announced that UF alumni and friends invested $414 million during the fiscal year that ended on June 30, 2018, marking the third consecutive year private giving has surpassed $400 million. This year’s contributions sustain an ambitious pace to reach a $3 billion fundraising goal for the

university’s Go Greater campaign. Now at the midpoint of the eight-year campaign, Gators have given $1.7 billion toward the campaign. Without a doubt, the support of the vibrant Gainesville community is key to UF’s success, and the partnerships between Gainesville and the University of Florida are growing stronger all the time.


GO GATORS. GO GREATER. U F I S O N T H E R I S E . The University of Florida, now ranked among the nation’s Top 10 public universities, is in the midst of the transformational “Go Greater” campaign, with the goal of raising billions of dollars in private support over the next several years. Contributions from our alumni and friends will fund new capital projects, scholarships and faculty endowments, ensuring UF has the resources and reach to solve the biggest issues facing people and the planet. It’s an exciting time to be a Gator. We hope you will join in as we Go Greater, fulfilling our public mission to improve lives, and propelling UF to the very top tier of public universities.

T W O W AY S T O G E T I N O N T H E A C T I O N !

MAKE A GIFT TO THE GO GREATER CAMPAIGN. Support the area of the university that means the most to you. www.ufl.edu/give-now

ORDER YOUR GATOR LICENSE PLATE.

THERE ARE 96,000 UF PLATES IN FLORIDA.

100,000

Show your pride when you drive. www.ufalumni.ufl.edu 80,000

GATOR

60,000

40,000 20,000 0

Help us reach 100,000. Your license plate directly supports the reach and visibility of The Gator Nation®.

PLEASE AGREE TO HAVE YOUR INFORMATION SHARED WITH UF SO YOUR CONTRIBUTION CAN BE RECOGNIZED.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 8 5

LICENSE PLATE AD.indd 4

10/20/16 11:01 AM


Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Since its founding more than 160 years ago, the University of Florida has continually pushed the boundaries of knowledge forward.

8 6 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


*

UF’s stature and ranking is in the stratosphere of our nation’s 4,000-plus universities and colleges. We are relatively young, and yet we are among the very best public universities. Our ambition is to be the very best. —KENT FUCHS, University of Florida President

A topranked university, united for a greater purpose.

The University of Florida is an institution on the rise. Its climb in academics, research and service have been recognized by being chosen No. 8 among national public universities in U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 ‘Best Colleges’ annual rankings. Founded as a land-grant research institution, UF is committed to making a difference in the world, and that begins in its hometown of Gainesville. A dynamic and diverse university on 2,000 acres in the Greater Gainesville area, UF is a major research institution. The proportion of students who stay in the area after graduation, the school’s graduate and professional students and its faculty and staff all add to Greater Gainesville’s pool of highly educated residents. Its cutting-edge research also attracts companies that require educated workers. With more than 55,000 students enrolled in 16 colleges, UF is proud of its intentional and intense comprehensiveness, boasting a legacy of academic and athletic excellence. UF believes in the power of collaboration and is working on many levels and in many disciplines to build a vision for the future, to help us all understand the implications for society, and “solving for next.”

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 87


Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Admitted Students Profile FOR 2018-19 ACADEMIC YEAR

55,862

Registered Students Enrolled for Fall 2018 52,992 Main Campus and 2,870 UF Online

40,849 Applications Received for Fall 2018

36%

18%

Acceptance Rate

Increase Over Last Year

30

Average ACT Score

Test Scores

4.4

1364

Average GPA

Average SAT Score

Great Gator Minds Have Shaped Our World

2

Nobel Prize Laureates

13

Pulitzer Prize winners

8

U.S. Ambassadors

Other Stats UF is #2 for Kiplinger’s Best College Values (in-state)

The New York Times ranked UF 6th Among Both Public and Private Universities in HelpingLowIncome Students Succeed

10

U.S. Senators

50

Federal Judges

8 8 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

42

U.S. Representatives

11

Governors

9

Astronauts

28

Presidents of Universities and Colleges


Increasing Educational Excellence by Strategically Hiring 500 Faculty The University of Florida is continuing to expand its faculty to further enhance teaching and research and to maintain its national stature as one of the best research universities in the U.S. By hiring 500 new researchers and scholars over the next few years, UF is addressing two of its goals: reaching top-ranked status by strengthening various research disciplines and by improving the university’s student-faculty ratio. The new faculty hires represent a number over and above the 300 to 400 faculty that UF hires annually to replace those who retire or leave the university. As of Fall 2018, more than 200 new hires began working at the University, bringing great new talent to the Gator Nation.

Spotlight on UF/IFAS The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) is a federalstate-county partnership dedicated to developing knowledge in agriculture, human and natural resources and the life sciences while enhancing and sustaining the quality of human life by making that information accessible. While extending into every county in the state, UF/IFAS has developed an international reputation for its accomplishments in teaching, research and Extension. Because of this mission and the diversity of Florida’s climate and agricultural commodities, UF/IFAS has facilities located across Florida. UF/IFAS provides research and development for Florida’s agricultural, natural resources and related food industries, which made value-added contributions of $123.2 billion to the gross domestic product of the state economy in 2013.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 8 9


Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Spotlight on Research

Using technology to stop deadly fake pills Researchers with the UF Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering have developed a way to instantly detect counterfeit pills, a growing problem in developing countries and a danger to others worldwide as online pharmacy use increases and sales of nutritional supplements are skyrocketing. The device uses nuclear quadrupole resonance, which is used in explosives detection and oil production. It can also be used to sniff out toxins on or in food. Swarup Bhunia, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and a lead researcher on the project, said the technology could be available to consumers and retailers within two years and could include a version that works with your smartphone, allowing consumers to test medicines and supplements themselves.

Naren Masna, doctoral student in UF Electrical & Computer Engineering is working with Swarup Bhunia, professor and Steven Yatauro Faculty Fellow, UF Electrical & Computer Engineering, on a detector for fake pills.

9 0 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


Why I Love Living in Gainesville “The best part about living in Gainesville is the people. There is someone from everywhere and something for everyone. People here care about the local environment, local resources and local initiatives. I love that I can spend time outside at Paynes Prairie or Ginnie Springs, attend a sports or non-sports event at UF and go to a local farmto-table dinner all in one weekend. I moved to Gainesville in 1999 for pharmacy school and I have been so lucky to stay and make this my home. I love it here.” D R . K AT I E V O G E L A N D E R S O N , C O L L E G E O F P H A R M A C Y A S S O C I AT E P R O F E S S O R A N D C H A I R O F T H E F A C U LT Y S E N AT E

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 9 1


Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Bringing International Flavor to Gainesville… “I tell people there are UF faculty, staff and students in all continents, dozens of countries, perhaps a hundred countries on any given day, doing research, teaching or service.”

UF was honored with the 2018 Senator Paul Simon Award for its broad commitment to international education and research, grounded in its fundamental goals of preparing our students to meet the challenges of a globalized world, striving for faculty research excellence with a global impact and advancing campus diversity. Over 150 countries are represented in the UF community, which includes over 6,500 international students on campus or pursuing practical training, as well as almost 2,000 visiting international scholars every year. More than 2,200 UF students studied abroad last year in over 100 destinations. UF has almost 500 collaborative agreements with partner institutions across the world.

LEO VILLALÓN, DEAN OF UF’S I N T E R N AT I O N A L C E N T E R

…and Keeping Our Hometown Steeped in Traditions Everyone is welcome to attend one of the longest-standing Gator traditions, the annual Homecoming Parade. The largest student-run parade in the nation draws a crowd of over 100,000, decked out in the school colors of orange and blue. The parade route extends from University Avenue to Main Street, downtown. More than 120 different groups including local charities, businesses and student organizations participate in the festivities. Local schools are closed for the day as well, so bring the family to this spectacle of floats and show off your Gator spirit!

92 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


Why We Love Living in Gainesville Megan and I are so excited to come back home to Gainesville. We have so many fond memories here from before that extend beyond winning two national championships. It has been great to rekindle the many relationships from years past and develop new ones in the Athletic Department, University and community. It’s an honor to work at an institution that is among the best in the nation in both academics and athletics and shares our values. We are also thankful to have the opportunity to raise our children in a community that offers a variety of educational and recreational choices.  G AT O R S H E A D F O O T B A L L C O A C H , D A N M U L L E N

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 9 3


Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Informing Our Community The University has been in the business of informing the Greater Gainesville community for 90 years, starting in 1928, when its radio station, WRUF-AM, began operations as one of the first radio stations in Florida. Since then, the UF College of Journalism and Communications (CJC) has been providing news and addressing local issues for 19 counties in the North Central Florida area on multiple platforms. The stations operated by the CJC are WUFT-TV, the PBS affiliate for North Central Florida and WRUF-TV, the local news, weather and Gator sports channel. The CJC also operates commercial radio stations ESPN 98.1/850 WRUF, the market’s leading sports-formatted radio station and flagship of the Gator Network, 103.7 The Gator, which programs contemporary country music, and the market-leading news/talk NPR affiliate WUFT-FM 89.1, which also has a weekly Spanish-language news broadcast, “Noticias.” Other stations include WUFT Classic, the 24-hour classical/arts channel at 102.7 FM and GHQ, a studenttargeted Top-40 radio station at 95.3 FM. Since 2012, the CJC and its students have earned more than 300 state, regional and national awards for news coverage.

…In All Kinds of Weather The UF College of Journalism and Communications runs the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network (FPREN). Through this service, which is offered thanks to funding from the Florida Legislature and other public radio stations throughout Florida, WUFT staff provide hurricane, tropical storm and other emergency messaging content to 13 stations that cover the entire state of Florida. FPREN also reaches residents through the Florida Storms app, which provides upto-date storm information and tracking, real-time evacuation and shelter information and a live stream of the closest Florida public radio station geo-targeted to the user’s location. The app is available for nearly all mobile devices.

9 4 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


Improving Life in Our Community Gainesville is on a roll! Autonomous vehicles, connected to smart devices and sensors, are no longer a thing of the future. UF is proud to partner with the City of Gainesville and the Florida Department of Transportation on testing the vehicles. As these cars are rolled out onto our streets, UF’s Transportation Institute, part of the Wertheim College of Engineering, has faculty and students working to conduct research into how these vehicles will relate to pedestrians, bicyclists, regular vehicles, traffic lights and flow, and more. This insight will help these technologies decrease the number of crashes and pollution on our roads. Mobility will be increased for the elderly, the disabled and the young, improving the way traffic flows. Autonomous vehicles will optimize the use of our travel time by allowing passengers to conduct activities that would otherwise not be permissible while physically driving a car.

Library Learning Did you know that the libraries at UF are open to the public? All campus libraries are open to guests and researchers looking for information covering a broad range of subjects. Resources from topics in education to Latin America to Judaica collections are waiting for you. Guests are able to access all online resources through the UF Smathers Libraries. There are many library events that may also be of interest.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 9 5


Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Preparing a Qualified Workforce Career Connections Center

“Gainesville is a truly magical place to live and work. The people, the community, and the unique culture all tie into the strong connections that make Gainesville what it is. I enjoy the diversity of activities that I can get involved in, especially anything arts related. You may catch me at a local arts festival, the Hippodrome or the annual craft show at the O’Connell Center! I’m always big on supporting local business, whether it’s personally or through my role at the Career Connections Center.” J A’ N E T G L OV E R , S E N I O R D I R E C T O R F O R CAREER SERVICES

9 6 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

Now in its 65th year of service on campus, the nationally recognized UF Career Connections Center, which serves the over 55,000 UF students and alumni, provides students with career education and guidance to enrich their college experience and prepare them for life beyond college. Located in the J. Wayne Reitz Union, the center reopened in 2018 after a 14-month renovation and expansion. It’s many features include four engagement centers with virtual capabilities so that students can access events online and virtual workshops can take place, along with several interview rooms for students, four of which have the technology that allows for virtual interviews. Additionally, students can borrow professional clothing for interviews, free of charge, at the Molm Family Gator Career Closet. Donations of business attire are welcome. The Career Connections Center holds annual career fairs and other events, and works with local and national employers to recruit on campus. “Employer development is a major focus for our team and connecting our students to local businesses is something that we take very seriously,” said Ja’Net Glover, Senior Director for Career Services. “Our team works with the Chamber, Innovation Hub and the CIED Center to bring new businesses to Gainesville and to make sure local companies and entrepreneurs see the incredible talent coming from UF.”


Innovation Destination At UF, our researchers are consistently making breakthroughs and developing new technologies that are creating a better world. But their biggest impact has been in establishing a culture of innovation where questions and connections across disciplines are encouraged. This mindset established UF Innovate | Tech Licensing, where more than 160 startups and new companies are bringing millions of dollars in revenue back to Florida, seeding future innovations to come. In 2017, the Milken Institute ranked the University of Florida third in the nation for its tech commercialization efforts. With the benefit of UF Innovate’s two business incubators and its Ventures organization, Tech Licensing connects researchers with investors and industry to guide them through the commercialization process. UF Innovate provides outstanding programs to assist startups and early-stage growth companies. Offerings include assistance with finding finances and forming relationships with venture investment groups, access to legal and accounting help, matching company leaders with experienced entrepreneurs and advisors in specialty areas, and guidance on recruitment of qualified employees.

Caring for Our Community UF Health is moving medicine forward UF Health is the Southeast’s most comprehensive academic health center, which encompasses nine hospitals and two veterinary hospitals, nine research institutes and centers and physician practices and services across Northeast and North Central Florida. With main campuses in Gainesville and Jacksonville, UF Health represents the shared vision and commitment to patient care excellence of more than 22,000 faculty and staff. The UF Health Heart & Vascular and Neuromedicine hospitals opened in 2017 in Gainesville, consolidating focused lifesaving care into one building. Patients now have streamlined access to highly specialized, comprehensive outpatient treatment options and inpatient services in one location. These specialty hospitals allow physicians, nurses and providers to save and extend more patients’ lives, advance UF Health’s research and education goals, and enable a new phase of growth for the health system.

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Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Bridging Health Gaps in Our Community With Innovative Engagement Research influences our health policies and practices, yet less than 2 percent of the population participates in health research. HealthStreet is an innovative community engagement program with a mission to change that, and to improve the health of our community by bridging gaps in health care and health research. HealthStreet’s Community Health Workers (CHWs) go out to the community and build meaningful connections with people where they live, work and play. When community members agree to join the HealthStreet cohort, a CHW will assess their health conditions, health concerns and research perceptions. They then provide them with health education and referrals to medical and social services and connect them to health research that meets their diverse needs. Involving a greater percentage of the population in the health research taking place at UF allows the research findings to be a reflection of our diverse community and applicable to the greatest number of people. The HealthStreet location on Archer Road in Gainesville provides a variety of free classes, services and events that help community members pursue better health and learn about opportunities to participate in research. Some community favorites include: • Weekly yoga classes • Hands-on cooking courses that teach how to cook healthy meals on a budget • Monthly town-hall discussions around a range of health topics and research discoveries • Fun community events such as the annual Night of Dance in October C H EC K O U T T H E C O M M U N I T Y CA L E N DA R AT M Y H E A LT H ST R E E T.O R G FO R C L AS S ES A N D E V E N TS O R CA L L 3 5 2 - 2 9 4 - 4 80 0 FO R M O R E I N FO R M AT I O N.

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Baby Gator UF isn’t only home to a top-ranked higher education system, but also to an elite early childhood development facility. Baby Gator Child Development Centers offer high-quality care to children ages six weeks to five years. Children grow and learn in a safe and healthy environment with a caring and attentive staff of well-trained early childhood educators. Curriculum is designed to encourage children to experience the world around them. Baby Gator addresses the needs of all children and fosters growth in social, behavioral, cognitive and physical skills and early literacy skills. Baby Gator’s mission is to provide quality care and early education, foster a lifelong love of learning, advance research across disciplines, support professional development in all fields related to children and families and to promote UF’s rise to preeminence. Enrollment to Baby Gator is reserved for children who have at least one parent or guardian associated with any college or department at the University or UF Health. TO L E A R N M O R E , V I S I T B A BYG ATO R .U F L .E D U.

Arts in Medicine

Ricky Kendall, guitarist.

UF Health Shands Arts in Medicine is one of the largest arts in health care programs in existence. There are 16 paid artists, specializing in subjects including visual arts, literary arts, performing arts and design and aesthetics who work throughout the UF Health system. The program is designed to transform the hospital experience for patients, visitors, caregivers and staff. Patients have the opportunity to create paintings, write poetry and perform music inside the hospital. These experiences create a more positive environment in which healing can take place. The program also works to educate UF medical and nursing students about the benefits of arts in health, researching the effects of arts in health care settings and working with local Gainesville arts organizations to bring arts in medicine messages to the community.

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Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Showcasing the Arts

UF is proud to put arts at the heart of our community by supporting and enriching student and faculty exhibits, performances, concerts and recitals. The University is a place of discovery, both terrestrially and intergalactically. Begin your journey by visiting UF’s Cultural Plaza, home to the Florida Museum of Natural History, the Harn Museum of Art and the Curtis M. Phillips Center for Performing Arts. From there, continue your voyage by taking a walk through UF’s campus to explore the University Gallery or learn all about the moon, planets and stars with the Department of Astronomy.

Florida Museum of Natural History Located on the University of Florida campus, the Florida Museum of Natural History is home to more than 40 million specimens and cultural archival treasures. Since its founding in 1891, the Museum has advanced its mission to discover and disseminate Florida’s biological diversity and cultural heritage. As the state’s official natural history museum, it is celebrated for its exhibitions that explore Florida’s unique habitats and cultural history. An exceptional hub for teaching and learning science, the Museum is dedicated to advancing research, education and public engagement for the Gainesville community. F LO R I DA M U S E U M.U F L .E D U.

Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts The Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts convenes a conversation across the disciplines of science, art and humanities. Dedicated to the cultural and artistic well-being of the Greater Gainesville community, UF Performing Arts brings world-class international performers to the stage in Gainesville. Whether it’s a Broadway show, a transcendent dance performance, a musical act, or a public figure sharing their life story, UF Performing Arts does it all. P E R FO R M I N G A RTS.U F L .E D U.

Harn Museum of Art The Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida is an 112,800-squarefoot-facility, which includes 40,400 square feet of exhibition space, five garden spaces, a 250-seat auditorium, study center, museum store, café and classroom spaces. The Harn’s collection totals more than 11,300 objects including African, Asian, modern and contemporary art, and photography with significant representations of ancient American and oceanic art, as well as a growing collection of natural history works on paper. UF warmly invites the Greater Gainesville community to the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art for exclusive, free once-a-month events. Museum Nights offer an array of activities and performances with the purpose of creating meaningful connections between community and art. The museum is committed to the continued collaboration with the University and community partners to inspire, educate and enrich people’s lives through art. H A R N.U F L .E D U/M U S E U M N I G H TS.

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University Gallery Take a walk through UF’s campus to the School of Art + Art History in the College of Arts and you’ll find the University Gallery. The space is organized into three art galleries that encourage appreciation and understanding of art and its role in society. University Gallery’s primary mission is to provide the community with a contemporary venue that continually explores new directions in visual art and historical perspectives. A RTS.U F L .E D U/G A L L E R I ES/ W E LC O M E

Gators Give Back to Our Community Caring for Our Furry Neighbors, Too The Veterinary Community Outreach Program is an elective clinical rotation for junior and senior veterinary students at the UF College of Veterinary Medicine. The service was started in 2003 under the direction of Dr. Natalie Isaza and is part of the UF Small Animal Hospital. This program is designed to introduce students to the challenges of veterinary practice in shelter environments, and to give experience in spay and neuter techniques of dogs, puppies, cats and kittens. The importance of community involvement in reducing the number of unwanted animals in local shelters is part of the Veterinary Community Outreach Program. Operation Catnip of Gainesville is a nonprofit organization that offers free spay/ neuter services and vaccines for unowned, free-roaming cats in our community.

The University of Florida’s culture of caring extends beyond campus walls to our community of Greater Gainesville. UF employees gave $1 million to local charities last year through The UF Campaign for Charities, held each fall. There are over 93 community agencies, including the United Way of North Central Florida, Community Health Charities of Florida and many independent agencies that benefit from this support.

V I S I T O P E R AT I O N CAT N I P.O R G TO S C H E D U L E A N A P P O I N T M E N T O R TO VO LU N T E E R .

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Education UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Why I Love Living in

Gainesville:

“Coming to the university town of Gainesville, my family and I knew there would be plenty to keep us busy, but we were surprised by just how much there is to do both on the University campus as well as downtown. We were also happily surprised to meet many residents who like Gainesville so much that they have lived here for 30-plus years.”

“I’m fundamentally interested in how to increase access to public education, and the University of Florida as well as Santa Fe College are principal educational opportunity engines for Florida and the nation. So naturally, Gainesville made the short list of places to live and work in. That I’ll never have to plow snow or rake endless bales of leaves is gravy!”

– LEE ANNE CHESTERFIELD, DIRECTOR OF THE HARN M U S E U M O F A R T, W H O J O I N E D I N J U L Y, 2 0 1 8

– A N TO N I O FA R I A S CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER AND SENIOR ADVISOR TO THE P R E S I D E N T, W H O J O I N E D I N J U LY 2 0 1 8

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“Gainesville has a thriving community where a sophisticated and complex appreciation for art and the way it intersects with science, technology and the design of human experience thrives and where we are cultivating and nourishing a partnership between the City and University. By being a regular visitor to the UF College of the Arts’ art exhibitions, music concerts, theater productions and dance performances, Greater Gainesville residents participate in an ecosystem of social infrastructure and lifelong learning and wellness that is an ideal context to facilitate our students’ success. In turn, we aim to extend our work to function in harmony with the community through programs such as: • The Center for Arts in Medicine’s Dance for Life classes and 352Creates network. • Outreach by faculty members such as voice professors Brenda Smith and Ronald Burrichter’s Sing for Life project with the UF Arts in Medicine program and the Oak Hammock Singers. • Jacaré Brazil, who performs every year in the World Music Festival, held downtown at Bo Diddley Plaza. • The Hippodrome, where the School of Theatre + Dance co-produces works each year.” – ONYE OZUZU, DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF THE ARTS, WHO JOINED IN AUGUST 2018


Department of Astronomy Teaching Observatory UF’s Department of Astronomy welcomes the Gainesville community to observe the moon, planets, double stars, star clusters, nebulae and other astronomical objects through 8-inch, 12-inch, and 14-inch Cassegrain telescopes. The Department of Astronomy operates an on-campus Teaching Observatory for educational and public programs, free to the public Friday evenings when UF classes are in session, weather permitting. L E A R N M O R E AT AST R O.U F L /E D U/O U T R E AC H/P U B L I C_N I G H TS

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Santa Fe College was founded in 1966 as an open-door college; our admissions policy has always been inclusive and unlimited. This year, Santa Fe College and the Santa Fe College Foundation are launching a new campaign to ensure that the doors of opportunity swing even wider, for everyone. This means growing our downtown campus for local populations that need expanded access to education and providing significantly more scholarships to benefit the students in Alachua and Bradford counties who are facing financial barriers. Santa Fe College is opening doors, and everyone in our community has a key.

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Education S A N TA F E C O L L E G E

Above and beyond. Since it opened its doors over 50 years ago, Santa Fe College has grown from a small community college serving Alachua and Bradford counties to a premier academic destination for students from nearly 100 countries. SF is the number one school in Florida’s State College System and in 2016, was designated the number one community college in the nation after winning the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. Our students, staff, faculty and community are the keys to our success. Offering personalized advising and distinctive classroom experiences, the SF Honors Program engages students to be partners in their learning process – developing critical thinking skills, promoting civic engagement and traveling farther down a path of lifelong learning. Many students receive scholarships for SF and after transferring to other institutions. Honors class sizes are among the smallest at the college; students are encouraged to challenge each other and to take a turn at teaching. SF also has Emerging Leaders and Engaged Leaders programs that allow students to network with leaders on campus and within the community, developing their own leadership skills and expanding their personal and professional development.

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Santa Fe College has earned a gold status rating for the fourth year in a row as one of the best colleges in the state. SF graduates have a 96% job placement rate, and the college received more Bright Futures scholars than any other school in the Florida College System.

#SaintsOfSantaFeCollege Francisco Lourenco, A.A. Health Sciences, ’17

From here, you can go anywhere. While you can earn one of nine bachelor’s degrees offered at Santa Fe College, SF also helps students transfer into and graduate from other fouryear schools at a rate more than double the national average. As a part of the SF2Universities program, SF graduates are guaranteed admission into the University of North Florida, Florida A&M University and the University of South Florida. But the majority of SF students transfer to our best partner, the University of Florida. UF admits more students from Santa Fe College than from any other college.

“After I graduated from Santa Fe, I went to Boston for an internship at the Stem Cell Institute at Harvard University. I learned there that I got the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship, the second time I applied, and then I was able to start at UF. Now I’m studying Applied Physiology and Kinesiology. I’m applying to medical school next summer. When I was growing up in Brazil, I failed every year of high school because of not showing up to class, which is evidence to the lack of mentorship I had and the problems of violence in the unfortunate environment where I lived. But at Santa Fe, I met people who were willing to support me and help me regardless of who I was. I’ll never forget meeting Bobby Hom, the Honors Program advisor. He gave me a sense of safety right away. I had so much gratitude when I met Bobby, Chief Ed Book [from the SF police department], and all my professors – especially when I compared them to how it was growing up.”

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Education S A N TA F E C O L L E G E

The bottom line. Getting a college degree is an important milestone in developing any successful career path, but there’s no reason why it should put a student thousands of dollars in debt before they earn their first paycheck. Santa Fe College students can earn an associate degree at a fraction of what it would cost to complete their first two years at a state or private college. And apprenticeships often offset the cost of college entirely. Bachelor’s degrees offered at SF are not only affordable – some cost less than $10,000 – they prepare students to enter the workforce in high-demand fields. SF opens doors to both our students and the greater community. Students get hands-on training from qualified instructors at an accredited college, giving them the skill set and the degree they need to become the first responders, educators, health care professionals, plumbers, computer programmers and more – jobs that are available right here in our community.

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Santa Fe College’s A.S. degree in graphic design and the B.A.S. degree in Multimedia and Video Production Technology both allow you to flex your creative muscles, master the most up-to-date software and develop your personal style as you prepare to enter the workforce.


In 2019, the ninth home built by SF students will be delivered to a family in North Central Florida. Santa Fe College donates these houses that have been built by students in the Charles R. Perry Construction Institute to Habitat for Humanity.

All of SF’s Career and Technical programs consult with area businesses to craft curriculum and develop apprenticeships, giving graduates the skills employers want. Scholarships are available, including several that are just for women.

Health Sciences programs offer bachelor’s degrees, associate degrees, and certificate programs that can have graduates working in the health care industry in as little as 10 months. SF’s Dental Hygiene and Dental Assisting tracks were accredited by the American Dental Association over 40 years ago. You probably know one of our graduates!

#SaintsOfSantaFeCollege Ulysses Fann, Systems and Data Center Manager B.A.S. Organizational Management, ’18 A.A. Computer Science, ’15 A.S. Networking, ’06

“Education changed my life. I’m from the inner city; I grew up in East New York, Brooklyn. It was pretty rough in our neighborhood. My mom moved her two youngest boys – that’s me and my brother Eric – to Florida to get a change of scenery and move closer to her family. It worked out pretty well. She’s proud of me. Now I work in ITS at Santa Fe College as the Systems and Datacenter Manager. So many doors have been opened for me at Santa Fe and friendships and connections made that I just would not have had. There’s no comparison as far as impact on my life.”

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Education S A N TA F E C O L L E G E

The Charles L. Blount Center in downtown Gainesville is in the process of a $36 million renovation that will make it an integral part of the Innovation Hub, working with the University of Florida and businesses in the region. The Blount Campus will also serve as the home for many of SF’s Business and Computer degree programs and offer STEM degrees for underrepresented communities in East Gainesville.

You are here. In addition to the Northwest Campus near I-75 and 39th Avenue in Gainesville, Santa Fe College has six centers positioned across Alachua and Bradford counties. Thanks to the vision and generosity of several families in the community, the college centers have been strategically located so that anyone within SF’s service area can have access to a quality and affordable education with about a 20-minute drive or less.

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#SaintsOfSantaFeCollege Patsy Blount, Board of Directors, SF Foundation “There was so much groundwork, dreaming and vision that went into the fruition of what we’re seeing at the downtown campus. I think Charley [Blount] would be so pleased at the opportunity this will provide for students in an ongoing way for years and years to come. It will have an impact on the community, and I think there will be a synergistic relationship that will impact the college, Gainesville, the University and students.”


The Ron and Norita Davis Center in Archer provides associate degrees, and also offers students in southwestern Alachua County the opportunity to earn college credit while still in high school with dual-enrollment classes.

The Guy Andrews Center in Starke provides Bradford County students classes in three buildings, including the historic Bradford County Courthouse and the Andrews Cultural Center.

The Alfred B. Sr. and Agnes W. Watson Center in Keystone Heights boasts a state-of-the-art science lab and a 40-acre preserve known as Watson Woods.

Alachua County is home to a growing number of biotech companies, where SF students have opportunities to intern while earning their degrees and to apply full-time after graduation. The Charles R. and Nancy V. Perry Center for Emerging Technologies is located near Progress Corporate Park in the city of Alachua and is home to SF’s biotech programs.

The George W. Kirkpatrick Center in East Gainesville recently underwent an $8 million expansion and provides state-of-the-art scenario-based training for law enforcement and paramedics, making it the premier training facility in the state.

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Education S A N TA F E C O L L E G E

A Global Focus. Santa Fe College is committed to preparing globally competent and competitive students who will excel in the midst of rapid globalization, adapt to an ever-changing world and effect positive change. Santa Fe College has a strong and vibrant international student population with students from nearly 100 countries around the world. SF offers foreign language instruction, dozens of courses with international content, and a rich set of extracurricular activities with a global focus. Students can expand their educational horizons with immersive international experiences through study abroad. These programs allow you to earn college credits while traveling to places like Brazil, the British Isles, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Jamaica, Spain and Portugal, South Africa and Sweden. Study abroad students travel with a faculty member and trips are planned during spring break or shortly after the spring term ends. SF also offers a certificate in International Studies to provide a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the history, politics, economics and languages of cultures beyond the borders of the United States.

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The new International Center, located in Building S on SF’s Northwest Campus, allows domestic and international students to interact with each other and get the services they need. From F-1 Visa support, to advising, study abroad opportunities and more, SF opens doors to a whole new world.

Santa Fe College prepares students to live in a globally competitive society. Students can study abroad during spring break or over the summer and work toward earning an International Studies Certificate.

#SaintsOfSantaFeCollege Joudi Ayroud, A.A. Political Science, ’19 “I left Syria before the war started, but it will forever have a piece of my heart. It’s not easy to live there. There’s no electricity, no water. There are bombings everywhere. My cousins who are still there weren’t allowed to go to school for a while. When they finally could, they knew they might not come back home, so they had to say goodbye in the morning. And that is always on my mind. Every single decision I’ve made, I’ve thought: This will be the opportunity to share my culture, to share my beliefs, to eliminate stereotypes about Syrians. Even since I was a little kid, this has always been something within me. One day, my dream is to work at the UN. I want to represent Syria there.”

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Education S A N TA F E C O L L E G E

Elevating the Arts.

Students perform throughout the year in the SF Fine Arts Hall. In 2017, Irish artist Al Maser painted this mural at the college with help from SF art students and 352walls/The Gainesville Urban Art Initiative.

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Santa Fe College has a long history of supporting and promoting the creative arts. Many graduates from the college’s music, dance, theatre and graphic arts programs have launched successful careers in our local community and beyond. The Northwest Campus is home to several art galleries where a rotation of exhibits fills the college calendar. The SF Fine Arts Hall features both student performances and the SF’s Master Artist Series, which brings world-renowned talent to the college both for classroom discussion and to benefit the public. The college also elevates the arts beyond its doors. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Spring Arts Festival. In 1969, at what is now the Thomas Center, the festival first came to life. Most area residents recognize the festival as an event that transforms the streets of downtown Gainesville every year, but it also shapes the philosophy of the college. The early influence of expressive, artistic faculty contributed to establishing a strong “student-first” mentality – and infrastructure – at the college. This influence remains evident today in SF’s smaller-scaled classrooms and lower student-to-teacher ratios.

#SaintsOfSantaFeCollege Eleanor Blair and Steve Howell, Artists, SF Spring Arts Festival Participants ELEANOR: “The phenomenon of the Spring Arts Festival for me was that a whole new world opened up. We’ve created a mutually beneficial environment for creators of art and lovers of art. There’s a lot of people who would never go to a gallery that will come to the festival. What it’s done over the decades is — not only provided a marvelous platform for artists to display their work and connect with people who might want to purchase something and keep an artist alive — but it’s educating the public.” STEVE: “It’s a yin and a yang in that the artist is mostly a solitary figure, but at the same time, is a viable, positive member of the community. And the Spring Arts show is a place to bring that all together.”

