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Edition 8 10 August 2018

In this edition

Principal’s Message Welcome to Term 3, I trust that all students and their families had an opportunity to have a restful holiday. As Semester 1 results and reports have been received during the break I hope that this time has provided an opportunity for rest, reflection and goal setting and that each student will have a productive and successful second semester. Congratulations to those students who have been acknowledged with either Academic or Endeavour Awards at our recent awards ceremonies. I trust that our students will be inspired to continue to put their best foot forward and make the most of their learning opportunities during Semester 2. Over the recent holiday break I had the good fortune to meet a young Somali woman by the name of Jamila Gordon. Jamila’s story is one of great determination, tenacity and most importantly hope. Jamila was born in Somalia, a country which at that time was ravaged by drought-on the night of Jamila’s birth it rained. This was a sign for Jamila’s father that Jamila was indeed a wonderful gift of life.

Jamila was the second eldest of 16 children and as a result at a very early age she became the primary carer for her brothers and sisters. Her family was poor, but she expressed to me in our conversation that she holds wonderful memories of her childhood. As a result of drought the family moved to Mogadishu. Unfortunately, this was just before civil war was to break out in Somalia in 1991. Jamila’s father and mother were forced to make a difficult decision to move out of Mogadishu and they did this on the eve of civil war breaking out. Every other person in Jamila’s family (who did not leave) were killed-relatives, friends and neighbours. Jamila’s family was scattered across the globe because they could not all escape together. Jamila ended up on the border of Kenya facing incredible odds of survival. She said to me that her father gave her three pieces of advice- 1) Make yourself useful, 2) Write your own story and 3) Dream big dreams. I encourage our students to follow the advice given to Jamila. There will inevitably be occasions when we do not receive the recognition we feel we deserve. I

Principal’s Message

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Casey Horan Announced as the Future Justice Award Winner

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From the Desk of the AP Curriculum and Assessment

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From the Desk of the AP Pastoral Care

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Semester 1 Awards Assembly

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Meet our Teachers

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Maths at St Clare’s

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NAIDOC Week Celebrations

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Year 12 Retreat

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Year 11 Leadership Day

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Visual Art and Design Visit to the 18 National Zoo and Aquarium A Fun Start to the Semester for Language Students

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Japanese Speech Contest

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Japanese Rakugo and Kyougen

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Falling Middle School Production 22 Youth Ministry

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Vinnies Winter Appeal

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ACT Volleyball Association Spring 24 Competition Weekend Netball

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Snow Sports

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Inspirational Women

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In the Headlines

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Our Heroes

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Family Breakfast

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Parent Advice

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Recognition Awards

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Catholic Schools Week Film Fest

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Upcoming Events

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Notices

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know that there are many students who worked hard last semester who did not receive a semester award. My simple message for our students is to not give up. While they may be disappointed, the most important thing is to know within themselves that they gave of their best and to keep trying to achieve to the very best of their ability. By doing this they will make themselves useful, write their own story and hopefully dream big dreams. Our Year 10 students participated in subject selection interviews in Week 1 of this term in preparation for commencing their senior studies next year. I am grateful to Sharyn Quirk, Lisa Summerville and our senior staff for undertaking the

subject selection interviews with our Year 10 students and their families. On Friday 17 August the College will celebrate St Clare’s Day. Our celebrations will include a Mass in the College Chapel. This year will see the introduction of a St Clare’s Day medal for one student in from each House who has demonstrated the qualities of their House. The theme for the Mass is “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me”. The girls need to attend school and the Mass in College uniform and after Mass they change into their costumes to celebrate this year’s theme: Our Heroes. Each year there are some wonderful costumes worn by our students and staff for this part of the day. After Mass various

activities, stalls and events will be held on the College Oval and in the Gymnasium. I welcome new staff members to St Clare’s who have begun since the holidays. They include: }}

Antony Eggler (SOSE)

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Richelle Fogarty (Mathematics)

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Allanye Horton (SOSE)

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Elizabeth Smith (Food Technology)

Best Wishes Brad Cooney Principal

Casey Horan Announced as the Future Justice Award Winner student body donated hundreds of women’s hygiene products and developed a real awareness around the cause. Last year in her role on the SRC, Casey identified a need for companionship for senior citizens while visiting a local aged-care facility. She set up a Pen Pal initiative between her peers and the senior citizens. Casey continues to develop the relationship with the nursing home and intends to invite the residents to a student-run morning tea later this year.

St Clare’s College Social Justice Captain, Casey Horan, has been named as the winner of the Future Leaders, Future Justice Award for 2018. The Future Justice Award recognises Year 12 students across Australia who have shown leadership and initiative on intergenerational equity.

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Casey has displayed signs of being a future leader throughout her time at the College by putting the needs of her peers first and looking at what she can do to better the lives of others. In Year 10, Casey initiated a Year 10 social justice campaign to support the Share the Dignity charity. Thanks to Casey, the

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

On her recommendation for the award Principal Brad Cooney said, “Casey approaches all that she does with intelligence, showing a depth of research and humility in her approach to all projects. I believe Casey will continue to be a giving and socially conscientious member of society beyond her school years.” Casey was presented with the Future Justice Award at the St Clare’s College Semester 1 Senior Award Ceremony on the 25 July 2018.


From the Desk of the AP Curriculum and Assessment

proceeding as well as intended. But concession can also occur following success, where the opportunity to progress a matter further is not taken, or subordinated to a lazy approach focussed purely on the success of the moment.

“If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort, and keep on learning. That way, their children don’t have to be slaves of praise. They will have a lifelong way to build and repair their own confidence.” Carol S. Dweck

Resilience in Growth Mindset Over the last few months I have addressed the essential elements to a growth mindset approach to education, culminating in a discussion about risk. In making this last point, the nature of risk in the classroom is not about being careless; rather it is about imbuing your daughter(s) with the strategies and confidence to make brave and courageous decisions, within the safe College environment. That said, their success or otherwise in embracing this approach will involve, and will likely need to be based on, some elements of failure, which is a trait so essential for growth and learning. For through failure, comes resilience; a quality that, if embraced, will situate your daughter(s) well for the many challenges ahead. As parents and guardians, your assistance in the education of

your daughters is essential to both their growth mindset approach and their resilience. We must all exhibit and promote those very skills and attitudes that we expect of our students and daughter(s). The desire they develop to never give up and to continue with a challenge with both persistence and tenacity, commences with your approach to their attitudes within the home environment. By being encouraging of their failures you lay a foundation for the College to build upon in furthering the resilience of your daughter(s). By being praiseworthy of their achievements, you are not only promoting their successes in a positive and meaningful manner, but you are encouraging them to go beyond this in order to transform their achievements into acts of significance. The desire to concede or ‘give-up’ is a quality that lays dormant within us all. It is easy to draw upon, particularly in circumstances where things are not

