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Edition 3 9 April 2018

In this edition

Principal’s Message According to Daniel Goleman we need to place as much importance on teaching our children the essential skills of Emotional Intelligence as we do on academic measures like the Tertiary Entrance Statement and NAPLAN results.

Exactly what is Emotional Intelligence?

Why Do We Need Emotional Intelligence?

The term encompasses the following five characteristics and abilities:

Research in brain-based learning suggests that emotional health is fundamental to effective learning. According to a report from the National Centre for Clinical Infant Programs, the most critical element for a student’s success in school is an understanding of how to learn (Emotional Intelligence, p. 193.) The key ingredients for this understanding are:

1. Self-awareness–knowing your emotions, recognizing feelings as they occur, and discriminating between them 2. Mood management–handling feelings so they’re relevant to the current situation and you react appropriately 3. Self-motivation–”gathering up” your feelings and directing yourself towards a goal, despite self-doubt, inertia, and impulsiveness 4. Empathy–recognizing feelings in others and tuning into their verbal and non-verbal cues 5. Managing relationships– handling interpersonal interaction, conflict resolution, and negotiations

Principal’s Message

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Diagnostic Inventory of School Alignment (DISA) Survey

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From the Desk of the AP Curriculum and Assessment

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From the Desk of the AP Pastoral Care

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Meet our Teachers

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Easter Liturgy

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Student Representative Council Update

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Meet the Ozobots!

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What is happening in Science

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Japanese

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Homestay Required

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OzCLO Results

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Hospitality

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Duke of Edinburgh International Award

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Health Haiku’s

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Representative Sport

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Weekly Sport

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Confidence

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Curiosity

Uniform Update

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Intentionality

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Self-control

School TV: Physical Activity and Exercise

Relatedness

Inspirational Women

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In the Headlines

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Capacity to communicate

Parent Advice Online Safety

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Ability to cooperate.

Upcoming Events

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Notices

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These traits are all aspects of Emotional Intelligence. Basically, a student who learns to learn is much more apt to succeed. Emotional Intelligence has proven a better predictor of future success than traditional methods like standardized test scores. Hence, the great interest in Emotional Intelligence on the part of corporations, universities, and schools nationwide. The idea of Emotional Intelligence has inspired research and curriculum development throughout these facilities. Researchers have concluded that people who manage their own feelings well and deal effectively with others are more likely to live content lives. Plus, happy people are more prone to retain information and do so more effectively than dissatisfied people. Building one’s Emotional Intelligence has a life-long impact. Many parents

and educators, alarmed by increasing levels of conflict in young school children–from low self-esteem to early drug and alcohol use to depression, are rushing to teach students the skills necessary for Emotional Intelligence. The academic, spiritual and co-curricular activities offered at St Clare’s support our students to become more confident, curious, communicative and cooperative and thus we believe that they will be better prepared to navigate through the changes that will continue to arise during their education and when they move into careers and life after school. Adapted from http://www. funderstanding.com/category/ content/emotional-intelligence

We wish Keely Small (Year 11, Makara House) all the very best as she competes in the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in the 800m on Thursday 12 April. Keely is a remarkable young women who is equally as dedicated to her studies as she is to the track. The St Clare’s College community and indeed all of Canberra will be right behind Keely. At the start of Term 2 it is expected that all students will be in full winter uniform. I wish to thank the parents and the girls for their on-going cooperation with uniform matters. The standard of uniform is generally very good at present. May I take the opportunity to thank everyone for another great term and to wish you all a safe and restful term break. Best wishes, Brad Cooney Principal

Diagnostic Inventory of School Alignment (DISA) Survey As the College embarks on its journey with the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) in the implementation of IDEAS (Innovative Designs for Enhancing Achievements in Schools), it is important to gain a picture of where we are beginning and one possible way to begin this journey is through obtaining the thoughts of all stakeholders. Staff and students have already undertaken the DISA (Diagnostic Inventory of School Alignment) survey. It is now time for parents/carers to add their voice to this survey. Please click on the following link to complete the survey https://disasurvey.acelleadership.org.au/survey/abbe1abf Your response would be appreciated by Friday 4 May. Thank you for your assistance and encouragement in the future direction of our College.

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


From the Desk of the AP Curriculum and Assessment

formed, from different influences, but on the same topic. It is about exercising internal leadership—not the type of leadership that takes control of something—rather preparedness within oneself to be prepared to adapt and change should circumstance, reasoning and thought lead to that conclusion.

“Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think.” - Albert Einstein

As we approach the end of the first term, it is an understandable thought to wonder where the year is going. For all of us, I know it has been an extremely busy and, at times, challenging period. Given this, I do hope that your daughter has settled well into her new year group and is discovering more about herself and her potential with each passing day. At St Clare’s College, it is my ambition to lead a curriculum and assessment team who involve themselves with your daughter’s education and development in innovative and creative ways. We want to deliver, not only the best education, but also the most relevant education to prepare your daughter for the many challenges ahead. In this regard, as educators, we also look to challenge ourselves; education is dynamic and if we cannot look to change the way we approach our tasks, then we will likely not deliver the optimal education outcomes to satisfy you or your daughter. One point I am very passionate about is critical thinking and, in particular, its relationship with the Internet and ‘information age.’ For some time we have been in an age of unprecedented information flows. To some extent, many of the students at St Clare’s College are better informed than other students who walked before them. Access to information