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Health Care

Health Care in Greater Gainesville — 120 — List of Hospitals, ERs and Urgent Care

— 122 — More About Area Hospitals

— 126 — Pediatric Care

— 128 — Public Health Services in Alachua County

— 130 — Senior Health Care Options

— 132 — Pet Health Care Options

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World-class healthcare is widely available in Greater Gainesville. The University of Florida Health Shands Hospital, North Florida Regional Medical Center and the Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center all offer unparalleled health care, in addition to countless private and specialty clinics in the area. With 13 primary care locations across Greater Gainesville and over 1,300 providers in more than 100 specialties, UF Health offers a continuum of care. At the end of 2017, UF Health opened its new $415 million specialty hospital providing concentrated neurologic, neurosurgical, heart and vascular services for patients with complex health conditions. UF Health is tied for top adult hospital in Florida, according to U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News also recognized UF Health Children’s Hospital as one of the nation’s best hospitals for children in nine medical specialties, seven of which are the highest ranked in Florida. For 44 years, NFRMC has been focused on enriching the community through dedicated, compassionate healthcare. NFRMC is a 432-bed, full-service, medical and surgical acute care center. The center leads the way with advanced procedures and minimally invasive surgery, cutting-edge technologies, cardiovascular care, orthopedics and cancer care. The Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center serves veterans from the Panhandle to Jacksonville and from southern Georgia and to just north of Orlando. It is one of the busiest VA medical centers in the country. The VA’s presence in Greater Gainesville includes 30 locations for clinics and offices. The Honors Center, located in East Gainesville, provides services for homeless veterans, including job and life skills training. G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 1 1 9


Health Care

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List of Hospitals, ERs and Urgent Care You’re never far from care in Greater Gainesville Hospital Listings MALCOM RANDALL VA MEDICAL CENTER 1601 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 376-1611 northflorida.va.gov

UF HEALTH SHANDS HOSPITAL 1600 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 265-0111 ufhealth.org/uf-health-shandshospital

NORTH FLORIDA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER 6500 W Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 333-4000 nfrmc.com

SELECT SPECIALTY HOSPITAL 1600 SW Archer Rd., 5th Floor. Gainesville, FL 32610 352-265-0055 gainesville.selectspecialtyhospitals.com

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UF HEALTH SHANDS CANCER HOSPITAL 1515 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 265-0111 ufhealth.org/uf-health-shandscancer-hospital UF HEALTH SHANDS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL 1600 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 265-7337 ufhealth.org/shands-hospital-children-uf

UF HEALTH SHANDS PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL 4101 NW 89th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 265-5481 ufhealth.org/uf-health-shandspsychiatric-hospital UF HEALTH SHANDS REHAB HOSPITAL 2708 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 554-2000 UFHealth.org/rehab


Select Urgent Care Listings 1ST CHOICE IMMEDIATE CARE CENTER 128 NW. 137th Dr. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 332-1890 1stchoiceicc.com CARESPOT URGENT CARE www.carespot.com/location/midtown-gainesville-fl

CARESPOT URGENT CARE GAINESVILLE – MIDTOWN 720 SW. 2nd Ave., Suite 160A Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 614-3694 CARESPOT URGENT CARE GAINESVILLE – 43RD STREET 3925 NW. 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 614-3687 CARESPOT URGENT CARE GAINESVILLE – ARCHER ROAD 3581 SW Archer Rd., Suite 40 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 415-9181 CARESPOT URGENT CARE OCALA 2415 SW College Rd. Ocala, FL 34471 (352) 877-2031

EMERGENCY PHYSICIANS MEDICAL CENTERS emergencypmc.com

GAINESVILLE – SOUTHWEST 2445 SW 76th St., Suite 110 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 872-5111 GAINESVILLE – NORTHWEST 9181 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL, 32606 (352) 727-7755

NORTH FLORIDA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER EMERGENCY ROOMS

NORTH FLORIDA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER: EMERGENCY ROOM 6500 W Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 415-4439 FREESTANDING EMERGENCY ROOM WEST END 12311 W Newberry Rd. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 313-8000 nfrmc.com/service/freestandingemergency-room-west-end

MINUTECLINIC AT CVS GAINESVILLE – ARCHER ROAD 3404 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 373-2507 cvs.com/minuteclinic UF HEALTH SHANDS EMERGENCY CENTERS UF HEALTH SHANDS EMERGENCY CENTER SPRINGHILL 8475 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352)-627-0400 ufhealth.org/uf-health-shandsemergency-center-springhill

UF HEALTH SHANDS EMERGENCY CENTER KANAPAHA 7405 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 627-0500 ufhealth.org/uf-health-emergencycenter-kanapaha

VA PAIN CLINIC 3401 NW 98th St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 376-1611 ext. 7090 www.northflorida.va.gov/NORTHFLORIDA/visitors/painclinic.asp

FREESTANDING EMERGENCY ROOM MILLHOPPER 4388 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 271- 4000 nfrmc.com/service/freestandingemergency-room-millhopper

FIRST CARE OF GAINESVILLE 4343 W. Newberry Rd., Suite 10 Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 373-2340 simedhealth.com/first_care GAINESVILLE AFTER HOURS CLINIC 926 NW. 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 379-1049 gainesvilleafterhoursclinic.com MINUTECLINIC AT CVS GAINESVILLE – 23RD AVENUE 4354 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 376-4565 cvs.com/minuteclinic

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Health Care

More About Area Hospitals Greater Gainesville is fortunate to rank higher than the national average in the medical/health care index of quality of life indicators. At the helm are eight topnotch hospitals, and in support are over 228 specialty offices ranging from women’s health to pediatrics to optometry.

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Malcom Randall VA Medical Center The Malcom Randall VA Medical Center (VAMC) is one of two medical centers in the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System. The Malcom Randall VAMC provides a full range of comprehensive health care, including: primary care, specialty care, tertiary care and long term care. For a full list, visit northflorida.va.gov/services. The Malcom Randall VAMC is located in Gainesville, Florida, on the south side of Archer Road, approximately three miles east of Interstate 75 (Exit 384), directly across the street from Shands at the University of Florida. Source: northflorida.va.gov

North Florida Regional Medical Center As Gainesville’s community hospital, North Florida Regional Medical Center (NFRMC) has continued to expand in order for more people to have access to the quality, award-winning care NFRMC consistently delivers. Over the past few years, North Florida Regional has undergone several expansions and is now a 432-bed, full-service medical and surgical acute care center serving residents throughout North Central Florida. NFRMC is a part of North Florida Regional Healthcare, a health care system that also includes a number of other outstanding medical programs dedicated to quality healing. Those programs include the Heart & Vascular Center, Cancer Center, Women’s Center, Robotics Center, Invision Imaging, Obesity Center for Surgery & Treatment, Neuroscience Center, Diabetes Center, Endoscopy Center, Sleep Disorders Center, Wound Therapy and Hyperbarics and now the Behavioral Health Center, as well as primary medical care that includes Gainesville Family Physicians, Gainesville Internal Medicine Physicians and the Senior Healthcare Centers. The new Pediatric ER at North Florida Regional Medical Center includes five pediatric medical/surgical beds and related support space, and is staffed with dedicated pediatric ER physicians and nurses. In addition to a full staff of board-certified pediatricians, the Pediatric ER offers pediatric-friendly rooms and pediatric-specific beds.

Select Specialty Hospital Select Specialty Hospital - Gainesville is a 50,000-square-foot, 44-bed private hospital that includes a six-bed ICU unit as well as four rooms with negative pressure capabilities and a surgical suite. The rooms and units offer state-of-the-art design features and equipment that creates an environment conducive to healing, according to the hospital’s website. The hospital was named a 2012 and 2013 Quality Respiratory Care Institute by the American Association for Respiratory Care. The facility is operated by Select Specialty Hospital, a division of Select Medical, which consists of over 100 long-term acute care hospitals located in 43 states, operating under the names of Select Specialty Hospitals and Regency Hospitals. Source: gainesville.selectspecialtyhospitals.com

NFRMC at a Glance

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• 432-Bed Acute Care • 3 locations for 24-Hour Emergency Services – NFRMC Main ER – NFRMC Freestanding Emergency Room - West End – NFRMC Freestanding Emergency Room - Millhopper • Dedicated Pediatric ER – Accredited Cancer Program – Accredited Stroke Program – Accredited Chest Pain Center

– Cardiovascular Program – Comprehensive Stroke Center – da Vinci® Surgical Systems for Minimally Invasive Surgery – Imaging Services - Level II Neonatal Intensive Care Unit - Neuroscience and Stroke Program - Orthopedic and Spine Surgery - Wound Therapy & Hyperbaric Services • Company Care - The Women’s Center - The Heart & Vascular Center

- The Robotics Center - The Sleep Disorders Center - The Neuroscience Center - The Behavioral Health Center - New Beginnings Maternity - Express ER - Senior Healthcare Centers - Obesity Center for Surgery & Treatment Source: North Florida Regional Healthcare’s 2017 Community Report and Hospital Corporation of America’s 2016 North Florida Division Community Report

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Health Care

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UF Health Shands Hospital at a Glance • 24-Hour Emergency Services • Includes UF Health Shands Cancer Hospital and UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital • Approximately 900 UF faculty physicians practice in about 100 specialty and subspecialty medical areas • Areas of excellence in cancer specialties, heart care, women and children’s services, neuromedicine specialties and transplant services • State-designated Level I Trauma Center that treats more than 2,000 patients a year • Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit • Operates one of Florida’s four regional burn centers • ShandsCair provides emergency ground and air transport for patients and includes a special flight team for neonatal transports

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Best Hospital Rankings UF Health Shands Hospital In U.S. News & World Report’s 2017-18 Best Hospital rankings, UF Health Shands Hospital was among the nation’s best in six specialties:

UF Health Shands Hospital Established in 1958, UF Health Shands Hospital is a 973-bed general medical and surgical facility with 41,669 admissions in the most recent year reported, according to U.S. News and World Report’s 2015-2016 Best Hospital Rankings. Nearly 900 expert UF College of Medicine and community physicians along with more than 9,000 skilled UF Health Shands nursing and support staff provide comprehensive high-quality patient care, from primary care and family medicine to subspecialty tertiary and quaternary services for patients with highly complex medical conditions. The faculty from the UF College of Medicine includes nationally and internationally recognized physicians whose expertise is supported by intensive research activities. UF Health Shands’ affiliation with the UF Health Science Center allows patients to benefit from the latest medical knowledge and technology. UF Health Shands Hospital has been recognized among the nation’s best hospitals in seven adult medical specialties and as one of the best hospitals in Florida. Source: health.usnews.com, ufhealth.org/shands-university-florida

• Nephrology (25th) • Diabetes & Endocrinology (tied for 31st) • Geriatrics (42nd)

• Gynecology (35th)* • Neurology & Neurosurgery (36th) • Pulmonology (tied for 34th)

* UF Health Shands is the only hospital in Florida ranked in gynecology.

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Other Awards and Recognitions • Designated as a Comprehensive Stroke Center by the Agency for Health Care Administration • Certified as a Primary Stroke Center with the Gold Seal of Approval™ by The Joint Commission • Received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Performance Achievement Award • Awarded 2012 Silver Medal of Honor by the US Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Health Resource and Services Administration (HRSA) Source: ufhealth.org/health-system-facts-and-figures

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UF Health Shands Cancer Hospital

UF Health Shands Psychiatric Hospital

UF Health Shands Cancer Hospital opened in November 2009. The 500,000-square-foot facility includes 192 licensed beds for a wide variety of patients, including those receiving diagnostic and therapeutic oncology services. Located across Archer Road from UF Health Shands Hospital, the facility offers advanced resources for a wide range of oncology, surgery, critical care and emergency/trauma patients. The hospital also features the Marshall M. and Paula P. Criser, Jr. Cancer Resource Center, designed to promote patient education and wellness. Patients and families can stay connected to family and friends through computers with free internet access, and find up-to-date information about treatment, recovery and how to cope with bereavement. For more information, call 352-733-0881. For a list of programs and events, stop by the center on the first floor of the hospital.

Formerly known as Shands Vista, UF Health Shands Psychiatric Hospital is located on a private, picturesque, 18-acre campus that offers comfort and serenity to people in crisis. The 81-bed facility provides a full range of confidential, effective services including treatment for addiction, memory disorders, anxiety, depression, bipolar disorders, eating disorders and a wide range of other conditions. Established in 1987, the hospital consists of a child/adolescent unit, an adult inpatient addiction unit, two adult inpatient psychiatric units and a geriatric psychiatry unit. The hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission and has a magnet designation from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. The nursing profession’s most prestigious honor, magnet status is achieved by less than one percent of the nation’s acute-care hospitals.

Source: ufhealth.org/shands-cancer-hospital-uf

Source: ufhealth.org/uf-health-shands-psychiatric-hospital

UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital

UF Health Shands Rehab Hospital

UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital is a hospital within a hospital on the UF Health Shands campus where UF physicians treat patients from throughout Florida and all over the U.S. The UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital represents the only quaternary-care academic pediatric center in North Florida. UF physicians offer some of the most specialized pediatric programs for the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of complex conditions. The hospital has 167 beds, including fully equipped pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital is part of the Children’s Miracle Network’s alliance of premier hospitals for children and a member of the Children’s Hospital Association, formerly known as the National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions. UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital was recognized among the nation’s best in nine medical specialties in the 2016-17 U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals rankings.

Established in 1987, UF Health Shands Rehab Hospital is a 40-bed acute rehab hospital for patients who have suffered strokes, traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, amputations, burns or major joint replacements. The hospital brings together a multi-disciplinary team of UF and community physicians specially trained in physical medicine and rehabilitation, Shands therapists, nurses and other healthcare professionals, all dedicated to helping people improve the quality of their lives while dealing with major traumas, injuries or diseases. The hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission and is one of only 10 rehabilitation centers in the state designated by the Florida Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Program as a brain and spinal cord injury rehabilitation center. Source: ufhealth.org/uf-health-shands-rehab-hospital

Best Hospital Rankings UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital

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In U.S. News & World Report’s 2017-18 Best Hospital rankings, UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital was among the nation’s best in six specialties. UF Health’s pediatric cardiology and heart surgery program earned a historically high ranking, moving up three places to 21st in the country. Five other UF Health pediatric specialties remained among the nation’s elite programs in the 2017-18 ranking. • Diabetes and Endocrinology (23rd) • Cancer (46th) • Neonatology (48th)

• Pulmonology (33rd) • Neurology and neurosurgery (49th)

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Health Care

Pediatric Care

Within a span of 62.4 square miles, people in Greater Gainesville have access to world-renowned health care services. Gainesville is home to eight award-winning hospitals and over 220 specialty offices, many of which focus exclusively on pediatric health. Pediatric patients can utilize services ranging from surgery and psychiatry to genetics, hematology and oncology.

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Home to the 2nd Largest Children’s Hospital in Florida The only comprehensive pediatric facility in North Central Florida, UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital was ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s best hospitals for children in six medical specialties for 2018-19. The hospital was also the second highest ranked hospital in Florida for pediatric cancer care. Additionally, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit nursing team holds a gold Beacon Award for Excellence from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. A Beacon Award is a three-year designation recognizing nursing units that meet stringent criteria consistent with other well-respected honors.

A Pediatric Community That Cares Gainesville also prides itself on providing care to pediatric patients and their families through charities such as the Ronald McDonald House Charities of North Central Florida. The 31room Ronald McDonald House in Gainesville assists families with sick children by providing a place to stay and rest. The program is built on the simple idea that nothing else should matter when a family is focused on the health of their

child. There is also a Ronald McDonald House Family Room located on the 10th floor of UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital, a special place for families to rest and regroup, just steps away from their child’s bedside. The South West Advocacy Group (SWAG) is an organization located in the Tower Road area that connects families to services and resources in the community. Its goal is to protect vulnerable children and to support families. The SWAG clinic offers services ranging from family planning and clinical care to immunizations and pediatric services.

Dedicated Pediatric ER North Florida Regional Medical Center has a dedicated pediatric ER, ready to provide emergency care for children from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily. NFRMC also has over 20 doctors on staff who specialize in pediatrics. UF Shands has a 24-hour pediatric ER with 13 private treatment rooms, separate areas for sick and well children, complementary valet parking and child-friendly designs.

Award-Winning Pediatricians The pediatricians in Gainesville are as excellent as the hospitals themselves. In 2013, Dr. David Weinstein, a pediatrician at UF Health Shands, was presented with the Order of the Smile, an international humanitarian award.

UF Shands Children’s Hospital Awards Ranked in U.S. News and World Report’s 2018 Best Pediatric Hospitals in six specialties: - #19 in Pediatric Cardiology & Heart Surgery - #27 in Pediatric Diabetes & Endocrinology - #22 in Pediatric Pulmonology - #49 in Pediatric Cancer - #39 in Neonatology - #50 in Pediatric Neurology & Neurosurgery

Three nursing care units earned Gold Beacon Awards for Excellence - The Cardiac ICU, the Pediatric ICU and the Surgical/Trauma ICU

Additional Pediatric Resources Healthy Families:

Healthy Families Florida is a nationally accredited family support and coaching program for expecting parents and parents of newborns. Parents voluntarily participate in services provided in their homes to help improve their child’s outcomes through positive parent-child relationships. Specially trained support workers help them develop healthy parenting skills and achieve goals that increase family stability and self-sufficiency. (352) 294-5523 healthyfamiliesfla.org

Healthy Start of North Central Florida: Healthy Start provides universal risk screening of all Florida’s pregnant women and newborn infants to identify those at risk for poor birth, health and developmental outcomes. Healthy Start provides free services to all pregnant women and babies, up to age 3, who can benefit from the program. Services include newborn care, childbirth education, breastfeeding education, parenting education, tobacco education and health and well-being. (352) 337-1200 healthystartncf.org

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Health Care

Public Health Services in Alachua County

The Florida Department of Health and Alachua County Health Department work to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. In 2015, the Alachua County Public Health Department had 243 full-time employees, at a rate of 95.8 per 100,000 residents — much higher than the state rate of 48.6 per 100,000 residents.

The Alachua County Public Health Department expenditures for 2017 totaled an incredible $16,768,439. In 2016, more than 13 percent of Alachua County residents received services from the Florida Department of Health, amounting to over 34,000 active clients accessing more than 521,923 health care services. Various wellness, clinical and nutrition services are offered at FLDOH’s three Greater Gainesville offices. Adult health services

provided include: physical examinations, health screenings, laboratory services, some prescription medicines, x-ray referrals, well and sick care, medical follow-up, referral to specialists, immunizations and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases. Additional services may be offered at some locations. To learn how to make an appointment and to see a full list of public health programs and services, clinic operating hours and eligibility requirements, visit alachua.floridahealth.gov.

L O C A T I O N S

MAIN OFFICE 224 SE 24th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 334-7900

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SOUTHWEST CLINIC 816 SW 64th Terr. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 225-4320

ALACHUA CLINIC 15530 NW US-441, Suite 10010 Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2542


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Health Care

Oak Hammock at the University of Florida is a Greater Gainesville retirement community committed to lifelong learning, fitness and health.

Senior Health Care Options By providing easy access to geriatric health care, Greater Gainesville not only takes exceptional care of its college students, but of its elderly residents as well. There are various locations dedicated to the wellbeing of senior citizens based in Gainesville through geriatric health. Many geriatric health care centers and long-term care facilities are minutes from major hospitals to ensure the welfare of senior citizens with medical emergencies.

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A resident runs the treadmill at Oak Hammock. It’s been well documented that lifelong fitness helps maintain health and wellness in many ways.

For aging veterans, there are programs at the Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) focused solely on geriatric health care to meet health-related needs, including the Community Living Center. In addition to operating as an assisted living center with 24-hour medical staff, the Community Living Center houses the Geriatric Evaluation and Management Center (GEM). The GEM cares for elderly short-term patients with the goal of attaining complete recovery and regaining independence. UF Health is a leading local authority in geriatric healthcare. The Institute on Aging conducts research to optimize care for elderly patients and improve their quality of life. Through the Institute on Aging, patients have access to numerous world-class health care options through the University of Florida. For rehabilitation services that aid seniors with the goal of regaining their quality of life, special therapy programs and general geriatric health care is offered to the residents of Oak Hammock at the University of Florida. Geriatric centers connected to UF Health Shands Hospital and North Florida Regional Medical Center (NFRMC) operate as clinics offering individualized health care to senior patients. NFRMC manages senior health care centers that serve the geriatric needs of the Greater Gainesville area. With four locations in and around Gainesville, NFRMC’s Senior Healthcare Centers provide a specialized health care experience for senior citizens. The affiliated assisted living community, The Village, includes 24/7 health care and on-site medical staff to guarantee residents have access to care when they need it most.

Statistics

UF Health Shands Hospital ranked among the Top 50 best hospitals for geriatric care (32nd) in the region for 2018-2019.

NFRMC Senior Healthcare Centers were recognized by The Joint Commission for maintaining the highest standards of quality care.

In 2017, UF Senior Care Clinic and Oak Hammock at the University of Florida achieved outstanding patient satisfaction.

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Health Care

Pet Health Care Options Alachua County Pet License Tag

Alachua County Animal Services

Every dog, cat and ferret that lives in Alachua County must have an Alachua County license tag. Additionally, all dogs and cats must wear the tag at all times, except during recognized sporting or exhibition events. New Alachua County residents have 30 days from the date they move into Alachua County to purchase their tag. Learn what documents you’ll need, how to apply and how much it will cost by contacting Alachua County Animal Services.

ALACHUA COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES 3400 NE 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 264-6870 alachuacounty.us/Depts/ animalServices

Animal Medical Services AFFORDABLE VET CLINIC, LLC 17010 W Newberry Rd. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-3277 affordable-vet-clinic.com

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ALL CATS HEALTH CARE CLINIC 1034 NW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 376-2287 allcatshealthcare.com

BLUE PEARL SPECIALTY & EMERGENCY PET HOSPITAL 7314 W University Ave. Gainesville FL 32607 (352) 373-4444 avspethospitals.com

ALL CREATURES FAMILY PET HOSPITAL 5027 NW 34th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 335-0041 allcreaturesfamilypethospital.com

COUNTRYSIDE ANIMAL HOSPITAL 15551 NW US Hwy 441, Unit 10 Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 518-2142 countrysideanimalhosp.com

ARCHER ANIMAL HOSPITAL 16105 SW Archer Rd. Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-2910 archeranimalhospital.com

GAINESVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL EAST 2838 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 372-5366 gainesvillevet.com

BANFIELD PET HOSPITAL 3736 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 377-3769 banfield.com

GAINESVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL WEST 7615 W Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 332-5366 gainesvillevet.com


HAILE PLANTATION ANIMAL CLINIC 5231 SW 91st Dr. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 377-6003 haileanimalclinic.com HIGH SPRINGS ANIMAL HOSPITAL 17925 NW US Hwy 441 High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-1001 highspringsanimalhospital.net HILLTOP ANIMAL HOSPITAL 16402 NW US Hwy 441, Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-3822 hilltop-animal.com DR. JACKIE CASANOVA, MOBILE VETERINARIAN (352) 538-32980 JONESVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL 14145 W Newberry Rd. #102 Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 331-7050 jonesvillevet.com LAKE AREA ANIMAL HOSPITAL 7410 US-301 Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-4333 lakeareavets.com MICANOPY ANIMAL HOSPITAL 306 NE Hwy 441 Micanopy, FL 32667 (352) 466-0067 micanopyanimalhospital.com MILLHOPPER VETERINARY MEDICAL CENTER 4209 NW 37th Pl. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 653-2206 millhoppervet.com

NEWBERRY ANIMAL HOLISTIC AND WELLNESS CENTER 3909 NW 97th Blvd., Suite B Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 332-9991 naholistic.com NEWBERRY ANIMAL HOSPITAL 280 SW 250th St. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-7035 newberryanimalhospital.com NEWBERRY ANIMAL HOSPITAL 39TH AVENUE 3909 NW 97th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 332-2292 newberryanimalhospital.com NEWBERRY ANIMAL HOSPITAL MAIN STREET 1609 S Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 372-5391 newberryanimalhospital.com NORTHWOOD OAKS VETERINARY HOSPITAL 5331 NW 34th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 373-7387 nwoaksvet.com OAKS VETERINARY HOSPITAL 229 NW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-7387 oaksvet.com ROBERTSON MOBILE VETERINARIAN (352) 373-6203 robertsonvet.com SHORES ANIMAL HOSPITAL 3717 NW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 289-8540 shoresanhosp.com

SPRINGHILL EQUINE 22837 NW 22nd Ave. Newberry, FL 32669 352-472-1620 springhillequine.com SUBURBAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL 3831 Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 377-3361 sahgainesville.com THE VETERINARY CENTER AT HUNTER’S CROSSING 5200 NW 43rd St., Ste. 501 Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 727-7633 thevetcenter.com TIMBERVIEW PET CLINIC 3740 NW 83rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 373-7208 timberviewpet.com TOBIAS VETERINARY SERVICES – MOBILE (352) 213-2844 tobiasveterinary.com

TOWN & COUNTRY VETERINARIANS AND PET RESORT 6980 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-6027 tandcvets.com UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LARGE ANIMAL HOSPITAL 2147 Shealy Dr. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 392-2229 largeanimal.vethospitals.ufl.edu UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SMALL ANIMAL HOSPITAL 2089 SW 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 392-2235 smallanimal.vethospital.ufl.edu WEST END ANIMAL HOSPITAL 15318 W Newberry Rd. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-7626 westendanimalhospital.com

University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine: University of Florida’s Small Animal Hospital

UF’s Small Animal Hospital offers surgical and medical care for birds, cats, dogs and exotic pets. Coverage includes specialty care, primary care and dentistry, staffed by board-certified specialists, residents and veterinary technicians.

University of Florida’s Large Animal Hospital

The Large Animal Hospital was built in 1994 to provide veterinary care and advanced diagnostics to alpacas, cattle, goats, horses, llamas, pigs and other large farm animals. The hospital serves as a clinical teaching environment within the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine and with the Large Animal Clinical Sciences Department.

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Health Care

Why Greater Gainesville? Ed Jimenez Chief Executive Officer, UF Health Shands

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE IN 2010

Gainesville is one of the nation’s great university towns: Incredible educational and cultural resources make this a special and rewarding place to put down roots, raise your family, build your career and enjoy a fantastic quality of living. And when it comes to your health, UF Health is here to support you in living your best life. UF Health is the Southeast’s most comprehensive “academic health center” — meaning it’s the largest and most inclusive health care organization of its kind in the region. Usually, you don’t find this level of world-class health care outside a major metropolitan area. Our combined resources here in Gainesville alone now include a major teaching hospital and medical center and six specialty hospitals, an extensive network of physician-led outpatient practices, six health science colleges and educational programs and eight research institutes. When it comes to patient care, we’re continually expanding services in new locations to make them more accessible and convenient for the community. Our doctors and health teams offer the full range of primary and specialty care as well as several 911-receiving ERs and the area’s only Level 1 trauma center. With a dedicated children’s teaching hospital, pediatric ER and neonatal emergency transport team, we serve the tiniest newborns as well as children and teens – and we’ll take care of you through adulthood and into your senior years. We are here to support individuals and families with preventive care as well as those facing the most complex medical conditions. Our UF College of Medicine faculty physicians, leaders in their fields, work alongside the best nurses and clinical and support teams. We have all this incredible medical and health care right here in our community. Patients rely on elite teaching hospitals like ours for care that cannot be accessed elsewhere. Each year, multiple UF Health medical services are consistently named among the nation’s Top 50 in the annual U.S. News & World Report Best Adult and Children’s Hospitals rankings. And our

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nursing teams recently earned a fourth consecutive Magnet designation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center — the profession’s top recognition for quality patient outcomes and nursing excellence. Only 8 percent of hospitals and health systems nationwide have received Magnet designation, and only 41 out of 500 hospitals have been awarded four times in a row. Throughout the state, we collaborate with other hospitals and health systems to provide even better care, connect with our

communities locally and beyond and take health care resources where people need them. Each year, UF Health serves patients from all 67 Florida counties, from throughout the Southeast and the nation, as well as several other countries. We have become a major health care destination and resource. Our highly skilled doctors, nurses, therapists, techs and support teams are dedicated to making a positive impact in people’s lives. It’s an honor to take care of our community.


Why Greater Gainesville? Eric Lawson CEO, North Florida Regional Medical Center

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ORIGINALLY MOVED TO THE GREATER GAINESVILLE AREA IN 2005, AND THEN AGAIN IN 2018

What year did you move to Greater Gainesville? I originally moved to the Greater Gainesville area in 2005, and then again in 2018, as the CEO of North Florida Regional Medical Center. What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? Compared to other areas, Greater Gainesville stood out to me because of the opportunity to lead a healthcare system in a progressive community focused on sustainable citizencentered growth. What is your favorite local food? One of my favorite dishes is Volcanic Sushi’s “Son’s Special,” which is composed of a tuna tartare mixed with onions and cilantro, encased in shaved avocado. Where do you go to escape into nature? When it comes to nature, I love adventuring out into Lake Santa Fe for some boating, skiing and fishing. When friends or family come to visit, where is the first place you take them? One Love Café is usually my go-to for family outings, as it is a great representation of the outdoor, friendly and eclectic culture of Gainesville. Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. My ideal day in Greater Gainesville would entail an early morning workout at Orange Theory Fitness, followed by a full day at North Florida Regional. I’m truly working side by side with the best physicians and caregivers to provide world-class healthcare to the citizens of Gainesville and the surrounding community. I would then enjoy a late dinner with my family to celebrate the day.

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Health Care UNIVERSITY OF F L O R I D A H E A LT H

Expanding the Focus on Patient Care At UF Health, we are committed to using problem-solving strategies to improve lives. As an integral part of the University of Florida, UF Health physicians and faculty are using more than $410 million in grant funding to advance new discoveries to impact health care locally, nationally and around the world. UF Health clinicians provide care to patients from all 67 counties in Florida and from numerous states and other countries.

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The UF Health network of hospitals serves patients from all 67 Florida counties, from around the nation and from more than a dozen countries. And the family, as well as the quality of care, just keeps growing. UF Health opened the UF Health Heart & Vascular and Neuromedicine hospitals in Gainesville in 2017 and cut the ribbon on UF Health North Hospital in Jacksonville. The expansion continued in 2018 as UF Health opened a second medical building at its Springhill site to better serve the Northwest Gainesville area while unveiling plans for a unique project: opening a new outpatient facility in vacated retail space at The Oaks Mall, the area’s largest shopping destination. UF Health has two major teaching hospitals, UF Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville and UF Health Jacksonville, each with a state-designated Level 1 trauma center and an emergency air and ground transport program serving neonatal, pediatric and adult patients. UF Health Shands Hospital also includes UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital and UF Health Shands Cancer Hospital. Additionally, the system includes two specialty hospitals in Gainesville: UF Health Rehab Hospital, in affiliation with Select Medical, and UF Health Shands Psychiatric Hospital. Along with UF Health Jacksonville, our sister hospital near downtown Jacksonville, UF Health has a network of outpatient rehabilitation centers, two home-health agencies and more than 100 physician practice locations throughout North Central and Northeast Florida. UF Health Shands owns a minority interest in three community hospitals in Lake City, Live Oak and Starke. In addition, a statewide presence exists through satellite medical, dental and nursing practices staffed by UF Health professionals and affiliations with community-based health care facilities stretching from Hialeah and Naples to Orlando and the Florida Panhandle. UF Health also is home to UF Veterinary Hospitals, which includes a small animal hospital and a large animal hospital.

is focused on health issues of importance to Floridians. Clinical research is growing rapidly at our vibrant regional campus in Jacksonville. The institutes are designed to create collaborative opportunities that follow the continuum from fundamental research to clinical studies and trials to patient care.

Dedicated to Education From the time of the health center’s founding in 1956, we have operated as a single academic enterprise dedicated to training a variety of professionals and to introducing knowledge that will safeguard the health of Florida’s citizens. UF Health encompasses the Gainesville-based colleges of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health and Health Professions, and Veterinary Medicine; the UF Health Shands family of hospitals; UF Health Jacksonville, including an academic campus that offers graduate education programs in medicine, nursing and pharmacy; and UF Health North. The colleges teach the full continuum of higher education, from undergraduates to professional students to advanced postdoctoral students. Together with clinical programs and services across all six colleges, UF Health is helping to create Florida’s future health care workforce.

Committed to Improving Community Health UF Health hosts an array of community seminars, screening opportunities and health fairs to improve the health of the communities we serve. If you would like to be added to the mailing list to learn more about these opportunities, please visit UFHealth.org/events or call 352-733-0000.

Innovative New Research UF Health is a world leader in interdisciplinary research. With nine major research centers and institutes, UF Health

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A Note From the Interim President Each day, more than 26,500 employees of the University of Florida, UF Health Shands and UF Health Jacksonville set out to make life better for people in Florida, the Southeast and beyond. Their shared vision and commitment to excellence informs everything they do, from advancing medical research to easing the suffering of all of our patients, including our loved ones who have more than two legs. As part of the University of Florida, we have an exceptional set of resources in health care services and the sciences, and an extraordinarily talented faculty and staff committed to the goal of making UF Health truly great across our missions of patient care, teaching, research and community service. UF Health is an academic health center, unique nationally in the breadth of healthrelated colleges, centers and institutes present on our Gainesville campus, coupled with the strength of the UF Health Shands hospital system. UF Health Shands Hospital and UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital are consistently ranked by the U.S. News and World Report, and are recognized nationally in a total of 12 specialties. UF Health Jacksonville continues to grow to serve the expanding population centers in Northeast Florida, including the new town of Wildlight in Nassau County, where UF Health is helping to create a dynamic community focused on healthy living for the entire family. Our research arm extends to Orlando and other sites around the state. In the following pages, you will get glimpses of the many ways in which the people of UF Health influence lives of their neighbors around the corner and across state. But this special section only touches on the countless ways we seek to serve. At UF Health, we extend to you a helping hand, for whatever reason you turn to us. We look forward to getting to know you.

DAVID R. NELSON, M.D.