All of us experience failure at points in our lives. For many, it is a failure to complete a task. For some, it is a failure to achieve a potential beyond success into a life of significance. Regardless of how this failure may present itself, the collaboration between parents and teachers in recognising these moments in your daughter(s), combined with the determination to push them into an arena of resilience and persistence, remains an essential attribute for the education of students at St Clare’s College. At St Clare’s College we will continue to work towards a culture where mistakes and setbacks represent a positive engagement opportunity for parents, teachers and students alike. These opportunities develop qualities within the students that do not allow them to become discouraged; rather that reinvigorate within each of them a desire to achieve and a determination to persist. Building and developing skills within young students is a long-term strategy. It will not happen overnight. It remains both worthwhile and important to encourage your daughter(s) to persist with a growth mindset approach to education despite the setbacks that may occur. Resilience builds character and leads to the development of strong, capable and courageous students. We all share a mutual responsibility for this education journey. Sharyn Quirk Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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From the Desk of the AP Pastoral Care Sexting is another name for sending or receiving nudes. This can include: }} naked pictures or ‘nudes’ }} ‘underwear shots’ }} sexual or ‘dirty pics’ }} sexual text messages or videos.

New technology has made it easier to take, send and share images than ever before. Walk into a shopping centre, drive behind or alongside a bus, drive through Fyshwick, pick up a magazine, turn on the television, watch a movie or a music clip play on social media, search the internet and take conscious note of the sexualised images and messages that influence our cultural norms. Whilst sexualised images have existed in advertising since print media existed, the saturation is unprecedented. These images send us messages about values, ideals and expectations and for our young people whose cognitive skills are still developing they face a great challenge in coping with the persuasive sexualised media messages, themes and the idea that they have to look ‘hot’ and ‘sexy’. Sexual imagery in mainstream society has become the norm. The term ‘sexting’ is not often used by young people or in popular culture. Most often, it’s called ‘nudes’, ‘naked selfies’, ‘rudie nudies’ or they might use other terms like ‘pic for pic’.

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For at least ten years now, teachers and police have been talking with young people about the dangers of online safety including sexting and digital footprints, yet we are still having the same conversations. Young people are reminded that once an image is shared, the sender loses control on how that image is used. Images can be copied and saved by others, shared with people the sender doesn’t know and posted on social media and public websites. I refer back to the cognitive development of young people as an explanation as to why they don’t understand the global nature and extent of the Internet, and how easy it is once something is posted, even if it's private, that it could become public very quickly. If we take a look at the influence celebrities have on our culture it is evident that some people will go to great lengths to be in the spotlight, to have their 15 minutes of fame and so sending pictures is a way of getting a whole lot of attention and recognition even though it could be devastating and short-lived. Writer and women’s advocate Nina Funnell suggests that our past warnings to young people have gone “unheard as they rely on scare tactics; the messages often presents young people as either callous criminals, or vulnerable victims. While it is important to be clear that sending, possessing or forwarding sexually explicit photos or photos of an underage person is a criminal act. There is a wide body of research that shows campaigns that rely only on fear as a motivator are both counterproductive and ineffective.”

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

So what approaches do work? }}

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Allowing young people who have sent nude images a safe, shame-free space to discuss why they sent these, and how they felt about this afterwards (especially if they were coerced into sending the image). Acknowledging that at some stage our young people may be sent an uninvited nude image. Providing ideas on a range of ways in which they can deal with this including everything from delete and block, to reporting the sender. It’s important too that when we talk about sexting we don’t present it only within a digital world framework. The discussion needs to also cover what a respectful relationship looks and feels like; why it is that female nudity in particular is so often associated with shame and loss of reputation; how we can be ethical bystanders and how we can always move beyond any mistakes we may make. It is key that young people are not only told about possible threats and dangers as this will shut down their willingness to talk about things. We urgently need to not only continue talking, but to listen.

My challenge to parents and carers and anyone privileged to work with young people is to continue promoting non-sexualised, yet diverse and aspirational portrayals of young people. Voice your concerns to our local MLA’s regarding the irresponsible marketing and put pressure on the Regulatory Authorities to take some action against sexualized media images. Natalie Dickie Assistant Principal Pastoral Care


Semester 1 Awards Ceremony

On Wednesday 25 July and 1 August we held Senior and Junior Awards Ceremonies for Semester 1. Congratulations to the students who received Academic and Endeavor awards for their outstanding academic achievement throughout the semester.

The awards ceremony also recognised students for their achievements in Mathematics competitions, the Duke of Edinburgh's International Award, the YLead leadership program and the students who participated in the St Vincent de Paul Volunteer event in May. Well done to all the students on their accomplishments for Semester 1.

Year 7 Awards

Year 8 Awards

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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Year 9 Awards

Year 10 Awards

Year 11 Awards

Year 12 Awards

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


Duke of Edinburgh

Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians

Computational and Algorithimc Thinking Competition

YLead Leadership Program

Volunteers for St Vincent de Paul Event

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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Meet our Teachers... Anthony Maas, Acting Technologies Coordinator learning about content and set skills. We all did the same thing! Today with Technology moving at such an exciting rate the whole mindset and focus on learning is about creating independent learners that are confident in adapting to and using new Technology to approach new learning situations. We never stop learning, myself included!

My role this year at St Clare’s College is the acting Technologies Coordinator. I have always had a passion for students being able to learn about and apply the design process and be actively engaged in using new technologies to help them solve problems that they have identified. When I went to school, (A few years ago now!) we were taught about Technology and were set specific tasks to complete. It was all about

In the technologies faculty we expose students to a range of content and skills, in relation to food, textiles and fashion, IT, graphics, Design and Technology. The talented staff encourage them to develop new and creative processes to solve design problems. This gives them a greater range of choice in their own learning, and leads them into thinking about the process of learning and how best to learn. When students gain confidence and experience success at their own level and ability in solving challenging problems and learn about the value of their skills acquired, appreciate

the knowledge and understanding of what they have experienced, which finally comes together in a design solution, something that they have personally designed and constructed themselves, where the student is very proud; this is the highlight of what it means for me to be an educator. Taking the varied range of products and showcasing them around the school, classrooms, via exhibitions, entering selected student work into competitions, textiles students showcasing their talents during fashion exhibits, food and hospitality students catering for a specific event, interactive IT events and challenges, (the list goes on!) are all what makes this particular subject area so exciting and rewarding for the students and my privileged part of your daughters journey. I have great faith in every child’s ability to learn, my desire is that they come to instil that same faith in themselves.

Catherine Jean-Krista, English Teacher interviewer for a role said to me: Isn’t that the most useless degree ever? It seems like a funny story… but the transferrable skills that degree offered me were invaluable – not just to me, but to the fields I worked in. Subsequently I worked in the public service and educational fields, as an analyst, as a writer, in project related roles, and as a project manager.