creates opportunities for knowledge and decisions, and provides greater assurance for your daughters moving forward. But does it? In my view, the access to and speed with which information may be transferred has created a superficiality that denies students wonderful opportunities to think critically. Knowledge of information of itself does not define who a student is, nor does it lead to the acquisition of wisdom. Understanding what that information means and its relationship to other pieces of information in the context where the implications of that information and these relationships may be debated beyond that which appears on a screen, remains the most important attribute to enable critical thinking. It is also our greatest challenge. In a world where information is available on an almost ubiquitous scale, there is a danger that we are enhancing superficiality. Critical thinking is not about the peeling-back of multiple website layers. It is about asking questions to the extent that that information is understood for the context of the individual concerned. It is about forming a view that one can hold in a discussion. It is about collaborating with others about these views, not to produce an homogenous solution— for to do so creates its own superficiality—but to understand how differing viewpoints may be

As parents and guardians you play a critical role in assisting us to shape a critical thinking model for the students at St Clare’s College. Your discussions with your daughters and how those discussions are unpacked, is pivotal to developing their awareness of and confidence with thinking at deeper levels. By doing this, you are enhancing critical thinking. We encourage students at St Clare’s College to be curious and inquisitive; to ask questions and to challenge conventional thought within respectful boundaries. Our leaders of tomorrow cannot just be people informed by the Internet. This is but one enabling tool to uncovering information—the veracity of which remains to be tested. That test is often applied through enquiry, conjecture and debate; in the home, at school and through friendship groups. Not all of life should be serious, and while we can all have fun exploring the superficiality of the Internet and information age, it is also important to spare time for personal reflection and collaborative engagement on the issues. The development of a critical thinking mindset remains an important focus of the curriculum at St Clare’s College. It is a fundamental enabler for successful life outside the College. While information will always remain important, true knowledge is derived from the manner in which that information is processed, enabling us all to think critically on the many issues before us today. Sharyn Quirk Assistant Principal of Curriculum and Assessment

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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From the Desk of the AP Pastoral Care

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The Importance of Powerful Parent-Teacher Partnerships I recently read a blog written by Linda Strade (a researcher and writer at Wesley College, Perth) that really struck me at this time of year with parent-teacher interviews happening at the end of the term. Linda discussed the different, but just as powerful knowledge banks that parents (relational knowledge) and teachers (expert knowledge) hold. As a parent myself I know that I give my two children the support and confidence they need to succeed in their learning socially and academically but I know that the partnership with their school is key in assisting my family to educate our children. It is the teachers that work with my children every day that have the expert knowledge in education and curriculum and have experience with the developmental stages they move through. Sometimes in schools, the parent and teacher partnership is weakened. This can happen when teachers are overly sensitive to criticism by parents. Teachers see their job as a vocation and it is part of their identity, so when challenged

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they question their understanding of self. When there is a clash between corporate expectations and a parent is overly demanding and aggressive and the vocation of educating and nurturing children, the supportive partnership is challenged. When parents as the primary and continuing educators of their children and the school whose purpose is to help a family educate a child do not have the child at the centre of the partnership, our children don’t see adults invested in their care, on the same page and so lose the opportunity for safe relationships with all involved. Linda has the following four recommendations for our partnership: }} Relationships with teachers and other school staff are a child’s entry point into an adult world. If those relationships are positive, it is a great advantage for a child. It empowers them to face the world with an expectation of collaboration, mentorship and growth.

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

Children don’t have as many significant adults outside of the home as they used to. This is due to the increase in smaller families, separated families, migration and the fact that parenting has become very private. All of this means that teachers have become more significant in providing different versions of what it means to be a happy, successful adult. If a supportive parent-teacher partnership exists, kids can seek clarity and different perspectives from teachers who are invested in their care. Children learn about relationships by seeing relationships. The partnership parents and teachers have, and the regard and respect they show one another, can have a powerful impact. Ultimately learning is compromised. If the relationship between teacher and student is sullied by undermining at home, the child loses. Respect breeds trust and trust is required for effective learning. It’s important to let your child know you trust their teachers. If you don’t have that trust, that’s a conversation you need to have privately with the school.

The Parent Charter for Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn (page 5) is all about mutually respectful partnerships that are all working towards the common goal of growing and nurturing young people. Our powerful parent-teacher relationships exist because of our common interest and bond and it is so integral that we map our way forward together. St Clare’s College welcomes you to the Parent- Teacher nights being held on Thursday 5 and Tuesday 10 April. Throughout the year, teachers can be contacted via email using the teacher’s Firstname.Surname@stcc.act.edu.au All colleagues at St Clare’s are always very pleased to respond to parental communications and will do their utmost best to respond within forty-eight hours. Natalie Dickie Assistant Principal Pastoral Care


PARENT CHARTER FOR CATHOLIC SCHOOLS IN THE ARCHDIOCESE OF CANBERRA & GOULBURN

Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Canberra Goulburn work in partnership with parents and their school communities to promote a shared responsibility for the education of each child. This Charter provides the principles and expectations that will help to achieve this critical partnership.

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This partnership recognises: Parents as the primary and continuing educators of their children. The contribution that parents make by valuing the Catholic identity of our schools. The shared responsibility for the moral, spiritual, emotional and social development of students in our schools.