INTERIM SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR HEALTH AFFAIRS, UF PRESIDENT, UF HEALTH

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Primary Care, Specialty Care and After-Hours Options From sore throats to serious illnesses, UF Health is here to care for your family every step of the way. With primary care locations across Gainesville and the surrounding areas and more than1,500 providers in more than 100 specialties, UF Health offers a continuum of care for you and your loved ones. Visit UFHealth.org/locations to learn more or to make an appointment.

Emergency Care UF Health has four emergency centers at locations around Gainesville: UF Health Shands ER, 1515 SW Archer Road, 352-733-0111 UF Health Shands Pediatric ER, 1600 SW Archer Road, 352-265-5437 UF Health Shands Emergency Center – Springhill, 8475 NW 39th Ave., 352-627-0400 UF Health Emergency Center – Kanapaha, 7405 SW Archer Road, 352-627-0500

Primary Care After Hours UF Health offers after-hours adult primary care appointments for patients of UF Health Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Senior Care practices. Open Monday through Friday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. For an appointment, call 352-2651234. After 5 p.m., call 352-273-8613.

Pediatrics After Hours UF Health Pediatrics After Hours offers evening and weekend appointments for children with urgent needs. Open Monday through Friday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. and Sunday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. For an appointment, call 352-265-0724.

ORTHOcare UF Health ORTHOcare’s physicians treat sprains, strains, minor breaks and X-rays. Walk-ins and call-ins welcome, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. For an appointment, call 352-265-BONE.


Health Colleges Offer Care The six health colleges at the University of Florida assist in the continuum of care for area residents.

Dental Care: UF Health’s dental centers perform general and specialty dental care for adults and children in one location. Call 352-273-7954 or visit ufhealth.org/ dental-care. Community Health Care in Archer: UF Health Archer

Family Health Care offers highquality adult, pediatric, psychiatric and women’s health. Care is provided by expert UF College of Nursing nurse practitioners and offers adult, pediatric, psychiatric and women’s prenatal health care. Call 352-495-2550 or visit afhc.nursing.ufl.edu.

Psychology Services:

UF Health Psychology offers care for those with chronic pain or illness, stress, anxiety, depression and general mental health issues. The practice also offers neuropsychological assessments and, for children, gifted assessments and treatment for learning disabilities and behavioral problems. Call 352265-0294 or visit chp.phhp.ufl.edu/ services/psychology.

Pharmacy: Clinical pharmacists in the UF College of Pharmacy work with health care professionals to ensure optimal drug therapy and consult directly with patients to help them better understand their medications and address any questions or concerns. Visit pharmacy.ufl.edu. Veterinary Medicine:

The UF Health Small Animal Hospital and Large Animal Hospital offer a wide range of veterinary specialty services. For more information, visit hospitals.vetmed. ufl.edu. For appointments, call 352392-2235 (small animals) or 352-3922229 (large animals).

Among the Elite UF Health Shands Hospital, UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital remain nationally ranked BY BILL LEVESQUE

University of Florida Health Shands Hospital and the UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital once again have been ranked among the nation’s best hospitals in six medical specialties each in the U.S. News & World Report surveys of Best Hospitals and Best Children’s Hospitals for 2018-19. UF Health Shands ranked highest in Florida in pulmonology and in neurology and neurosurgery. No other Florida hospital has more than six specialties ranked in the nation’s Top 50. And for the fourth year in a row, UF Health Shands ranked in more adult and pediatric specialties than any other hospital in the state — a total of 12, factoring in the pediatric rankings released in June. UF Health Shands’ highest-ranked specialty nationally is pulmonology at 22nd. Also ranked are nephrology (27th), geriatrics (32nd), neurology and neurosurgery (32nd), diabetes and endocrinology (39th) and gastroenterology and GI surgery (46th). Four additional specialties are rated as “high performing,” meaning they ranked in the top 10 percent of the hospitals surveyed by U.S. News. Those are cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, orthopaedics and urology. Pulmonology jumped 12 spots in the rankings, up from last year’s 34th. The division has a highly regarded lung transplant program and was recently designated as a member of the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation’s Care Center Network. Medical centers in the network — the division is one of 60 nationwide — have the highest level of expertise and resources for the treatment of interstitial lung disease. U.S. News also evaluated treatment involving “common procedures and conditions” at UF Health and rated five as “high performing.” Those are abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, colon cancer surgery, knee replacement, heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. “We take great pride in our teams and the unwavering skill and commitment they bring to

patient care, and these rankings are a reflection of their dedication,” said David R. Nelson, M.D., interim senior vice president for health affairs at UF and president of UF Health. In rankings released earlier, the UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital remained among the nation’s elite in the same six specialties as it did a year ago. But UF Health’s pediatric cardiology and heart surgery program moved up two places from last year to 19th nationwide. Additional rankings included pulmonology, which moved up 11 spots from last year to 22nd, a historically high ranking. The other ranked specialties were diabetes and endocrinology (27th), neonatology (39th), cancer (49th) and neurology and neurosurgery (50th). The children’s hospital’s pediatric cardiology and heart surgery program was the highest-rated in Florida for the third consecutive year. Also ranked highest in Florida were pulmonology, and diabetes and endocrinology. “The rankings confirm that UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital continues to be viewed as one of the top children’s hospitals in the country,” said Scott Rivkees, M.D., chair of the UF College of Medicine’s department of pediatrics and physician-in-chief of the UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital. The “Best Hospitals” rankings are based largely on objective measures such as riskadjusted survival and readmission rates, patient volume, patient experience and safety, and quality of nursing, among several metrics, according to U.S. News. “The physicians, nurses and staff of a great hospital system recognize that the respect of patients is something that can never be taken for granted and must be continually renewed,” said Ed Jimenez, CEO of UF Health Shands. “We’re honored that U.S. News has again recognized our efforts. But we know the job of providing great health care begins anew tomorrow, one patient at a time.”

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Health Care UNIVERSITY OF F L O R I D A H E A LT H

UF HEALTH:

By the Numbers 9 research centers and institutes

9+2

nine hospitals and two veterinary hospitals

$155 million

total NIH awards to UF Health, the university’s academic health center

2,723 faculty

$410 million research awards

6 health colleges

$4.6 billion

amount UF Health contributes to Florida’s overall economy

$25 million

royalties/licensing (85 percent of UF’s total)

92,046

overall inpatient admissions (excluding newborns)

OUR ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTER

889,000 physician outpatient visits

148,500

78,797 animal visits

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dental visits

MyUFHealth An Easier Way to Manage Your Health

Your health is important to you 24 hours a day, not just during office hours. That’s why UF Health has invested in an electronic medical record, MyUFHealth. My.UFHealth.org allows you access to portions of your medical record to encourage you to take an even greater role in your health care. MyUFHealth is safe and convenient, saves time and gives you the privacy you deserve. You will need a personal email address and an activation code to enroll in MyUFHealth. Ask your health care provider for an activation code and sign-up instructions. Learn more at My.UFHealth.org.

With MyUFHealth, you can: • Schedule appointments with your primary care and specialty care providers • View your health summary from the MyUFHealth electronic health record

$3,026,420 amount raised by Dance Marathon at the University of Florida in support of Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals at the UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital

• View released test results, keep shared family health records • Request prescription refills • Communicate electronically and securely with your health care team


Mother Nature seemed to be smiling on the UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital as a rainbow embraced the site where so many dedicated people share love and essential care for children in need.

Best Hospitals Rankings UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital In the U.S. News & World Report’s 2018-19 Best Hospitals rankings, UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital was among the nation’s best pediatric hospitals in six medical specialties: # pediatric cardiology and heart surgery (19) # pulmonology (22) # diabetes and endocrinology (27) # neonatology (39) # cancer (49) # neurology and neurosurgery (50)

UF Health Shands Hospital In U.S. News & World Report’s 2018-19 Best Hospitals rankings, UF Health Shands Hospital rated the No. 2 hospital overall in Florida and among the nation’s best in six specialties: # pulmonology (22) # nephrology (27) # geriatrics (32) # neurology and neurosurgery (32) # diabetes and endocrinology (39) # gastroenterology and GI surgery (46)

Four additional specialties are rated as “high performing,” meaning they ranked in the top 10 percent of the hospitals surveyed by U.S. News. Those are cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, orthopedics and urology. No other Florida hospital has more than six specialties ranked in the nation’s top 50. And for the fourth year in a row, UF Health Shands ranked in more adult and pediatric specialties than any other hospital in the state — a total of 12. U.S. News also evaluated treatment involving “common procedures and conditions” at UF Health and rated five as “high performing.” Those are abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, colon cancer surgery, knee replacement, heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD.

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Health Care UNIVERSITY OF F L O R I D A H E A LT H

MEDICAL MILESTONE

UF Health Shands, 60 years of moving medicine forward BY MICHELLE MOORE

Sixty years ago, the UF Teaching Hospital opened as the first hospital in Florida affiliated with a medical school, the University of Florida’s new College of Medicine. Pausing to celebrate this significant milestone and the birth of what is now UF Health, the Gainesville community can look back on the hospital system’s history and its profound impact on health care, not only in Florida, but across the nation and around the world. Since first opening its doors on Oct. 20 1958, UF College of Medicine faculty physicians and UF Health Shands nurses and staff have treated more than 2.75 million patients. They have opened new hospitals, primary care and specialty medical practices and branched out with affiliations and partnerships to expand their reach, providing highly specialized and complex care to many communities throughout the state. There have been many changes since 9-year-old Nancy Sue Smith of Williston was admitted as the hospital’s first patient, but one thing has been consistent: the mission to provide the highest level of clinical care and the best possible patient experience with every patient served. Over the years, UF Health Shands has been at the forefront of many clinical innovations, dating back to 1959, when UF College of Medicine surgeons performed the state’s first open-heart surgery. There have been numerous other firsts over the last six decades, including Florida’s first kidney transplant and first pediatric heart transplant. UF physicians also implanted the nation’s first computerized 20-year rechargeable pacemaker, to name a few milestones. UF Health Shands has been ranked among the top 50 in the U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals” and “Best Children’s Hospitals” lists for numerous years, and the nursing services recently earned a fourth consecutive national Magnet designation from the American Nurses Credentialing

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Center, the nation’s top honor for quality nursing care and practice. While anniversaries are a time to reflect on accomplishments, the goal of the hospital’s 60th celebration is to recognize all the ways that UF Health Shands has always been focused on the future. Imagine what will be accomplished in the next 60 years. Here are just some of UF Health Shands Hospital’s clinical “firsts.’’

In 1985, UF surgeons performed the first heart transplant at Shands. In 1985, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first cochlear implantation for hearing restoration. In 1986, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first pediatric heart transplant. In 1994, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first lung transplant.

In 1959, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first open-heart surgery.

In 2000, UF surgeons performed North Florida’s first live-donor liver transplant.

In 1966, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first adult and pediatric kidney transplants.

In 2003, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first double-corneal transplant.

In 1970, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first total hip replacement.

In 2006, UF surgeons performed Florida’s first mechanical Berlin Heart ventricular assist device in a pediatric patient awaiting transplantation.

In 1974, UF surgeons were first in Florida to implant a 20-year rechargeable pacemaker. In 1981, UF surgeons performed the Southeast’s first bone marrow transplant.

In 2015, a UF Health neurosurgeon and a UF Health neurologist turned on the first “deep brain stimulus on demand” anywhere in the world for patient with Tourette syndrome.


UF Health Bringing Care Closer to the Community it Serves

UF Health will be riding the crest of a national trend of bringing leadingedge health care services closer to the community when it opens three specialty practices this year at The Oaks Mall, Gainesville’s most-popular shopping destination. And in another effort to improve health care services for those living in Northwest Gainesville, UF Health leaders in 2018 opened a $36 million, 72,000-square-foot facility at its Springhill medical center off Northwest 39th Avenue. The new building consolidated numerous practices that had been around the city into one location to better serve an estimated 70,000 patients each year. The move to the mall, which will be known as UF Health The Oaks, will feature ophthalmology, otolaryngology (ear, nose and throat) and audiology services provided by UF faculty in the 139,000-square-foot former Sears space at 6201 W. Newberry Road. The facility will also have an outpatient surgical center to support ophthalmology and otolaryngology procedures. The mall is particularly attractive and exciting for several reasons, said Ed Jimenez, CEO of UF Health Shands: UF Health has many patients throughout the region, so finding an accessible location close to

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Health Care UNIVERSITY OF F L O R I D A H E A LT H

Interstate 75 was a priority. The otolaryngology and ophthalmology programs needed clinical space befitting of their national prominence. Also, the site can be renovated and opened in a relatively short time. “Everything we have done lately has been focused on bringing services closer to our patients,” Jimenez said. “Now, we are moving two practices with a strong national reputation into a location that is ideal for patients and their families.” UF Health ophthalmology and otolaryngology services are relocating from the nearby UF Health Hampton Oaks and another site. Remodeling is expected to take about a year. The long-term lease agreement also includes 500 parking spaces adjacent to the facility. Placing medical facilities in the mall will provide an exceptional experience that is unique in the Gainesville area, UF Health officials said. It has ample parking and easy accessibility for both local and out-of-town residents. Dining and shopping opportunities abound, giving relatives and caregivers many things to do while they wait for patients undergoing treatment. Physicians in UF Health’s otolaryngology practice have been recognized for expertise in all areas of their specialty, including hearing, balance, nasal, sinus, allergy and facial disorders in both adults and children. The new practice will bring under one roof all practitioners for the cochlear implant program, which uses a “bionic ear” to restore hearing. Its radiology and lab services will provide a “onestop” destination for ear, nose and throat care delivery. Also, UF Health otolaryngologists are working with the university’s research-focused Center for Smell and Taste on the UF Health Smell Disorders Program. This rare, new model pairs clinical care for smell disorders with the benefits of extensive research to better understand and develop treatments for these often vexing conditions. UF Health has the only ophthalmology practice in the region that covers every subspecialty, including corneal transplants, pediatric ophthalmology, specialty contact lenses, refractive surgery and low-vision services. It also has state-of-the-art surgical and diagnostic equipment. Additionally, it is the only practice in the region to perform novel procedures such as “bionic eye” retinal implants, artificial corneas and miniature telescopes to improve vision loss caused by macular degeneration. UF ophthalmology has a world-renowned Vision Research Center, where the recently approved Luxturna gene therapy for childhood blindness was developed.

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The debut of UF Health The Oaks will also bring changes to other UF Health facilities. The eye practices at the UF Health Medical Plaza on Southwest Archer Road and at Hampton Oaks on Southwest 62nd Boulevard will be consolidated at the new Oaks Mall location, freeing up Medical Plaza space for other services. The move also allows the practices to expand and grow, raising the prospects for future job growth, UF Health officials said. Nearly 70 employees in the UF Health ophthalmology and ear, nose and throat practices will move to the new location. Meanwhile, the new building at Springhill offers UF Health Physicians practices and services, including the primary care services of internal medicine and family medicine as well as the specialties of allergy, child psychiatry, integrative medicine, psychology and pain management. An outpatient pharmacy and a clinical laboratory service both Springhill facilities. A new two-story parking garage is located adjacent to the new three-story building. The new facility complements services provided in the first Springhill building that opened in 2012. Its practices include adult psychiatry, cardiology, dermatology, general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, plastic surgery, reproductive medicine, surgical oncology and women’s diagnostic imaging.

“We’re excited to expand clinical services at UF Health Springhill with primary care and specialty practices in a convenient location that’s easily accessible to our patients,” said David R. Nelson, M.D., interim senior vice president for health affairs at UF and president of UF Health. “The opening of this new facility reinforces our continued commitment to serving the needs of our community,” said Joseph Tyndall, M.D., M.P.H., interim dean of the UF College of Medicine. “We remain dedicated to bringing high-quality care to the citizens of Gainesville and its surrounding areas. This new space also offers our patients the convenience of a medical lab, pharmacy and ample parking.” “Our goal is for the community to see our physicians for high-quality care in pleasant surroundings that are easy to access. We think you will agree that this exciting new addition to the Springhill campus meets that goal,” said Marvin Dewar, M.D., J.D., CEO and chief medical officer of UF Health Physicians and a senior associate dean of the UF College of Medicine. Like the first Springhill facility, the building was designed and constructed according to stringent sustainability standards to lessen its environmental footprint. Expansive windows enable natural light to stream into the building as automated blinds offer shade from the sun. Low-water landscaping adds to the welcoming atmosphere for patients.


Training Tomorrow’s Health Care Providers From the time of the academic health center’s founding in 1956, we have operated as a single academic enterprise dedicated to training a variety of professionals and to introducing knowledge that will safeguard the health of Florida’s citizens. This model has helped the University of Florida achieve the No. 8 ranking among public universities in the United States, according to U.S. News & World Report.

Leda Mugayar, D.D.S., right, oversees the care of children in the Infant Oral Health Clinic.

College of Dentistry The UF College of Dentistry is the only state-supported dental school in Florida and is one of the country’s top dental education programs and the school’s research enterprise now ranks fourth nationally among all U.S. dental schools in NIH funding. About 90 new dentists and 56 dental specialists graduate each year, with the vast majority choosing to stay in Florida and serve the oral health needs of Florida’s citizens. The college’s educational programs have a reputation of excellence within the profession nationally and internationally, resulting in a very competitive admissions process. Each year the college receives a high number of applications from exceptionally qualified applicants — generally about 2,700 applications for approximately 140 available positions. Another unique strength is that training for all American Dental Association-recognized dental specialties are available through the School of Advanced Dental Sciences. The college offers advanced education programs in endodontics, general dentistry, oral and maxillofacial pathology, oral and maxillofacial radiology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, prosthodontics and dental public health.

College of Medicine The UF College of Medicine is the largest college within UF Health, the university’s academic health center. In 2018, the UF College of Medicine ranked No. 41 among the 150 medical schools nationwide by U.S. News & World Report and No. 17 among public medical schools. UF continues to be the highestranked medical school in Florida. The college comprises 28 research-oriented and clinical science departments and the School of Physician Assistant Studies. In addition to medical training, the college offers a highly regarded graduate training program in the biomedical sciences leading to master’s and doctorate degrees as well as a combined M.D.– Ph.D. training program. In 2012, the college revamped its curriculum to provide students more exposure to clinical training early in their medical education and to place more emphasis on small group and collaborative learning. The George T. Harrell, M.D., Medical Education Building, designed to serve the college’s modern, patient-centered curriculum, further helps students learn, care and lead. The building opened in 2015 and serves as a home for medical education at UF, accommodating advanced simulation training and meeting the educational needs of the next generation of UF physicians and physician assistants.

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College of Medicine – Jacksonville The UF College of Medicine – Jacksonville has 445 faculty, 448 of whom are physicians, among 17 clinical departments. The college offers 37 ACGME- or CODAaccredited residency and fellowship programs, as well as 11 clinical fellowships. More than 380 resident physicians and fellows train on the UF Health – Jacksonville campus and in affiliated outpatient practices, making it the fifth-largest GME program in Florida. For 2018, 40 percent of graduating residents remained in Jacksonville, and 58 percent remained in Florida. Doximity ranks the college’s residency programs in emergency medicine and neurosurgery as among the most reputable programs in the South. The college offers clerkships for third- and fourth-year medical students, as well as physician assistant students, primarily from the university’s main campus.

College of Nursing The UF College of Nursing is the premier educational institution for nursing in the state of Florida and one of the top leaders nationally. The college continually attracts and retains the highest caliber of nursing students and faculty with a passion for science and caring. The college has strong and innovative educational programs preparing students to receive their B.S.N., D.N.P. and Ph.D. degrees. The B.S.N. program has three tracks: the traditional B.S.N., the Accelerated B.S.N. for students who have degrees in other fields, and the R.N. to B.S.N. program, which is fully online. Our B.S.N. students are among the top in the state — incoming GPA typically averages 3.5 — and more than 80 percent pursue graduate education within three years of earning their degree. Our Doctor of Nursing Practice, or D.N.P., program prepares advanced practice nurses in five clinical specialties. The D.N.P. program was ranked among the Top 20 public programs nationally by U.S. News & World Report and was top ranked in the state. The Ph.D. program prepares nursing scholars and future faculty members.

College of Pharmacy Ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the No. 1 pharmacy college in Florida and in the Top 10 nationally, the University of Florida College of Pharmacy has been developing future leaders in pharmacy

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practice and science for nearly a century. At campuses in Gainesville, Jacksonville and Orlando, award-winning faculty aim to improve the health of Floridians and people across the world through pharmacy education, high-impact research and clinical innovation. As one of the Top 10 federally funded pharmacy colleges nationally, the UF College of Pharmacy features preeminent researchers who are leading major medical breakthroughs in areas such as drug discovery and development, drug safety and precision medicine.

College of Public Health and Health Professions The UF College of Public Health and Health Professions is one of more than 60 colleges and schools in the U.S. that have achieved accreditation as a school of public health from the Council on Education for Public Health. Across its eight departments — biostatistics; clinical and health psychology; environmental and global health; epidemiology; health services research, management and policy; occupational therapy; physical therapy; and speech, language, and hearing sciences — the college offers two bachelor’s, seven master’s, eight Ph.D. and three professional programs to more than 2,500 students. Working collaboratively in its teaching, research and service endeavors, the college is making a meaningful difference in the lives of many by preserving, protecting and improving the health and well-being of populations, communities and individuals, locally, nationally and globally.

Veterinarians at the UF College of Veterinary Medicine are using a state-of-the-art 3D printer to create bones of animals to help guide surgeries.

Current students at the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions helped celebrate the 60th anniversary of the college, the first college of health professions located within an academic health center.

College of Veterinary Medicine As the state’s only veterinary college, the UF College of Veterinary Medicine is a leader in research, including initiatives in infectious diseases and immunology and broad efforts in neuroscience and environmental toxicology. Among the college’s key programs are shelter medicine, aquatic animal health, infectious disease and “One Health” research aimed at enhancing animal, human and ecosystem health. The UF Veterinary Hospitals serve as a major referral center, treating nearly 38,000 small and large animals last year, including through the UF Pet Emergency Treatment Services clinic in Ocala. Outreach to animal owners as well as to a variety of animalrelated industries focused on species ranging

The Comfort Shawl Project began in 2014 as a way for UF College of Nursing students to experience working with patients receiving palliative care.

from aquatic to equine to bovine and other species is provided through Veterinary Extension, which is associated with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.


9

Research Centers and Institutes

UF Health Cancer Center The UF Health Cancer Center stands alone in the state of Florida in its unique ability to blend comprehensive patient care and innovative research in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment. It boasts a membership of more than 230 researchers and clinicians from across the University of Florida, a Top 10 public university, and UF Health, the Southeast’s most comprehensive academic health center. The UF Health Cancer Center’s clinical enterprise uses a comprehensive care model, with multidisciplinary cancer programs offering advanced treatment options, such as minimally invasive and robotic surgery, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, chemotherapy, targeted therapy and immunotherapy — as well as access to clinical trials with limited availability elsewhere. The UF Health Cancer Center is a statedesignated Center of Excellence, along with its partners — the UF Health Proton Therapy Institute in Jacksonville and the Orlando Health UF Health Cancer Center.

UF Clinical and Translational Science Institute The UF Clinical and Translational Science Institute speeds the movement of scientific discoveries into improved health in our communities and beyond. Translational research means moving the discoveries that scientists make in the laboratory to the bedside in the form of new drugs, devices and treatment options and ensuring that effective new approaches reach people who need them. The CTSI provides opportunities for people to participate in health research conducted at the university through clinical research studies, programs such as HealthStreet and initiatives such as the Citizen Scientist program. Researchers need volunteers to participate in studies, some of which end early because of a shortage of

Researchers at the Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Florida are searching for cures to neurological disorders ranging from dementia to Parkinson’s disease.

participants. The institute helps connect people with research opportunities in Gainesville and beyond. Anyone wishing to become involved in such research can visit ctsi.ufl.edu/community or ufhealth.org/research-studies-clinical-trials.

UF Diabetes Institute The University of Florida Diabetes Institute was founded in 2015 with a commitment to advance patient care and ultimately find a cure through pioneering research, innovative treatment and education. The Diabetes Institute serves as the umbrella organization under which research, treatment, education and outreach are coordinated at UF and UF Health, the university academic health center. Researchers and physicians affiliated with the Diabetes Institute are working to prevent, diagnose and treat diabetes in a wide array of areas, including immunology, genetics, endocrinology, metabolism, pediatrics and social sciences. At the UF Diabetes Institute, researchers are asking questions to advance knowledge and understanding of diabetes

through collaboration. Widely considered to be among the Top 5 in the nation, UF’s Type 1 diabetes research program has proved that passion for discovery and clinical innovation leads to new research paradigms and improved patient care. UF is internationally recognized for its efforts in diabetes care and research, and houses a model for statewide diabetes education through collaboration with UF/IFAS Extension in all 67 Florida counties.

UF Emerging Pathogens Institute Florida’s unique geography and climate require novel disease prevention and control strategies. Florida’s residents and industries, especially agriculture and tourism, are threatened by new diseases, such as Zika virus, dengue fever, H1N1 swine flu and citrus greening. The Emerging Pathogens Institute was created in 2006 to provide a world-class research environment to facilitate interdisciplinary studies of emergence

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and control of human, animal and plant pathogens of concern to Florida, the nation and the world. EPI’s goals are to understand the genetic changes (and evolutionary drivers) that lead to the emergence of new pathogens; to appreciate the complex interaction of environmental and host factors that permit these pathogens to spread within plant, animal and human populations; to train the next generation of investigators in emerging diseases, within a unique, interdisciplinary setting; and to disseminate information about emerging pathogens, and their control, to the people of Florida.

The UF Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute The Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida is one of the nation’s most comprehensive and diverse neuroscience research centers. More than 200 faculty members across 16 UF colleges and 50 academic departments are devoted to discovering how the normal brain operates and how we can repair the brain amid injury, disease and aging. Collectively, the MBI’s investigators hope their research and educational efforts will advance brain aging research and make a difference for those suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, brain tumors, neurovascular disorders, neuromuscular disease, and addictive and psychiatric disorders. Led by executive director Todd Golde, M.D., Ph.D., the MBI’s investigators strive to help change the understanding of many neurological disorders from untreatable to treatable, incurable to curable and inevitable to preventable.

UF Genetics Institute The UF Genetics Institute is a biomedical research center that promotes collaborative and multidisciplinary research using the tools of genetics and genomics. Formed in 1999, the UF Genetics Institute involves more than 220 faculty members representing nine colleges and 51 academic departments. Their research includes fields such as human genetics, bioinformatics, agricultural and plant biology, and evolutionary biology. They also study relevant and pressing issues such as the impact of climate change, health-related genetic mutations and feeding an expanding global population.

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Norman Fixel Institute for Neurological Diseases at UF Health

Scholars at the UF Institute for Child Health Policy shared with findings with faculty and guests during the institute’s Research Day event.

UF Institute on Aging The UF Institute on Aging, formed in 2005, builds relationships between researchers who study aging in different fields. In addition to providing primary care on the UF campus and at UF Health Springhill as well as care at the retirement community Oak Hammock at the University of Florida, the Institute on Aging is also changing the way older adults receive care at UF Health Shands Hospital. Geriatricians are embedded in the hospital’s trauma unit and the general hospital unit. They meet with older patients to help design health care around their unique needs and the diverse medical conditions they may have. The institute also focuses on the prevention of injury and illness in older adults. Other recent research endeavors include studying methods to help these patients better manage pain, preserve cognitive abilities and maintain mobility. Maintaining mobility and independence helps older adults prevent memory and cognition from declining.

UF Health’s newest institute is positioned to amass some of the world’s most talented researchers to tackle Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders and to advance scientific discoveries that lead to breakthroughs in treatment options for patients. The Normal Fixel Institute for Neurological Diseases is home to scientists and clinicians at UF Health who are working on neurological disorders that afflict millions of people across the globe. These conditions include movement disorders such as Parkinson’s, dystonia and ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease); dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease and Lewy body disease; and concussions and traumatic brain injuries. The institute is a cornerstone of the university’s aspiration to help create history’s healthiest generation through precison health, the elimination of health disparities and the advancements of therapies related to the brain and neuromuscular and mental health. UF Health physicians are conducting leading-edge treatments, such as deep brain stimulation and gene therapy, that are transforming patient care. Under the umbrella of the Fixel Institute, they will seek to revolutionize discoveries in Parkinson’s and other neurological diseases that will lead to new therapies that improve quality of life for patients and forever change how these conditions are treated.

UF Institute for Child Health Policy The UF Institute for Child Health Policy promotes the health of children, adolescents and their families through research conducted by collaborative teams of multidisciplinary scientists and clinicians. To enhance the potential impact of research on the health of children, ICHP faculty engage stakeholders, including families, policymakers, payers and others in all phases of research, from topic identification to information dissemination. ICHP researchers leverage big data and conduct rigorous, innovative studies to identify the biological, behavioral, environmental and social underpinnings of children’s health and disease. This data-driven research plays a key role in the development of interventions that improve both individual and population health for children and their families.

With UF Health leaders and family looking on, Lee Fixel and his father, Norman Fixel, sign their names to a commemorative beam at a ceremony announcing a $20 million gift from the family to launch the Normal Fixel Institute for Neurological Diseases at UF Health.


Mark’s Parkinson’s disease kept him from exploring. At UF Health, he found a problem-solver who was able to guide the way.

Dr. Kelly Foote, Dr. Michael Okun and their colleagues are developing solutions for Parkinson’s patients. Their world-renowned team uses deep brain stimulation to restore mobility and muscle control. So Mark is back to hiking the trails around his home, while Dr. Foote continues to solve one of the toughest challenges in medicine. That’s the kind of problem-solving care that moves medicine forward.

Learn more at ProblemSolvingCare.org.


Town of Tioga/Tioga Realty

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Real Estate in Greater Gainesville — 152 — Reinvesting In Our Community: The CRA’s Work in Gainesville

The Greater Gainesville area covers nine municipalities across 194.3 square miles, with hundreds of additional miles worth of unincorporated communities – blending natural Florida landscapes and neighborhood living. There are a multitude of housing options ranging from homes to apartments to historic downtown homes, with around 50 percent of the total housing units in Alachua County being detached singlehousing units. Live, work and play communities are creating the planned urban spaces that blend the residential with the commercial. Between downtown and the University of Florida campus, development is vibrant. The new Power District development will be a mixed-use project between downtown and Depot Park, which is planned to include a mix of housing as well as attract tech companies, restaurants and other commercial development. Greater Gainesville’s original live, work, play communities Haile Plantation Village and Town of Tioga continue to provide exceptional options for housing. For those seeking acreage, the options abound. From oneto two-acre parcels in gated communities to farms in quiet Newberry, Archer or Alachua, there is a home for everyone. Greater Gainesville has abundant real estate resources to help interested buyers and renters. Now is the ideal time to relocate to Greater Gainesville.

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C O M M U N I T Y :

The CRA’s Work in Gainesville

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A dance troupe performs during the annual Spring Arts Festival in downtown Gainesville.

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Bo Diddley Plaza, located at the corner of SE First Street and East University Avenue, has long been a cultural staple in downtown Gainesville. Its importance to the community is one of the reasons the Gainesville Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) selected the plaza for a renovation in 2016. Since undergoing the $1.8 million renovation, Bo Diddley Plaza has been transformed from an underutilized space to a reactivated community venue. Every Wednesday, downtown Gainesville is full of activity, handmade wares and locally farmed foods. Over 60 vendors gather each week for the Union Street Farmers Market at Bo Diddley Plaza, in the heart of downtown Gainesville, to sell everything from goose eggs to organic lotions. The market draws university students, Gainesville residents and even out-of-town visitors and has called Bo Diddley Plaza home since 2007.

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Each Friday evening in April through October, the Free Fridays Concert Series brings a variety of acts to the stage at Bo Diddley Plaza. The concert series attracts hundreds of attendees each week, and features bands playing music across many genres, from rock to soul to Latin fusion. Throughout the year, regularly scheduled activities are planned six days a week. Depending on the day, visitors can listen to music, watch a live band, join a free yoga class or other fitness class, or shop at the farmers market. Every day, visitors can grab a craft soda and some Indonesian curry at Steamers restaurant, try Patticakes on the Plaza for fresh cupcakes and cold brew coffee or just lounge in the grass and enjoy the fresh air.

About the Gainesville CRA The Gainesville CRA exists to help underserved regions attract private investment through community initiatives and partnerships, competitive economic development incentives and improved public infrastructure. The CRA targets redevelopment efforts in four core areas: 1. Eastside 2. Downtown 3. Fifth Avenue/Pleasant Street 4. College Park/University Heights

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The Bo Diddley Plaza renovations are only one example of the various projects the Gainesville CRA manages within the community. Other completed projects include the creation of Depot Park, Helyx Bridge, the A. Quinn Jones Museum & Cultural Center and the NW 1st Ave Streetscape. Like the Bo Diddley Plaza renovations, each project begun by the Gainesville CRA brightens and revitalizes Gainesville’s core while preserving its unique heritage and personality. “Good urban planning focuses on connectivity,” said Gainesville Mayor Lauren Poe. “The CRA has been crucial in reaching a great vision of revitalizing Gainesville’s core.” The approach is that after planning and achieving strategic goals in a district, the CRA steps out of the way and lets the private sector do the rest. It is devoted to cultivating the Heart of Gainesville and helping our city achieve its full potential as a diverse, vibrant community. The CRA, like similar organizations nationwide, employs tax increment financing

(TIF), a mechanism that uses increased property taxes paid to city and county government – from properties within a redevelopment district – to reinvest funds for capital projects and programs. These projects follow a long history that began with the City Commission creating the Fifth Avenue/Pleasant Street


Development area in 1979 – an area north of downtown that has since experienced revitalization while preserving its historic character. Next came the Downtown Redevelopment Area, which had deteriorated as shopping and business offices moved to locations such as Archer Road and the Oaks Mall. The assessed value of property in the area stagnated 20 years ago – at $19 million, noted Ken McGurn, who was an early primary private downtown developer. After revitalization, the value rose to $152 million. “The return on the private and public money invested in downtown is incredible,” McGurn said. The renovation of downtown could never have happened without TIF, McGurn said. “Somebody had to take the risk,” he said. “Once that occurred, the banks would lend to us.”