I have been teaching at St Clare’s for five years now. I graduated in 1996 from the Australian National University with First Class Honours – English Literature. I loved the academic world, but as one

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I am passionate about teaching students to think critically, to be able to analyse, to draw connections, and to be creative – which is one of the key skills for the 21st Century. I know that no matter what field a student goes into in the future, they will need to be able to communicate effectively, argue cogently, and understand the motivations and

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

intentions of others. Studying literature teaches all these skills. I also believe that learning to focus, to sustain attention in your reading, is invaluable in any field of research or further study. I have worked in youth theatre for over 20 years; theatre is another passion, and watching young people build their confidence in this field inspires me in turn. I have also had odd poems published and occasionally been paid for a script or some dramaturgical work – but in terms of writing, I would be described as a hobbyist. I have four children of my own and one of the thoughts I keep central when I am teaching is: what kind of education do I want my child to have?


Natalie Hastings, Science Teacher

My favourite thing about coming to work each day is the knowledge that I’ll get to gross out my students or expose them to something new. Whether it be through dissecting eyeballs or inflating some lungs, I know that they’ll be morbidly fascinated.

Having this opportunity to engage my students with the wonders of the natural world has always been the true joy of being a Science teacher. I started my teaching career at St. Mary Mackillop College and have been teaching at St. Clare’s for the past 10 years. When I was a student at St. Clare’s myself, I learnt to love learning and always had a strong interest for Science. I knew that I wanted to share that passion with students in the future. I studied a Bachelor of Human Biology and Sport Science at the University of Canberra and followed that with a Diploma of Education in Science. Part of my passion as a teacher, not just a Science teacher, is being in the position to foster a sense of community in my students, as I

believe that learning shouldn’t be an isolated experience and that if my students can learn together, then they gain so much more that facts. A recent highlight of mine was attending the St. Clare’s College Singapore STEM tour in September 2017. This was such a fantastic experience and the level of science and technology that we were exposed to was inspirational. If you walk into my classroom you would expect to see students engaged in an array of learning activities. I thoroughly enjoy incorporating practical activities into my lessons and endeavor to provide students with a variety of teaching styles to support individual needs of students.

Rebecca Harrison, English Teacher holding numerous tutoring positions, I decided that teaching might also be a viable career option. Fast forward five years, and I have gained my Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary) and have been an English teacher at St Clare’s for the last three.

My road to teaching was not the most straightforward of paths. After high school, I completed a Bachelor of Professional and Creative Writing, majoring in Literature and Media and Communication – this was after I changed courses three or four times throughout my degree! My plan was to become an editor to combine my love of reading, writing, and debating literature; however, after

The most enjoyable thing about teaching English lies in the very nature of the subject, and the platform it provides to explore and engage with new ideas and texts. English, fundamentally, deals with the art of communication and thus its delivery must constantly be adapted to the ever changing landscape of the 21st century. My greatest drive as a teacher is to not only make the content interesting and engaging for students, but also ensure they are prepared for the world that they will enter when they leave school. Most recently, in a senior English unit, my class and

I have been exploring the concept of ‘fake news’ and it’s implications for 21st century audiences. I could not have imagined how excited and engaged the girls would get when we discussed and debated the topic. Even more surprising, was that they were constantly coming to class with examples of news that they had engaged with and conversations they had had with their parents about what they were doing in class (who would have thought, teenagers wanting to talk to their parents!). Some of the best lessons we have had this year were when we debated the importance of journalism to democracy and our responsibility to hold the ‘powers that be’ to account. My greatest triumph as a teacher will always be when a students says, ‘I would never have picked up this book … but it’s the greatest thing I have ever read.’

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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Maths at St Clare’s

As educators in a high school environment, it is our duty, in partnership with parents and guardians, to prepare our young women for taking an active and useful role in society. Our core business is to develop essential skills in our students in line with what will be most useful to them to succeed in the workforce, namely: critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity. This is the underlying goal within the Mathematics Faculty.

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The Mathematics content, outlined by the Australian Curriculum, specifies the vehicle for developing these essential 21st century skills within our classrooms. The delivery of Mathematical content has traditionally relied on textbooks and rote learning. Although there is definitely a place for both textbooks and rote learning, it is important that 21st century educators provide students with a wealth of rich learning activities which enable each student to experience success.

Earlier in the year, there was an article in papers entitled ‘Maths illiteracy has led to Trump and Brexit’. In this article, Eddie Woo, Mathematics teacher and the 2018 NSW Australia’s Local Hero, discussed how the inability of many people to understand data and statistics has become a major social problem, thus leading to crises such as Trump, Brexit and Climate Change denial. Within the article, Woo talked about the problem with current Maths teaching:

At St Clare’s, we are committed to helping all students experience success in Maths.

“… the problem is the way the subject is taught. We move forward

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

in lockstep fashion where, if you haven't gotten algebra in the two weeks I spend on it in year 7, you'll never learn it again. Next year, you'll still be trying to wrap your head around it but I'll have moved on. You can contrast that to a masterybased system. If you're learning a musical instrument, how old is an eighth-grade piano student? And the answer is, however old they need to be to get to eighth grade.” Woo, E. (2018), ‘Maths illiteracy has led to Trump and Brexit’., Sydney Morning Herald. 19/03/2018


This quote is particularly pertinent. It is an affinity with such thinking that has led to the introduction of Maths Pathways into Year 7 and Year 8 Level 3 this year. At its core, Maths Pathway has been developed to enable students to experience success in Maths by enabling them to access the right Maths for them at the right time. For many students, lack of success in primary years has led to disengagement, which has led to further lack of success. Whilst for other students, lack of appropriate challenge has led to the same disengagement. Studies show that engagement is increased when autonomy is promoted. Self-direction leads to engagement, which is far more likely to lead to success. Linked closely with these findings is the notion of Growth Mindset. Learning is a continuum, and it is important that every child understands that they are capable of making progress. At the beginning of the year, the Years 7, 8 and 9 Maths teachers explicitly taught our students about developing a growth mindset, drawing on the work of Jo Boaler, author and Professor of Mathematics Education at Stanford University. The Growth Mindset lessons focussed on the science of brain plasticity and were accompanied by appropriate maths-based activities for reinforcing growth mindset messages, such as, ‘mistakes are valuable learning tools’ and ‘the importance of visualising maths concepts’. Another exciting development in Mathematics at St Clare’s this year, is our partnership with the University of Canberra, in a research project on Spatial Reasoning, led by Tom Lowrie. The research project is funded by the Australian Research Council and is looking at the nature and influence of visuospatial reasoning. Visuospatial reasoning is the ability to visually perceive objects and understand the spatial relationships among objects in two and three dimensional space.