Parents can expect that their child’s school will: Provide an excellent education based on the traditions of Catholic teachings. Strive to maintain a safe, secure and welcoming environment for their children. Involve parents as the first educators in any decisions that affect their child’s learning or well being. Provide timely and accurate information about their child’s progress. Demonstrate respect for the privacy of families in all interactions, including through the use of technology and social media.

The School can expect that parents will: Actively support school policies and expectations. Work collaboratively with school leaders, teachers and staff. Respect the skills, knowledge and experience of school leaders and teachers. Demonstrate respect for the school and staff in all communications including digital technologies and social media. Contribute to the life of the school in ways that reflect their interests, skills and experience. Support their child’s consistent and punctual attendance at school. Fulfil their commitment to pay all fees in a timely manner, and in hardship circumstances to actively work with the school to seek out mutually suitable arrangements for their payment. Respect a teacher’s working hours in terms of response times to emails and phone calls. Request a formal interview time with their child’s teacher when there is a concern to be discussed.

Integral partners in the life of school communities, the school with parents have a co-responsibility to: Value and respect the Catholic identity of the School, its relationship to its parish community and the teaching of Catholic beliefs. Model Christian values and support the ethos of Catholic schools with all members of the School community. Value and respect the diversity of faiths and cultures within the School community. Contribute to a welcoming and inclusive school community. Support the child’s learning at school and home. Contribute to consultation and decision making processes. Work toward resolving grievances through respectful discussion and negotiation. Contribute to a culture where privacy and confidentiality are assured. Ensure respectful and caring relationships are reflected in the ways in which staff, students and parents interact when engaging in sporting and extra-curricular activities. Acknowledge and support the work of the School Community Council/Board and associated committees.

Parent is used in this document as a term to include natural, adoptive or foster parents, guardians and caregivers of students.

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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Meet our Teachers... Natalie Dickie, Assistant Principal Pastoral Care I have been blessed to be a part of the St Clare’s College community for 8 years as an Assistant Principal in both the Staffing and Administration portfolio and the Pastoral Care portfolio, which I have returned to this year. I first started teaching 24 years ago as a Physical Education and Health Teacher and a Japanese teacher and have over the years continued to grow my skills and expertise teaching Inclusive Education classes and Religious Education. The things I love about working in the teaching vocation is the fast paced and extremely diverse situations and experiences I have and share with students, their families and teachers every day. A day for me

might include: inspiring the teams I work with by building the capacity of others; planning; implementing and evaluating educational policies and practices that will best support student learning and wellbeing; working with students, their families and/or external agencies to solve complex people issues that ensure our Catholic values are at the forefront of our relationships with each other. I am a lifelong learner and hold a Bachelor of Education, Master of Education, Master of Religious Education degrees, Growth Coaching Accreditation and I am a National Assessor of Highly Accomplished and Lead Teachers in Australia.

Patrick Elliott, Physical Education and Health Coordinator My role at the College is Physical Education and Health Coordinator which allows me to work with likeminded teachers, with the overall goal to promote healthy lifestyles to the students within the College. I have held this position for 2 years since moving back to Canberra from Kalgoorlie in Western Australia where I taught for 4 years. I am passionate about Physical Education and Health and the idea of creating healthy students who develop into healthy adults. I have a particular interest in exercise science within the senior classes which gives me the opportunity to teach the girls about how the body works and why it works a specific way and how this can affect performance. The junior classes allow me to teach the girls new and exciting skills which they may not have the opportunity to do outside of school. Health allows me to talk to the girls about the different aspects of health and how they impact their overall lifestyle/ health. With technology having such a big influence on teenagers today

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

I also have an interest in how we can incorporate technology in the Physical Education sector. The most enjoyable aspect of my job is seeing students achieve/ successfully complete a skill they have not previously been able to do. The look on the students face and sense of achievement they have makes the job even more rewarding. I also enjoy being able to have conversations with students around current topics of interest related to Physical Education and Health which gives me an insight into the lives of the students outside of the College. Physical Education teaching is extremely rewarding allowing me to be outside teaching students about how to be healthy not only while they are at school but when they leave school. If you cannot find me in my office you will find me outside with a class making physical education fun and enjoyable.


Meg Gardiner, Assistant English Coordinator 2018 is my fourteenth year of teaching English – all of which have been at St Clare’s. I have been the Assistant Coordinator for a number of years where I have enjoyed working with colleagues to help implement the English curriculum and develop our learning goals. This position also enables me to broaden my relationships with students in non-classroom situations. Having had a previous career in public relations and marketing, I find the challenges and rewards of teaching stimulating and invigorating. I love teaching English and the opportunities it provides me to encourage students to explore their ideas and the world. I am passionate about bringing new texts and ideas to students, these can be part of the literary cannon as well as concepts that are applicable to the 21st century. Many students are scared or constrained about engaging with new texts, and yet when they do, it can be such a wonderful experience for them. One of the most exciting things for me as an educator, is when a student comes to me and

says she loved the text we looked at, it made her really think about the world differently, and she is now going to read/watch more from that author – success!! It is these “ah ha” moments that make teaching worthwhile and enable me to see the bright future that so many of the St Clare’s girls will have. I know that the world and my “old age” are going to be in good hands. I try to bring energy and enthusiasm to all that I teach and encourage my students to find this within themselves. I live with much joie de vivre and, based on comments from my students, this is evident to them and adds to the spirit within the classroom. In particular I have an abiding interest in Jane Austen, presenting at the Jane Austen Festival Australia for the last five years. I also love speculative texts and steam punk, both of which I read avidly in my own time. Remember: a girl can never have too many flamingos; and the bigger the cat, the better (I love my Maine Coons!).