Before

College Park/ University Heights The College Park/University Heights Redevelopment Area is another model of success. “No question, the district has worked – slowly but surely,” said Bruce DeLaney, who was the area’s advisory board’s first chairperson. In College Park and University Heights, the CRA invested in sidewalks and street lighting, essential components in making the area feel safe and pedestrian-friendly. It also provided tax rebates for redevelopment projects through negotiating development agreements. Recently, the CRA completed a major capital project along NW First Avenue, including the undergrounding of utilities and infrastructure improvements and finishing with a carefully designed streetscape. The NW First Avenue Streetscape project transformed a congested span of four blocks into a pedestrian- and vehicle-friendly destination. Mayor Lauren Poe commented about tax increment financing. “Ultimately, TIF is a really effective tool for making targeted investment in areas that have seen disinvestment and neglect,” he said. The CRA is also using TIF to help business owners transform their commercial

After

properties. The Commercial Façade Improvements Program is available in all four redevelopment areas. It provides a reimbursement for eligible improvements to the exterior of a property. The program has helped business owners such as Willie Wims, who converted a vacant cement block building on a major corridor

in East Gainesville into a new home for Wims Hair Studio. In the Downtown redevelopment area, a similar transformation happened on the corner of SW Fourth Avenue and Fifth Street. A new burger restaurant called Dick Mondell’s has opened after the owners renovated a building that had been empty for nearly a decade.

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“These are examples of the best kind of outcome we could wish for,” said Tricia Lopez, CRA Project Manager. “Activating a vacant space with a locally owned business that people will walk to is a great thing for the neighborhood.” The CRA’s current projects include: • Creation of a new neighborhood called Heartwood in East Gainesville, which will contain 34 new, single-family homes that will be available for buyers within a wide price range. • Implementing a master plan for Cornerstone – a commercial campus development located on 13.6 acres in East Gainesville that includes the Gainesville Technology Entrepreneurship Center. • Bringing the history of the Fifth Avenue Pleasant Street Neighborhood to life through the Heritage Trail, a walking tour that will teach and inspire those who experience it. • A major renovation of the South Main Street corridor with enhanced safety, parking and aesthetic features. • Supporting the buildout of the Innovation District – property between the University of Florida and Downtown that is ready for development as a live, work and play tech campus.

Heartwood Neighborhood Progress The Heartwood neighborhood on SE Eighth Avenue will include the construction of 34 new homes with thoughtfully planned public outdoor spaces. It is an investment in a part of Gainesville that has historically been underserved, a catalyst for development and hope. The City of Gainesville bought the land for $1.95 million in 2007 as part of its Southeast Gainesville Renaissance Initiative, but the plans to revitalize the area were held up for various reasons, including the Recession of 2008. Nearly a decade later, the city — along with the CRA — is making good on the initiative, with plans for 34 single-family houses and a revitalized Cornerstone office complex nearby. Construction of infrastructure on the site is expected to be complete in mid-2019, with the lots going on sale as early as April. “You’re going to have a nice modern neighborhood development right next to an expanding economic hub in an area that has

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Located within walking distance to local schools and in close proximity to downtown and the University of Florida, The Heartwood Neighborhood will offer 34 new homes, tree-lined streets, and walking trails.

not seen that kind of investment for a long time,” said Mayor Lauren Poe. There are several design options and the homes will be available at a wide range of price points in order to encourage a diverse community. Heartwood, according to CRA Director Sarah Vidal-Finn, has “a huge narrative around it.” Part of that narrative involves the history of Gainesville’s east side. Gainesville, like most cities in America, still bears the pernicious imprint of racial segregation. Persistent economic and social disparities separate the east and west sides, with Main Street acting as an unofficial line of demarcation dividing the traditionally black east side from the traditionally white west side. A 2011 report from the U.S. Census Bureau found that Gainesville had the fifthwidest income gap in the country, and much of that gap was due to the east-west division. Heartwood will appeal to people of all races and backgrounds, community member Doris Edwards believes. “We’ve held workshops about it, and people have embraced the concept,” she said. “They want something they can afford,

and they want it to be safe. I also hope it attracts people working at GTEC (the Gainesville Technology Entrepreneurship Center).” Edwards has worked hard on the area’s safety as president of the Lincoln Estates Neighborhood Association, next to the site where Heartwood will be built, with the help of 16 block captains. She also advocated for good lighting in and around Heartwood to promote safety. Heartwood is one example of recent progress achieved in East Gainesville with the CRA’s help, Edwards noted. Part of what makes Heartwood so promising is the effort to draw businesses to the area through the Cornerstone commercial campus. The CRA understands that improved housing can have an impact only if the economic reality of the area also improves. “It’s an honor to be able to make a long-term dream come true for the eastside community,” Vidal-Finn said. “I think it’s just the beginning of a whole bunch of special things that are going to happen.”


Cornerstone Brings More Business to East Gainesville The Gainesville CRA has been methodically putting in place a master plan for the Cornerstone economic development center in East Gainesville – 13.6 acres that are anchored by the Gainesville Technology Entrepreneurship Center (GTEC). GTEC is a 30,000-square-foot business incubator managed by Santa Fe College, and the construction of a mixed-use commercial campus, with up to 100,000 additional square feet of building space, aims to retain GTEC graduates and attract new businesses to the district. Over the past year, the CRA has invested in laying the groundwork for the Cornerstone infrastructure. The

project includes the utilities, parking, stormwater, hardscape and landscape needed to accommodate six of the 10 buildings proposed in the master plan adopted in 2015. The work is paying off and the first new business, Merieux Nutrisciences, will move to the property as soon as its building is complete in early 2019. “We were moving forward with the Phase I construction for the building fronting Hawthorne Road when we were approached by a potential tenant with a need for approximately 22,000 square feet as soon as we could make it happen.”said Vidal-Finn. That tenant is Mérieux NutriSciences Corp, and that time is now. The newly constructed Mérieux Building at Cornerstone is expected to be completed and occupied by early 2019. The business is expanding from its current location near Archer Road and will be moving with nearly 80 employees.

Mérieux NutriSciences new 22,700-square-foot space in East Gainesville will be closer to the University of Florida campus and provide room to grow for the lab’s various culinary and educational ventures.

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The CRA is also working with Avison Young (formerly Front Street Realty) to list the additional building pads for sale, which will add approximately 100,000 square feet of developable commercial potential in its Eastside District. “Having Mérieux as an anchor will spur further development,” said VidalFinn. Marketing and business recruitment for the site continues while the physical improvements are developed. The CRA is promoting the residential and commercial opportunities coming online through its Gainesville East marketing campaign. The campaign also highlights recreational and lifestyle amenities available to residents and visitors alike.

The Fifth Avenue Connection June 2017 saw the official opening of the A. Quinn Jones Museum & Cultural Center. Allen Quinn Jones, a long-time educator and leader of the Gainesville African-American community, was born in Quincy, Florida. He graduated from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in 1915 at the top of his class. After six years of teaching in public schools across the state, he accepted the position of principal at Union Academy in Gainesville, which was the premier school for AfricanAmerican students in the county at the time. At its closing, he became the first principal of its replacement, Lincoln High School. Under his leadership, the school became accredited in 1926 and was the second African-American high school in the state to do so. The Fifth Avenue Pleasant Street redevelopment area has historically been home to many prominent African-American leaders within the Gainesville community and it houses some the finest historical examples of residential, religious and educational buildings in Gainesville. Pleasant Street boasts such a fine collection of historic structures that it has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. To connect with the history of the neighborhood, the Gainesville CRA engaged in the renovation and adaptive reuse of the A. Quinn Jones homestead to transform it into a public museum and cultural center.

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The A. Quinn Jones Museum & Cultural Center is only one example of the developments the Gainesville CRA is spearheading in the Fifth Avenue Pleasant Street neighborhoods. The redevelopment area offers opportunity where a mix of uses can occur in a single corridor – in a manner sensitive to residential occupancy and scale so that residential and commercial uses can exist and thrive together. According to the Gainesville CRA, these neighborhoods contribute enormously to Gainesville’s arts and culture with their annual activities and festivals, location within the city and rich local history. The A. Quinn Jones Museum & Cultural Center will eventually serve as a trailhead to a companion project, the Fifth Avenue Pleasant Street Heritage Trail. The Heritage Trail will be a physical walking trail system of interpretive markers celebrating the social and cultural history and landmarks of the neighborhood. The Heritage Trail will bring the neighborhood’s rich history to life and will recognize the historic significance of key locations in the area.

Destination South Main Street At the end of Depot Park, past the green lawns and children playing, is the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention. Open to the public in spring of 2018, the Cade Museum is named after Dr. J. Robert Cade, the inventor of Gatorade. In his honor, the museum is devoted to interactive science and technology exhibits. The Cade Museum is one of the newest developments the CRA worked to include on South Main Street, but more are in the works. While the CRA has completed a historic rehabilitation of the Depot Building and constructed Depot Park, it also has drawn new commercial-oriented businesses to the area and continues to invest in creating a truly unique destination in southeast Gainesville. The South Main Street Project strives to develop an improvement strategy for the South Main Street corridor that supports existing businesses, attracts new investments

and prepares the corridor for future needs and additional users. Based on community feedback, the progress in the area is guided by five goals:

1. Improved Safety

Stakeholders voiced a desire to evaluate changes that could improve connectivity and safety for all current and future users passing through or arriving in the area.

2. Improved Parking

Existing on-street parking opportunities should be preserved and increased wherever possible to support adjacent businesses, parks and trails.

3. Improved Accessibility

The design should include creative and functional strategies that balance the operational requirements of existing businesses with the desire for calming traffic, and facilities that support pedestrians and bicyclists.

4. Improved Identity

Stakeholders expressed a desire for amenities, activities and destinations throughout the area that would give South Main a unique, brandable identity celebrating its distinctive character.

5. Improved Aesthetic

A lack of green space and trees created a negative appearance in the corridor, so the community showed support for small, coordinated aesthetic changes to increase the overall attractiveness of the area.

This $8.5 million construction project that is scheduled to be completed by summer of 2019 will transform the area into a destination to go to, not just through. It will include the conversion of overhead power lines to an underground system to promote redevelopment, improve utility reliability, and become more aesthetically appealing. Nearly 200 new trees will be planted along the corridor while also enhancing bicycle and pedestrian facilities and increasing on-street parking opportunities for area businesses as well as the Cade Museum and Depot Park.


The Pop-a-Top General Store is located in the repurposed freight building next to Depot Park.

Cade Museum, located next to Depot Park, opened to the public in 2018.

Kids enjoy the splash pad at Depot Park.

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Children can swing, slide, climb and run in the Depot Park playground.

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Recognition Earned by the Gainesville CRA Since 2010, work done by the Gainesville CRA has received over 40 local, regional, national and international awards. They include: • The 2015 Bronze Small Cities Award from the International Economic Development Council. • The 2015 Project of the Year Award for the SW Ninth Street at Innovation Square renovation from the American Public Works Association. • Two 2016 City Beautification Awards for the CRA’s work on Porters SW Fifth Avenue Community Project and Bo Diddley Plaza. • In 2017, Depot Park was selected as a finalist for the International Making Cities Livable Design Awards Competition. Depot Park has been nominated for several awards since it opened in 2016 and its popularity is clear in the community. • In October of 2017, the A. Quinn Jones Museum and Cultural Center won the Roy F. Kenzie Award for Cultural Enhancement from the Florida Redevelopment Association. • In 2018, Depot Park won ULI North Florida’s Award for Excellence in the Public Sector/ nonprofit category, and The Northwest First Avenue Streetscape/More in Midtown project won the Roy F. Kenzie Award for Capital Projects/Beautification from the Florida Redevelopment Association. Additionally, the organization receives recognition from its peers as a leader in the state for CRAs. A full list of the CRA’s nearly 50 awards is available on its website, gainesvillecra.com.

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Innovation District Primes for Big Things The Gainesville CRA, in partnership with the University of Florida and the City of Gainesville, saw an opportunity to reclaim 16 acres of land located between Downtown and the University of Florida and transform it to the live, work, play environment that companies are seeking. The vision for the Innovation District is to create a technology-, science-, and research-oriented development in an effort to both retain and attract intellectual capital within our community with the broader goal of economic development and diversification of our economic base. Fracture, a homegrown Innovation District success story, is an example of retained talent. Alex Theodore and Abhi Lokesh were UF students when they founded the company, which prints pictures on glass, in 2009. In 2011, Fracture moved into a Trimark property in Innovation Square at 112 SW Sixth Street and has now grown to 75 employees. One of the major first steps in the execution of Innovation District was the rezoning of the area to the new UMU2 zoning category. This new zoning designation defined development and density patterns within the area to support the vision. The simplified zoning was adopted in 2010. By turning the old “super-block” that previously had housed Alachua General Hospital into a walkable, pedestrian-

friendly grid of interaction, SW Ninth Street and SW Third Avenue are quite literally paving the way for companies that wish to relocate and create jobs here in Gainesville. Planners focused on SW Fourth Avenue becoming the main street linking campus and downtown. With the roadway projects and underground utilities installed, developers can just “plug and play” their buildings into the system. Robust development between campus and downtown will embrace the benefits of density that have been demonstrated through the redevelopment of areas adjoining campuses nationwide – creating “new American cities,” said Greg Janks, a consultant with the planning company DumontJanks. New progress in Innovation square includes an expansion of the Innovation Hub. The Hub is a business incubator that provides mentoring and inexpensive, state-of-the-art laboratory and office space. Phase II doubled the size of the original three-story, 48,000-square-foot building. The university partnered with Jacksonville-based Signet Enterprises in developing Infinity Hall, a UF residence hall oriented toward students interested in entrepreneurship. The CRA’s work in Gainesville both beautifies and energizes the city. Its projects and renovations create more enjoyable visitors’ spaces, like Bo Diddley Plaza. Its work is more than buildings and streetways – it’s economy and culture. In its development districts, the CRA attracts jobs, builds houses and provides places for children to play. In short, the CRA invests in people and places and creates diverse opportunities for living, working and playing.


Power District Vision Coming to Life Over the next several years, the area around the Kelly Power Plant in Downtown Gainesville is expected to become a powerful force in creating opportunities for employment, entertainment and housing. The area now branded as the Power District is a 16-acre site that housed GRU’s operations and maintenance facilities for 60 years before the utility outgrew the location and built a new operations center on North Main Street, which opened in 2011. The move opened up the Power District land, which still houses some warehouse buildings and vacant land for redevelopment. Following years of predevelopment due diligence efforts led by the CRA, the stage is set to execute the community vision for a mixed-use district that includes diverse housing options, dynamic office spaces, parking, public open spaces and retail opportunities for small, local entrepreneurs. “At the CRA, we work to bridge the gap between the public and private, and the prospect and opportunity of the Power District to spur reinvestment into a former industrial area has the ability to be transformative for the community,” said CRA Manager Andrew Meeker. As a result of a national solicitation process to find a developer with experience partnering with local communities on complex infill development, the CRA is working with Cross Street Partners of Baltimore to help transform the abandoned area into a safe, welcoming and thriving destination that compliments Downtown Gainesville, Depot Park, the South Main Street area and nearby neighborhoods.

Key potential project features include: • “Daylighting” of Sweetwater Branch Creek, which was buried during the industrialized era, and creating a greenway along the creek from Downtown to Depot Park. • Constructing new rental and owner-occupied housing with a variety of price ranges. • Adaptive re-use of buildings that were former GRU warehouses into spaces that could be suitable for a craft brewery, a food hall, entertainment venues and vendor space for arts and crafts makers. • Office and commercial spaces. • Public art complimented by a walkable and connected pedestrian environment. “The Power District will connect the east with the west and be a win-win for everyone,” said City Commissioner Gigi Simmons. The Power District is already the home of the McRorie Community Garden, and the plan anticipates celebrating it as focal point of community life. Cross Street Partners also proposes incorporating the existing industrial aesthetic from the GRU Kelly Power Plant into the architecture, public art and branding of the Power District to honor the past while also looking to the future.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation in Greater Gainesville — 164 — Activities in Every Season

— 172 — Arts in Greater Gainesville

— 176 — Dining Out in Greater Gainesville

— 180 — Shopping

— 184 — Athletics in Greater Gainesville

— 186 — Welcome to the Heart of Florida Athletics

— 192 — List of Fitness Centers, Gyms and Athletic Activities in Greater Gainesville

— 202 — Map of Outdoor Hotspots

— 204 — Outdoor Activities Abound

— 206 — Natural Springs

— 208 — List of Parks and Recreation Areas

— 213 — Your Local Libraries

— 214 — 10 Destinations Within Driving Distance

You can find Gainesville’s spirit not only in its people, but in every one of its cultural landmarks. Whether you’re walking through the butterfly rainforest at the Florida Museum of Natural History or watching a play at the Hippodrome Theatre, there is something for everyone. Greater Gainesville is not only home to a chamber orchestra, a professional ballet company and a rapidly growing retail environment, but it also boasts excellent museums and theatres. Located on the UF campus, the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art is one of the largest art museums at a public university in the nation. The museum offers more than 40,000-square-feet of exhibits, five garden spaces, a 250-seat auditorium and a cafe. In near proximity to the Harn is the Florida Museum of Natural History – Florida’s official state-sponsored and chartered natural-history museum – and the Curtis M. Phillips Center for Performing Arts, which presents on its main stage some of the most established and emerging national and international artists. The Cade Museum for Creativity + Invention, named for Dr. James Robert Cade, the lead inventor of Gatorade, opened to the public on May 19th, 2018. The museum focuses on thinking, creativity and discovering the wonder in all things. For those looking to spend time outdoors, Greater Gainesville offers superb eco-tourism spots offering world-class fishing, snorkeling, canoeing, scuba diving, tubing and swimming. Geologists estimate there are about 1,000 known springs in Florida, ranging in size from those that discharge little more than a trickle of water to first magnitude springs like Wakulla, Manatee and Silver Springs that discharge hundreds of millions of gallons of water per day. There is no shortage of offerings for the sports enthusiast, whether interested in viewing a game or in joining a team, Greater Gainesville offers everything from college football to adult softball leagues. Foodies will be pleased with the hundreds of eateries and breweries in the area. The community can definitely satisfy anyone’s cravings. G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 1 6 3


Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Activities in Every Season Looking for some fun things to do in the Greater Gainesville area? Well, there’s a lot going on throughout the year, more than we can include in this list, but at least it’s a start. Read on to learn about the diversity of activities for every season. There’s something for everyone.


To see a full calendar of events, visit www.homemagazinegainesville.com/events/

Once-a-Week Events Every Monday –Karaoke at The Backyard at Boca Fiesta and Palomino –Brainaholics Trivia at First Magnitude Brewery Every Tuesday –Taco Tuesday at Swamp Head Brewery featuring Cilantro Tacos Every Wednesday –Bo Diddley Plaza Farmers Market – Running Tabs Wednesday Run at First Magnitude Brewery Every Thursday –Trivia at The Backyard at Boca Fiesta and Palomino –Alachua Farmers Market Every Friday –Free Friday Concert Series (from May through October) at Bo Diddley Plaza Every Saturday –Haile Plantation Farmers Market –441 Farmers Market –Tours of Historic Homestead Every Sunday –Tours of Historic Homestead –Brewery Yoga/Yogalates

January Event: Gators Men’s Basketball – Gators vs. South Carolina Event Details: Thursday, Jan. 5, 6:00 p.m., Exactech Arena at the Stephen C. O’Connell

First Monday –Gainesville Music Association Public Symposium & Workshop Last Friday –Gainesville ArtWalk First Thursday –Frog Drinks at First Magnitude First Friday –High Springs First Friday Night –Food Truck Rally @ Root and Pecker Once a month Gainesville Food truck rally, dates alternate Second Thursday Civil War Roundtable of North Florida Third Thursday Alachua Third Thursday on Main

Event Details: Jan. 26 - 27 & Feb. 1 - 3 Alachua County Fairgrounds Event Cost: Prices vary

Description: Men’s Basketball season began Nov. 6 and continues into March 2019.

Description: Step back in time and cheer on jousting knights, wander through the medieval marketplace where hundreds of artisans sell their wares, witness a battle on the living chess board, partake in old world games and rides, and feast on food fit for a king.

Source: floridagators.com

Source: www.hoggetownefaire.com/

Event Cost: Ticket prices vary

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Gators Women’s Basketball – Gators vs. Auburn Event Details: Sunday, Jan. 6, 1:00 p.m., Exactech Arena at the Stephen C. O’Connell Center. Event Cost: Ticket prices vary Description: Women’s Basketball season began Nov. 6 and continues into March 2019. Source: floridagators.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Gators Gymnastics Event Details: Friday, Jan. 11, 6:45 p.m., Exactech Arena at the Stephen C. O’Connell Center. Event Cost: Ticket prices vary

Once-a-Month Events

Event: Hoggetowne Medieval Faire

February Event: Gators Softball Event Details: Wednesday, Feb. 8, 6:00 p.m., Katie Seashole Pressly Stadium Event Cost: Ticket prices vary Description: Gators vs. Japan - Florida added an exhibition game against the Japanese Women’s National Team. Source: floridagators.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Gator Baseball Season Begins

Description: Gators vs Missouri

Event Details: Saturday, Feb. 9, 6:00 p.m., Alfred A. McKethan Stadium at Perry Field

Source: floridagators.com

Event Cost: Ticket prices vary

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: The Springs Run 2019 Event Details: Saturday, Jan. 12, 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., First Magnitude Brewing Company Event Cost: TBD Description: Description: Raise money for springs protection and get your sweat on. This year the run will be followed by an all-day festival with music, artists, vendors, and whatever other shenanigans our team dreams up. Source: www.facebook.com/ events/489082921451288/ –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Power! by the Gainesville Orchestra Event Details: Friday, Jan .25, 7:30 p.m., Santa Fe Fine Arts Hall Theatre Event Cost: Ticket prices vary.

Description: 2019 Alumni Scrimmage. The home schedule features 36 games with five Southeastern Conference series on tap. In 11 seasons under head coach Kevin O’Sullivan, UF holds a 329-92 (.781) record at McKethan Stadium. Source: FloridaGators.com/tickets –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Winter Concert by Gainesville Community Band Event Details: Sunday, Feb. 10, 3:00 p.m., Santa Fe College Fine Arts Hall Event Cost: $5 Description: Comprised of teachers, professors, scientists, business professionals, students, physicians, contractors, realtors, trades-persons, and retirees, the Gainesville Community Band performs under the direction of Robert Gary Langford. Source: www.gnvband.org

Description: Celebrating powerful women from Rimsky Korsakov’s beloved and exotic “Scheherazade” to American composer Joan Tower’s towering “Sequoia.” Source: www.gainesvilleorchestra.com/concerts G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 1 6 5


Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Event: Santa Fe Valentine’s Swing Dance Event Details: Thursday, Feb. 14, 6:30 p.m., Santa Fe Fine Arts Hall Lobby Event Cost: Tickets - $10 Description: A swing dance class at 6:30 p.m. followed by the sounds of the Santa Fe Big Band at 7:30 p.m. Dance the night away in the lobby of the Fine Arts Hall!

March

Event Cost: TBD

Event Details: March 1 – March 24, The Hippodrome

Description: Fans can watch as the world’s best drag racers power their 10,000 horsepower, firebreathing machines down the strip in pursuit of championship points and early-season momentum.

Event Cost: Tickets prices vary

Event Details: Saturday, Feb. 16, Depot Park Event Cost: Free

Source: www.thehipp.org

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Vegfest Gainesville

Description: Gainesville VegFest 2019 will feature informative exhibitors, vegan food vendors, animal rescue organizations and sanctuaries, speakers, food demos, music and more. Everyone is welcome. Source: gainesvillevegfest.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Five Points of Life Weekend Event Details: Saturday Feb. 16-17, 7:00 a.m. Start and finish lines are at UF Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Event Cost: Prices vary Description: Run for a great cause at the 14th Annual Five Points of Life Race Weekend in scenic Gainesville, Florida! Source: www.fivepointsoflife.com/registration/ marathon-half-marathon-relay/ –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: The Gainesville Orchestra “Precision” Event Details: Sunday, Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m., Santa Fe Fine Arts Hall Theatre Event Cost: $5 - $40 Description: Including George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Rivets” featuring Evans Haile and Prokofiev’s exciting and energetic 5th Symphony. Source: www.gainesvilleorchestra.com/concerts

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Dance Alive National Ballet: Land of La Chua Event Details: Friday, March 1, Phillips Center Event Cost: Tickets prices vary Description: Celebrate Gainesville’s Birthday! Indian life, the beautiful springs, our town through the ages. It’s all there, with contributions from the Matheson Museum, artist Margaret Tolbert, poet Lola Haskins, composer Stella Sung, Will McLean’s ‘Black Hat Troubadour’ songs, and much more. Created by choreographers Kim Tuttle and Judy Skinner. Source: performingarts.ufl.edu –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Gainesville Old Time Dance Society Event Details: Sunday, March 3, 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., Thelma A. Boltin Center Event Cost: $5-$10

Source: www.nhra.com/tickets –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Women of Distinction Event Details: Tuesday, March 26., 11:30 a.m., Location TBA. Event Cost: TBA Description: Women of Distinction has honored more than 180 outstanding women in the community since its inception and acknowledges new women each spring at a formal ceremony. Source: www.sfcollege.edu/wod/index –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Yefim Bronfman Event Details: Thursday, March 28 7:30 p.m., Phillips Center Event Cost: Tickets prices vary Description: Widely considered one of today’s most acclaimed and admired pianists, Yefim Bronfman stands among a handful of artists regularly sought by festivals, orchestras, conductors, and recital series. He will be the first classical artist to perform a recital using UF Performing Arts’ new Steinway D. Source: performingarts.ufl.edu ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Description: Contra dancing is energetic, social dancing that’s fun for everyone (all ages are welcome) and no partner is necessary. The music is live. Dances are taught, walked through, and called. No experience or special dress is required. Wear casual attire and comfortable shoes. If you are new, please come to the beginner lesson (workshop) that begins about 30 minutes before the dance.

Event: Florida Relays

Source: godsdance.org

Source: floridagators.com

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Event Details: March 28-30, James G. Pressly Stadium at Percy Beard Track Event Cost: Prices vary Description: Pepsi Florida Relays

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Event: The Chieftans

Event: Jest FEST!

Event Details: Sunday, March 10, 2:00 p.m., Phillips Center

Event Details: Sunday, March 31,. 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., The Thomas Center, 302 NE 6 Ave.

Event Cost: Tickets prices vary

Event Cost: Free

Description: The Chieftains take you on a journey through rousing jigs, mournful ballads, and everything in between. Throughout their five decades of making music, they have worked with countless traditional artists such as The Dubliners and Moya Brennan, as well as contemporary artists like Pink Martini and Punch Brothers.

Description: This event features circus and performance acts such as a daredevil high-wire act, a revolving cast of clowns, jugglers, magicians, sword swallowers, stilt walkers, and a one-man band. The event also plans to serve pony rides, ice cream and roving entertainers.

Source: performingarts.ufl.edu

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Event Details: Mar. 14 -17, Gainesville Raceway

Event: Miracle on South Division Street

Description: Miracle on South Division Street is the story of the Nowak family, living in the East Side of Buffalo, New York, where Clara, the family matriarch, happily runs her soup kitchen and tends to the family heirloom – a 20-foot shrine to the Blessed Mother that adjoins the house. The Nowak family’s faith is shaken to the very core when a deathbed confession causes the family legend to unravel, and the results are heartfelt and hilarious.

Source: news.sfcollege.edu

Event: Amalie Motor Oil NHRA Gatornationals

Source: gnvculturalseries.org/jest-fest/


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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

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Event: Spring Concert by the Gainesville Community Band Event Details: Sunday, March 31, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Santa Fe College Fine Arts Hall Event Cost: $5 Description: Come enjoy the Gainesville Community Band perform under the direction of R. Gary Langford. Source: www.gnvband.org

May Event: University of Florida Commencement

Event: Taste of Greater Gainesville

Event Details: May 3-4, times vary, Exactech Arena at the Stephen C. O’Connell Center

Event Details: Sunday, June 9, 4:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Exactech Arena

Event Cost: Free

Event Cost: $125 - $175

Description: Come congratulate the UF grads.

Description: There will be over 40 restaurants to taste, an incredible auction and the one and only Iron Chef Gainesville competition. This event benefits the Child Advocacy Center of Gainesville, Tyler’s Hope for a Dystonia Cure, PACE Center for Girls Alachua and Ronald McDonald House Charities of North Central Florida.

Source: ufl.edu ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

April Event: Santa Fe College Spring Arts Festival Event Details: Saturday, April 6, 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., NE 1st St. and the grounds of the Thomas Center in downtown Gainesville’s historic district. Event Cost: Free Description: The festival is one of the three largest annual events in Gainesville and is known for its high quality, unique artwork. Source: www.sfspringarts.org/ –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: 40th Annual Fifth Avenue Art Festival Event Details: April 19-21, 321 NW 10th St Event Cost: Free Description: The Festival has grown and now regularly hosts more than 20,000 people each year. The event features three days of performance and visual arts. Source: culturalartscoalition.org –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: 43rd Annual Pioneer Days Festival Event Details: April 27 – 28, Downtown High Springs, James Paul Park Event Cost: Free Description: The festival features vendors selling handmade crafts, clothing, furniture and other goods; artists selling their wonderful creations; merchandisers selling unique and often locally produced items Source: highsprings.com/

June

Event: Mother’s Day Concert by the Gainesville Community Band Event Details: Details: Sunday, May 12, 3:00 p.m., Trinity United Methodist Church

Source: www.tasteofgainesville.com/ ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Event Cost: Venue offering requested

Event: Summer Steamer 5

Description: Bring your mom and listen to the Gainesville Community Band perform under the direction of R. Gary Langford.

Event Details: Saturday, June 22, 9:00 a.m., at Goodbike

Source: www.gnvband.org –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: An Intimate Evening with Kristin Chenoweth Event Details: Sunday, May 19, 7:30 p.m., Phillips Center

Event Cost: TBD Description: Heat up the race on these blazing fast courses then cool off with some great summer fun! The post party will be a block party with music, ice cream trucks, a foam pit after the finish to play in, and great summer fun for the whole family! Source: www.facebook.com/goodbike352/

Event Cost: Tickets prices vary Description: Whether she’s delighting audiences as Glinda the Good Witch in Wicked on Broadway, or lighting up the screen as Olive Snook on Pushing Daisies and the personification of Easter on American Gods, she’s a scene-stealer. Source: performingarts.ufl.edu –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Million Dollar Quartet Event Details: May 31 – June 9, 8:00 p.m., The Hippodrome Event Cost: Tickets prices vary Description: Four legends, one night and a whole lot of rock ‘n’ roll! Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley have one of the greatest jam sessions of all time in this Tony Award-winning musical. Source: www.thehipp.org

July Event: Fanfares and Fireworks Event Details: Wednesday, July 3, 6:00 – 10:00 p.m., UF Bandshell at Flavet Field Event Cost: Free Description: Various musical groups including the Gainesville Community Band. The fireworks will begin at approximately 9:40 p.m. For safety reasons, no dogs, sparklers or alcohol are allowed at the event. Coolers are allowed, but may be subject to search by the University of Florida Police Department. Source: www.wuft.org/fireworks/ –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Micanopy Annual July 4th Parade Event Details: Thursday, July 4, 11:00 a.m. Downtown Micanopy Event Cost: Free. Description: This parade was featured in “Doc Hollywood.” Come on out, have some ice cream, watch the parade and meet the neighbors of Micanopy. Source: 352arts.org/event/micanopy-annual-july4th-parade

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Event: Alachua’s Fourth of July Celebration Event Details: Thursday, July 4, 3:00 – 10:00 p.m. at Hal Brady Recreation Center Event Cost: Free Description: Billed as “The Largest Small-Town Fireworks Display in America,” the event will begin at 3 p.m. with fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Source: www.cityofalachua.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Zookeeper Day Event Details: Typically held in July (date TBD), Santa Fe College. Event Cost: TBD Description: The Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo celebrates National Zookeeper Week by showcasing the zookeepers and the amazing work they do every day. Source: www.sfcollege.edu/zoo/teaching-zooevents/zookeeper-day

August Event: Wing Bowl

September Event: Folk in the Springs

Event: The Fest

Event Details: Sunday, September 15, 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Downtown High Springs

Event Details: Nov. 1 - 3, Various venues in downtown Gainesville.

Event Cost: Free

Event Cost: TBD

Description: Featuring some of the best local, regional and touring folk artists all throughout Downtown High Springs.

Description: The Fest is an independent multiple-day, multiple-venue underground music festival held annually in Gainesville with support from the fine folks at No Idea Records and now the City of Gainesville.