Previous research has found that improving spatial thinking can greatly improve students’ mathematics performance. Data collected from our Year 8 cohort participating in this project will help inform further development and refinement of mathematics curriculum, and teaching and learning practices going forward. Opportunities for junior students to engage more fully in Mathematics at St Clare’s has been a priority for the Mathematics faculty this year. However, the flow-on effects in terms of teaching practices are intended to spread to all other year groups. At the end of Term 2, the ‘World of Maths’ visited St Clare’s. This has been some-what of a tradition at St Clare’s for a number of years, where Year 7 students delight in an hour and a half of hands-on problem solving. Students work collaboratively, interacting with manipulatives to solve a range of challenging scenarios. Mathematical fun was had by all! Another opportunity for Years 7 and 8 to engage in the wonders of Mathematics was afforded in an excursion to the National Gallery of Australia at the end of Term 2. Students were treated to a guided tour of the Cartier Exhibition, where they were fortunate to hear about the geometry of jewelry design. Students were then able to interact within the virtual reality space of the Terminus Exhibit, which is heavily influenced by geometric design. The excursion is being followed up at the College with various geometric and measurement activities. Such an experience was invaluable for students in terms of witnessing and participating in, the creative side of Mathematics.

higher order thinking, within the context of either authentic or pure mathematical problems is paramount. By assisting our students to develop their skills of analysis, through collaboration and creative endeavour, and systematically building their logical, sequential communication skills, we are enabling the active and successful participation of our students in future society.

Simple steps for helping at home: Remind your daughter that mistakes are good: }}

Help your daughter to see mistakes as an opportunity to learn and grow

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Talk to your daughter about the importance of resilience not just in maths, but in life

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Productive struggle is key to success in Mathematics – help your daughter to find enjoyment in the challenge!

Support a Growth Mindset: }}

Praise your daughter’s effort, not just her results

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Remind her of areas other than maths (sport, music etc) where continual effort has resulted in improvement and success

Discuss your daughter’s learning with her regularly: }}

After a test, talk to your daughter about her learning – What does she feel she did well this time? What will she need to focus on next time? What study skills has she been working on?

Beth Bright Mathematics Coordinator

Moving forward, creativity and problem-solving are our focus areas in Mathematics at St Clare’s. Application of skills, utilising

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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NAIDOC

Week Celebrations

NAIDOC Week celebrates the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ASTSI) peoples. This year St Clare’s College celebrated NAIDOC week from Monday 23 to Friday 27 July. The week started with St Clare’s hosting ‘Being an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander for the Day’ for ATSI students and their friends. St Clare’s students joined students from St Edmund’s College, John Paul College, St Thomas the Apostle, St Matthew’s Primary School, Holy Spirit Primary School, St Vincent’s Primary School, Sacred Heart Primary School, St Francis of Assisi Primary and St Anthony’s Primary School. Developed by Cultural Infusion, the program was led by Alan, an elder from the Noonga tribe, near the Margaret River. The students participated in three cultural activities: dance, art and a historical/ cultural session. In the cultural dance activity the boys learnt the emu dance while the girls learnt the eagle dance. During this session students were exposed to ATSI words and their meanings, as well as the significance of dance moves in ATSI culture. In the traditional art

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session students learnt to draw ATSI tracks and symbols and a picture of their own journey or story. The highlight of the day was the historical/cultural session. In this session Alan discussed the difference between Indigenous (inhabited this land for 65,000 years) and nonIndigenous Australians (inhabited for 230 years), but more importantly with the understanding that all of us belong to Australia. The students did renditions of “Aussie, Aussie, Aussie Oi, Oi, Oi” to celebrate this unity. He explained the 324 tribal groups among ATSI today, each tribe having their own unique culture, language, dress, laws, customs and food. Alan is an elder and custodian for his tribe. Each year he makes a journey with other elders to talk about the history of the tribe and he records every school and contact teacher as wall art. He discussed the importance of ancestors. Alan then related his own story, as part of the Stolen Generations, he was a foster child and later came to the realization that education has been the key to his success. He gave a very heartfelt message to the audience that healing is ongoing. Each student has to realise that they can

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


change the world, to not waste your schooling, more importantly that they are the future. Alan thoroughly engaged the students throughout his discussion. They responded to his questions and affirmations. His message was a powerful reminder to the students about doing their best at school and taking advantage of all that they have. The session concluded with students performing the dances they had learnt and a recap of ATSI History and Culture. On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday all students across the College were invited to watch the movie, The Sapphires in the Flexible Learning Centre. This wonderful movie based in 1968 is a true story. It celebrates four young, extremely talented Australian Aboriginal girls as they learn about love, friendship and war when they combine to form the all-girls group the Sapphires and travel to Vietnam to entertain the US troops. This movie provides a positive affirmation of the talent of these four girls and they are a great role model for all females and our students.

which were made by our talented hospitality students. This sensational sampler is an example of ATSI foods, the richness of their culture and a reminder of the diversity and harmony they experienced over the many generations that they lived over this land. NAIDOC Week was a wonderful opportunity for all of our students to reflect on the importance of the culture and traditions for the of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. I would like to express a special thank you to Mr Kai Mohell and all the Hospitality students who worked tirelessly to make the scones. To all the girls who assisted on the ‘Aboriginal for a Day’ program: Shania, Ellie, Jallamarra, Olivia, Emily, Chelsea, Kiarra, Halle and Claudia. Your efforts were greatly appreciated and helped make the day a great success. Caroline Blackshaw Aboriginal Contact Teacher

On Friday all students were provided with the opportunity to sample wattle seed scones

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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Year 12 Retreat

Year 12 Retreat is traditionally an important calendared event on the College schedule, signifying a milestone in the faith journey of our graduating students. Retreat gives the opportunity to be together as a cohort, away from the daily pressures of the classroom, family and life in general, allowing opportunity for reflection, prayer, listening and discussion as our students consider their spirituality and life after school. Our Year 12 Retreat (2-3 August) was held at Warrambui Retreat and Recreation Centre in Murrumbateman, where ten staff spent two days and one night with 130 Year 12 students. We began the retreat reflecting on where we started in Year 7 and where we are now as Year 12's, with plenty of laughs and tears as we looked at photos, old and new. Our first liturgy gave opportunity to consider the people who supported us from Year 7 to now and their names and qualities were written on the petals of paper flowers which unfolded in the water. Most of Thursday was then spent with David Kobler from YourChoicez, our guest presenter. David talked about relationships

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with a palpable honesty. "This talk has changed my life" and "I am so inspired" were just a couple of comments made by the girls at the end of the day. David left the girls (and us as adults too) with much to think about, instilling in them that they are worthy of quality relationships, and they should not settle for less.

bracelets and the Year 12 Graduation alter cloth to be made. At the conclusion of the activities, and our final hearty meal, Father Percy joined us for Mass. His down-toearth sermon, approachable manner and genuine interest in the journey the girls had been on while at retreat made for a beautiful conclusion to our time together.