Angela Crompton, Science Teacher I am a Science educator with over 10 years of education experience across various types of schools and organisations, working with learners of different ages and backgrounds. I started at St Clare's College this year and I am currently teaching Year 8 and 9 Science, Year 11 Biology and Year 7 Maths Pathways. I have a Bachelor of Science (Hon Environmental Science) and a Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary). Starting my career as an ecologist, I realised that I wanted to make a difference through environmental education and decided to become a teacher - to help shape the future by educating the present. In 2009, I spent 4 months teaching senior Biology at Edmund Rice Secondary School in Arusha Tanzania, an experience that helped me understand the importance of effective

communication, resourcefulness and relating science to everyday life and experiences. I have worked in education and outreach at both Questacon and CSIRO, developing resources and programs and delivering professional learning and workshops for teachers, STEM professionals and students in inquiry based learning, innovation and entrepreneurship. I am passionate about all things STEM, cross curricular teaching, science communication, sustainability and social justice. My favourite subjects at school were Maths and Art and my favourite quote is “be the change you want to see”.

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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Easter Liturgy

On Thursday 29 March we held our Easter Liturgy. The liturgy was run by the St Clare’s Youth Ministry Team and Music Ministry Team, lead by Anjalie Upasena, Faith and Community Captain. The team created a moving liturgy commencing with a re-enactment of the Stations of the Cross with Youth Ministers Jake Wenger from St Francis Xavier College and Dillon Fernando from Marist College Canberra playing the role of Jesus. The students and staff were asked to come forward, to light a candle and place it at the Station of the Cross that spoke to them. Marie Manning Mission and Ministry

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


Student Representative Meet the Council Update Ozobots! Last week we introduced four Ozobots to the Learning Commons Makerspace. Ozobots are pocket sized robots that you can program with the stroke of a texta. The Ozobots have been available for students to meet in the Learning Commons at lunchtime for a week and will then be available every Maker Monday. The students who have used the Ozobots thus far have had a great time programming them to follow the path they set, or even to do a moonwalk! We also have a competition to name our Ozobots and the entries have been coming in thick and fast! The SRC has been working on their focus for 2018, Healthy Bodies. The first major activity organised by the SRC is a Q&A program on 11 April during Pastoral Care, for Years 9 to 12. We have assembled an incredible panel of experts, Dr Truong Sugerman, Chiropractor; Ms Natasha Cole, Physiotherapist from TORQUE Physiotherapy, Dr Alice Heikkonen, Clinical Psychologist from Psychsessions; and, Janelle Croatto, Accredited Dietitian with FEEDInc. This panel will answer students’ questions relating to healthy eating and exercise.

Renee Jones Learning Commons Coordinator

Last week, the SRC welcomed their newest members, Peytan and Alicia from Year 7, and they got straight to work, contributing to the analysis of the Mobile Phone and Technology survey data. This survey was completed by students, parents and staff in Term 4 last year, and we have been reading and sorting the responses from all groups. Members of the SRC will bbe presenting the findings to the Executive Team, and an update will be provided to the school community in the near future. The SRC are always looking for new ideas and to hear and promote student voices. Please contact your year level representatives with any ideas, concerns or suggestions: }}

Year 12: Sarah Ashleigh and Edwina Kelly

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Year 11: Ella Hickey and Ashley Tang

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Year 10: Analise Greenhalgh and Emma Ianniello

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Year 9: Sophie Thorp and Grace McCarter

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Year 8: Theresa Joseph and Sarah Rosin

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Year 7: Peytan Hughes and Alicia Thomas

Lydia Milosavljevic, School Captain and SRC Chair and Ms Allsopp, SRC Facilitator

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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What is happening in Science... Science After School Tutoring Science after school tutoring will start next term. It will be held on Tuesday’s after school from 3.30pm to 4.30pm in P111. Please take advantage of this opportunity. A note in your daughter’s diary is all you need to do.

ICAS Science Competition If you would like your daughter to take part in the ICAS Science competition, please email Janet Worontschak at Janet. Worontschak@stcc.act.edu.au. You just need to let her know your daughter’s name and year group.

Science Club This runs every Tuesday at lunchtime in P111. We do fun activities. The girls just need to turn up and they are not committed to coming every week.