Source: www.highspringsmusicinthepark.com/2019season-schedule

October

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Downtown Festival and Art Show Event Details: Saturday and Sunday, November 16 - 17, 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Event Details: Saturday, October 12, 10:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m., Florida Museum of Natural History

Event Cost: Free

Event Cost: Price varies Description: ButterflyFest is an annual festival to celebrate backyard wildlife with an emphasis on pollinators Source: www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Trick or Treat on Main Street

Event Cost: Tickets: $20 per adult (10 and over), $5 per child (6-9yrs), children 5 and under are FREE.

Event Details: Wednesday, Oct. 31, downtown Alachua

Description: An evening of food, music, bowling, door prizes and the main event – a chicken wing eating contest. Wing Bowl was organized to help raise money and public awareness for the Child Advocacy Center, a local nonprofit that serves abused and neglected children.

Event Cost: Free

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Source: thefestfl.com/news/

Event: 14th Annual ButterflyFest

Event Details: Aug. date TBD, Splitz Bowling Center.

Source: www.childadvocacycentergainesville.org

November

Description: Local vendors hand out candy so bring the kids to downtown Alachua. Source: www.cityofalachua.com –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Boo at the Zoo

Description: North Florida’s art scene swings into high gear with the arrival of the highly acclaimed festival. The streets of historic downtown Gainesville, from City Hall to the Hippodrome State Theatre, will be transformed into a celebration of art and creativity complete with live music, performing arts and a spectacular array of food. Source: www.gainesvilledowntownartfest.org/ –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Alachua’s Main Street Fall Harvest Festival Event Details: Sunday, November 17, downtown Alachua Event Cost: Free Description: Hosted by Alachua Business League, visitors can enjoy music, food and a variety of vendors. Source: alachuabusiness.com/2017-main-streetfestival/4662398 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Event: UF Football season starts – University of Miami v. UF

Event Details: Wednesday, Oct. 31, Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo

Event Details: Saturday, Aug. 31, Orlando

Event Cost: Admission to the event is one canned good per person.

Event Details: Saturday, Nov. 30, Morningside Nature Center.

Description: Students and staff transform the zoo into a spooky but safe trick-or-treating event for the whole family.

Event Cost: Free

Event Cost: Ticket prices vary Description: Go Gators! The season begins the weekend of August 31 with 13 games, including four neutral site games on opening weekend. The 2019 season will culminate with the SEC Championship Game in Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta on Saturday, December 7. It will be the 28th edition of the game and the 26th in the city of Atlanta. Source: floridagators.com

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Source: www.sfcollege.edu/zoo/teaching-zooevents/boo-at-the-zoo

Event: Cane Boil and FiddleFest

Description: Held each year on the Saturday after Thanksgiving, the festival combines traditions of giving thanks and fall harvest with live fiddle, banjo and string-band music. Source: www.cityofgainesville.org/


December Event: Stop Children’s Cancer Holiday Traditions Event Details: Dec. 2019 (dates not finalized), Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts Event Cost: TBD Description: A wonderful holiday concert featuring area youth choral and orchestra groups. The tradition continues under the direction of Professor Gary Langford, Professor of Music Emeritus at the University of Florida and Conductor of the Alachua County Youth Orchestra. Source: www.performingarts.ufl.edu

Event: Impact Awards Event Details: Dec. (TBD), 11:30-1 p.m. at UF Hilton Conference Center Event Cost: TBD Description: The Impact Awards recognizes those individuals in the community that have motivated, educated, inspired and altogether had a positive impact on our Greater Gainesville community. Source: businessmagazinegainesville.comx –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Annual Fall Farm and Cane Festival

Farm tours, domestic crafts, children’s activities, music and vendors are featured on this living history day. Demonstrators will be showcasing Florida’s traditions of yesteryear. Source: www.floridastateparks.org/park-events/ Dudley-Farm –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Event: Annual Tree Lighting at the Thomas Center Event Description: Annual Holiday Tree Lighting Celebration at the Historic Thomas Center Event Details: December (dates not finalized), 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Event Details: Early Dec., Dudley Farm Historic State Park, Newberry Event Cost: $8.00/car (cash only) Description: Celebrate our pioneering past by watching some of the area’s rural lifestyle. The Park Service commemorates Ms. Myrtle Dudley’s birthday by grinding sugar cane and boiling it into cane syrup.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Arts

in Greater Gainesville

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While Gator-Chomping is an art in itself, Greater Gainesville boasts a wide variety of events, ranging from Watermelon festivals to Fine Arts Festivals, to Pioneer Days. Renowned for its intellectual variety, and college football, the area also offers a unique blend of over 80 fine arts organizations and attractions. Each year, millions of residents and visitors participate in cultural and artistic events in Alachua county, according to a report by Americans for the Arts.

Matheson History Museum

513 East University Avenue, Gainesville ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Dating back to 1867, this museum boasts a collection of over 20,000 postcards from every county in the state – and much more.

Thomas Center

302 NE 6th Avenue, Gainesville ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Enjoy free galleries and gardens that are open to the public. Throughout the year, the center hosts over 400 events, including Jest Fest, weddings and Jewel Box concerts.

Artwalk Gainesville Downtown, Gainesville

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

On the last Friday of every month (except in November and December), from 7-10 p.m. visitors take to the streets of Gainesville for a self-guided tours to enjoy a vast array of visual arts.

352 Gainesville

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Art featured around downtown Gainesville offers visitors a chance to view unique mural masterpieces. Grab your cell phone and embark on a free self-guided tour.

Fine Arts for Ocala Arts Festival

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– October 26 & 27 | Downtown Ocala There are 155 artists from all over the United States bringing their beautiful pieces to Ocala. The festival is produced by an all-volunteer board and draws more than 25,000 visitors each year.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Micanopy Fall Festival

High Springs Pioneer Days Festival

Local artists, crafters and musicians participate in the festival, as well as artists from across the southeast. Feast your eyes on 200 displays of arts and crafts and many other attractions, including good time music and an old-time auction.

This family-friendly event invites visitors to take a step back in time and enjoy a variety of food, rides and live music, as well as “Ole’ Fashioned Shoot-outs.”

November 2 & 3 Cholokka Boulevard, Micanopy ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Newberry Watermelon Festival

May 18 | CountryWay TownSquare, Newberry –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Celebrate the harvest and participate in baking, beauty pageants, seed spitting and watermelon eating.

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April 27 & 28 120 NW 2nd Avenue, High Springs ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Downtown Festival and Arts Show

November 16 & 17 200 East University Ave., Gainesville –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Ranked No. 24 on the Sunshine Arts magazine’s list of the best fine arts festival in the nation, this event offers paintings, jewelry, sculptures and photography from more than 240 artists across the country.


Cinema Verde International Environmental Film & Arts Festival February 14 & 17 The Hippodrome Theatre, 25 SE 2nd Place, Gainesville –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– This film festival’s mission is aimed at raising environmental awareness through arts, workshops, events and films.

Crafts Festival

December 7 & 8 | Stephen C. O’Connell Center 250 Gale Lemerand Dr., Gainesville –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– This event showcases crafts authentically made by talented artisans and crafters. Featuring hundreds of different vendors, the festival provides an excellent opportunity to shop for unique merchandise and gifts.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Dining Out

in Greater Gainesville

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* When you feel like dining out, you’ll have more options than you can choose from with Greater Gainesville’s active foodie culture. From fine dining and wine to casual food truck rallies and local breweries, Greater Gainesville has the perfect dining location for any occasion.

Kick off your week with a leisurely brunch at one of many breakfast spots. If you’re looking for great atmosphere, homegrown ingredients and a space for your children to play, try One Love Café in Magnolia Parke. Complete with a stage for live music, a fire pit, swing seating and surrounded by greenery, One Love Café is the perfect place to bring the whole family (and the dog) when you’re in need of some weekend relaxation. For an elegant take on southern brunch visit the Sweetwater Branch Inn’s restaurant, The Sweet Tea. Situated in a quaint and beautifully revived Victorian home, The Sweet Tea features timeless Southern specialties such as fried green tomatoes with buttermilk basil dressing and a southern catfish po’boy with candied jalapeños. If Latin flavors are more your style, have Sunday brunch at Emiliano’s Café. With food this good, the only thing you’ll be wondering after breakfast is, “What’s for lunch?”

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

You don’t have to travel south of the border to enjoy real Mexican food. You can find the harmonious blend of lime, cilantro, onions and tomatoes right here in Greater Gainesville. Local favorites like La Tienda Latina in Gainesville, Cilantro Tacos in Newberry, and El Molino in Waldo offer casual Mexican style settings where you can sit outside, take a crunchy bite out of a freshly prepared tostada and enjoy a light Mexican beer. If you want to be licking barbecue sauce off your fingers by the end of your meal, Greater Gainesville has over 100 options. Adam’s Rib Co., MOJO Hogtown Bar-B-Que and Woodyard Grill are a few popular establishments firing up smokers and offering fall-off-the-bone ribs that will please even the pickiest of eaters. If you live a meat-free lifestyle, don’t fret. Gainesville has its share of vegan and vegetarian options. Known for its falafel and pickled onions, Sababa has many options for vegans and vegetarians ranging from vegan shawarma to veggie schnitzel. Located in the Sun Center next to the Hippodrome Theatre, you can enjoy your meal before seeing a play. In the mood for pizza? Head over to Satchel’s for a funky atmosphere and a fresh pizza. With vegan-friendly pesto sauce, vegan-friendly crust, vegan cheese and tempeh toppings, what more could you want? The dynamic aroma of ginger, garlic and chilies sizzling away in a pan is popular throughout Greater Gainesville. With over 50 Asian restaurants to choose from and an impressive number of flavors to try, you will feel like you are halfway across the world.

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Found in the heart of downtown Gainesville, Dragonfly has been a staple of sushi lovers since it first opened its doors in 2000. Promoting a modern and stylish atmosphere coupled with a large assortment of fresh sushi rolls and delicious entrees, Dragonfly is the perfect spot for a date night or just a casual outing with friends and family. If you need to grab a quick meal but don’t want to sacrifice quality and taste, look no further than Bento Café. For fine dining, a local favorite is Embers Wood Grill. Featuring a real wood grill and a select combination of woods, Embers is sure to delight. The Chef’s Table even offers a personalized menu. Or visit Mark’s Prime Steakhouse, serving a quality dining experience since November 2002 and offering beef, fresh seafood, vegetables and premium wines. In Greater Gainesville, Italian food is easy to come by and hard to forget. For an upscale dining experience featuring creamy sauce, fine wine and roasted garlic, try Manuel’s Vintage Room. And don’t forget Francesca’s Trattoria for lunch, brunch or dinner complete with live jazz on most days. For a more a casual experience, Blue Highway Pizza is the perfect place for you to grab your friends to watch a game. The variety of Sicilian-style pizza is sure to rouse the taste buds. And be sure to check out O Sole Mio in Jonesville for an authentic, hand-prepared Italian meal with the freshest regional ingredients. No matter what you are in the mood for when you decide to eat out, the Greater Gainesville area has the perfect place for every palate. Whether you want to enjoy the lively atmosphere of downtown or sample sushi on a lake, Gainesville will make you feel at home.


Grab a bite and a drink at One Love Café and enjoy some live music.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Shopping Whether you want to hop on the latest fashion trend or discover unique items at a quaint antique store, Greater Gainesville hosts a wide variety of shops, boutiques, malls and galleries that will fulfill all your shopping needs.

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Take a scenic stroll through downtown Gainesville and explore the many shops for a personalized shopping experience or reconnect with the origins of your food at the Union Street Farmers Market, where you can purchase locally grown produce every Wednesday. Head over to The Oaks Mall, your one-stop shop for anything you need. Featuring over 140 of your favorite stores, the mall houses department stores like JCPenney, Dillard’s and Belk as well as retail stores that appeal to individuals of all ages, including Banana Republic, Forever 21, GNC, Francesca’s, Gap, H&M, LOFT, American Eagle and Express. And if you’re hungry, you can dine at the fullservice restaurants such as Ruby Tuesday or Buffalo Wild Wings or grab a quick bite to eat at the food court. Enjoy the fresh air while you shop at the Tioga Town Center in Jonesville. The open-air shopping experience offers quality merchandise, excellent customer service and an inviting community atmosphere.

If you’re west of UF, visit Haile Plantation. The Haile Village features a variety of restaurants, boutiques, shops and pubs to appeal to every taste. There are also events to be enjoyed such as Easter Egg Hunts, HotRodding for Heroes and Oktoberfest. For artisanal products and a picturesque shopping experience, stop by Thornebrook Village. With beautiful landscaping and covered breezeways, the shopping plaza is a pleasant place to idle and window-shop. Savor the handmade confections of Thornebrook Chocolates or treat your eyes to some original stained-glass art at McIntyre Stained Glass Studio and Art Gallery. Interested in antiques and collectibles? Explore Smiley’s Antique Mall in Micanopy. Open since 1994, the 25,000-square-foot mall is packed with hidden treasures. The Antique Center of High Springs and the Waldo Antique Village also offer antiquing experiences that are second to none. Dig your way through time, take your findings with you, and add a bold accent to your new home.

Located next to the Waldo Antique Village is the Waldo Farmers and Flea Market – North Central Florida’s largest flea market, where you can find everything from fresh local produce to unique arts and crafts. When it comes to shopping in Greater Gainesville, there’s always something new to discover.

Celebration Pointe Just west of the interstate in Southwest Gainesville you will find Celebration Pointe. With 700 acres of protected land to the west and I-75 to the east, this 125acre, mixed-use property includes restaurants, a movie theater and shopping, as well as town homes, luxury apartments and office spaces. In late 2016, Bass Pro Shops Sportsman’s Center opened and welcomed thousands of outdoor enthusiasts. Within the Bass Pro Shops, shoppers can experience not only traditional shopping with a wilderness vibe, but also mounted animal heads throughout the store and a 12,000-gallon freshwater aquarium. Described as the next generation of urban development, Celebration Pointe has many districts, offering a town within a town. In the center of it all is City Walk and The Promenade, an area where pedestrians will enjoy not only dining, shopping and entertainment opportunities but residential offerings as well. Not only does Celebration Pointe offer a variety of culinary options, ranging from fine dining to fast food, the 10-screen theater boasts king-size recliners and a full bar and lounge, as well as Regal Premium Experience (RPX) technology.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Butler Plaza Conveniently located along Archer Road in booming Southwest Gainesville is Butler Plaza. In the Neighborhoods at Butler, you can find over 150 stores and 2 millionsquare-feet of retail stores and restaurants. Butler Plaza was established in 1975 with the opening of Gainesville’s first Publix supermarket. Here you can shop at leading retail stores such as Target, Publix Super Markets, OfficeMax and CVS. Or you can pop into PetSmart and treat your favorite furry friends. There’s also a Best Buy for your electronics needs and Re-Tech if you break your cell phone. In 2016, Butler expanded north along its newly constructed S. Clark Butler Blvd. In Butler North you can shop at Sam’s Club, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Lowe’s Home Improvement and Walmart. Construction continues at its newest extension, Butler Town Center, which is designed as a walkable, urban, open-air environment. Butler Town Center plans to offer restaurants, shops and cafés as well as interactive fountains and entertainment, once completed.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Athletics Beyond Football in Greater Gainesville While best known for the University of Florida Gators, you don’t have to be a fan or a university student to enjoy the athletics Greater Gainesville has to offer.

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While best known for the University of Florida Gators, you don’t have to be a fan or a university student to enjoy the athletics Greater Gainesville has to offer. Gainesville, Florida, is home to some of the greatest sports teams in the nation. From UF’s number one ranked men’s baseball team to an unstoppable women’s volleyball team, there is no shortage of opportunities to see amazing sports in action. But what if you want to do more than just cheer from the sidelines? Greater Gainesville has many sports teams to join for residents of all ages. You don’t have to be a world-class athlete to enjoy all that Gainesville has to offer. Whether you’re looking for a friendly kickball league, swimming or soccer team, Gainesville will offer you options. The City of Gainesville hosts an extensive list of sports programs every year for the youth in the community. Children four to 14 can choose from cheerleading, tennis, football, softball, baseball and basketball. The programs run year-round and practices meet after school. In the summer, special sports camps are available. In addition to the typical youth leagues, the City of Gainesville partners with a local non-profit organization, Noah’s Endeavor, to sponsor adaptive sports programs for children with special physical and developmental needs. The fun isn’t limited to just children. There are multiple leagues for adults in the area, as well. Anyone 18 years or older can join a league put on by the City of Gainesville, which includes co-ed softball, volleyball and basketball. The games are at night so even the busiest of workers can get involved. Have a group of friends who want to start a team? All you need to do is register with the City of Gainesville’s Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs department. These adult sports leagues are a great way to connect with friends, meet new people and get your mind off of the daily stresses of life for a couple of hours. In addition to children and adult leagues, the City of Gainesville also sponsors programs and activities for senior citizens. Residents over the age of 60 can engage in outdoor activities every day of the week. The activities, which take place at the Thelma A. Boltin Recreation Center, are completely free. Most Gainesville residents are wellacquainted with Gator football, but more obscure sports have also been gaining popularity in recent years, and Greater Gainesville has been quick to jump on the trend. Gainesville has two Ultimate Frisbee

courses that are certified by the Professional Disc Golf Association: Jonesville and Northside Park. Gainesville Chain Hawks Disc Golf Club hosts events and tournaments year-round at the parks and engages people from around the county. They don’t require any experience to get involved, just a passion to learn. Gainesville has activities for everyone, including the daredevils and adrenaline-junkies. At Sun Country Sports Center, you can climb a 2,500-square-foot rock wall made to feel like a real mountain. Race a group of friends up the wall, take lessons, join the climbing club or even make a family fun day out of it. Your climbing doesn’t have to be limited to an indoor gym. Canopy Climbers of North Central Florida is an organization that teaches people how to climb trees. The purpose of the organization is to help people

connect with nature and each other in a safe, challenging and fun environment. Anyone eight and older can spend a day or two learning how to safely defy gravity and climb trees they can brag about. Greater Gainesville is a thriving community rich in health and fitness. You don’t need to be a university student or Gator fan to enjoy the activities and sports that are offered. Whether you’re just learning how to throw a Frisbee or are passionate about competitive swimming, you’ll be able to find a group of people as dedicated as you, right around the corner.

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Leisure & Culture, Recreation Leisure & Recreation

Welcome to the Heart of Florida Athletics

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Steve Spurrier Ambassador, Florida Gators Athletic Department ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Former Florida Quarterback and Head Coach

I visited Gainesville, Florida, as a high school recruit in March of 1963. I left Johnson City, Tennessee, when it was about 40 degrees and arrived in Gainesville when it was around 72 degrees. Immediately, I knew this was a wonderful city and state to go to college, play football and hopefully, someday, live for a long time. Being a student athlete here for four years was the best. Coach Graves, our head coach, and his staff were outstanding coaches and role models. My teammates are still some of my best friends in life. I was fortunate to play 10 years in the NFL. My family would always return to Gainesville in the off-seasons to enjoy our friends, our church and Crescent Beach. My path in life has taken me to several wonderful places to live. Now that my coaching career is history, I have been blessed to have the opportunity to return to the University of Florida and Gainesville to help promote our university and our city. I see so many Gators that really enjoy retiring in Gainesville so they can not only attend lots of Gator games in all sports, but also enjoy the entertainment that our city provides. Go Gators.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

In 2017-18, a national-leading 12 Florida teams posted top-five NCAA finishes including a NCAA Championship by the men’s indoor track & field program.

NCAA Champions • Men’s Indoor Track & Field (No. 1) • Men’s Outdoor Track & Field (No. 2) • Volleyball (No. 2) • Gymnastics (No. 3) • Baseball (No. T-3) • Women’s Indoor Track & Field (No. 4) • Men’s Swimming & Diving (No. 5) • Women’s Outdoor Track & Field (No. 5) • Lacrosse (No. T-5) • Soccer (No. T-5) • Softball (No. T-5) • Men’s Tennis (No. T-5)

1 NCAA Elite 90 Award went to Gators in 2017-18

19

Florida teams claimed national titles in the last 10 seasons.

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UF is 1of 3 programs to win at least one national title each season since 2008–09.

10 TOP-10 national finishes by 2017-18 teams

SOURCE: UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION’S 2017-18 UF ATHLETICS YEAR IN REVIEW

83%

Graduation Success Rate for UF

4 GATORS picked up national athlete of the year honors in 2017-18

7 GATORS collected 13 NCAA individual titles in 2017-18

6

conference titles by the Gators in 2017-18


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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

FLORIDA CREDIT: FLORIDA ATHLETICS

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Mike White Head Coach, University of Florida Men’s Basketball Why Gainesville? That was an easy question for me and my family. For us, it obviously centers around my work at the University of Florida. UF is one of the most elite athletic programs and public academic institutions, so we jumped at the chance to relocate here to Gainesville to be a part of that. I always tell our recruits, when you come to Florida, you’ll be sitting in class not only with future leaders in business, science, law and medicine, but also next to future NFL players, a top-10 MLB draft pick, future Olympian swimmers, gymnasts and track athletes. You will be surrounded by academic and athletic excellence at UF. My family has a special connection to the state of Florida too. I was born in Dunedin and even though my family moved away soon after I was born, we went back to the Cocoa Beach area every year for vacation, and still do to this day. I played basketball at Ole Miss almost 20 years ago, and one day in my academic advisor’s office I flipped through the volleyball media guide sitting on the table. One of the players caught my eye. If you can believe it, her hometown was Dunedin, Florida. I knew then I had to meet her, so I sought Kira out at a social gathering soon after. Today, she and I have five young kids. (On a side note, not only is Kira from Dunedin, but she played volleyball at Clearwater Central Catholic High School. My mom launched that volleyball program way back when my parents lived on Florida’s west coast. Talk about fate.) Fast-forward to the Spring of 2015; we had been living in Ruston, Louisiana, for four years and felt very much at home and content there at Louisiana Tech. We had a couple opportunities at larger schools the previous year, but the timing and the fit hadn’t been right. Then one day we watched Billy Donovan, who I have always admired, giving his farewell press conference at the University of Florida. Later that day, I saw the 352 area code pop up on my phone and it was Jeremy Foley on the phone. A few days later, he was in my living room. I told Jeremy, “If you offer me the job, I’ll start driving to Gainesville.” He asked Kira and me if we’d like to take some time together to discuss it and look over the contract privately – we looked at each other and said, “No, we know we want to come to Gainesville.” We’re nearing three years here now and Kira and I and our kids absolutely love it. This is a wonderful place to raise a family and we could not be happier. We love our neighbors, and every day we meet more amazing people. We are so proud to be part of this community and call Gainesville home. Go Gators!

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Get Active! 2 0 1 8

A list of fitness centers, gyms and athletic activities in Greater Gainesville.

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Adult Club Sports 300 CLUB SWIM AND TENNIS 3715 NW 12th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 378-2898 300clubswimandtennis.org ADULT COED & MEN’S SOFTBALL LEAGUES 306 NE 6th Ave., Bldg. B Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 334-5067 www.leaguelineup.com CANOPY CLIMBERS TREE CLIMBING (352) 284-7777 canopyclimbers.com DB RACQUET CLUB 5100 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 377-9580 dbtennis.com FLORIDA HOCKEY ACADEMY floridahockeyacademy.com

WESTSIDE BAPTIST westsidebaptist.org ADULT BASKETBALL (35+) 10000 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-7700 ext.157 FLAG FOOTBALL 10000 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-7700 ext.157

Cycling FREEWHEEL PROJECT 618 S Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 378-2100 GAINESVILLE CYCLING CLUB, INC. 5015 NW 19th Place Gainesville, FL 32605 gccfla.org

GAINESVILLE SPORTS COMMISSION 300 E University Ave., Suite 100 Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 338-9300 gainesvillesportscommission.com USTA TENNIS (386) 671-8949 ustaflorida.com

POFAHL STUDIOS 1325 NW 2nd St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 373-1166 pofahldancestudio.com

DOXA DANCE STUDIO 490 NW 60th St., Suite 6 Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 870-1208 doxadancestudio.com

S-CONNECTION AERIAL ARTS 250-2 SE 10th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 316-0682 sconnection.org

ETHNIC DANCE EXPRESSIONS SCHOOL OF BELLY DANCE 4000 W Newberry Road, Suite D-2 Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 384-9200 ethnicdanceexpressions.com GAINESVILLE BALLET THEATRE 1501 NW 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 372-9898 gainesville-ballet-theatre.org

HIGH SPRINGS BMX CENTER 1050 NW 2nd St. HighSprings, FL 32655 (352) 474-8105

GAINESVILLE DANCE ASSOCIATION 7715 NE 56th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 327-3672 gainesvilledance.com

Dance

HIP MOVES 708 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 215-2852 hipmoves.com

GAINESVILLE KICKBALL gainesvillekickball.com GAINESVILLE REGIONAL SOCCER LEAGUE grsl.org

CHOSEN DANCE MINISTRY 10000 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-7700 westsidebaptist.org

CAMERON DANCENTER camerondancenter.com NORTHWEST LOCATION 5003 NW 34th Blvd., Suite 120 Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 371-0761 SOUTHWEST LOCATION 5211 SW 91st Terrace Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 335-7785

HOGAN SCHOOL OF IRISH DANCE 16 NW 7th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 346-5539 hoganirishdance.com

DANCE SUN COUNTRY 333 SW 140th Terrace Jonesville, FL 32669 (352) 331-8773 suncountrysports.com WILLISTON SCHOOL OF DANCE 153 NW 6th St. Williston, FL 32696 (352) 528-6540

Equestrian CANTERBURY SHOWPLACE 23100 W Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-6758 canterburyshowplace.com CAVALLI FARM 1734 SW 8 Ave. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 665-2047 cavallifarmgainesville.com DREAMSTONE FARM 16025 W Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 494-6897

IMPERIAL DANCE STUDIO (352) 372-6140 imperialdancestudio.net

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Equestrian (cont.)

THUMBS UP RIDING SCHOOL 22507 NW County Road 1493 Alachua, FL 32615 (305) 781-3882 thumbsupriding.com

EVERGLADE EQUESTRIAN CENTER 10659 NW 198th St. Micanopy, FL 32667 (352) 591-3175 everglade-equestrian.com

TKO FARM 5560 NE State Road 121 Williston, FL 32696 (352) 219-0248 tkofarm.com

GAME ON EVENTING, LLC 21327 NW 58th Pl. Newberry, FL 32669 (850) 212-1601 gameoneventing.weebly.com/

TWIN OAKS STABLES 9813 NW State Road 45 High Springs, FL 32643 (352) 339-6559 twinoaksstables.co

HAILE EQUESTRIAN 7680 SW 46th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 665-7433 haileequestrian.com HORSES HELPING PEOPLE (HOPE) 9722 SW 153rd Ave. Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-0533 horseshelpingpeople.org MADONNA’S EQUESTRIAN ACADEMY 7624 NE 62nd Dr Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 222-3266 horsebacklessons.com PONY PADDOCK AT DRAGON’S LAIR 704 NW 202nd St. Newberry, FL 32669 (386) 853-0615 ponypaddockatdragonslair.com THADDLEDO FARM NW 122nd St. High Springs, FL 32643 (352) 870-5272 thaddledofarm.com

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Fitness Centers & Gyms ALACHUA HEALTH & FITNESS CENTER 15043 Main St. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2639 alachuafitness.com ANYTIME FITNESS anytimefitness.com 7070 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 338-7722 15202 NW 147th Dr. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 518-5277 BAILEY’S GYM 3441 W University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 373-4439 baileysgym.com

BEAST MODE BOXING AND FITNESS 250 SE 10th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 535-0896 beastmodeboxingandfitness.net GAINESVILLE HEALTH AND FITNESS CENTER ghfc.com MAIN CENTER 4820 Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 366-50235 GHF WOMEN 2441 NW 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 366-4683 TIOGA CENTER 12830 SW 1st Ln., Suite 100 Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 366-4683 HAILE PLANTATION FITNESS CENTER 9905 SW 44th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 335-0055 ORANGETHEORY FITNESS orangetheoryfitness.com 2005 NW 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 559-3937 3205 Clark Butler Rd., Suite 20 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 242-0020 PLANET FITNESS 2210 NW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 505-6685 planetfitness.com


UF SOUTHWEST RECREATION CENTER 3150 Hull Road Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 846-1081 recsports.ufl.edu UF HEALTH FITNESS AND WELLNESS CENTER 1310 SW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 733-0834 fitness.ufhealth.org

Golf GAINESVILLE COUNTRY CLUB 7300 SW 35th Way Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 372-1458 gainesvillegolf.cc HAILE PLANTATION GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB 9905 SW 44th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 335-0055 clubcorp.com/Clubs/Haile-PlantationGolf-Country-Club IRONWOOD GOLF COURSE 2100 NE 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 393-8500 ironwoodgolfcourse.org MARK BOSTICK GOLF COURSE 2800 SW 2nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 375-4866 markbostickgolfcourse.com MEADOWBROOK GOLF CLUB 3200 NW 98th St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 332-0577 fb.com/meadowbrook-golf-club

WEST END GOLF CLUB 12830 W Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 332-2721 westendgolfclub.com

Martial Arts ALLIED CAPOEIRA LEAGUE GAINESVILLE 2020 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 219-6106 capoeiragainesville.com CAPOEIRA ACADEMY OF GAINESVILLE 604 and 606 N Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 494-7323 capoeiraacademyofgainesville.weebly.com CK JUDO AND KARATE Hal Brady Recreation Complex 14300 NW 146 Terrace Alachua, Fl 32615 (352) 210-3729 ckjudo.com FLOWING ZEN STUDIO flowingzen.com F2 ARENA & DARKSIDE ATHLETICS 4406 SW 35th Terrace, Unit 106 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 281-8725 f2arena.com GAINESVILLE DOJO 727 SW 4th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 378-3070 gainesvilledojo.org

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Martial Arts (cont.) GAINESVILLE JUDO SCHOOL 809 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 262-52026 gainesvillejudoschool.com GLOBAL MIXED MARTIAL ARTS ACADEMY 4000 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 371-1007 globalmmaacademy.com KARATE AMERICA 1207 NW 76th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 332-8065 martialartsgainesvillefl.com KATSU DOJO KARATE 4936 NW 39th Ave., Suite B Gainesville, FL. 32606 (352) 354-2860 katsudojo.com THE MARCELO GARCIA JIU JITSU ASSOCIATION OF GAINESVILLE 710 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 328-2768 bjjgainesville.com OKITO AMERICA 6900 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 338-7262 okitoamerica.com PRO TAEKWONDO 4907 NW 43rd St., Suite F Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 375-0700 protkd.com/index.php

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THE GAINESVILLE T’AI CHI CENTER 1409 NW 6th St., Suite 220 Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 371-3718 gainesvilletaichi.com

CROSSFIT 352 3720 NW 13th St., Suite 10B Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 317-0965 crossfit352.com

MASTER FITNESS GURUS 3201 SW 42nd St., Suite 5 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 283-0758 masterfitnessgurus.com

STAR MARTIAL ARTS 500 NW 60th St., Suite A Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 374-4950 star-tkd.com

CROSSFIT GAINESVILLE 1126 NW 2nd St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 215-8609 livathletic.com/crossfitgainesville

NEXT LEVEL SPORTS AND FITNESS (352) 575-0801 nlsfitness.com

TALLEST TREE CUONG NHU ORIENTAL MARTIAL ARTS CENTER 716 N Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 213-2468 afn.org/~cnomaa/center.htm

CROSSFIT LEAD 1124 NW 76th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 792-6551 crossfitlead.com

WORLD MARTIAL ARTS CENTER 333 SW 140th Terrace Jonesville, FL 32669 (352) 331-3557 worldmartialartscenter.net

Personal and/or Group Training BARRE FORTE 4994 NW 39th Ave., Suite D Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 727-7800 barreforte.com B3 GYM 2134 NW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 234-4348 b3gym.com BUTTERFLY PILATES 4923 NW 27th Ct. Gainesville, FL. 32606 (352) 373-9996 butterflypilates.com

DYNASTY CROSSFIT 3737 SW 42nd Ave., Suite 1 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 792-6688 dynastycrossfit.com ENCORE PILATES 4140 NW 37th Pl., Suite C Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 377-3305 encore-pilates.com EVOLVE PILATES & FITNESS 6450 SW Archer Road, Suite 210 Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-7517 evolvepilates.com GATOR CROSSFIT 6020 NW 4th Pl., Suite G Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 332-9348 gatorcrossfit.com GO PRIMAL FITNESS & TRAINING INSTITUTE 3842 W Newberry Rd #1k, Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 372-5208 goprimalfitness.com

SWAMP FITNESS (352) 562-0444 swampfitness.com SWEAT LIFE FITNESS 2625 SW 91st St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 692-4926 sweatlifefitness.com UNDERGROUND FITNESS REVOLUTION 14911 Main St., Suite 102 Alachua, FL 32615 (352) 872-4751 undergroundfitnessrevolution.com VISIONARY CROSSFIT 716 N Main St. Gainesville, FL 32607 (786) 447-8503 XCEED SPORTS PERFORMANCE 7420 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 327-7700 xceedperformance.com ZEN FITNESS 2440 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 333-0936 thezenfitness.com


Located in downtown Gainesville, S-Connection, LLC offers a variety of classes ranging from Brazilian dance to aerial yoga.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Yoga AYURVEDA HEALTH RETREAT 14616 NW 140th St. Alachua, FL 32616 (352) 870-7645 ayurvedahealthretreat.com BIG RON’S YOGA COLLEGE 102 NE 10th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 875-1976 bigronsyoga.com HARMONY POINT ACUPUNCTURE 900 NW 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 222-3816 harmonypointacupuncture.com PHYSICAL ENERGY WORKS 1240 NW 11th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 745-8028 fb.com/PhysicalEnergyWorksYoga SANCTUARY YOGA 411 SE 7th St. Gainesville, FL. 32601 (352) 538-7537 yogagainesville.com THE SANITY GURUS 1730 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 222-3647 sanitygurus.com SEARCHLIGHT YOGA 3501 SW 2nd Ave., Suite O Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 214-8948 searchlightyoga.com