As parents have been a key support, the letters they wrote to their daughters over the holidays were presented to the girls after the evening liturgy. This was an emotive occasion and one which I wish parents could have witnessed. Many students took the opportunity to respond to their letters with their own gratitude letter which parents can look forward to receiving in the coming weeks. The first night ended with guitar playing, singing and toasting marshmallows around the camp fire under the millions of stars of the clear countryside sky.

A huge thank you to Lisa Melis, David Garrity, Juliette Major, Elena Vasalif, Elizabeth White, Esther O'Brien, Sarah Huntly and Helen Steel who took time away from their own families to be with the Year 12's at retreat. As for Marie Manning, 'thank you' does not seem enough! Her commitment, dedication and love is on constant exhibition and I wish to publicly acknowledge all that she does.

An early start on Friday saw the girls choose a Head, Hand and Heart activity - there were obstacle courses, walking prayers, mission survivor team challenges for the physical activities, reflection on future goals, letter to your Year 7-self and cards to gratitude to write as well as Frocks for Fiji, 'Embrace'

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

With cars packed, buses heading back to Griffith and our final farewells said to the Warrambui staff, Mrs Manning and I were alone for a moment to reflect ourselves... what a joyous two days spent with our amazing Year 12 girls. We were left feeling nothing but gratitude and hope for our graduating class of 2018. #blessed Trish Brown Year 12 Coordinator


“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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Year 11 Leadership Day

On Friday 3 August, Year 11 Leadership Day took place in the College Hall. The purpose of the day was to provide the students with the opportunity to explore the concept and purpose of leadership as they transition into Year 12. Session 1 - “Being the best of you” provided the opportunity for students to explore the essence of giving back and creating a legacy. The session created movement and was very energetic. The students created a dance which represented the foundations they have learnt through their families and schools, as well as their own experiences. They were encouraged to contribute their own moves to the dance to symbolise the importance of integrity and individuality in leadership. Session 2 – “Together has power” demonstrated various activities that

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explored critical teamwork skills, such as, communication, trust, strategy and support. The session demonstrated the power of uniting together for a common vision, it showed the importance of how to lead and follow when working in large groups. Session 3 – “Seeing the good” encouraged the students to recognise that everyone has a valuable story to share and to build relationships abased on honesty, openness and transparency. Students stepped outside their comfort zone to recognize other’s stories and the positive qualities we each all bring to this wonderful year group.

“Don’t just settle. Dare to be” Mrs Kym Darmody Year 11 Coordinator

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

Student Responses: “Back yourself- have confidence in your own ability” “Create an environment that enables everyone to be the best version of themselves” “Time is limited, you have today to create your future” “Activities were extremely engaging and challenging”


“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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Visual Art and Design Visit to he National Zoo and Aquarium

On Friday 27 July, St Clare’s College Art and Photography students spent the day at the National Zoo and Aquarium. Senior Visual Art and Photography students were joined by Year 10 Visual Arts to explore a myriad of potential subjects. Using a range of drawing materials and digital technologies, students captured and created individual interpretations of their experiences. Senior Visual Arts students focused on the expressive qualities of eyes and explored the sculptural forms of hides, scales and feathers as inspiration for studio practice. Senior photography students practised their technical skills and capturing abstract images using shadows and camera techniques. Year 10 Visual Art students explored drawing techniques with a focus on texture, movement and line. Toni Smith Visual Arts Teacher

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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A Fun Start to the Semester for Languages Students Carousel Theatre

On the first day of Term 3, the Italian and French students were treated to a performance of Aladdin by the Carousel Theatre. We were also joined by a number of students from St Edmund's College and their teachers. Using a mixture of puppets, the target language and a little English to aid comprehension, students were challenged to spot the ways the story differed from the original. Having undertaken preparatory work before the holiday, this was an excellent way to start the semester. There was a real buzz in the air, both during the performance and afterwards, as students chatted to their friends on the way back to class. Student Comments: "Great story, fun break from usual classes. Aladdin puppet show 10/10" Hannah, Year 7 "Aladdin was très bien! I loved it and it was so funny!" Bella, Year 7

French Breakfast The next event was a Year 7 French breakfast, spread over a few days to accommodate the four Year 7 classes. Students were to order their hot chocolate and croissant in French, before enjoying them with their friends. Student comments: "The French breakfast was a great insight into the culture of France. Really enjoyable!" Grace, Year 7 "The croissant and hot chocolate made me feel as if I was in the French culture" Chelsea, Year 7 "The croissant melted and flaked as it touched my taste buds. It made me feel like I was flying" Lauren, Year 7 We would like to thank the Carousel Theatre for their performance, our wonderful canteen staff for ordering and serving the girls their French breakfast, Signora Conte for organising the breakfast and Bourne Sensei for organising the theatre performance. Rhiannon Richards French Teacher

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


Japanese Speech Contest

Congratulations to Lauren Moloney and Ava Warren in Year 9 and Tia Hatchman in Year 10 for participating in the ACT Japanese Speech Contest on Saturday 4 August. This is an exciting opportunity for students to challenge themselves and their Japanese speaking skills amongst students of the same age from highs schools across the ACT. All girls had to prepare a 2-3 minute speech in Japanese on a topic of their own choice. They all presented very well with Lauren Moloney placing third in her division. Her speech was about her recent trip to America and Canada, which she delivered in a very engaging manner. Well done to all the girls. Lisa Bourne Assistant Arts and Languages Coordinator

Japanese Rakugo and Kyougen

incorporated English and Japanese so it was very easy to understand. There was a storyline but it was told in a short space of time. It was fun to watch and interesting to learn about. We enjoyed this experience." Nina Kippaya and Breanna Williams "It wasn’t like anything that we’ve seen before, it was eye catching and funny. The combination of English and Japanese was done in a way that was very entertaining." Lauren Moloney Eleanor Jenkins and Holly May

On Wednesday 4 July Japanese students and Ms Johnson’s Year 7 Drama class were treated to a Rakugo and Kyougen (Japanese traditional storytelling) by Jarrod Hoare, a visiting bilingual storyteller offering tailored interactive performances of the traditional art form of Rakugo and Kyougen.