Year 11 and 12 Environmental Science Excursion As part of the renewable energy unit the Year 11 and 12 Earth and Environmental Science Class went on an excursion to the Mugga Lane Resource Management Centre. The students went on an interactive tour, using virtual reality headphones, to see what happens to waste after the kerbside bins are collected. This was followed by a bus tour of the Mugga Lane landfill. They also visited the landfill gas power station (methane to electricity) that generates enough electricity to power 4,000 houses and the leachate environmental dam. On the way, we passed the solar farm. Janet Worontschak Science Coordinator

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


Japanese

Japanese Trivia On Friday 16 March Ms Bourne's Year 8 Japanese class was invited to St Edmund's to participate in a joint activity with their sister school from Nagasaki. The class joined the St Edmund's senior Japanese class and the Japanese boys to complete some Australian and Japanese trivia. The girls had a great time and the questions were very challenging so we learned more about Japanese and Australian geography and pop culture. Congratulations to tables 1, 2 and 5 for winning small prizes for having the best team work and knowledge. Lisa Bourne Assistant Coordinator Arts and Languages

Homestay Required Would you like your daughter to practice her Japanese and/ or your family to learn more about Japanese culture? Or maybe you would like to travel to Japan in the future and have a friend there to host you? We have a Japanese Assistant Language Teacher coming to our school for 4 weeks from the 29 April and we need one or two families to host her. Ideally if you could host for the month that would be great, but if you are interested in hosting her for a minimum of 2 weeks we’d love to hear from you. All she will require from the host families is her accommodation and meals. Dinner,

breakfast and a cut lunch will need to be provided by the host family and she can always make her own lunch from ingredients provided. She will need to have her own room with a table/lamp. There will be a payment to the host family to offset costs per week. If you have any questions or are interested in hosting please email me at lisa.bourne@stcc.act.edu.au I would be happy to share more details and her profile with you at this time. Lisa Bourne Assistant Arts and Languages Coordinator

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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OzCLO Results

Year 12 Hospitality Café Experience We are off to a great start this year with the 2018 Year 12 Hospitality cohort demonstrating their culinary skills through many café functions. The students were asked to create menus for two functions that meet current food and industry trends. They have been presented with many challenges leading up to their café functions with limited cohort numbers but have managed to adapt and persevere resulting in successful events and many happy customers. Amie Connor Hospitality Teacher

The Australian Computational Thinking and Linguistics Olympiad (OzCLO) results are in. St Clare's College entered the OzCLO competition for the first time in Canberra in early March. Out of 55 teams competing at the ANU event for OzCLO 2018, St Clare's College students were ranked 17th, 29th, 38th and 48th. There were 510 teams across Australia competing. Lara Diego, Stana Fernadez, Ananya Giridhar and Aleena Babu have been awarded Silver certificates and all other competitors a Bronze Certificate. Congratulations to all competitors and we look forward to competing again in 2019. Juliette Major ICT Coordinator

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


Duke of Edinburgh International Award Bronze Award Adventurous Journey On 17 and 18 March our first group of 14 Bronze Award participants of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award ACT complete their practice of Adventurous Journey to Namadgi. Day 1 they completed a 7km hike with a full pack with an ascent of 400m up to Granite Tor. Day 2 the group took off from Orroral Campground towards Nursery Swamp for a 16km hike. Participants demonstrated grit, perseverance and overcame a range of personal challenges to complete their practice.

Silver Award Adventurous Journey On Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 March seven of our Silver Duke of Edinburgh's International Award participants embarked on their practice Adventurous Journey. They completed a 23km kayak from Bendeela to Tallowa Dam and a 5km steep hike in the Kangaroo Valley. Congratulations to all participants for your determination, resilience and collaboration in completing this challenge.

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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Health Haiku's

Over the term Years 8 to 10 Physical Education and Health classes have been doing a health module, one of the activities involves writing Haiku poetry as a literacy strategy. Haiku poetry is traditional Japanese verse that has a rhythmic five syllable, seven syllable five syllable line patter. The students were asked to view their scenario from the aspect of what the Japanese call “fusoku furi” meaning a perspective of not too far, not too close. Year 8 themes were from the perspective of someone who is desperately in need of help and from the perspective of an outsider viewing someone who needs help. Year 9 themes included on what a good or what a bad relationship feels like and respect. Year 10 themes were from the perspective of someone suffering a mental illness or an outsiders perspective of mental illness or about a specific mental illness. David Garrity Sports Coordinator

The following are examples of student Haiku poems:

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Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

The flower seed grows Blossoming, growing everyday In the cold it’s gone Anon

The vibrant sun shines Feeling warm and comfortable My fear painted joy Anon

They say I am ill But I can’t see their faces Their labels blind me Lauren

I am all alone You then run to me and help I no longer cry Jemma

Free to be myself No need to hide from his love Seeing bright colours Olivia

Crying out for help Hidden behind a false mask Feeling locked away Ellen

A dark storm is near Should I help or take shelter The sun is now out Neeta

These walls closing in I am trapped cannot get out I need to escape Lily

When will she realise She always has her head down Never wants to join Anna

A rough wild ocean Help me for I am drowning Nobody heard me Lillian

If you say your words A girl once stone will turn to glass Shattered as she falls Anon

The world is so slow I feel so isolated Where did they all go Anna

Surrounded by pain A tear runs down their cold cheek Panic in my mind Alisha

You do respect me You trust me with anything You warm up my soul Sara

Scared in my own mind Detached from reality Feeling all alone Amber

Struggling I stand Pain is in my heavy chest My eyes slowly close Loucia

I don’t understand Why are they doing this to me I need to get away Halle

Why can’t they make friends Everyone just makes jokes and laughs They aren’t different to me Melanie