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SIDDHA YOGA MEDITATION CENTER 4609 NW 6th St., Suite 8 Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 376-9587 siddhayoga.org

GAINESVILLE FASTPITCH SOFTBALL 400 NE 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 258-1592 gainesvillefastpitch.org

ZEN VIBE YOGA 5200 W Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 246-1311 zenvibeyoga.com

GAINESVILLE JUNIOR GOLF TOUR 2942 SW 68th Ln. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 332-2154 gjgt.org

Youth Athletics ACES IN MOTION (352) 514-9975 acesinmotion.org BALANCE 180 6527 NW 18th Drive Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 340-1180 balance180.org BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF ALACHUA COUNTY myboysandgirlsclub.com NORTHWEST UNIT 2661 NW 51st St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 373-6639 WOODLAND PARK UNIT 1900 SE 4th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 377-8003 FLORIDA TEAMCHEER 3500 NE Waldo Rd., Suite B Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 222-9977 ftcgators.com

GAINESVILLE JUNIORS VOLLEYBALL 12895 NW US-441 Alachua, FL 32616 (352) 871-2418 gainesvillejuniorsvolleyball.com GAINESVILLE SOCCER ALLIANCE 14100 NW 32nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32606 gainesvillesoccer.org GAINESVILLE STRIDERS TRACK CLUB (352) 281-2630 gainesvillestriders.org GAINESVILLE YOUTH BASEBALL (352) 251-3247 gainesvilleyouthbaseball.com GAINESVILLE YOUTH SOCCER, INC. 614 NE 5th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 377-1714 gainesvilleyouthsoccer.net GAINESVILLE YOUTH LACROSSE gainesvilleyouthlax.com

FLORIDA TRACK CLUB floridatrackclub.org

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Youth Athletics (cont.) GATORBALL BASEBALL ACADEMY 3401 NW 143rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 514-4414 gatorballtraining.com GATOR SWIM CLUB 250 Gale Lemerand Dr. Gainesville, FL 32611 gatorswimclub.com GIRLS ON THE RUN OF ALACHUA COUNTY (352) 318-7831 alachuagotr.org GIRLS PLACE, INC. 2101 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 373-4475 girlsplace.net I9 SPORTS i9sports.com DIAMOND SPORTS PARK WEST GAINESVILLE 4000 SW 122nd St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 283-8586 KANAPAHA MIDDLE SCHOOL WEST GAINESVILLE 5005 SW 75th St. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 283-8586 GAINESVILLE TENNIS ACADEMY 1001 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 376-8250 gainesvilletennisacademy.com

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O2BKIDS! o2bkids.com O2BKIDS! SUPERCENTER 6680 W Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 332-5500 O2BKIDS! MIDTOWN 1555 NW 23rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 374-2202 O2BKIDS! HUNTERS CROSSING 4929 NW 43rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 371-4202 O2BKIDS! ARCHER ROAD 3989 SW 37th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-8838

O2BKIDS! ALACHUA 14400 NW 152nd Ln. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-0092 SUN COUNTRY SPORTS CENTER suncountrysports.com WEST LOCATION 333 SW 140th Terrace Jonesville, FL 32669 (352) 331-8773 MILLHOPPER LOCATION 4010 NW 27th Ln. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 378-8711 UPWARD SPORTS 10000 W. Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 333-7700 westsidebaptist.org/upward.html

YOUTH COMBINE youthcombine.org WESTSIDE PARK 1001 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 888-7882 NORTHEAST PARK 501 NE 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 888-7882 VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK 7400 SW 41st Pl. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 888-7882


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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

FE RIVER SANTA

River Rise Preserve State Park SANTA FE

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Spring

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ALACHUA COUNTY

Outdoor Hotspots Devil’s Millhopper State Park

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Outdoor Activities Abound For many people, having an active lifestyle is an important part of choosing where they live. For residents in the Greater Gainesville area, there is no better place to be active and spend some time outdoors. Gainesville offers residents a variety of outdoor recreational activities, including hiking, horseback riding, tubing, scuba diving, cave diving, cycling, kayaking and exploring. 2 0 4 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


The variety of trails allows residents to experience the tropical, Southern scenery and natural wonders that Gainesville has to offer, whether you’re taking a light stroll on date night or looking for an intense workout. Parks, such as San Felasco Hammock Preserve State Park, Kanapaha Botanical Gardens and Morningside Nature Center, give people the opportunity to observe local wildlife in their natural habitats. Many of the parks are free and pet-friendly. For residents who just can’t seem to stay away from the water, Florida has the largest concentration of freshwater springs in the nation. Most are located right in the heart of Greater Gainesville. Poe Springs Park and Ginnie Springs allow visitors to experience various aquatic activities such as scuba diving and tubing. Relax and socialize with friends and family as you float in the Ichetucknee Springs, which remain a crisp, 72 degrees year-round. What is fascinating about these springs is that many of them have provided researchers with fossils and remains that have allowed them to uncover much about Florida’s natural history. Activities such as stargazing, hiking, horseback riding and cycling are all available at Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park. This 21,000acre park is home to 20 biological communities and over 300 species of birds. A 50-foot-tall observation tower allows visitors to see the entire park at once. Visitors especially enjoy cycling through the trails and watching the sun set. Some even stay late to watch the stars in the night sky — the viewing area is a popular place to observe meteor showers. Aside from an abundance of sunshine, Gainesville’s endless outdoor activities provide residents with opportunities to learn about local wildlife. The Bat Houses at the University of Florida are home to 400,000 bats that help protect yards, gardens and farms from pesky mosquitoes. The University provides information for residents to see how the bats’ presence help the biological community. And the Florida Museum of Natural History’s butterfly exhibit holds over 50 butterfly and moth species with information on each. Whether you are hoping to enjoy some rigorous activities or just spend some leisure time with a loved one, Greater Gainesville has an outdoor destination for you.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Natural

Springs Greater Gainesville and the surrounding areas have a vast selection of crystal clear natural springs to enjoy with the whole family.

A beautiful part of Greater Gainesville’s natural wildlife, Ginnie Springs boasts clear blue water and familyfriendly activities.

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* ALEXANDER SPRINGS 49525 County Road 445 Altoona, FL 32707 (352) 669-3522 floridasprings.org

JUNIPER SPRINGS 26701 FL-40 Silver Springs, FL 34488 (352) 625-/3147 juniper-springs.com

RAINBOW SPRINGS 19158 SW 81st Place Road Dunnellon, FL 34432 (352) 465-8555 floridastateparks.org/rainbow-springs

BLUE SPRINGS 7450 NE 60th St. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-1369 floridastateparks.org

K.P. HOLE 9435 SW 190th Avenue Rd. Dunnellon, FL 34432 (352) 489-3055 kphole.com

RUM ISLAND SPRINGS COUNTY PARK 1447 SW Rum Island Terr. Fort White, Florida 32038 www.naturalnorthflorida.com/ things-to-do/rum-island-springs

GINNIE SPRINGS 5000 NE 60th Ave. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-7188 ginniespringsoutdoors.com

OTTER SPRINGS 6470 SW 80th Ave. Trenton, FL 32693 (352) 463-0800 ottersprings.com

ICHETUCKNEE SPRINGS 12087 SW US Hwy 27 Fort White, FL 32038 (386) 497-4690 floridastateparks.org/ichetucknee-springs

POE SPRINGS 28800 NW 182nd Ave. High Springs, FL 32643 (352) 374-5245 visitgainesville.com

SALT SPRINGS 13851 Hwy 19 N. Fort McCoy, FL 32134 (352) 685-2048 recreation.gov SILVER GLEN SPRINGS 5271 FL-19 Salt Springs, FL 32134 (352) 685-2799 recreation.gov

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

2 0 1 9

List of Parks and Recreation Areas

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Performers entertain visitors at Depot Park. A wide variety of activities take place at the park, including festivals and live music.


Recreation & Neighborhood Parks ALACHUA LIONS CLUB DOWNTOWN PARK 15120 Main St. Alachua, FL 32615 ALBERT “RAY” MASSEY (WESTSIDE) PARK 1001 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 A.N.N.E. PARK 6310 NW 28th Ter. Gainesville, FL 32653 ARCHERY RANGE WACAHOOTA 1200 SW Williston Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 ALAN HITCHCOCK THEATRE PARK 14900 Main St. Alachua, FL 32615 CATHERINE TAYLOR PARK 18100 SE Douglas St. High Springs, FL 32643 CEDAR GROVE PARK 1201 NE 22nd St. Gainesville, FL 32641 CITIZENS FIELD 1000 NE Waldo Rd. Gainesville, FL 32601 CIVIC RECREATION CENTER & PARK 19107 NW 240th St. High Springs, FL 32643

COPELAND PARK 7020 NE 27th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609

HAISLEY LYNCH PARK 450 S Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601

MONTEOCHA PARK 803 NW 192 Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609

CYNTHIA MOORE CHESTNUT PARK & CLARK BUTLER NATURE PRESERVE 2315 SE 35th St. Gainesville, FL 32641

HAL BRADY RECREATION COMPLEX 5100 NW 142nd Ter. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-1610

NORTHEAST 31ST AVE. PARK 1700 NE 31st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609

DEPOT PARK 874 SE 4th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 393-8510

HAMPSTEAD PARK SW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32608

EAST PARK 24505 Newberry Ln. Newberry, FL 32669 FEIRMON E. WELCH PARK 13801 NW 142nd Ave. Alachua, FL 32615 FRED CONE PARK 2841 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 GERALD CRISWELL PARK 15490 Hipp Way Alachua, FL 32615 GROVE PARK 6300 SE 152 St. Hawthorne, FL 32640 GREEN ACRES PARK 643 SW 40th St Gainesville, FL 32607 GREENTREE PARK 3700 NW 19th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 HAILE VILLAGE CENTER PLAYGROUND 5100 SW 91st Ter. Gainesville, FL 32608

HATHCOCK COMMUNITY CENTER 15818 NW 140th St. Alachua, FL 32615 HAWTHORNE ATHLETIC PARK 6000 SE 205 St. Hawthorne, FL 32640

NORTHEAST COMPLEX 1400 NE 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 NORTHEAST PARK 400 NE 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 NORTHSIDE PARK 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32653 OAK HILL PARK NW 42nd Ave. & NW 9th St. Gainesville, FL 32609

HIGH SPRING SPORTS COMPLEX 19499 N W 238th St. High Springs, FL 32643

PHOENIX PARK 2611 SW 31st Pl. Gainesville, FL 32608

JAMES PAUL PARK 23718 W US Hwy. 27 High Springs, FL 32643

POE SPRINGS PARK 28800 NW 182nd Ave. High Springs, FL 32643

KANAPAHA VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK 7400 SW 41st Place Gainesville, FL 32608

POSSUM CREEK PARK 4009 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32653

KIWANIS CHALLENGE PARK 2002 NW 36th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 KIWANIS/GIRL SCOUT PARK NW 8th St. & 8th Pl. Gainesville, FL 32601 LINCOLN PARK 924 SE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32641

ROPER PARK 401 Block NE 2nd St. Gainesville, FL 32653 SHARMIE FAR PARK 321 NW 10th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 SKINNER FIELD 15120 Main St. Alachua, FL 32615

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

SMOKEY BEAR PARK 2300 NE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32609 SPLASH PARK 14300 NW 146th Ter. Alachua, FL 32615 SPRINGHILL PARK 918 SE 5th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 SWEETWATER PARK 500 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 T.B. MCPHERSON PARK 1717 SE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 TIOGA TOWN CENTER PLAYGROUND 105 SW 128th St. Newberry, FL. 32669 TUMBLIN’ CREEK PARK 600 SW 6th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 WALDO MOTORSPORTS PARK 16258 NE US Hwy. 301 Waldo, FL 32694 WALTER HOWARD PARK 18651 NW 250th St. High Springs, FL 32643 WOODLAWN PARK 1900 SE 4th St. Gainesville, FL 32641

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Nature Parks

DOGWOOD PARK & DAYCARE 5505 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 335-1919

29TH ROAD NATURE PARK 1502 NW 29th Rd. Gainesville, FL 32605

DUVAL PARK 520 NE 21st St. Gainesville, FL 32641

ALFRED A. RING PARK 1801 NW 23rd Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32605

EARL P. POWERS PARK 5910 SE Hawthorne Rd. Gainesville, FL 32641

BARR HAMMOCK 14920 SE 11th Dr. Micanopy, FL 32667

FEIRMON E. WELCH PARK 13801 NW 142nd Ave. Alachua, FL 32615

BIVENS ARM NATURE PARK 3650 S Main St. Gainesville, FL 32608

FLATWOODS CONSERVATION AREA 2010 NE 31st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609

BOULWARE SPRINGS NATURE PARK 3300 SE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32641

GAINESVILLE SOLAR WALK 3349-3399 NW 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605

BROKEN ARROW BLUFF NATURE PARK 5724 SW 46th Pl. Gainesville, FL 32608

GUM ROOT NATURE PARK 7300 NE 27th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609

CLEAR LAKE NATURE PARK 5480 SW 1st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607

HOGTOWN CREEK HEADWATERS NATURE PARK 1500 NW 45th Ave. Gainesville, FL 3260

COFRIN NATURE PARK 4810 NW 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605

JOHN MAHON NATURE PARK 4300 W Newberry Rd. Gainesville, FL 32607

COLCLOUGH POND NATURE PARK 2315 S Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601

KANAPAHA BOTANICAL GARDENS 4700 SW 58th Dr. Gainesville, FL 32608

DEVIL’S MILLHOPPER GEOLOGICAL STATE PARK 4732 Millhopper Road Gainesville, FL 32653

LAKE ALTO NORTH PRESERVE 14512 Co Rd 1471 Waldo, FL 32694

LAKE ALTO TRAIL 17800 NE 134th Pl. Waldo, FL 32694 LAKE WAUBURG North Park 133 Regatta Dr. South Park 312 Whitehurst Rd. Micanopy, FL 32667 LITTLE ORANGE CREEK NATURE PARK 24115 SE Hawthorne Rd. Hawthorne, FL 32640 LOBLOLLY WOODS NATURE PARK 3315 NW 5th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 LOCHLOOSA CREEK PHIFER FLATWOODS 12909 SE Hawthorne Rd. Hawthorne, FL 32640 LOIS FORTE PARK 25842 NW 3rd Ave. Newberry, FL 32669 MARJORIE KINNAN RAWLINGS HISTORIC STATE PARK 18700 S County Road 325 Cross Creek, FL 32640 MAUDE LEWIS PARK 15731 NW 141 St. Alachua, FL 32615 MORNINGSIDE NATURE CENTER 3540 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 MILL CREEK NATURE PRESERVE NW County Road 236 Alachua, FL 32615


NEWNANS LAKE CONSERVATION AREA 8635 NE 69 Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 O’LENO STATE PARK & RIVER RISE 410 Dogwood Trail High Springs, FL 32643 PALM POINT NATURE PARK 7401 Lakeshore Dr. Gainesville, FL 32641 PAYNES PRAIRIE PRESERVE STATE PARK 100 Savannah Blvd. Micanopy, FL 32667 SAN FELASCO PARK 6400 NW 43th Way Gainesville, FL 32606 SAN FELASCO CONSERVATION CORRIDOR 13851 NW 126th Terrace Alachua, FL 32615 SAN FELASCO HAMMOCK PRESERVE STATE PARK 12720 NW 109 Lane Alachua, FL 32615 SPLIT ROCK CONSERVATION AREA SW 20th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32607 SPRINGTREE PARK 2700 NW 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32605 SWEETWATER WETLANDS PARK 325 SW Williston Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 WATERMELON POND 10700 SW 250th St. Newberry, FL 32669

Community Centers ALBERT “RAY” MASSEY WESTSIDE RECREATION CENTER 1001 NW 34th St. Gainesville, FL 32605 CLARENCE R KELLY COMMUNITY CENTER 1700 NE 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 EASTSIDE COMMUNITY CENTER 2841 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MULTIPURPOSE CENTER 1028 NE 14th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 MLK NEWBERRY COMMUNITY CENTER 25515 NW 6th Ave. Newberry, FL 32669 PORTER’S COMMUNITY CENTER 512 SW 6 Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 ROSA B. WILLIAMS/ UNION ACADEMY 524 NW 1st St. Gainesville, FL 32601 GAINESVILLE/ ALACHUA SENIOR RECREATION CENTER 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 265-9040

T.B. MCPHERSON CENTER 1717 SE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 334-2188 THELMA A. BOLTIN CENTER 516 NE 2nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601

EASTON NEWBERRY SPORTS COMPLEX 24880 NW 16th Ave. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-2388 EVERGREEN CEMETERY 401 SE 21st Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 393-8535

Cultural & Special Facilities

IRONWOOD GOLF COURSE 2100 NE 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 393-8500

ALACHUA COUNTY FAIR GROUNDS 3100 NE 39th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609

MILL CREEK FARM 20307 NW County Rd. 235A Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-1001

ARCHER COMMUNITY CENTER 16671 SW 137th Ave. Archer, FL 32618 BO DIDDLEY PLAZA 111 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 CARSON ROBERTS SPORTS COMPLEX 702 Eestaulkee Ave. Micanopy, FL 32667 CHAMPIONS PARK 24617 SW 30th Ave. Newberry, FL 32669 DEEP SPRINGS FARM 16419 W County Rd. 1491 Alachua, FL 32615 DUDLEY FARM HISTORIC STATE PARK 18730 W Newberry Rd. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-1142

TENCH ARTIST BUILDING 115 S Main St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 377-8660 HISTORIC THOMAS CENTER & GARDENS 602 NE 6th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 393-8532 SANTA FE COLLEGE TEACHING ZOO 3000 NW 83rd St., Building Z Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 395-5603 WACAHOOTA FARM 1223 SW 136th Place Micanopy, FL 32667 (352) 538-3290 WILHELMINA JOHNSON RESOURCE CENTER 321 NW 10th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 372-0216

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Pools ANDREW R. MICKLE, SR. POOL AT T. B. MCPHERSON PARK 1717 SE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 334-2190 DWIGHT H. HUNTER (NORTHEAST) POOL 1100 NE 14th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 334-2191 H. SPURGEON CHERRY (WESTSIDE) POOL 1001 NW 31st Dr. Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 334-2187

Museums A. QUINN JONES MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER 1013 NW 77th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 334-2010 www.aqjmuseum.org/about-a-quinnjones/ ARCHER RAILROAD MUSEUM 16994 SW 134th Ave. Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-1044 BUTTERFLY RAINFOREST 3215 Hull Rd. Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 846-2000 floridamuseum.ufl.edu/exhibits/butterfly-rainforest/

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DUDLEY FARM HISTORIC STATE PARK 18730 W Newberry Rd. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-1142 www. friendsofdudleyfarm.org

MICANOPY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM 607 NE Cholokka Blvd. Micanopy, FL 32667 (352) 466-3200 micanopyhistoricalsociety.com

FLORIDA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 3215 Hull Rd. Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 846-2000 f loridamuseum.ufl.edu

THOMAS CENTER GALLERIES 602 NE 6th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 393-8532 historicthomascenter.org

HARN MUSEUM OF ART 3259 Hull Rd. Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 392-9826 harn.ufl.edu HAWTHORNE HISTORICAL MUSEUM 7225 SE 221st St. Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-4491 HIGH SPRINGS HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM 120 NW 2nd Ave. High Springs, FL 32643 (352) 514-3300 highspringsmuesum.org HISTORIC HAILE HOMESTEAD 8500 SW Archer Rd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 336-909 hailehomestead.org MATHESON HISTORY MUSEUM 513 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 378-1246 mathesonmuseum.org

MOTHER LUCILLE PERKINS TOT LOT 318 SW 7th Pl. Gainesville, FL 32601 TOT LOT #2 SE 9th St. & SE 8th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 TOT LOT #4 424 NW 6th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Tot Lots BARBARA HIGGINS PARK (TOT LOT #5) 1352 SE 2nd St. Gainesville, FL 32601 C.F. FRANKLIN MEMORIAL PARK (TOT LOT #1) NE 4th Ave. & NE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32601 DOLLIREE BOWENS (TOT LOT #9) 820 NW 4th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 NW 5TH AVE. PARK SEMINARY TOT LOT 1007 NW 5th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 PLEASANT PARK (TOT LOT #3) 508 NW 2nd St. Gainesville, FL 32601 HIDDEN GEM TOT LOT NW 32nd Pl. & 20th Ln. Gainesville, FL 32605

FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.cityofgainesville.org/ParksRecreationCulturalAffairs.aspx highsprings.us/parks-recreation/ parksfield-locations/ www.cityofalachua.com/index.php/ recreation-department www.ci.newberry.fl.us/parksrec/ page/parks


Your Local Libraries The Alachua County Library District’s goal is to provide all community members with free, open and equal access to education, information and entertainment. To that end, the ACLD provides services to approximately 250,000 citizens in Alachua County, with 12 branch locations, two bookmobiles and multiple deposit collections.

Online sources are available 24/7 from the ACLIB website at aclib.us. Additionally, libraries and bookmobiles offer free WiFi and access to internet-connected computers. Library cardholders can borrow books in multiple formats, and check out DVDs, CDs and book club kits. Members can also reserve a computer or a meeting/study room at most locations. Other services include the eBooks and audiobooks, magazines and even music to download. Additionally, you search online eSources to research family history, investments or car repair instructions, learn a foreign language or a software program, even access a tutor for help with homework. Local libraries provide quality programs, including Storytimes, art, yoga and language-learning classes, one-on-one computer instruction and many more opportunities for all ages. New and innovative offerings include MAKERspaces and STEAM programs to introduce new technologies, such as 3D printing. The programs also provide equipment such as sewing machines to learn sewing, and cooking demonstrations to share healthy recipes, cooking tips and more. Collaborations with community organizations, agencies and local businesses expand programs and services’ efficiency to offer tax preparation assistance, job fairs and health and wellness programs. Library staff offer specialized expertise and assistance across the county.

* Mission:

Locations:

Core Values:

ALACHUA BRANCH 14913 NW 140 St. Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 462-2592 aclib.us/alachua

HAWTHORNE BRANCH 6640 SE 221 St. Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 481-1920 aclib.us/hawthorne

ARCHER BRANCH 13266 SW State Rd. 45 Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-3367 aclib.us/archer

HEADQUARTERS LIBRARY 401 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 334-3900 aclib.us/headquarters

–––––––––––– Alachua County Library District: a key to building a better community by creating opportunities to participate, connect and discover.

–––––––––––––––––– The Library District values diversity of people and ideas, free and equal access, excellent and innovative service and an open exchange of ideas.

––––––––––––––– Check websites for branch hours.

CONE PARK BRANCH 2801 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 334-0720 aclib.us//cone-park

LIBRARY PARTNERSHIP BRANCH 912 NE 16th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 334-0165 aclib.us/library-partnership

HIGH SPRINGS BRANCH 23779 W US Hwy 27 High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-2515 aclib.us/high-springs

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

10 Aerial view of the The Coca-Cola Orlando Eye, one of the newest attractions in Orlando and the largest observation wheel on the East Coast.

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Destinations Within Driving Distance


When it’s time for vacation, people all over the world picture sandy beaches, palm trees swaying in the breeze and color schemes that gently scream “tropical paradise.” For those of us lucky enough to live in Florida, we can choose a destination that fits this exact description and can get there in under four hours.

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

#2: Jacksonville Beach

#1: St. Augustine Time’s Money.com rated St. Augustine No. 1 Best in Travel on its Best U.S. Destinations 2017. The Spanish city is the oldest city in North America and there are several historical sites to discover. The Castillo de San Marcos, a Spanish fort that is more than 315 years old, and the Colonial Quarter give visitors a feel for St. Augustine’s rich Spanish history. Another popular landmark is the Oldest Wooden School House. According to tax records, the school was present in 1716, making it the oldest wooden schoolhouse in the country. In addition to family-friendly activities, such as beaches and the Pirate and Treasure Museum, tourists can visit The Fountain of Youth to explore history and drink from the famous springs. visitstaugustine.com

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While the beach is certainly the main attraction, the area has much more to offer in outdoor adventure. For a different type of water fun, visit Shipwreck Island Waterpark, a family-friendly venue with slides, waterfalls and more. Near Oceanfront Park is the University of North Florida’s Seaside Sculpture Park, which is free and full of sculptures created by UNF students. Castaway Island Preserve is another adventure. This intercoastal sanctuary offers an afternoon of fun with an observation deck, education center, boardwalk and butterfly garden. If you need a break from the sun, try the Rhoda L. Martin Cultural Heritage Center or take a quick 20-minute drive to downtown Jacksonville to cool off. jacksonvillebeach.org


#3: Cedar Key Located on the Gulf of Mexico with a population of less than 700, this quaint, old-fashioned town offers beaches and natural preserves that showcase wild Florida. Relax by throwing a line out at one of Cedar Key’s great fishing locations. To learn more about the history surrounding this part of Florida, visit Cedar Key Museum State Park. According to VisitFlorida. com, “It’s easy to find a tasty clam chowder and a cold brew in Cedar Key. The people smile and wave and the police drive spiffed-up golf carts.” Other activities include birdwatching, kayaking, fresh seafood and beautiful sunsets. visitcedarkey.com

#4: Amelia Island This barrier island has long been a beloved destination for visitors and residents alike and consistently ranks among the top 10 U.S. Islands on Condé Nast’s Reader’s Choice Awards. Visit Fernandina Beach, peruse the various galleries and boutiques and end the trip with a drink from the oldest bar in Florida, the Palace Saloon. Looking for some educational fun? Check out the Civil War reenactments and other live interpretations of life in the 1860s at Fort Clinch State Park. Amelia Island State Park is another great destination. The park offers shelling, kayaking, fishing and guided horseback riding along the shore. End the day with one of the island’s sunset sails. ameliaisland.com

#5: Savannah, Georgia About three and a half hours north of Gainesville is the coastal city of Savannah. This pedestrian-friendly city boasts an innovative urban design with majestic architecture and quaint cobblestone streets. Savannah is great for visitors any time of the year, offering a wide variety of entertainment including art exhibits, live music, food festivals, Civil War reenactments and even ghost tours. Also be sure to visit the 100-acre Bonaventure Cemetery and stroll the winding paths or have a picnic. For beer lovers there are breweries to tour, but if other spirits are more to your liking, check out the Ghost Coast Distillery, Savannah’s first operational distillery since before Prohibition. www.savannah.com

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

#6: St. Petersburg St. Petersburg, Florida, currently holds the title of “most consecutive days with sunshine” at 768 days. In addition to the multitude of sunny days, the city is known for its art culture. One of the most popular art museums is the Salvador Dalí Museum, which houses the largest collection of Dalí’s work outside of Spain. The city is home to several other art centers such as the Chihuly Collection and the Morean Arts Center. St. Pete also has a lively beer culture. A craft beer trail with more than 30 craft breweries extends from Tarpon Springs to St. Petersburg. The area also offers praised beaches, such as Fort De Soto Park. Covering more than 1,136 acres on the Gulf of Mexico and Tampa Bay, visitors can enjoy paddling, fishing, nature trails, a historic fort and museum. visitstpeteclearwater.com

#7: Weeki Wachee An unusual sight can be found in Weeki Wachee: an underwater mermaid (and merman) show. The Weeki Wachee Springs State Park hosts the show in a submerged 400-seat auditorium. Human mermaids have been performing at Weeki Wachee, also known as “The Only City with Live Mermaids,” for more than 60 years. The water is so clear that limestone walls 100 feet away from the theatre’s glass windows are easily visible. In addition to a one-of-a-kind show, the springs offer riverboat cruises, kayaking, paddle boarding and camps for both adults and children. weekiwachee.com

#8: Ocala Hollywood has used Ocala’s beautiful freshwater springs and rolling hills in movie productions. Close to Ocala is the Silver Springs State Park, one of the largest artesian springs in the world. Known for its glass bottom boat rides, the park also offers swimming, kayaking, canoeing and special event productions. Try The Canyons Zip Line and Canopy Tours to get your adrenaline pumping as you zip past countless oak trees. With more than a mile of zip lines, the tours can take two to three hours. Or you can enjoy a horseback tour. For a slow-paced adventure, catch a double feature at Ocala’s Drive-In Theater, one of the few remaining drive-in theaters in the country. ocalamarion.com

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#10: Cumberland Island, Georgia #9: Orlando There is a reason Orlando is a popular choice for vacations: there’s so much to do! The city is home to several amusement parks including Walt Disney World, SeaWorld and Universal Orlando Resort. Orlando also offers a great art culture scene, pristine, challenging golf courses, kid-friendly activities such as Madame Tussauds Orlando and the Orlando Science Center, an incredible view of the city from the 400-foot Coca-Cola Orlando Eye, an exciting night life with spots like ICEBAR Orlando and several parks and lakes that showcase natural Florida. visitorlando.com

Those who love outdoor adventure should visit this barrier island off the southeast coast of Georgia. A trip to Cumberland Island begins with a relaxing ferry ride from St. Marys, Georgia. With a variety of activities to choose from, exploring Cumberland Island can be fast or slow paced. Rent one of the island’s bikes and travel the grounds, or enjoy a walk on the beach while you go shelling. Some of the island’s sightseeing opportunities include the Dungeness Ruins, which are the remains of a mansion built by Thomas Carnegie; the First African Baptist Church, where John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bessette were married; and Plum Orchard, the only Carnegie mansion open to public tours. Visitors are also allowed to camp on the island, which features wild horses that roam freely. cumberlandisland.com

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Culture, Leisure & Recreation

Why Greater Gainesville?

Brian Jose

Director, University of Florida Performing Arts

–––––––– CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE IN 2015 ––––––––

What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? I tell anyone that will listen to me that,“Gainesville punches way above its weight when it comes to the arts.” And I mean it! I’ve lived in Pittsburgh, Phoenix, Columbus, and DC, all places with much higher population concentrations, and their culture scenes have nothing on Gainesville. In my line of business that is pretty important. Further, the Florida Natural History Museum, the Harn Museum of Art, and UF College of Arts are all national leaders in their fields. Lest we forget about the excellent faculty and facilities that Santa Fe College offers North Central Florida. There’s the National Touring company DanceAlive and the Gainesville Orchestra that call our fair city home. Add in jazz night at Leonardo’s and Francesca’s, JestFest and the Spring and Fall Arts Festivals, the Bulla Cubana Arts Festival, and you see my point. What is something you wish you knew before moving here? Here is what you need to know before moving to Gainesville: purchase or rent close to campus and downtown. With so many arts and cultural offerings, not to mention the abundance of top-shelf, locally owned restaurants, you’ll have easy access to the creativity that makes this city so special. Patty and I have four children, and living close to town gives them a great experience as well. We are never bored! What is your favorite local food? Root & Pecker for healthy food and pizza. The Top to entertain artists after the show. Volcanic Sushi for, well, sushi. Fresco in Haile. And Antonio’s in Micanopy for a change of scenery. Oh yeah, Blue Water Bay in Melrose is the bomb, and lastly, Backstreet Blues for fresh oysters from both coasts.

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Kathleen Joseph

Owner, Kathleen Joseph & Associates, LLC

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CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE IN AUGUST 2002 WHEN SHE STARTED UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES AT UF

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What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? I knew I wanted to be a Gator due to the options that the University of Florida offered to me. I came from a high school in Pompano Beach, FL that stressed the importance of pursuing academic excellence after high school. When I learned about UF, and the programs that it offered to minority students, I knew that Gainesville would be the new home for me. I think the better question is what kept me in Gainesville after my studies. Toward the end of my undergraduate years, I really began to become involved with the Greater Gainesville community and continued this after I graduated and into today. What I found was people who were really invested in the betterment of this community while preserving the warmth and charm that makes Gainesville feel like home to me. I love that the citizens in this community are active and invested in social growth. I love that there are so many opportunities to create change. And I love that this community is responsive to the type of change that creates a better Gainesville for future generations. What is something you wish you knew before moving here? I wish I had a better appreciation for college athletics before moving here! Growing up in a big city like Fort Lauderdale where professional sports are king, I didn’t get as much exposure to the magic of a college home team. Since moving to Gainesville and attending the University of Florida, I’ve really taken on what it means to be a Gator and am drawn to the passion of the Gator fans. It is great to be a Florida Gator! Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. A morning walk at the Sweetwater Wetlands Park followed by brunch with friends at Civilization. In the fall, staying home to watch a Florida football game with friends, and in the spring, going out to the O’Connell Center to watch a Women’s Basketball game with my Girls Place family followed by snacks and drinks at Mark’s Prime Steakhouse.


Why Greater Gainesville?