Below are some of the Year 9 girls’ impressions of the performance: "The Rakugo performance was very entertaining. The traditional Japanese comic storytelling was very interesting as it was very interesting as it was different to regular comedy. It was performed sitting down and

"The Rakugo and Kyougen gave us a real snapshot of traditional Japanese performing arts in a fun and interesting way. It was engaging for not only the students of Japanese, but also the drama students. It was interactive which was the best part." Sophie Chandler and Maia Schyvens

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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Falling Middle School Production

Rehearsals and work shopping of FALLING, the original middle school production, for students in Years 7 to 9 is now well under way. There are approximately 50 students who make up the cast and 20 students who will be working in our technical theatre crew. It's a wonderfully large group of talented and enthusiastic performers, designers, musicians and choreographers. Fifteen students in Years 10-12 are also assisting as mentors and tackling larger production roles such as assistant director, stage managers and choreographers. This is a great opportunity for students from across all year group to work together and for senior students to practice both their creative and leadership skills. Performances will take place in Week 14, Term 4. Stay tuned for further updates. Vanessa Johnson Arts and Languages Coordinator

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13


Youth Ministry

On Tuesday 31 July, the following students Grace Carton (Year 11), Sarah Jackson (Year 10), Chiara Strmota (Year 9) and Sarah Pearson our Youth Minister participated in the Sacramental program for Corpus Christ Parish, Gowrie. Our Youth Ministry team took the Year 3 students from St Clare of Assisi through a number of activities in preparation for them receiving their first Eucharist in the coming weeks. Yet again, our students were true witnesses of their faith and outstanding sharing God's message to others within our community. Marie Manning Mission and Ministry Coordinator

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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ACT Volleyball Association Spring Competition

The ACT Volleyball Association Spring Competition began on the first Tuesday of Term 3 with SCC entering three teams. In a very exciting addition to our sporting landscape we have two Year 7 teams competing in the Junior competition.

Year 7 Teams Two Year 7 teams (Teams Clancy and Cook) made their debut in the competition in a hard fought first

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round battle against each other, ultimately won by team Clancy under the coaching of Volleyball Captains Macey Radburn and Lucinda Trotman. The game saw both teams go point for point for the most part and the 25 – 19, 25 -21 scoreline was testimony to the evenness of the contest. Great serving by Sachi Proctor and Lauren Codd in particular, kept their respective scores ticking over whilst strong defensive work by Katherine Kneeshaw, Olivia Hansen, Lily Watts, Lara Myers and Rose Graham saw a series of rallies evolve. Kudos also to Georgia Roughley and Sophie Campbell for their endeavour and positivity on court. Each team then played different opposition in Round two, both going down, with team Cook taking the third set from Merici College just as time ran out. Debut players Charlise Dickson and Kaitlyn Kelly did well in their first competitive outing given they missed the first-round match. All in all the first two weeks have been a great success and we look

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

forward to watching both teams improve as the season progresses.

Seniors The Seniors (Team Pottharst) had a bye first round then lost an absolute heartbreaker in Round 2 against Belconnen VC. The team responded very well from losing the first set and with strong serving by Macey Radburn and Tash Morrison leading the way, and excellent defence from Lucinda Trotman, Eliza Foot, Babette Tosolini and Rebecca Nash the team convincingly won the second to tie the match at 1-1. SCC Pottharst made the early break and skipped out to a four point lead before a thundering serving run down the stretch by Belconnen’s number one player got them in front on the second last point before time ran out, SCC going down 17-19 in the third. David Garrity Acting Sports Coordinator


Weekend Netball

starting a player down. A pretty tall and exceedingly confident Bullants shooting combination saw them shoot out to a lead approaching double digits as team Timms found it difficult to lock down the extra Bullants.

With only two weeks to go before the finals series begins SCC have a number of teams in contention for not only play offs, but minor premierships and titles. SCC Kerr (Year 8s) are the undefeated leaders of the Intermediates Div 2 comp, whilst SCC's flagship team, SCC Ellis (Years 10-12) currently lead the Senior Div 1 competition having convincingly won each of their ten games to date. This weeks sees a top of the table clash in Intermediates Div 3 with the undefeated SCC Fraser (Year 7) taking on second place SCC Clarke (Year 9) in a battle that will undoubtedly decide who wins the minor premiership in that division. SCC McKay (Year 9) are currently favoured to take the Intermediates Div 1 title after some resounding wins through the season to this point, whilst in Seniors Div 2 both SCC Goolagong and SCC Freeman are charging up the ladder in 3rd and 4th respectively, looking to secure a top two finish and the double chance come finals time. Please find below some match reports from the most recent round.

Intermediates Division 4 – SCC Timms vs Bullants It was always going to be a tough ask for SCC Timms as they were up against a high-flying, ladder leading team from Bullants. The task was made even tougher with the team

After the quarter time break SCC Timms began to better transition the ball with Imogen Bull running her heart out through the midcourt. Hannah White showed great determination and grit as GD, picking off a number of balls to stem the tide heading to the Bullants goal. A solid second quarter effort saw the scoreboard begin to tick over for team Timms. With the arrival of the seventh player the game swung in momentum with SCC Timms dominating for the remainder of the match, in the end drawing one, and winning two of the last three quarters. In the end a couple of steadying goals from Bullants saw them keep the tenacious Timms at arms length, eventually securing a four goal victory.

Intermediates Division 3 – SCC Clarke vs Bullants SCC Clarke made it eight wins in a row against a very competitive and finals bound Bullants side to set up a mouth watering 1st versus 2nd clash with SCC Fraser in the next round in a match likely to decide the minor premiership. Whilst the team got the win, it wasn’t until the last five minutes that they hit the front for the first time. The team then closed the game out with some cool-headed offence and very strong defence in what proved to be excellent preparation for the upcoming finals series. The match pretty much went goal for goal through the first quarter. With Jacqui Di Fronzo running the midcourt through the centre position, great link play with Georgia Boyes and youngster Charlise Dickson saw the team free up both Eliza Fleming-Berry and Josephine Wood in the circle to peg back the

difference to two at the last change. Up this point Sophie Burgess had been the dominant shooter for SCC in a great display. All the while Charlotte Stimson was on fire in defence. With Charlotte rotating out in the final period someone would need to step up, and this they did, Abbey Alexander grabbing a handful of intercepts in the defensive circle, ably assisted by a fine defensive cameo from Eliza. Cienwen Velasco also impressed when the game was in the balance with great pressure and tight bodywork on her opposing player. In the end a couple of great stops saw the team string four goals together to take the lead out to three with a couple of minutes to go.

Seniors Division 3 – SCC O’Neill vs CGGS A sixteen goal first quarter suggested this game was going to based on attack, both teams demonstrating a free-flowing style going into the first break, SCC O’Neill down by two. Great rebound work by Alex Greenwood at GK made the Grammar girls earn every circle entry, which, backed by the industrious, hard running Analise Greenhalgh as WD saw SCC O’Neill benefit through a number of turnovers leading to goals to keep the game on a knife’s edge. Up front Emma Dailly had found her range and was shooting at a good clip, ably assisted by Brooke Baran who was always a threat near the goal with her agility and ability to be in the right place at the right time. Thoughout the tight middle stages Gen Haswell’s outstanding court coverage and hustle play at centre worked to SCC’s advantage. Going into the final quarter the game was there to be taken by both sides, Grammar with the slight edge on the scoreboard. Just into the fourth quarter Grammar went on a mini run banking four consecutive goals on end to effectively put an end to the match given the short amount of time remaining. David Garrity Acting Sports Coordinator

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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Snowsports