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


Representative Sport

Brumbies High School Rugby 7s Championships Wednesday 28 February Southwell Park

Giants Cup ACT Under 16 Australian Football Championships Friday 16 March - Hughes Oval Game 1: St Clare’s 7, 14, 56 defeated Merici College 2, 0, 12 Goals: Amelia Vea x3, Harriet Sharp, Claudia Knobel, Maddison Mertz and Brianna Williams. In the blink of an eye Harriet Sharp had the team on the ball with a great johnny on the spot goal and from here the team never looked back. A classic all round team performance to get the first win of the day. Game 2: St Clare’s 4, 4, 28 lost to St Francis Xavier College 5, 2, 32 Goals: Amelia Vea x2 and Gisela Vea x2. What a thriller this was! The teams went goal for goal early on before SFX grabbed that handy pair of consecutive goals to give them the buffer. A finals appearance now relied on winning the next two games. Game 3: St Clare’s 4, 1, 25 defeated Lyneham High School 3, 2, 20 Goals: Gisela Vea x2, Amelia Vea and Hayley MacDonald If the second game wasn’t enough this one redefined the word heartstopper as an Amelia Vea siren beater, closely followed a Hayley MacDonald super goal to bring St Clare’s back from the brink at seven points down with less then two minutes to play to keep the finals dream well and truly alive.

Game 4: St Clare’s 4, 6, 30 defeated St Mary MacKillop College 0, 0, 0 Goals: Gisela Vea x3 and McKenzie Bale A great solo effort leading to a well taken 30 metre goal from McKenzie Bale sealed this game fairly early on after Gisela had once again got the team rolling with two first half goals. Keeping MacKillop scoreless was a great filip for the team, who had now booked a finals berth. Final: St Clare’s 3, 4, 22 lost to St Francis Xavier College 7, 0, 42 Goals: Amelia Vea, Gisela Vea and Harriet Sharp. With the team down by five points after an even first half St Francis went on a five minute scoring blitz to pile on three quick goals just after the half time resumption to effectively lay claims to the title. St Clare’s just couldn’t find a way to get the ball past the centre line and constant weight of pressure and possession eventually told. Harriet Sharp’s second of the day with five minutes remaining breathed a flicker of life back into the contest, but St Francis replied two minutes later to round out in the end a well-deserved win and retain their title from 2017. Squad: Charlize Bale, McKenzie Bale, Julia Bassett, Ella Blewitt, Lucy Burnell, Olivia Culek, Grace Egan, Sophie Exposito, Georgia Keogh, Ruby Kelly, Claudia Knobel, Grace Love, Hayley MacDonald, Maddison Mertz, Grace Nicholls, Harriet Sharp, Amelia Vea, Gisela Vea and Brianna Williams.

A highly successful day saw St Clare’s two sides come home with one championship and a second place finish. Year 7/8 Team – Runners Up The team got off to a winning start against John Paul II College after a hard fought 10-5 victory. A similar scoreline and the team went undefeated going into the Grand Final against John Paul II College. In a seesawing encounter the attacking flair of both teams came to the fore and a helter-skelter 15-15 scoreline eventuated. The all-important first score however went to the opposition, which enabled them to be crowned Champions. Squad: Abbey Christou, Jemima Grimmond, Charlotte Guthrie, Amara Hynes, Ruby Kelly, Kiarra Morgan, Callie Roberston, Jannali Taoine, Nicole Vea and Georgia Willey Year 9/10 Team - Champions The 9/10s got off to a flyer running in four tries in a terrific attacking display in the first match to lay down a marker to the other teams for the day. In the third match against Radford College both teams the match became an absolute tryfest unable to be separated on the scoreboard in a 20 all draw. They then took stock and a highly anticipated rematch took place in the decider. In the end the scoreline reflected the dominance of St Clare’s as they romped to a 30-15 victory to claim the 2018 Championship. Squad: Mackenzie Bale, Lucy Burnell, Hulita Fainga’a, Hayley Jacobs, Emma Ianniello, Georgia Kennedy, Hayley Ruhen, Ella Ryan, Niamh Smith, Steffi Tootoo, Amelia Vea and Gisela Vea

Player's Player: McKenzie Bale for an outstanding all-round performance.

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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Weekly Sport

teams have been honing their skills at squad trainings each Monday afternoon and Wednesday mornings. Turn outs have been very impressive reinforcing the students appreciation of quality coaching and commitment to wearing the maroon and blue.

Weekend Netball Aftertwo weekends of grading matches the 16 St Clare’s team took to the Deakin courts on Saturday 7 April for the South Canberra Netball Association’s Winter Competition. The 2018 version sees all St Clare’s teams named after Australian female sporting legends and with names like St Clare’s Kerr, St Clare’s Freeman, St Clare’s Gould and St Clare’s Goolagong to name a few, the quality of play is set to emulate the lofty heights of these famous women. Under the guidance of former Canberra Darters Captain and Commonwealth Games (Delhi 2010) representative Mrs Sepi Hawke

The first week of March saw the inaugural St Clare’s Fast 5 Netball Tournament which enabled students of all year groups to mix and play with each other in randomly allocated teams. Indeed, it was great to see the fabulous mentoring of our new Year 7s and less experienced Year 8s by the senior students. Much was learned during the course of the afternoon and new relationships formed. St Clare’s teams are involved in games at 12 noon, 1pm, 2pm and 3pm each Saturday at the Deakin Netball Courts. Mrs Hawke has established a St Clare’s College netball page on SEQTA which carries all information, including updated draws, game times, copies of training sessions, team contacts and a photo gallery for anyone who would like to find out more.