Joe Cirulli

Mary Wise

Owner and President, Gainesville Health & Fitness

Gator Volleyball Head Coach

Rebel Support Leader, Nerd Fitness

It all started with a set of Mighty Mouse weights when I was nine years old and I have been hooked on health and fitness ever since. Fast forward 10 years and I found myself in Gainesville visiting a friend and quickly fell in love with the city and the community. I knew I wanted to own a gym and now I knew it was to be in Gainesville. From the moment I arrived here, I noticed the small community feel in a large university setting, giving Gainesville the best of both worlds. The people were nice, the geography beautiful, and, of course, there were no New York winters. Gainesville gave me the opportunity to be an entrepreneur in an industry that I love. With the support of the business community, the residents and everyone around me, I was able to realize my dream of owning a fitness company, Gainesville Health & Fitness. I have worked all of my life, along with my staff, to inspire the Gainesville community to get fit and healthy. We have just completed a four year, multi-million dollar renovation and expansion project to bring Gainesville the most innovative fitness trends. All of our focus and resources are committed to Gainesville for healthier individuals, families, companies and community. A health and fitness mindset is part of the Greater Gainesville culture; it’s the way we do things around here. There are many opportunities to stay active, including fitness facilities, walking and biking trails, parks, pools, courts, clubs, leagues, worksite wellness initiatives and activity-based events almost every weekend. The Greater Gainesville region is where cool things happen from fitness and recreation, health care and agriculture to the arts. We are happy to be part of it.

So much of a coach’s job — and success — is based on recruiting. How successful can we be convincing 15 and 16-year-olds (yes, that’s how early we recruit) to make the most important decision up to this point in their lives and choose the University of Florida? Sure, we recruit to our brand:

CAME TO GAINESVILLE IN JUNE OF 2004 TO ATTEND UF

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– Winners amongst Winners – The best of both: Academics and Athletics – Preparation for the next level – Family Atmosphere – And for the Northerners, we just might mention the great weather. But, there is also one important piece in describing the UF experience and why it can be so special: Greater Gainesville. We tell the recruits and their families to choose UF and be part of a diverse community where sports are pretty darn important but so are the arts, the food and the environment. This is a community where you will WANT to return as an alum. You will enjoy seeing all that looks the same, but you will also enjoy seeing the changes in a vibrant community that is always trying to get better. There’s a reason so many former Gator athletes live in the region: We did a great job recruiting, but so did the Greater Gainesville region. It might appear that life in Greater Gainesville centers around the Gators, but in fact, the Gators are built around this community. Now, will you commit?

Brittany Ferguson –––––––– ––––––––

What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other options? The University offered the degree and specific track for editing that I was pursuing, and I knew that a degree from UF would stand out to future employers. The campus and town also reminded me of my hometown in Norman, OK where the University of Oklahoma is located, which also helped influence my decision. Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. I always have a hard time picking one thing to do on some weekends, so here it goes: Wake up and get a breakfast sandwich from Ward’s to pair with a homebrewed coffee while sitting under the shade at The Duck Pond; head out to La Chua for a couple hours and wander off on the side trails; check out the Gainesville Indie Flea at Depot Park (during the hotter summer months it’s been at the Wooly); grab a bite from Humble Pie or Pop a Top General Store; enjoy some wine or sangria at the Boxcar while listening to music; get in a walk around the Depot trail right at sunset.

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Quality of Life in Greater Gainesville — 224 — Gainesville: An Award-Winning Community

— 227 — Religion in Greater Gainesville

— 228 — Community Supported Agriculture

— 232 — Why Retire in Greater Gainesville?

— 234 — Senior Resources & Activities

— 236 — History of Alachua County

Greater Gainesville is far from a sleepy, small town. Small town qualities, however, such as a strong sense of community and caring for thy neighbor are everpresent within the area. Service and giving back are cornerstones of the community and contribute to a better quality of life in Greater Gainesville. When individuals are serving to improve the whole, everyone benefits. Whether involvement is with a non-profit or in a house of worship, taking action is always one step away. There are over 500 houses of worship in Greater Gainesville. Faith, for some, shapes their quality of life. Greater Gainesville is a higher-than-average volunteering community with hundreds of charities and non-profits that rely on volunteers and community giving to help make a difference. The Heart of Florida has many attributes that make it a top choice for retirees and families. The cost of living, diverse cultural and recreational offerings and access to health care at North Florida Regional Medical Center and UF Health make it a top contender when it comes to quality of life.

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Quality of Life

Gainesville An Award-Winning Community

Retired couple walking their dog and enjoying the Florida weather.

Millhopper Road, designated a Historic and Scenic highway, is one of the most beautiful roads in Greater Gainesville. Take a drive or ride your bike on this wandering two lane road with oak trees and Spanish moss hanging over the roadway.

The Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts presents some of the most established and emerging national and international artists on the main stage.

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Depot Park, a signature city park located downtown, provides an excellent outdoor space for The Allied Capoeira League of Gainesville to practice.

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Gainesville has been recognized by high-profile media groups, such as Forbes, Gallup and Business Insider, for its incredible opportunities and quality of life for residents. The area has proven to be a premier destination for people of all ages. Whether you’re a student, a parent or a retiree, Gainesville has something for everyone. Here are just some of the recognitions awarded to our community over the years.

No. 29 on “Top 50 Bike-Friendly Cities” 2016 If you’ve ever walked the streets of Gainesville, chances are you’ve seen someone zooming by on their bicycle. That’s because the city strives to be as bike-friendly as possible. Bicycling magazine lists Gainesville’s unconventional system of urban trails and notes how it stands out from other bike cities in the United States. The trails connect alleyways, parks and paved paths, allowing bike commuters to breeze through the city. There are many bike shops that offer maintenance and rentals for low prices. The Gainesville Cycling Club features a diverse group of cyclists including commuters, sight-seeing groups, tandem riders, and amateur bike racers. The club also organizes regular picnic and social events for its members. Each year the club hosts the Gainesville Cycling Festival, a two-day event that incorporates the Santa Fe Century and Horse Farm Hundred that raises more than $15,000 for a local charity (The Boys and Girls Club of Alachua County).

No. 38 - 2018 Top 100 Best Places to Live Gainesville was ranked No. 38 out of 100 for one of the Best Places to Live by Livibility.com. In addition to Gainesville being an education hub, the economy remains robust because of sectors like agriculture, IT, life sciences, manufacturing, tourism and transportation. Livibility.com also noted perks such as the city’s health care rating, which was boosted by easy access to Shands HealthCare and North Florida Regional Medical Center, as well as a variety of housing options and price points available throughout the community. It also cited the weather, offering a year-round mild climate, and a lower cost of living than the national average.

“25 Best Places to Retire in 2013” Choosing where to retire can be a big decision. Retirees may want to find a place that offers tranquility and activities without breaking the bank. Gainesville made the cut because of its low cost of living and no state income tax. The city also offers many benefits for retirees looking to escape the cold winds and higher cost of living up north. Residents age 60 and older can enroll in courses at the University of Florida at no cost on a space-available basis. In addition, the Institute for Learning in Retirement at Oak Hammock, a retirement community affiliated with the University of Florida, offers an extensive roster of courses, many of them taught by university professors. (Seniors don’t have to live in the community to participate.)

No. 2 on “Most Environmentally Friendly Cities 2016 Not only does Gainesville offer a beautiful outdoor landscape, but the people in this community are actively working to preserve it. For this study, ValuePenguin looked at the most environmentally friendly cities in America, using 15 data points from 11 sources, and Gainesville came in at No. 2.

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Quality of Life

Other Notable Awards

The Florida Museum of Natural History is the State of Florida’s official state-sponsored and chartered natural history museum.

• Tree City USA, National Arbor Day Foundation, annually since 1984 • Livability.com, No. 9 “Top 100 Best Places to Live,” 2018 • Livability.com, No. 9 “Best College Towns,” 2018 • Zippia, No. 1, “Best City in Each State to Start Your Career,” 2018 • US News & World Report, No. 8 “Best Colleges,” 2018 • WalletHub.com, No. 12 “Best Midsize Sports City,” 2018 • Livability.com, No. 15 “Best Cities for Entrepreneurs,” 2017 • Niche.com, No. 14 “Best Places to Retire in Florida,” 2017 • Niche.com, No. 48 “Best Cities to Live in America,” 2017 • American Institute for Economic Research, No. 14 “Employment Destinations Index,” 2016 Goodcall.com, No. 75 “‘Best Cities for Black Entrepreneurs,” 2015 • Business Insider, No. 16 “Top 20 Small Cities for American College Students,” 2015 • NerdWallet, No. 31, “Best Places for Women-Owned Businesses,” 2015 • fDi Intelligence, No. 4 “American Cities of the Future – Human Capital and Lifestyle Category,” 2015 • Livability.com, No. 67 “Best Beers in the Best Cities,” 2015 • WalletHub.com, “Best Midsize College City in America,” 2015 • FiveThirtyEight.com, No. 14 “Top Public Transit Cities,” 2014 • Movoto.com, No. 5 “Top Ten Best Places to Live in Florida,” 2014 • Business Insider, No. 6 “Top Ten Cities with the Fastest Growing Incomes in America,” 2013 • MSN.com, “Best College Town for Adult-Job Seekers,” 2013 • NerdWallet.com, No. 1 “Top Ten Cities on the Rise,” 2013 • Amazon.com, No. 8 “Well-Read Cities,” 2012 • PARADE Magazine, No. 6 “Hardest Working Cities i n America,” 2012 • The Atlantic Cities, No. 17 “America’s Leading Creative Class Metros,” 2012 • Gallup, No. 8 “Gallup’s U.S. City Well-Being Index,” 2010 • Livability.com, “Ten Amazing Local Farmers Markets,” 2010 • Men’s Health Magazine, “Best Places to Work Out,” 2010 • Forbes Magazine, No. 50 “Best Places for Businesses and Careers,” 2009 • Forbes Magazine, No. 22, “America’s Smartest Cities,” 2008 • Frommer’s, No. 1, “Cities Ranked and Rated, Second Edition,” 2007

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First Butterfly City in the Nation, 2009 Over 60 butterfly and moth species interact in a rich tropical environment in the Florida Museum of Natural History’s Butterfly Rainforest. Because of this, The Butterfly Education Project awarded Gainesville the nation’s first Butterfly City Certification. The exhibit practices a form of sustainable agriculture that helps protect natural forests from destruction. The species and the landscape change regularly, offering an educational experience for all ages. Similarly, Gainesville was ranked as a Tree City in 2014 by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. These certifications are among the first steps taken to promote eco-tourism in the community.

“Where to Live Next” 2008 In addition to a low cost of living and easy access to health care, the Smithsonian also lists Gainesville’s growing art scene as part of the reason it should be your new place to live. Downtown Gainesville hosts a number of art fairs, most notably the Downtown Festival and Art Show and the Spring Arts Festival. Gainesville is also home to The Hippodrome State Theatre. The Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, located near the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art and the Florida Museum of Natural History, hosts a variety of music and theater acts from all over the world. Gainesville’s restaurants offer seasonal and organic options for all types of cuisines, while free shows and concerts add to the city’s nightlife and family activities.


Religion in Greater Gainesville Gainesville is alive with many faiths and religions. With over 100 different houses of worship, there is a place for everyone to celebrate their faith. There are more than 10 Christian denominations offered in the area, from Episcopal to Pentecostal. Gainesville is also home to one of the largest Islamic Centers in North Florida and the largest Hare Krishna Temple outside of India, according to the Hoda Center website. Conservative, traditional, reform, or any other group of religious individuals can find a community of worship in the Greater Gainesville area. Gainesville’s places of worship are accepting and strive to make a strong community. Gainesville Baptist Church is rooted in the scripture and the teachings of the Bible. The church begins its Sunday services with songs of worship and then the lead pastor, Brad Noble, gives his sermon. The church offers a children’s ministry, a youth ministry, a couple’s ministry, a men’s and women’s ministry and a senior adults’ ministry. Greenhouse Church, with its five locations, brings together Christians from throughout Greater Gainesville, with campuses in the Northwest, Northeast, Southwest and East areas of Gainesville. They also offer Sunday night services on the University of Florida Campus. According to its website, the church strives to create community in Gainesville, create thoughtful and devoted followers of Jesus and to love people. Why green? Church members envision their devotion (worship) toward God with the color yellow and their devotion toward people with the color blue. Together this makes green, and they call people to live in this green reality of the Kingdom of God. The Islamic Center of Gainesville, Inc. is a Florida non-profit corporation devoted to communication with others on the message of Islam. The center, located on University Avenue near the UF campus, was built for any type of religious, educational and charitable activities. Gainesville is also home the Hoda Academy of Quranic Studies, the largest Islamic Center in North Central Florida. Established in 1999, the Hoda Center is located by the Sweetwater Wetlands Park. The center’s goal is to guide others in the teaching of the Quran and the Prophet Muhammad. It also serves the growing Muslim community in Gainesville with weekly Friday prayers and a Sunday school for children, which is held between September and May. The center also gives back to the Gainesville community with an organic garden, a food pantry and a free medical clinic. Alachua Hare Krishna Temple offers the opportunity to explore Bhakti yoga. The yoga practice is a loving service to Krishna, or God. The philosophy of the Hare Krishna movement is rooted in ancient

Churches In Our Area

Vedic texts, including the Bhagavad Gita, which contain essential teachings on how to achieve the highest perfection of life. This Temple serves over 500 families on a 127-acre property 20 minutes north of Gainesville, making it the largest Hare Krishna community outside of India. The Temple hosts a daily meditation program in the morning and traditional ancient ceremonies are performed six times a day. The temple offers arts and pottery classes, yoga classes, the Holi Festival of Colorsand music lessons. The Hare Krishnas also serve food to 2,500 people at weekly Sunday open house programs. Congregation B’nai Israel helps the Gainesville community deepen its connection to Judaism. With about 100 attendants at its weekly services, this synagogue offers a more conservative service of teachings to Northeast Gainesville. Rabbi David Kaiman leads the congregation by establishing core values, including community, pursuit of justice, studying the Torah, practicing Mitzvot and having a covenant with God. There are weekly services on Fridays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays at 9:30 a.m. A major tenant of the congregation is social action projects that give back to the community. Jenifer Petrescu, executive director of the congregation, said that the congregation hosts holiday drives and serves food twice a month at the St. Francis House. Temple Shir Shalom expresses the values of Reform Judaism, inclusion and Jewish education in their services. The temple holds evening services on the first Friday each month at 6:30 p.m. and all other Fridays at 7:00 p.m. Temple Shir Shalom also hosts an active sisterhood organization, adult education, a youth group and a religious school, which takes place every Sunday during the school year. The Unitarian Universalism Fellowship of Gainesville is open to people of all religious faiths. The Unitarian Universalist (UU) website describes its congregation as a “diverse religious community committed to lifelong spiritual growth and service to each other, our own community and the earth.” UU congregations include agnostics, theists and atheists among their membership. This liberal church is the only Unitarian Universalist congregation in Alachua County and serves the entire Greater Gainesville area, with the addition of other regional cities like Starke, Ft. White and Chiefland. The diversity of worship in Gainesville reflects a community with a wide array of faiths. There are more religious centers than those listed here, so whether you call Gainesville home or are here visiting, you are certain to find a place of worship for your beliefs.

50 Baptist

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7

Catholic

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6

Episcopal

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4

Lutheran

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2

Jehovah’s Witnesses Churches

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9

Methodist

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12

Non-Denominational

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5

Orthodox

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4

Pentecostal

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4

Synagogues ––

1

Church of Scientology

in Ocala ––

4

Mosques

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Quality of Life

Community Supported Agriculture I N G R E AT E R G A I N E S V I L L E

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People nationwide are developing healthier lifestyles, looking to reconnect with the source of their food and buy locally grown, organic products. In Greater Gainesville, people are following the national trend by participating in community supported agriculture projects hosted by local farms. Each project invites members of the community to become shareholders of a farm. For a full season of growing, participants each receive a basket of organic, seasonal produce like arugula, mushrooms and potatoes each week in return for their investments in the farm.

Greater Gainesville is home to three farms that offer this service: Swallowtail Farm, located north of Alachua; Frog Song Organics, located in Hawthorne; and Siembra Farm, located in Southeast Gainesville. By joining a CSA, shareholders have the opportunity to support sustainable agricultural practices, strengthen the local economy and develop relationships with the food they eat and the people who grow it.

Greater Gainesville Farmers Markets ALACHUA COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET | 441 MARKET 5920 NW 13th St. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 371-8236 Saturdays 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. 441market.com HAILE VILLAGE FARMERS MARKET 5213 SW 91st Terrace, Gainesville, FL 32608 Saturdays 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Hailefarmersmarket.com HIGH SPRINGS FARMERS MARKET 115 NE Railroad Ave. High Springs, FL 32643 (352) 275-6346 Thursdays 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. fb.com/farmersmarkethighsprings

UNION STREET FARMERS MARKET Bo Diddley Community Plaza 111 E University Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (386) 462-3192 Wednesdays 4 p.m.– 7 p.m. unionstreetfarmersmkt.com WALDO FARMERS AND FLEA MARKET 17805 US Hwy 301 Waldo, FL 32694 Saturdays and Sundays 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (352) 468-2255 waldofleamarket.com WIC FARMERS MARKET AT THE ALACHUA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT 224 SE 24th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 Fridays 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. (early April to early October)

KEYSTONE HEIGHTS FARMERS MARKET The Natural Park, State Road 21, 555 S. Lawrence Blvd. Keystone Heights, FL 32656 Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

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Greater Gainesville’s Community Gardens: DREAMERS GARDEN – THE GROVE STREET NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY GARDEN 404 NW 10th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 258-1238 GREEN ACRES COMMUNITY GARDEN Green Acres Park 700 Block and SW 40th St. Gainesville, FL 32607 HIGH SPRINGS COMMUNITY GARDEN: DOWNTOWN DEMONSTRATION PLOTS James Paul Park High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-3304 McRORIE COMMUNITY GARDEN Corner of SE 4th Ave. & SE 6th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32601 NE 31ST AVENUE COMMUNITY GARDEN 1700 NE 31st Ave. (within NE 31st Avenue Park) Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 373-7314 PORTER’S COMMUNITY CENTER GARDEN 512 SW 6th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 SW 40TH PLACE AND SW 30TH TERRACE COMMUNITY GARDEN 2947 SW 40th Place Gainesville, FL 32608

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ORGANIC GARDENS COOPERATIVE 2617 SW 23rd Ter. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-6103

Pick Your Own BIOGERA ORGANIC Fruits and Vegetables 4088 W State Rd. 235 Alachua, FL 32615 (214) 213-9594 biogera.com BLUEBELA FARMS LLC Blueberry Farm 7650 NE 40th St. High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-3116 fb.com/bluebelafarm BLUEFIELD ESTATE WINERY Muscadine Grapes, Blueberries and Wine 22 NE CR 234 Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 337-2544 bluefieldestatewinery.com

DEEP SPRING FARM Blueberries 16419 W CR 1491 Alachua, FL 32615 (352) 507-8128 deepspringfarm.com GAINESVILLE BLUEBERRY & ORGANIC FARM Blueberries, Strawberries, Seasonal Vegetables 1621 SE 15th St. Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 222-0246 ROGER’S FARM 3831 NW 156th Ave. Gainesville, FL 32609 (386) 462-2406 Rogersfarmfl.com SOUTH MOON FARMS Organic Blueberry Farm 15912 S CR 325 Hawthorne, FL 32640 (352) 466-0105 Upickblueberriesgainesville.com


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Quality of Life

Why Retire In Greater Gainesville Greater Gainesville is a friendly community with abundant trees, parks, fine dining restaurants and art venues, offering a peaceful haven for seniors to enjoy their golden years.

According to the United States Census Bureau, as of July 2017, an estimated 13.6 percent of the population in Alachua County are 65 or older. That’s more than 36,000 people! To accommodate the needs of this growing segment of the population, there are many senior centers to choose from in Gainesville. The many options are too numerous to list, and they range from special-focused living facilities to art and sports programs. While not an exhaustive list, below are some of the prominent senior living centers in Greater Gainesville.

Senior Living in Greater Gainesville The Village at Gainesville has created a retirement lifestyle with its residents in mind – one that offers a superb living experience and a thoughtful combination of maintenance-free living and services, conveniences and amenities that complement an already engaging retirement environment.

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Tucked away on spacious North Florida acreage, The Village offers the natural beauty of the small ponds, tall pines and native live oaks. In addition, the location of its campus is only 10 minutes from major shopping malls, theaters and restaurants. Residents of The Village benefit from recreational activities, cultural events and more while still enjoying a historically rich, relaxing community. “Better living, by design” captures its commitment to innovative senior living, creating an environment that helps improve the life of every resident, every day, which requires smart, innovative thinking all over its campus. From their partnership with Santa Fe College for encouraging lifelong learning, to their Vitality Program that focuses on helping residents live healthier and more independently, you’ll find examples of “Better living, by design” all over the campus. The residents at Oak Hammock take academic classes, work out in a 20,000-square-foot gym, and are active volunteers in the Gainesville community. No, they’re not college students — these residents are seniors ranging from 60 to 90, said Jeffrey Hagen, Oak Hammock’s CEO. “We’d like Gainesville to know about this jewel of a community, tucked away in the woods,” Hagen said. Oak Hammock began when University of Florida alumni and faculty members proposed an idea to bring other alumni back to Gainesville and encourage retirees to stay in the community, Hagen added. Located in southwest Gainesville, Oak Hammock has 269 independent living residences that include 212 apartments and 57 villas and club homes on 136 beautiful acres. Although UF alumni made up many of the initial residents, an affiliation with the university is not required for prospective residents to live there. The community challenges traditional notions of retirement with extensive learning and physical fitness opportunities. Included in their monthly fee, residents can enjoy expanding their education through the Institute for Learning in Retirement. The ILR offers a diverse range of courses taught on-site, on a variety of subjects, such as Shakespeare, current events and medical issues. Oak Hammock also provides transportation for residents to go to Gator games, the performing arts center or any spot downtown, so they do not have to worry about parking. In addition to an art studio and active gallery, residents can channel their creative abilities into other forms of expression, such as the stained-glass studio or the on-site woodworking shop.


Oak Hammock also offers more than 40 different clubs to appeal to all interests. Residents can join a travel club, genealogy club or book club to socialize and stay engaged. The comradery, social opportunities and active lifestyle attract new residents to the Oak Hammock community. As residents age, they are guaranteed additional care, should they need it. This way, residents do not have to worry about leaving their Oak Hammock family or finding health care elsewhere. “We offer what’s called a Life Care Contract, where we promise them should they need a higher level of care as they age that it will be provided for them,” Hagen said. “We provide a peace-of-mind level of care for our members.” The Atrium, located in northwest Gainesville, provides many amenities, such as a heated lanai pool, chef-prepared meals and a variety of activities to enrich the social lives of the retiree, according to its website. Residents can enjoy playing bridge in the community room, or join the garden club, which offers growing plots. Additionally, the patio and campus are ideal for barbecues or walks. The Windsor of Gainesville is one of the newest and largest senior living centers in the area. This facility is not only an assisted living center, but also a memory care residence for those who might need extra services. The Windsor built its foundation on specific fundamental concepts essential to each resident, according to Legend Senior Living’s website. Some of these concepts include: supporting the needs of family and friends, providing a supportive residential environment, giving choices to each resident for their care, services and lifestyle, fostering residents’ independence and more. The Windsor also provides opportunities for new hobbies, cultural events, education, religion and trips. The Senior Recreation Center, located on NW 34th Boulevard, is a part of UF Health and has partnerships with the City of Gainesville and ElderCare of Alachua County. This center is not a living center, but a recreation and activity center where the staff coordinates programs for the seniors. This center serves as an example of a multi-service senior center, offering a variety of opportunities that meet the needs of all members — from the youngest baby boomers to the oldest seniors and their caregivers. ElderCare of Alachua County runs the dayto-day operations of the center. Recreation opportunities include health education, physical fitness activities, nutritional services, preventative screenings, arts and cultural activities, social and volunteer opportunities and more. ElderCare of Alachua County, also a part of UF Health, is a 100 percent grant- and

Oak Hammock at the University of Florida is a Greater Gainesville retirement community committed to lifelong learning, fitness and health.

donation-funded agency in Gainesville, according to UF Health’s website. The mission of this agency is to “advocate for the elderly and provide services that will build capacity, maximize independence, and enrich the quality of life for the seniors in Alachua County and North Central Florida.” The grants and donations given to ElderCare help provide meals at six sites in the county and home-delivered meals to seniors who are homebound. ElderCare also provides services such as Al’z Place, which is a daycare for Alzheimer’s patients. ElderCare also provides free lunch to attendees and offers the Tree Town Bridge

Club, which meets on the first and third Friday of each month at the Albert “Ray” Massey Recreation Center. The bridge activities are free and open to the public. The City of Gainesville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs department offers a wide range of programs for seniors throughout the city. These city-sponsored events promote good health for older adults. One example is the Active Senior Day Program, which occurs every weekday from 8:30 a.m. until noon and offers a variety of activities including arts and crafts, movies, board games, bingo, guest speakers, exercise and more.

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Senior Resources A list of senior resources and recreation centers in Greater Gainesville. Members can stay fit and healthy at the Senior Recreation Center by using the onsite gym.

Adult Club Sports ATRIUM AT GAINESVILLE 2431 NW 41st St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 261-0858 fb.com/AtriumatGainesvilleRetirementCommunity BROOKDALE GAINESVILLE SOUTHWEST 1001 SW 62nd Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 378-3838 brookdale.com

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HARBORCHASE OF GAINESVILLE 1415 Fort Clarke Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 614-0005 harborchase.com

OAK HAMMOCK AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 5100 SW 25th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 548-1000 oakhammock.org

SOUTHWEST RETIREMENT HOME INC. 3207 SW 42nd Place Gainesville, 32608 (352) 338-0252 southwestretirementhome.com

HUNTER’S CROSSING PLACE 4601 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 338-7500 www.enlivant.com/communities/ www.enlivant.com/communities/ florida/hunters-crossing-placegainesville/

PALM GARDEN OF GAINESVILLE 227 SW 62nd Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 331-0601 palmgardenofgainesville.com

THE VILLAGE AT GAINESVILLE 8000 NW 27th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 224-9338 thevillageonline.com

PLANTATION OAKS 23301 W Highway 27 High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-0801 poslhs.com

THE WINDSOR OF GAINESVILLE 3605 NW 83rd St. Gainesville, FL 32606 (352) 372-1900 Legendseniorliving.com

MISTY MEADOWS 103 NW 298th St. Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-2820


Recreation and Activity Centers SENIOR RECREATION CENTER 5701 NW 34th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32653 (352) 265-9040 ufhealth.org/senior-recreation-center THELMA BOLTIN SENIOR ACTIVITY CENTER 516 NE 2nd Ave. Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 334-2103

Senior Resources

Zumba class is a favorite activity at the Senior Recreation Center, often filled with over 100 members.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF RETIRED PERSONS (AARP) 1-888-687-2277 aarp.org

AMERICAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION (800) 342-2383 diabetes.org

ASTHMA AND ALLERGY FOUNDATION (800) 727-8462 www.aafa.org

AARP CHAPTER SERVICES (352) 284-7606 aarp.org

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION (800) 257-6941 ext.8168 heart.org

BENEFITS CHECKUP benefitscheckup.org

ADULT PROTECTIVE SERVICES (800) 962-2873 myflfamilies.com ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (352) 372-8091 northcentralflaa.org ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION (800) 272-3900 alz.org AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY (352) 376-6866 cancer.org

AMERICAN LIVER FOUNDATION 786-864-1100 liverfoundation.org AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION (800) 586-4872 lung.org ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION 1-844-571-4357 arthritis.org

ELDER ABUSE HOTLINE (800) 222-8000 EPILEPSY FOUNDATION OF AMERICA (800) 332-1000 epilepsy.com ELDERCARE LOCATOR (800) 677-1116 ncea.aoa.gov THE LEGAL CENTER FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES & OLDER PEOPLE (303) 722-0300 thelegalcenter.org

MEDICARE (800) 633-4227 medicare.gov NATIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS FOUNDATION (800) 231-4222 nof.org NATIONAL SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION (800) 772-1213 ssa.gov REPORT MEDICAID FRAUD (800) 447-8477 oig.hhs.go UNITED OSTOMY ASSOCIATION (800) 826-0826 ostomy.org

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Quality of Life

a u h c Ala nty Cou History of

Alachua County history is filled with colorful characters who left their mark on everything from education to medicine. JOANNA TALBOT | MATHESON MUSEUM

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Native Americans and Early Settlers The name Alachua comes from the area’s first settlers, the Timucuan Indians. Sinkholes, such as the Great Sink in the Alachua Savannah (now Paynes Prairie), were called “chua” and mapmakers eventually began naming the area “Allachua” or “Lachua.” After Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto’s Mick-E-No-Pah, Tribe Chief year of destruction and plunder in 1539, Catholic priests and Franciscan missionaries from St. Augustine traveled to the interior with the hopes of converting the Native Americans to Christianity. By 1655, missions included a large cattle ranch, Rancho de la Chua, on the northern edge of the Alachua Savannah. The area changed hands among the Spanish, French and English over the next 281 years until Spain ceded Florida to the United States in 1821. Alachua County, created in 1824, stretched from the Georgia border to the Gulf of Mexico as far south as Port Charlotte. Early settlers established towns such as Hogtown, Micanopy, Newnansville and Gainesville. The 1850s saw the arrival of families, including the Baileys, Hailes, Chesnuts, Thomases and Mathesons. Main Street Train

Railroads

Gainesville Courthouse Square North Side. Circa 1870

Chartered in 1853, David Yulee’s Florida Railway proposed to connect Fernandina with Cedar Key and Tampa – which eventually occurred. The proposed route bypassed the county seat, Newnansville, so the county commission moved the county seat to the newly named Gainesville. The first railroad arrived in Gainesville in 1859, and Downtown Gainesville became a center of agriculture and industry. Railroads led to the founding of the towns of Waldo, Archer, Hawthorne, Melrose, Campville and Rochelle.

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Quality of Life

industry was replaced by the phosphate mining industry. During the 1890s, Gainesville’s Dutton Phosphate Co. shipped over half the state’s phosphate. From the 1930s to the 1950s, the oil industry took off. During World War II, 90 percent of all the tung oil shipped in the U.S. came from Alachua and Bradford counties.

Paynes Prairie ecotourism

Minority Communities

Natural Spaces In addition to bringing trade and industry, the railroads brought tourists. The two biggest draws were Devil’s Millhopper and Alachua Sink at Paynes Prairie. In the 1880s, tourists came to Alachua Sink to enjoy paddle boats that showed off natural scenes and wildlife. In 1891, the natural drain under the sink became unplugged and the lake disappeared.

Agriculture and Industry Crops grown here have included corn, beans, tobacco, cotton, sugar, indigo and citrus. Vast orange groves were planted in the 1880s. By 1894, six million barrels of fruit were shipped to market. Big freezes decimated the industry and the groves moved farther south. The citrus

Train passing through orange grove

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Sarah’s Restaurant

Prior to the Civil War, a large population of slaves lived and worked on the area plantations. After the Civil War, the African-American population nearly tripled and outnumbered the white population. African-American businesses and communities thrived, centered mainly around the Pleasant Street and Porter’s Quarters neighborhoods in Gainesville. Florida’s first black congressman, Josiah T. Walls, who lived in Alachua County, served from 1870-1876. The state’s election laws of 1889 almost completely disenfranchised black voters. In 1914, Chestnut Funeral Home, one of the county’s oldest businesses, was founded. Gainesville was on the Chitlin’ Circuit, a collection of venues featuring African-American performers. Gainesville stops included Sarah’s Restaurant and the Cotton Club, which is now being renovated.


One of the sinks on Paynes Prairie, showing the remains of old steamer.

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Quality of Life

Medicine

East Florida Seminary Class of 1900

After the Civil War, Alachua County welcomed its first Jewish citizens, including Moses Endel, who opened a dry goods store on the courthouse square in Gainesville. In 1872, a Jewish cemetery that still exists was established at the corner of University Avenue and Waldo Road.

Education The Gainesville Academy, a private school founded in 1858 by James Henry Roper, served both male and female students. After becoming a state senator, Roper offered the

buildings and land to the state if the East Florida Seminary, founded in Ocala in 1852, would move to Gainesville. In 1877, the East Florida Seminary moved. In 1866, the Freedmen’s Bureau established Union Academy in Gainesville to serve the African-American community. It eventually included a normal school to train teachers. Its last principal was A. Quinn Jones. After Union Academy closed in 1923, Jones became the principal of its replacement, Lincoln High School, which closed with desegregation in 1970. After much lobbying by local leaders, the state legislature in 1905 chose the city as the location for the new consolidated men’s university to be known as the University of Florida.

Since the mid-1800s, Greater Gainesville’s warm climate and the area’s natural springs attracted people suffering with various ailments. Dr. Dr. Robert Robb Robert Robb and his wife, Dr. Sarah Robb, moved to Gainesville in 1882 to give Robert a chance to recover from tuberculosis. He helped establish the Odd Fellows Home & Sanitarium (which treated tuberculosis), and Sarah became the county’s first female doctor – known for making house calls in her horse and buggy. In 1928, the county’s first major public hospital, Alachua General Hospital, was opened. It served patients until it merged with Shands HealthCare in 1996 and eventually closed in 2009. The University of Florida’s medical school opened in 1956, and Shands Hospital opened in 1958. North Florida Regional Medical Center opened in 1973. The Matheson History Museum  offers original exhibitions and programs on a variety of topics in local and Florida history. The museum is free and open to the public (donations are encouraged), Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 513 E University Ave., Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 378-2280 | mathesonmuseum.org fb.com/mathesonhistorymuseum twitter.com/mathesonmuseum

Dr. Sarah Robb with horse and buggy in front of the Robb House ca. 1900

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Why Greater Gainesville?

Barzella Papa

Deidra Dodd

President & CEO, Community Foundation of North Central Florida

Council Director, Girls on the Run of Alachua County

CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE FROM THE WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA IN 1999

CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE AS A CHILD IN 1983

What is something you wish you knew before moving here? That I would eventually live in flipflops and love it!