July is a busy month for the St Clare’s Snowsports Team. During the middle weekend of the school holidays Dana Forster competed in the Cross Country 2018 NSW Sprints and came a magnificent fifth. The following day many of the team competed in the Scots Race, hosted by Scots College from Sydney. This is the first race of the season and there was a buzz of excitement, topped off by a bluebird day. First time racer Zara Carson and senior team member Lara Groeneweg raced on the Boardercross for this event. The skiers raced on the Front Valley Alpine course. All the team raced well, with Cailin Hempstead placing fourth in Division 2 and Jenna Hempstead placing fifth in Division 3. Tuesday 24 July was a very special day for our Snowsports Team, the team was presented with our first official St Clare’s Snowsports jackets. Thank you to Mr Cooney for making the presentation. Huge thanks to the parent sponsors, Rob Rosin from Rosin Bros, Custom Home Builders and Samantha Crompvoets from Rapid Context for making our jackets a reality. Following the jacket presentation, the team headed up the Monaro Highway once more to compete in the ACT/Southern NSW Interschools Championships. On Wednesday we headed up to Perisher for

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Championships the following St Clare’s Snowsports team members have progressed to the Australian Interschools Championships to be held at Perisher in September: }} Div 2 Snowboard GS – Lara G, Chelsea S and Claudia D }} Div 2 Snowboard Cross - Lara G, Chelsea S and Claudia D }} Div 2 Skier Cross A – Cailin H, Dana S and Chelsea S }} Individual qualifiers - Zara C for Div 3 Snowboard Cross and Jenna H for Div 3 Alpine.

the first day of competition. Our snowboarders raced in both Snowboard Alpine and Boarder-Cross in a busy day. We had four boarders competing in these competitions all of whom raced well in windy and icy conditions. Congratulations to Zara Carson and Claudia Downes for making their interschools debuts in style. On Thursday our skiers raced the skier-cross event. Massive congratulations to first time racers Matilda Duncan, Louise Stevenson, Harriet Stubbs and Annie Tonner Dixon who all overcame their pre-race butterflies to record fantastic times for their first races. Sarah Rosin, Amber Vink, Cailin Hempstead, Jenna Hempstead and Zara Egan were not so nervous as they had all raced before. On Friday we once again had difficult weather conditions with rain, snow and fog affecting the Alpine event for our skiers. Our jackets were a standout on the day. Not only making it easy to identify our teammates on the course but for the amazing and positive feedback from other schools, parents and the public about how good they looked and how well our team represented the school. Following exceptional results at the ACT/Southern NSW Interschools

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

Thank you to Mr Cooney who came up on Friday to support the team. Thank you as always to the parents who support us. Massive thanks to Mrs Batch and Ms Baker for accompanying us, supporting us and helping us to be the best we can. Cailin Hempstead 2018 Snowsports Captain


Inspirational Women

2011

Class of Bridget Perman

In Bridget's final year of school, she was Wirana House Captain and loved every minute of it. After graduating in 2011, Bridget took a ‘gap’ year and worked at a small boutique clothing store in the city. The following year, she went to university to pursue a degree in Psychology with the aim of being a Psychologist. At the end of her first year of university, Bridget was still working at the boutique clothing store, now as a manager. The owners of the store offered for her to purchase their business and run it as her own; she was only 20 years old. After careful consideration, Bridget declined their offer and instead she deferred her studies and went on to open her own Vintage Clothing Store at the age of 21. Bridget ran the shop for two successful and fun-filled years before deciding to close the doors and move on to her next adventure. She still sells her vintage clothing collection at fashion markets on the weekends. For the next couple of years, Bridget worked in school administration, then she decided to pursue a degree in Social Work. Bridget is currently studying to be a social worker with the aim of one day working with vulnerable women, children and young people. Funnily enough, some of the girls in her university course were in Years 7 and 8 when she was in Year 12 and she was their House Captain! Bridget lives on a farm with her partner Josh who she met in Year 9, he was a student at St Edmund's College. They will be celebrating their ten year anniversary this month. They have two goats, six chickens, one rabbit and one dog. Bridget also helps Josh run his dog boarding business on the farm which can be great fun. Bridget said, "St Clare’s was a wonderful school and I loved the community spirit we had there; the sports carnivals, St Clare’s day and fundraising weeks. I will always look back on my time there with fond memories."

2005

Class of Natalie D'Rozario (nee. Bannan) Natalie attended St Clares College from 2000-2005 for Years 7-12. Natalie was always interested in science, however, in her final year at St Clares, Natalie undertook a human biology elective. After taking this subject, Natalie's interest in science and the human body developed further and after graduating she undertook a Bachelor of Medical Science at the Australian National University. Unsure of what career direction she wanted to take, Natalie begun working at Capital Pathology as a pathology aide in the microbiology department. After a few months she decided that she wanted a career that combined her love for human biology and medicine with her passion for helping people, and so decided to do her Masters in Physiotherapy. Natalie has now been a physiotherapist for six years and treats all types of musculoskeletal, sporting and workplace injuries. Natalie has a special interest in women’s health physiotherapy and enjoys treating pregnant women with back and pelvic pain along with other musculoskeletal issues associated with this stage of life. Due to her love for this area of physiotherapy, Natalie started a business in 2015 called Bub & Me Physiotherapy, delivering physiotherapy-led prenatal and postnatal exercise classes to Canberra and the surrounding regions. After the birth of her daughter Lena, Natalie developed an even deeper understanding, interest and appreciation for women’s health. She primarily enjoys working with women not only before and after birth, but also throughout each stage of their lives. Natalie has now also recently opened her own private physiotherapy practice called Origin Physiotherapy & Wellness in Deakin, ACT, where she sees a wide range of patients and her passion for physiotherapy continues to grow. Contributions are greatlly welcomed from past students. Send 300 words plus a current image to media@stcc.act.edu.au

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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In the Headlines

Contributions are greatly received for any updates on student activities. Content and images can be sent to media@stcc.act.edu.au

Lucy is to perform with the Canberra Youth Orchestra

St Clare's Arts and Culture Captain Lucy Sugerman will be the guest soloist at a major concert presented by the Canberra Youth Orchestra at Llewellyn Hall on Saturday 29 September. Lucy will be performing many of her original songs as well as her audition piece, David Bowie's Space Oddity, for The Voice. Tickets are available through Ticketek.

Asian Grand Prix

ACT Netball Team

Congratulations to Abigail Davidson (Year 7) who is a finalist in the annual ballet competition the Asian Grand Prix. Abigail is currently competing at the Asian Grand Prix in Hong Kong.

Congratulations to Jemima Grimmond (Year 7) who has been selected in the Under 12’s ACT Netball Team. She will be competing at the National Championships in Darwin from 15 - 21 September.

Calisthenics Nationals

Australian Schoolgirls Hockey Championships Well done to Madeline Dooley (Year 10) for making the U16 Australian Schoolgirls Championships for Hockey. Madeline has been competing this week in Queensland at the Championships.