Tuesday Night Volleyball The ACT Autumn Open Women’s Volleyball season has begun and at time of printing the St Clare’s teams had gone undefeated through the opening two rounds with convincing straight set victories in both matches. With one team (St Clare’s Cook) in the Under 18 competition and another (St Clare’s Pottharst) competing in Women’s B grade the opening two rounds have confidence riding high for successful seasons, with the Junior team looking to go back to back from 2017’s title success. Thanks to Ms Hannah Baillie who has been coaching/supervising our teams at Lyneham each Tuesday evening and taking Thursday training before school. #Undefeated after two #FollowusatLyneham

#FollowusonSEQTA #Followus@Deakin

Uniform Update College Blazer In 2018 the College Blazer is a compulsory part of the St Clare's College uniform for all students in Terms 2 and 3. Savvy School-wear in Tuggeranong will extend their opening hours for next week only to allow families to collect orders or purchase an order outside of the busy holiday period. The extended opening hours are as follows: }}

Tuesday 10 April 9am to 7pm

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Wednesday 11 April -9am to 7pm

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Thursday 12 April 9am to 7pm

Winter pants should arrive this week and can be collected from the College reception. If you have any questions/concerns regarding the uniform please contact the.principal@stcc.act.edu.au

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


School TV This month on SchoolTV - Physical Activity and Exercise

In the last decade, children's participation in physical activity and exercise has been in decline. In this digital age, children are using computers and mobile devices, not only for learning, but for relaxation and recreation purposes. This sedentary behaviour is having a detrimental effect on today's youth. The key is finding the balance. Research shows, that regular physical activity and exercise leads to changes in the brain. It improves cognitive function, elevates mood, enhances learning and improves academic outcomes. Playing sport helps kids develop fundamental movement skills impacting positively on their confidence, self-esteem and ability to develop social skills. Parents play an important role in helping children

establish positive habits that will benefit them in the long-term. In this edition of SchoolTV, parents will discover practical advice relating to the benefits of regular physical activity and exercise, as well as tips on how to get their kids motivated

and moving more. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month's edition and we always welcome your feedback. If you have any concerns about your child, please contact the school counsellor for further information.

Try a Day at St Clare’s Tuesday 1 or Tuesday 8 May Become a St Clare’s girl for a day! We invite prospective Year 7 students to experience the exciting and enriching opportunities available at St Clare’s College. Please register on our website.

Open Evening Wednesday 2 May Our Open Evening is an opportunity for parents and all prospective students to look at our facilities and talk to staff and students. The evening will run from 4.00pm to 7.00pm with an information session to be held in the College Hall from 6.00pm-6.30pm.

Year 11 Information Evening Thursday 10 May Discover the many courses and leadership opportunities available for senior students at our Information Evening from 6.00pm - 7.30pm at the College.

School Tours Tuesday 8 and Wednesday 16 May School Tours with the Principal are available by appointment at 9.00am or 4.00pm. Please contact the College to register for a tour.

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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P: 02 6260 9400 E: the.principal@stcc.act.edu.au A: 1 McMillan Crescent, Griffith ACT 2603 www.stcc.act.edu.au


Inspirational Women Contributions are greatlly welcomed from past students. Send 300 words plus a current image to media@stcc.act.edu.au

1978

Class of Catherine Durr

When Catherine left school, she initially studied nursing. Though she qualified, she subsequently worked as a hotel housemaid, car rental service officer, grape picker, baker’s apprentice, in theatre marketing, arts sponsorship, and TV production. It’s an eclectic mix in which she has lived and worked all over Australia, in Canada, the USA, New Caledonia and India. She now lives and works in Sydney. Her longest career, from which she’s deviated a few times and then returned, is TV production. Her current role is to manage a slate of production for a boutique Australian company. Business scales up and down with contractors on various productions: one month she can have just two employees and the next up to 200. It’s an insecure industry and employment path, but she’s managed to stay with it now, on and off, for 20 years. The diversity of people she works with, locations she works in, and the variety of programs themselves keeps it interesting and challenging. She’s completed studies at five different tertiary institutions for her nursing, BA, MA and graduate qualifications. Though she values education, and enjoyed her studies, she could be where she is in her career without any of it. The difference between the uneducated and the educated Catherine is discernible only in the qualities she brings to work: discipline, team management, and negotiation, among others. Because of the many phases of her education, career and life, she has a wide circle of friends, covering all generations and many countries. Ultimately, it’s not what she’s done or where she’s been, but how she’s been with friends, family and colleagues that is of most importance.

1998

Class of Kristen Watson

When Kristen left St Clare’s she had no idea what she wanted to do, dabbling in Music Business Studies at TAFE while working for the charity NAPCAN - National Association of Child Abuse and Neglect as Administrative Assistant / Volunteer Coordinator / NSW Coordinator her career followed an organic course into Kristen’s current role as a Project Coordinator on large IT projects. Some of the bigger projects she has been involved with over the years include the Department of Education’s economic stimulus package, Building the Education Revolution (BER), where she assisted State Authorities push out much needed maintenance, new classrooms or school halls and science labs; integrated a specialised helpdesk into a service desk which including creating a training program to upskill service desk staff; and upgrading Defence IT infrastructure, operating systems and network. Over the years Kristen has been involved in many volunteering ventures, she was a Lifeline Telephone Crises Supporter for six years during which time she also performed duties as a supervisor on call and a group leader in their counsellor training program. As group leader on this program, she found it very rewarding to watch people learn a new and more effective way of communicating and turning it into an in built skill that naturally helps many. After Lifeline she joined the ACT State Emergency Services where she held the position of Unit Training Coordinator then Unit Commander and was deployed on taskforces that assisted Sydney and Newcastle clean up after big storms and as an Air Observer she helped search for missing Malaysian airline MH370 in the initial days after is disappearance. Lately outside of work Kristen has been focusing on more personal endeavours as she picks up a camera again and re-learn photography in the digital age and she has begun singing lessons with a plan to do musical theatre once she back in the swing of belting out a good tune.