What is your favorite local food? While there is so much great food in Gainesville to choose from, my current favorite food is from the Cilantro Tacos food truck, which invariably leads me to find it at one of the local breweries in town.

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Where do you go to escape into nature? Definitely the water – boating or sitting on the beach, I love to be near the water. There’s something calming about the waves. When friends or family come to visit, where is the first place you take them? We have so many wonderful parks and trails, I usually take guests on an outdoor adventure. Whether we climb Devil’s Millhopper or feed horses at Mill Creek Farm or watch the bats emerge for the evening, we take advantage of great weather and head outdoors when friends or family visit.

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Where do you go to escape into nature? I love to visit Mill Creek Farm, acres and acres of field devoted to retired horses. On Saturdays with the admission of two carrots, Mill Creek Farm is a wonderful escape into nature. With 335 acres, my family loves to walk the farm as well as feed and interact with the horses. Describe your ideal day in Greater Gainesville. My ideal day would be a day in October, waking up on a brisk, cool Saturday morning, lacing up the shoes and going on a run, watching my girls play in a soccer game, then heading out to Mill Creek Farm in Alachua with my family, carrots in tow for admission, to feed and spend time together with the horses on the farm. When leaving Alachua, stopping by Mi Apa for some yummy café con leche, and have dinner together.

John Barli ––––––––

Regional Director, Catholic Charities CAME TO GREATER GAINESVILLE IN THE FALL OF 1974 TO ATTEND UF.

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What about Greater Gainesville stood out when comparing it to your other choices? As with many college students, I started working in the restaurant business to supplement those student loans, and that afforded me the opportunity to meet more of the “locals.” I could not believe how nice and genuine the people I met were. I knew this was the place I wanted to stay. My part-time job as a dishwasher at the Brown Derby on southwest 13 Street led to a career in the restaurant business; after finishing school, I became the general manager. That job eventually took me away from Gainesville and I was relocated nine times all over the state of Florida, but I kept coming back to the place I had fallen for as an 18-year-old. One of the things that drew me back to Gainesville was the faith-based community; I first became exposed to it when I was attending church while in college. Coming back to Gainesville to open Carrabba’s Italian Grill in 2001, I became more involved with a number of churches and charities. I am always amazed at what a giving community we have – people so willing to give, not only of their treasures, but their time and talents. Where do you go to escape into nature? There is no better way to spend a day than paddle boarding the Santa Fe River from Rum Island. It is so peaceful, my mind drifts to those original explorers who ventured over from St. Augustine – the sounds of the students tubing at Ginnie Springs bring me back to reality. What better way to end a day on the river than dinner and drinks at the Great Outdoors? When friends or family come to visit, where is the first place you take them? When you have season tickets to Gator Football, fall becomes visitor time – visiting friends for tailgates at Norman Field, the Union North Lawn and J.J. Finley, and for real nostalgia start it all off at Lillian’s Music Store downtown, where Tom still remembers everyone’s name and drink of choice.

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Why Greater Gainesville? Rebecca Martin Nagy

Director Emerita at Harn Museum of Art, UF January 21, 2019 to present

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Sixteen years ago, when my husband Paul and I moved to Gainesville from Raleigh in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park, we felt we had made the right decision, even though it was difficult to tear ourselves away from that beautiful state. Indeed, we soon fell in love with Gainesville and within a short time decided that, wherever our careers might take us, we would retire here. After 16 years as director of the Harn Museum of Art at the University of Florida, I’m a new retiree, whereas Paul still works as an executive at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa. When he retires, commuting will be behind him and Gainesville will be his full-time home as well. Like so many of our friends who have chosen to retire here, we love the environment of a college town where being around thousands of young people helps us to remain open-minded and progressive. The University of Florida and Santa Fe College provide boundless opportunities to enjoy stellar lectures, concerts, theatrical performances, exhibitions and athletic competitions. Community venues round out the plethora of offerings for live theater and music, museum exhibitions and art festivals and for learning about the rich history of our region by visiting the Matheson History Museum, Historic Haile Homestead, Marjorie Kinnan Rawling’s Cross Creek, the Cotton Club Museum and other fascinating sites. Paul and I enjoy hot weather, so even Florida’s steamy summers are fun for us. For those who swelter in the heat and humidity, the area offers crystal clear springs and beautiful public swimming pools for cool dips, as well as lovely lakes and rivers for swimming and boating. Located in the center of the state, we are buffered from the full force of tropical storms and hurricanes, but the Gulf and Atlantic coasts are close enough for day trips or weekend getaways. For horse-lovers the region is a mecca, and for non-equestrians the rolling hills of horse country offer delightful escapes for driving or bicycling excursions. Some retirees prefer a rural lifestyle and choose one of the area’s charming, historic small towns for the ideal combination of idyllic surroundings in proximity to the amenities of the city. Gainesville itself has wonderful old neighborhoods as well as new developments accessible to paths that make it convenient to walk or bike to cultural venues, parks, farmers markets, restaurants and shops. We live in the historic Duck Pond neighborhood and can walk to many of our favorite downtown haunts in just minutes. Early morning walks to Depot Park are a highlight of my flexible retirement schedule. In the heart of downtown, the park is a major attraction for residents of the entire Greater Gainesville region, offering nature walks, birdwatching, concerts, food and drink, and the amazing new Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention. We are grateful for the excellent health care facilities and professionals available to us in Greater Gainesville. However, our goal in retirement is to stay healthy, mentally and physically, through taking full advantage of the mild climate, beautiful parks, recreational facilities, cultural amenities and libraries, as well as the many opportunities for productive engagement in the community through volunteering. For all these reasons, although we have worked and traveled the world over, we choose Gainesville as our home.

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Getting Settled in Greater Gainesville — 244 — Moving Tips for Sellers

— 253 — Alachua County DMV Services

— 254 — Emergency Contacts Numbers

— 255 — Voter Information and Civic Engagement

— 257 — Pet Services in Greater Gainesville

As we wrap up this Guide to Greater Gainesville, we leave you with valuable information to help new residents get settled. Moving is overwhelming, but getting to know the area and who to contact doesn’t have to be a frightening task. From utilities to DMV information to pet services, there is someone to help you get adjusted. To make sure you’re ready for the move, check our list of moving tips to find advice for what to do in each segment of your move. You will also find a list of DMVs, a voter’s guide, helpful numbers and an introduction to transportation in the region. Let us help you get settled in Greater Gainesville!

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Getting Settled

Moving Tips for Sellers No matter how organized you think you are, when you’re moving out of your house, it’s almost always a stressful time. Here are a few tips that can help you prepare.

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Two Months Prior to Moving Day: If you are using a mover, get a few estimates from moving companies. If you are moving yourself, get quotes from at least two truck rental companies. Choose a mover (or truck rental company). Make an inventory of your household goods and begin to remove clutter (start with basement, attic, garage and other storage areas). Start a file for all of your moving paperwork (estimates, receipts, etc). Arrange to transfer school records. Get your new home ready – contact painters, carpenters, plumbers, roofers, etc., so your home is ready when you arrive. Remember to change the locks on all the doors in your new home.

Six Weeks Prior to Moving Day: Obtain and fill out post office change-of-address cards. Make arrangements for storage if necessary. Ask your doctor or health plan provider for referrals, and obtain all medical records (if moving out of the area). Clean all closets and drawers. Start using foods and cleaning supplies that can’t be moved.

Four Weeks Prior to Moving Day: Schedule disconnection of all utility services at your old home, and connection of them at your new home. Be sure to disconnect the day after you leave and connect the day before you arrive. If you have “last month” deposits with services, such as the telephone company, request your refund.

materials and start packing items you won’t need after you arrive at your new house. Arrange for cleaning and repair of furniture, drapes and carpeting. Check with your insurance company to see how your possessions are covered during transit. Collect your important records. Gather personal and family records, including medical and dental, veterinary and school records; legal and financial documents; birth certificates, passports and insurance documents.

Three Weeks Prior to Moving Day:

a checkbook, credit cards, personal phone book, ID, flashlight, keys, toiletries, tools, paper plates, cups, towels, travel alarm clock, aspirin, bandages and games for the kids. Also, pack a suitcase with clothing and other personal items.

One Day Prior to Moving Day: Disconnect and prepare major appliances for the move. Set aside anything that will travel in your car so it will not be loaded on the truck. Pack a box of items that will be needed first at the new house. Clearly mark this box “Load Last.”

Properly dispose of items that cannot be moved, such as flammable liquids.

Obtain cash or traveler’s checks for the trip and to pay the movers.

Prepare auto registration for transfer (if moving to another state).

Confirm arrival time of your moving van/truck.

If you are moving in or out of an apartment, arrange for use of the elevator.

If moving yourself, dismantle beds and other large furniture.

Make child-care arrangements for moving day. Hold your moving sale.

Two Weeks Prior to Moving Day: Decide what to do with anything that didn’t sell at your moving sale (Dispose? Keep? Donate?) Return any borrowed items (including library books) and retrieve any loaned items. Cancel newspaper delivery. Notify creditors of your move. Transfer prescriptions and be sure you have an adequate supply of medications on hand (if moving out of the area). Assemble a file folder of information to leave for the new owner of your home. Change your address. One week before your move, send change-of-address cards to everyone who will need to contact you.

If you are moving yourself, reserve a rental truck.

Pick up laundry. Laundry tickets are easy to misplace, so ask for your things by name and not just by the receipts you have.

If you are packing yourself, obtain packing

Pack a travel kit: Put aside critical items like

Moving Day: If using a mover, be sure someone is at the old house to answer questions. Note all utility meter readings. Read your bill of lading and inventory carefully before signing. Keep this paperwork in a safe place.

Delivery Day: Check your belongings carefully and note on the inventory paperwork any damaged items. On an interstate move, be prepared to pay the driver before your possessions are unloaded. Supervise unloading and unpacking. Be prepared to pay your mover with cash, certified check, or traveler’s checks unless other arrangements have been made in advance.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 24 5


Getting Settled

Gainesville UTILITIES: Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434 Clay Electric Cooperative................................................................(352) 473-8000 Department of Public Works..........................................................(352) 334-5070

gru.com clayelectric.com cityofgainesville.org/PublicWorks.aspx

CABLE/INTERNET: Cox Communications .......................................................................(352) 672-6083 AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 338-3696 DIRECTV..................................................................................................(855) 802-3473 Windstream Communications.......................................................(800) 347-1991 Dish Network.........................................................................................(877) 678-0210 SVIC Internet & Computers............................................................(352) 490-5433

cox.com att.com directv.com windstream.com Dish.com svic.net

DMV SERVICES: Alachua County Tax Collector - Northwest Branch...........(352) 374-5236 Alachua County Tax Collector - Downtown Branch...........(352) 374-5236 Transportation Department............................................................(800) 749-2967

alachuacollector.com alachuacollector.com Fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Gainesville Police Department....................................................................(352) 955-1818 UF Health ER..........................................................................................................(352) 733-0111 University of Florida Police Department..............................................(352) 392-1111

gainesvillepd.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center police.ufl.edu

GRU Emergency Power Failure:...................................................................................................(352) 334-2871 Water & Wastewater Issues: .................................................................(352) 334-2711 Natural Gas Leak: .........................................................................................(352) 334-2550

gru.com/Home/NeedHelp/EmergencyRepairs.aspx

Alachua County Sheriff’s Department...................................................(352) 367-4000 Alachua County Fire Rescue.......................................................................(352) 384-3101 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER........................................(352) 415-4439

alachuasheriff.org www.alachuacounty.us/ nfrmc.com/service/emergency-care

Alachua UTILITIES: Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434 Alachua City Water Treatment......................................................(386) 462-1084 Alachua County Household Waste.............................................(352) 334-0440 Alachua Utilities....................................................................................(386) 418-6145 Clay Electric Cooperative................................................................(352) 372-8543

gru.com cityofalachua.com alachuacounty.us cityofalachua.com clayelectric.com

CABLE/INTERNET: Cox Communications.........................................................................(800) 234-3993 Dish Network.........................................................................................(800) 333-3474 DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Windstream Communications.......................................................(800) 347-1991 Exede.........................................................................................................(844) 753-9199 Earth Link.................................................................................................(866) 383-3080

24 6 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

cox.com dish.com directv.com windstream.com exede.com earthlink.net


DMV SERVICES: Alachua County Tax Collector .....................................................(352) 374-5236 Transportation Department............................................................

alachuacollector.com (800) 749-2967

fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua Police Department............................................................(386) 462-1396 Alachua County Sheriff’s Department.......................................(352) 367-4000 UF Health ER ........................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER.............................(352) 333-4000 Alachua County Fire Department ...............................................(352) 384-3101

cityofalachua.com/index.php/police-department alachuasheriff.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com www.alachuacounty.us/Depts/PublicSafety/Pages/fr.aspx

GRU Emergency Power Failure: .................................................................................(352) 334-2871 Water & Wastewater Issues: ...................................................(352) 334-2711 Natural Gas Leak: .........................................................................(352) 334-2550

gru.com/Home/NeedHelp/EmergencyRepairs.aspx

Alachua County Animal Services.................................................(352) 264-6870

alachuacounty.us/Depts/animalServices/Pages/AnimalServices.aspx

Archer UTILITIES: Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434 The Department of Public Works.................................................(352) 495-2880 Duke Energy...........................................................................................(800) 700-8744 Clay Electric Cooperative................................................................(352) 372-8543

gru.com cityofarcher.com/Public-Works.html Duke-energy.com clayelectric.com

CABLE/INTERNET: Comcast...................................................................................................(800) 266-2278 DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Dish Network.........................................................................................(877) 678-0210 Cox Communications.........................................................................(800) 234-3993 AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 338-3696

xfinity.com directv.com Dish.com cox.com att.com

DMV SERVICES: Alachua County Tax Collector Northwest Branch................................................................................(352) 374-5236 Alachua County Tax Collector - Downtown Branch..............................................(352) 374-5236 Transportation Department............................................................(800) 749-2967

alachuacollector.com alachuacollector.com Fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua County Emergency Management........................................(352) 264-6500 Alachua County Sheriff’s Department...................................................(352) 367-4000

cityofarcher.com/General-Information.html alachuasheriff.org

GRU Emergency Power Failure: ................................................................................................(352) 334-2871 Water & Wastewater Issues: ...............................................................(352) 334-2711 Natural Gas Leak: .......................................................................................(352) 334-2550

gru.com/Home/NeedHelp/EmergencyRepairs.aspx

Gainesville Police Department....................................................................(352) 955-1818 UF Health ER..........................................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER........................................(352) 415-4439 Archer Fire Department..................................................................................(352) 495-2333

gainesvillepd.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com/service/emergency-care cityofarcher.com/Public-Safety.html

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 247


Getting Settled

Hawthorne UTILITIES: Clay Electric Cooperative................................................................(352) 372-8543 City of Hawthorne...............................................................................(352) 481-2432 Florida Power & Light.........................................................................(800) 226-3545

clayelectric.com cityofhawthorne.net fpl.com

CABLE/ INTERNET: AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 801-8001 Cox Communications.........................................................................(800) 234-3993 DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Comcast...................................................................................................(800) 266-2278

att.com cox.com directv.com xfinity.com

DMV SERVICES: Driver License & Motor Vehicle of Interlachen......................(386) 684-4649 Alachua County Tax Collector - Downtown Branch...........(352) 374-5236

local.dmv.org alachuacollector.com

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua County Sheriff’s Department.......................................(352) 367-4000 UF Health ER..........................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER.............................(352) 333-4000 Hawthorne Police Department......................................................(352) 955-1818

24 8 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

alachuasheriff.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com cityofhawthorne.powweb.com/police.htm


High Springs UTILITIES: Duke Energy...........................................................................................(800) 700-8744 City of High Springs............................................................................(386) 454-2134 Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434 Clay Electric Cooperative................................................................(352) 372-8543

progress-energy.com highsprings.us/utility-billing gru.com clayelectric.com

CABLE/INTERNET: Satellite Cable Systems....................................................................(386) 454-8589 DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Dish Network.........................................................................................(800) 333-3474 AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 474-2500 Windstream.............................................................................................(866) 445-5915

satellitecablesystems.com directv.com dish.com att.com windstream.com

DMV SERVICES: Motor Vehicle Services.....................................................................(386) 454-1416 Driver License & Motor Vehicle Services of Fort White....(386) 497-2456 Alachua County Tax Collector - Northwest Branch...........(352) 374-5236 Transportation Department............................................................(800) 749-2967

local.dmv.org dmv.com/fl/florida/dmv-office/fort-white alachuacollector.com Fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua County Sheriff’s Department.......................................(352) 367-4000 UF Health ER..........................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER.............................(352) 333-4000 High Springs Police Department..................................................(386) 454-1415 High Springs Fire Department .....................................................(386) 454-2056

alachuasheriff.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com highsprings.us/police-department highsprings.us/fire-department

LaCrosse UTILITIES: Duke Energy...........................................................................................(800) 700-8744 LaCrosse Utilities.................................................................................(386) 462-2784 Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434 Clay Electric Cooperative................................................................(352) 372-8543

progress-energy.com townoflacrosse.net gru.com clayelectric.com

CABLE/INTERNET: AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 474-2500 Comcast...................................................................................................(800) 266-2278 DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Cox Communications.........................................................................(800) 234-3993

att.com xfinity.com directv.com cox.com

DMV SERVICES: Alachua County Tax Collector.......................................................(352) 374-5236 Transportation Department............................................................(800) 749-2967

alachuacollector.com fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua County Sheriff’s Department.......................................(352) 367-4000 UF Health ER..........................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER.............................(352) 333-4000 Gainesville Police Department......................................................(352) 955-1818 La Crosse Fire Department............................................................(386) 462-1544

alachuasheriff.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com gainesvillepd.org townoflacrosse.net/page1.htm

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 24 9


Getting Settled

Micanopy UTILITIES: Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434 Micanopy Utilities.................................................................................(352) 466-3121 Progress Energy...................................................................................(800) 700-8744

gru.com micanopytown.com/TownDepartments.html progress-energy.com

CABLE/ INTERNET: DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Cox Communications.........................................................................(800) 234-3993 AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 338-3696 Dish Network.........................................................................................(800) 333-3474

directv.com cox.com att.com dish.com

DMV SERVICES: Alachua County Tax Collector - Northwest Branch...........(352) 374-5236 Transportation Department............................................................(800) 749-2967

alachuacollector.com fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua County Sheriff’s Department.......................................(352) 367-4000 UF Health ER..........................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER.............................(352) 333-4000 Micanopy Fire Department.............................................................(352) 466-3741

2 5 0 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

alachuasheriff.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com micanopytown.com/FireDepartment.html


Newberry UTILITIES: Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434 Newberry Utilities ...............................................................................(352) 472-2161 Clay Electric Cooperative................................................................(352) 372-8543

gru.com ci.newberry.fl.us/utility clayelectric.com

CABLE/INTERNET: DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Cox Communications.........................................................................(800) 234-3993 AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 244-0200 Dish Network.........................................................................................(800) 333-3474

directv.com cox.com att.com dish.com

DMV SERVICES: Driver License & Motor Vehicle Services of Fort White....(386) 497-2456 Alachua County Tax Collector - Northwest Branch...........(352) 374-5236 Transportation Department............................................................(800) 749-2967

dmv.com/fl/florida/dmv-office/fort-white alachuacollector.com fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua County Sheriff’s Department.......................................(352) 367-4000 UF Health ER..........................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER...........................(352) 333-4000 Newberry Fire Department.............................................................(352) 472-2161

alachuasheriff.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com ci.newberry.fl.us/#!fire-department/cuvy

GRU Emergency Power Failure: ................................................................................(352) 334-2871 Water & Wastewater Issues: ..................................................(352) 334-2711 Natural Gas Leak: ........................................................................(352) 334-2550

gru.com/Home/NeedHelp/EmergencyRepairs.aspx

Gainesville Police Department......................................................(352) 955-1818

gainesvillepd.org

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 2 51


Getting Settled

Waldo UTILITIES: Gainesville Regional Utilities .........................................................(352) 334-3434

gru.com

CABLE/INTERNET: Windstream Communications.......................................................(800) 347-1991 Comcast...................................................................................................(800) 266-2278 DIRECTV..................................................................................................(800) 531-5000 Cox Communications.........................................................................(800) 234-3993 AT&T...........................................................................................................(352) 405-5350

windstream.com xfinity.com directv.com cox.com att.com

DMV SERVICES: Driver License & Motor Vehicle of Interlachen ....................(386) 684-4649 Alachua County Tax Collector - Northwest Branch...........(352) 374-5236 Florida Department of Transportation .....................................(800) 749-2967

local.dmv.org alachuacollector.com fdot.gov

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFO: Alachua County Sheriff’s Department.......................................(352) 367-4000 UF Health ER..........................................................................................(352) 733-0111 North Florida Regional Medical Center ER.............................(352) 333-4000

alachuasheriff.org ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center nfrmc.com

GRU Emergency Power Failure: .......................................................................................(352) 334-2871 Water & Wastewater Issues:...........................................................(352) 334-2711 Natural Gas Leak:................................................................................(352) 334-2550

gru.com/Home/NeedHelp/EmergencyRepairs.aspx

Gainesville Police Department......................................................(352) 955-1818

gainesvillepd.org

2 52 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


Alachua County DMV Services To experience all that Alachua County offers, the DMV will help you reach your destination! If you are a new resident in the state of Florida, you must visit the DMV before you can legally drive. For your convenience, Alachua County has three Gainesville DMV locations.

Alachua County DMV Offices & Services: Alachua County DMV offices provide vehicle registration, driver’s licenses, ID cards, tag and titles services for cars, trucks, trailers, vessels and mobile homes. They also provide specialty tags and disability parking permits. Many of Alachua County’s DMV services are available online or by phone. For general information about vehicle services, call (850) 617-2000. For location-specific questions, you can call the number for the Alachua County main office at (352) 374-5236.

Moving to Florida: New Florida residents are required to register vehicles within 10 days of moving as well as obtain a Florida driver’s license within 30 days. Legal name changes and address changes also require a replacement license. If you have an out-of-state driver’s license and it has not expired beyond 30 days, you can convert the license to a Florida license without taking a written or road test. If you do not have your first driver’s license yet, you must complete a Florida DMV-approved Drug and Alcohol course (DATA) and pass a DMV test on road signs and road rules.

Car Registration and Auto Insurance: Before new Florida residents can register their vehicles, they must obtain auto insurance from an insurance company licensed by the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation. Florida’s minimum coverage is $10,000 personal injury protection (PIP) and $10,000 property damage liability (PDL). If you have been involved in a vehicular accident or convicted of certain offenses, you may be required to purchase bodily injury liability coverage (BIL). All Florida residents are required to verify the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). If the vehicle being registered is new, then it must be validated with a manufacturers Certificate of Origin. If the vehicle is used, the VIN must be verified with a HSMV 82040 form that can be filled out at an Alachua County tax collector office. The form must be signed by a Florida notary, DMV compliance examiner, law enforcement officer or a licensed dealer in Florida.

Alachua County DMV Offices: Alachua County DMV Offices: Main number: (352) 374-5236

Northwest Public Branch 5801 NW 34th Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32653

Downtown Public Branch 12 SE 1st St. Gainesville, FL 32601

Southwest Public Branch 3837 Windmeadows Blvd. Gainesville, FL 32608

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 2 5 3


Getting Settled

Emergency Contact Numbers Emergency Services ALACHUA COUNTY CRISIS CENTER (352) 264-6789 alachuacounty.us/crisis ALACHUA COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT (352) 264-6500 alachuacounty.us/depts/em NORTH FLORIDA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER ER (352) 333-4900 nfrmc.com UF HEALTH ER (352) 733-0111 ufhealth.org/emergency-room-trauma-center GRU EMERGENCY Power Failure: (352) 334-2871 Before a Storm: (352) 334-3434 During/After a Storm: (352) 334-2871 Waste & Wastewater Problems: (352) 334-2711 Natural Gas Emergency: (352) 334-2550 gru.com

2 5 4 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E

Police Departments ALACHUA COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE (352) 367-4000 alachuasheriff.org ALACHUA POLICE DEPARTMENT (386) 462-1396 cityofalachua.com/index.php/ police-department GAINESVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT (352) 955-1818 – Non-emergency dispatch gainesvillepd.org HAWTHORNE POLICE DEPARTMENT Hawthorne receives law enforcement services from Alachua County (352) 955-1818 cityofhawthorne.powweb.com/police.htm HIGH SPRINGS POLICE DEPARTMENT (386) 454-1415 highsprings.us/police-department

SANTA FE COLLEGE POLICE DEPARTMENT (352) 395-5519 www.sfcollege.edu/pd/

HIGH SPRINGS FIRE DEPARTMENT (386) 454-2056 highsprings.us/fire-department

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA POLICE DEPARTMENT (352) 392-1111 police.ufl.edu

LACROSSE FIRE DEPARTMENT (386) 462-1544 townoflacrosse.net/page1.htm

Fire Departments ALACHUA COUNTY FIRE RESCUE (352) 384-3101 www.alachuacounty.us/Depts/PublicSafety/FireSafety/Pages/EmergencyMedicalServices.aspx ARCHER FIRE DEPARTMENT (352) 495-2333 cityofarcher.com/sheriff GAINESVILLE FIRE RESCUE HEADQUARTERS (352) 334-5078 cityofgainesville.org/Gainesville

MICANOPY FIRE DEPARTMENT (352) 466-3741 micanopytown.com/FireDepartment.html

Outdoor Services ALACHUA COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES (352) 264-6870 alachuacounty.us/Depts/animalServices FLORIDA FOREST SERVICES WACCASSA FORESTRY CENTER Serving Alachua, Putnumn, Gilchrist, Marion and Levy Counties (352) 395-4951 www.freshfromflorida.com/Divisions-Offices/Florida-Forest-Service/ Our-Forests/Field-Operations/Waccasassa-Forestry-Center


Civic Engagement Greater Gainesville residents are informed and engaged members of the community. Attend a school board or commission meeting and learn your elected officials’ names using the information below.

Local Mayors and Commission Members

Commission and School Board Meetings HOW TO REGISTER: Register to vote or update your current registration at registertovoteflorida.gov or in-person at the Alachua County Supervisor of Elections office. You can update the registration record at any time. For a primary election, party changes must be made 29 days before the election. Learn more about who is eligible and what identification is needed to register at votealachua.com.

1. Alachua County

Commission: Meets second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. in Board of County Commissioner’s building.

School board: Meets first and third Tuesday of each month

2. City of Alachua

City of Alachua Commission Mayor Gib Coerper Vice Mayor Gary Hardacre Shirley Green Brown Dayna Miller Robert W. Wilford City of Archer Commission Mayor Iris Bailey Vice Mayor Wade Wheeler Fletcher Hope Melanie Wells Joan White City of Gainesville Commission Mayor Lauren Poe David Arreola Adrian Hayes-Santos Gail Johnson Gigi Simmons Harvey Ward Helen Warren City of Hawthorne Commission Mayor Matthew Surrency Vice Mayor Tommie Howard Patricia Bouie Jimmy Floyd Sr. DeLoris Roberts City of High Springs Commission Mayor Linda Jones Vice Mayor Byran Williams Gloria James Scott Jamison Nancy Lavin

Town of La Crosse Commission (Town Council) Mayor Dianne Dubberly Vice Mayor Barbara Thomas Jishnu Dasa Fitch Sheila Dubberly Johnny Ho Anthony Kelley Barbara Thomas Town of Micanopy Commission Mayor Tim Parker Joseph L. Aufmuth Troy Blakely Virginia Mance Mike Roberts City of Newberry Commission Mayor Jordan Marlowe Rick Coleman Monty Farnsworth Joy Glanzer Matt Hersom Tim Marden City of Waldo Commission Mayor Louie Davis Chuck Hall Irvin Jackson Glen Johnson Rick Pisano Carolyn Wade

at 6 p.m. in Boardroom at Kirby-Smith, 620 E University Ave.

Commission: Meets second and fourth Monday of each month at 6 p.m. in James A. Lewis Commission Chambers building.

3. City of Archer

Commission: Meets every second Monday of each month at 6 p.m. in City Hall building.

4. City of Gainesville

Commission: Meets first and third Thursday of each month

School Board: Meets first and third Tuesdays of each month at 6 p.m. in the Boardroom at the District Office.

at 1 p.m. in City Commission Auditorium.

5. City of Hawthorne

Commission: Meets first and third Tuesday of each month

at 6:30 p.m in City Hall building.

6. City of High Springs

Commission: Meets second and fourth Thursday

of each month at 6:30 p.m. in City Hall building.

7. Town of La Crosse

Commission: Meets second Monday of each month

at 6 p.m. in Town Hall building.

8. Town of Micanopy

Commission: Meets second Tuesday of each month

at 7:30 p.m. in Town Hall building.

9. City of Newberry

Commission: Meets second and fourth Monday of each month at 7 p.m. in City Hall building.

10. City of Waldo

Commission: Meets second Tuesday of each month

at 7 p.m. in meeting hall building.

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 2 5 5


Getting Settled

Pet Services in Greater Gainesville

2 5 6 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


Pet Boarding ALL PAWS PET KENNEL 15614 FL 26 Gainesville, FL 32641 (352) 468-3544 allpawspetkennel.com ARCHER ROAD PET RESORT 16011 SW Archer Road Archer, FL 32618 (352) 495-9111 archerroadpetresort.com BED ‘N BISCUIT INN 10723 NW State Road 45 High Springs, FL 32643 (386) 454-0676 bednbiscuitnet.wordpress.com DANCIN’ DOGS BOARDING & DAYCARE 17314 SW 30th Avenue Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 642-3572 dancindogsboarding.com

VACATION STATION PET RESORT 578 SE Brawley Terrace High Springs, FL 32643 (352) 538-9431 vacationstationpetresort.com TOWN & COUNTRY VETERINARIANS AND PET RESORT 6980 SW Archer Road Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 378-6027 tandcvets.com

Pet Sitting BOB’S PET SITTING (352) 331-6308 bobspetsitting.com DAYTIME DOGS AND FRIENDS (352) 219-4246 daytimedogs.com

DOGS RULE 501 SE 2nd Street Gainesville, FL 32601 (352) 505-0019 dogsrulegainesville.com

DOGWOOD PARK & DAYCARE 5505 SW Archer Road Gainesville FL 32608 (352) 335-1919 dogwoodpark.com

PET PARADISE 19518 W Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 472-4732 petparadiseresort.com

HONEY PAWS DOGGIE DAYCARE AND BOARDING 16025 W Newberry Road Newberry, FL 32669 (352) 494-6897 honeypawsdogboarding.com

Pet Stores EARTH WISE PET SUPPLY 4106 NW 16th Blvd Gainesville, FL 32605 (352) 373-4738 earthwisepet.com EARTH PETS NATURAL PET MARKET 500 NW 60th Street, Suite F Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 331-5123 earthpetsflorida.com SWEET PAWS BAKERY 5330 SW 91st Terrace Gainesville, FL 32608 (352) 317-1044 sweetpawsbakery.com

Pet Grooming

CLAUDIA’S PAWS AND CLAWS 2028 NW 6th Street Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 562-0013 petgroominggainesville.com CLOUD K9 PET GROOMING SALON 14040 NW 148th Place Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 518-6306 FOXSHIRE GROOMING 14203 NW 150th Avenue Alachua, FL 32615 (386) 418-0050 foxshiregrooming.com NATURE’S PET GROOMING 500 NW 60th Street, Ste C Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 331-8681 naturepetsgrooming.com PAMPERED PAWS OF HIGH SPRINGS 210 NE 1st Avenue High Springs, Florida (386) 454-4464

CHARLIE’S PLACE, A PET SPA AND BOUTIQUE 600 NW 75th Street Suite B Gainesville, FL 32607 (352) 333-3100 charliesplacepetspa.com

PRESTIGE PET RESORT & SPA 3717 NW 13th Street Gainesville, FL 32609 (352) 505-5304 shoresanhosp.com/boarding.html

G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E .C O M – 2 57


Index OF ADVERTISERS

5701 pg. 5

First Federal Bank Pg. 201

Oak Hammock Pg. 129

Butler Enterprises Pg. 183

Florida Credit Union Pg. 104

Oakmont Pg. 2

Cade Museum Pg. 222

Florida Museum Pg. 201

Queen of Peace Catholic Academy Pg. 104

CareerSource North Central Florida Pg. 50

Gainesville Dermatology Pg. 117

Santa Fe College Pg. 189

Cottage Gardens Pg. 5

Gainesville Health and Fitness Pg. 116

Sun Country Sports Center Pg. 222

Cox Business Pg. 7

Gainesville Regional Airport Pg. 5

Town of Tioga/Tioga Realty Pg. 150

Crime Prevention Security Systems Pg. 260

Harn Museum of Art Pg. 222

Trade PMR Pg. 44

DoubleTree by Hilton Pg. 116

Info Tech Pg. 50

UF Communications Pg. 85

Elder Care Pg. 104

Ironwood Golf Course Pg. 201

UF Health Pgs. 3 and 149

Emmer Development Pg. 162

North Florida Regional Medical Center Pg. 259

2 5 8 – 2 01 9 G U I D E TO G R E AT E R G A I N ESV I L L E


Profile for St. Croix Press

Guide to Greater Gainsville - 2019  

The Guide to Greater Gainesville is the premier relocation guide for our region. As a product of Advantage Publishing Inc., The Guide is an...

Guide to Greater Gainsville - 2019  

The Guide to Greater Gainesville is the premier relocation guide for our region. As a product of Advantage Publishing Inc., The Guide is an...