Quantum Leap

During the school holidays, six students represented the ACT in the ACF Calisthenics Nationals at the Canberra Theatre. Chloe Taunton (Year 11), Sophie Taunton (Year 8), Josie Gaudie-Craze (Year 10), McKinley Darby (Year 10), Sarah Goodwin (Year 10) and Lara Haines (Year 9) were all a part of the ACT Rep Intermediate Team, who competed against other states and successfully came 3rd overall. Additionally Sophie performed her amazing Warewolf Solo and did the ACT proud. They showed us what strong and confident dancers they’ve become. Well done girls!

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

Sarah Long (Year 9) is apart of the Quantum Leap dance production, Two Zero playing this weekend at the Playhouse Theatre. There are tickets available for the performance on Friday 10 and Saturday 11 August through Canberra Theatre. Best of luck for the performances Sarah!

ACT Schools Basketball Team Congratulations to Sophie Brennan (Year 7) who has made the 12 and under ACT Schools Basketball team to compete at the Schoolsports Australia Basketball tournament in Darwin. Sophie has been named as co-captain of the team. Well done Sophie.


St Clare’s Day: Friday 17 August

Family

Breakfast

Mr Brad Cooney would like to invite the students and parents of St Clare’s College to a family breakfast. We are delighted to welcome Sonia Di Mezza, Acting CEO at ACT Disability, Aged and Carer Advocacy Service as our guest speaker. When: 8 am - 9 am, Friday 7 September Cost: $10.00 payment via www.trybooking.com/XNHG RSVP: Friday 31 August (Please note places are limited)

Hope to see you there!

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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AUGUST 2018

Games and Apps recommended for ages 17+ are not restricted – meaning anyone of any age is able to download them, even if you have set your child’s date of birth in a Family Sharing or Family Link account. Ensuring “Ask to Buy” is turned on, and your own “Purchase Sharing” is switched off – Settings / AppleID / Family Sharing (Apple) or Play Store App Store / Menu / Account / Family / Manage Family Members (Google Play) will give you control of their apps and purchases. It is worth noting that age restrictions are set by the app developers, so parents should satisfy themselves independently of the app’s suitability.

12+

YUBO – LIVE VIDEO WITH FRIENDS Entertaining

Adult themes Mild violence Mild language Sexual themes

ABOUT:

12+

DISCORD Educational Fun

Chat with strangers

ABOUT:

Discord is a social gaming app that allows users to connect with each other using both voice and text channels. It allows gamers to talk to one another in real time whilst simultaneously playing games. Users need to log in with a user name and can send private messages or create and participate in group chats.

Yubo (Formerly Yellow), is a social media app that encourages users to find new friends online. It allows users to choose friends by swiping left or right on their profile photo. A central feature of the app is location sharing so users can make friends with people in their local area. The app allows for group chats and live video streaming, where anyone can view the uploaded material. The app links contacts from Snapchat and Instagram automatically when friends are accepted or added.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

As with any app that allows kids to livestream, parents have raised concerns around privacy and the potential for child grooming. Anyone can view group chats, and users can share inappropriate content. While the app is designed for children 13 years and over, there is no age verification required. Yubo has been described as Snapchat’s version of Tinder, where users swipe left or right on users’ profiles, depending on whether they like the look of them. A concern raised around this Tinder-esque method is that it can potentially send the harmful message to children that they will be valued or chosen based solely on their outward appearance.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

While Discord has made online gaming communication much easier, it is still essentially a social networking tool and as such carries the same potential risks for children. While the recommended age for users of Discord is 13, the app is geared primarily at older teens and adults. A large majority of online games include mature content and themes, which are discussed in the forums on Discord. While the app itself doesn’t promote questionable content, some concerns have been raised over the use of vulgar, over-sexualised or abusive language, a potential feature of most online forums and group conversations. For more information and helpful parent tips regarding your child’s tech use, visit www.perimeterguardian.com.au/insights

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


Who is exceeding expecta�on? This is an opportunity to showcase and recognise their extraordinary ‘above and beyond’ commitment, innova�on and talent. The Recogni�on Awards pay tribute to exemplary prac�ce, dedica�on, and innova�on contributed to the system of Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn. The Awards will be celebrated during Catholic Schools Week Mass 4pm Friday 21 September 2018. For more informa�on and to nominate click here! Award Categories 1. Mission - Faith forma�on, religious educa�on, Catholic iden�ty 2. Performance - Student engagement, learning progress, teaching performance 3. Service - Pastoral care, wellbeing of students/staff, parent engagement and sa�sfac�on, social jus�ce, outreach 4. The Director’s Award - In recogni�on of special service to Catholic Educa�on 5. The Archbishop’s Religious Educa�on Award - An individual or group will be selected by the Archbishop in recogni�on of emerging leadership in Religious Educa�on. Categories 1, 2 & 3 will recognise two awardees - an individual or group nominated from NSW and one individual or group nominated from the ACT. Nomina�ons can be made by any member of the school community – students, staff or parents. Nominees will have demonstrated one or more of the following: a. achieving exemplary progress b. implemen�ng novel approaches c. posi�ve influence on other parts of the system or could be scaled across the system. d. Demonstrated best prac�ce, a system approach or ini�a�ve that can be scaled and imported to the system e. Extraordinary service over and above normal du�es f. Collabora�ve effort of great benefit to the system Nomina�ons close: COB 17 AUGUST


Up Coming Events Saturday 11 August:

St Clare's Feast Day

Sunday 12 August:

Snowsports ACT Citizen's Race

Monday 13 August:

ASC Hockey

Monday 13 August:

ICAS Mathematics Competition

Tuesday 14 August:

Senior Focus Day (Year 12 only)

Wednesday 15 August: RAP Meeting Friday 17 August:

St Clare's Day

Wednesday 22 August: Snowsports NSW/ACT Cross Country Championships Monday 27 August:

ASC Basketball

Tuesday 28 and Wednesday 29 August: PISA Assessment Wednesday 29 August: House Assembly Thursday 30 August: Year 11 Retreat Day

Notices

Daily notices are emailed to all staff and students and are available daily in SEQTA.

Club The STEM

b) meets lu C e c n ie (Sc nchtimes Tuesday Lu in P111

Contact Us: P: 6260 9400 E: media@stcc.act.edu.au St Clare’s College 1 McMillan Crescent Griffith ACT 2603

stcc.act.edu.au

Maths Hom ew Help ork (Junior Stu dents)

Thursday D ay 4 3:30 - 4:30 pm in W10 3a Tuesday D ay 7 lunchti nd me in W103

Tutoring for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

Day 4 Period 1 (Year 7) and Period 2 (Year 7 and 8), Day 8 Period 1 (Year 9) all other students are welcome to come as well or see Mrs Leer for any other Tutoring assistance.

Profile for St Clare's College Canberra

Tidings, Edition 8 2018  

Tidings, Edition 8 2018  

Profile for stclares