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13


In the Headlines

Contributions are greatly received for any updates on student activities. Content and images can be sent to media@stcc.act.edu.au

State Karate Champion Congratulations to Kate Jones (Year 12) for her outstanding results at the recent NSW State Karate Championships. She initially won gold in the U21 68kg+ Female Kumite (sparring) which is her current age and weight division. Then Kate went on to win her first major senior event in Senior Women 68kg+ Kumite, making her the women's heavyweight champion of NSW. She also picked up a bronze in the Seniors Women's Open Kumite. Kate has been selected in the NSW Karate Team and will go on to represent NSW at the National Karate Championships on the Sunshine Coast in August.

National Champions! Congratulations to Emma Dunn (Year 10) and Keely Small (Year 11) for their outstanding results from the Australian Junior Athletics Championships in Sydney Olympic Park. Emma won gold in the under 16 years 1500 m and 800 m. Keely won gold in the under 18 years 800m event.

Judo Win for Bethany

Bethany Cramp (Year 9) competed in the Victorian International Judo competition on 17 March. She was awarded a silver medal in the under 48kg female cadets division. Congratulations Bethany!

Keely at the Commonwealth Games Best of luck to Keely Small will be competing at the Commonwealth Games on Thursday 12 April. Tune into the games at 12.20pm for the heats and the final will be on prime time on Friday 13 April.

Emma Selected for the Under 19's Australian Basketball Team Emma Rowcliffe our 2018 Sports Captain has been selected in the under 19's Australian Basketball team. She will attend a training camp with the squad at the AIS in July. If selected in the Australian team Emma will compete in the World Championships which will be held in India in November. Congratulations Emma!

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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APRIL 2018

Keeping your information private and only available for people you choose (such as friends and family) can seem difficult in an increasingly on-line world. If you have a Facebook account, for example, your profile picture and user name is public and available for anyone to see (as stated in the t&c’s of the app), regardless of your privacy settings. Being aware of how much of your information is publicly available is the first step to keeping it safe. Periodically ‘googling’ yourself will give you an idea of what information about you is available online, so you can take steps to rectify this if you’re over-exposed.

KIK

WHAT IS IT?

Kik Messenger is an instant messenger app for mobile devices. Kik is known for preserving users' anonymity by allowing users to register without providing a telephone number. It is advertised as being suitable for ages 17+.

REPLIKA

WHAT IS IT?

Replika is an Artificial Intelligence (AI) app, which learns from you (grows) the more you use it. There are other similar apps available, described as Chat bots, AI, Virtual talk etc. The app encourages you to share your thoughts and feelings, and answers and asks you questions. It can steer conversations and tell jokes, getting to 'know’ your sense of humour. It is a ‘virtual friend’. It is self-regulated as suitable for users aged 12+.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS? Whilst its primary purpose is stated to be ‘messaging’, Kik Messenger has been criticised as being potentially unsafe for minors due to its anonymity features and weak parental control mechanisms. Downloading the app enables strangers to send adult content to its users. The app’s anonymity more easily allows users to become targets of cyber bullying. Kik has its own internal apps, some of which require users to purchase them or make in-app micro-transactions. Kik also has its own dating apps that randomly match users; however there is no way to verify the age of the people the app matches you with. For more information and tips, visit our blog: www.perimeterguardian.com.au/insights

WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

After answering a series of questions about yourself, the app creates your own Replika which adapts to you the more you use it. The app encourages sharing of more and more intimate information about yourself, so it becomes more like you with every conversation. While supporters of the app argue that some teens are able to open up to Replika without judgement, and in a way they couldn’t with ‘real people’, parents are to be advised that this app has the potential to replace human interaction with vulnerable teens, especially when they may need expert help or advice, or when it would be best to talk to family and friends. There have been anecdotal reports of some young people ‘falling in love’ with their AI, after spending a lot of time interacting as well as relying on it for advice and friendship.

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” Philippians 4:13

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“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.� Philippians 4:13

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Up Coming Events Thursday 12 April - Year 7 Retreat Friday 13 April - AST Intensive Exam Year 12 Tertiary Package Students only Friday 13 April - Term 1 Concludes Wednesday 25 April - ANZAC Day Monday 30 April - Term 1 Commences Tuesday 1 May - Try A Day at St Clares Wednesday 2 May - Open Evening Thursday 3 May - ASC Athletics Thursday 3 to Saturday 5 May - St Edmunds Musical 'Disco Inferno' Friday 4 May - ANZAC Day Service Tuesday 8 May - Try A Day at St Clares Tuesday 8 May and Wednesday 16 May - School Tours by appointment at 9 am and 4pm

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