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Tidings Edition 3 9 April 2019

Highlights 9

What is Happening in Religious Education?

11

Year 7 Reflection Day

13

Visual Art and Photography Retreat

30

St Clare’s Sport


Contents In this edition

©2019 St Clare’s College

Principal’s Message

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From the Desk of the AP Pastoral Care and Wellbeing

4

From the Desk of the AP Curriculum and Assessment

6

Religious Education

9

Year 7 Reflection Day

11

LEGO Build Challenge

12

Visual Art and Photography Retreat

13

Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad

16

Women in Economics

16

Australian War Memorial Box

17

Around Oz Tour

17

Debating

18

Birrigai Defence Integration Day

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ANU Guest Speaker

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From our Japanese Exchange Students

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Exchange Program

21

Commissioning Mass for Youth Ministry

22

Project Compassion

22

World’s Greatest Shave

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Harmony Day

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Walk for Epilepsy

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Share the Dignity

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Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander News

26

Music Lessons

27

Level 1 Coaching Courses

27

Fees Reminder

27

2019 Swimming Carnival

28

St Clare’s Sport

30

In the Headlines

32

Inspirational Women

33

Upcoming Events

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Principal’s Message Learning is our core business at St Clare’s College and we pride ourselves on measuring the impact that our teachers have in the classroom and creating learning opportunities for our young women to achieve their full potential. One key area to continue our focus on developing positive student learning outcomes has been by introducing a professional learning classroom observation program called Educator Impact for our staff with a focus on student learning.

must be able to do by the end of a lesson. Explicit Teaching: Explicit Teaching is an instructional strategy used by our teachers to meet the needs of their students and engage them in clearly articulated teaching and learning. This includes sequencing teaching to focus on the steps that lead to new knowledge, deeper understandings and increasingly sophisticated skill, varying instruction in response to immediate or real time feedback and asking questions to monitor understanding and progress.

Our evaluation of the 2018 AST results, combined with teaching and learning conversations with teaching staff and students has highlighted four key principles in effective instruction that we wish to ensure becomes the foundation of our best practice for every student, every classroom, every-day.

A Culture of Thinking: Ron Ritchhart’s Eight Cultural Forces to Develop Thinking consist of language, time, environment, opportunities, routines, modelling, interactions and expectations. Our teaching staff are striving to create cultures of thinking in our classrooms by using a variety of methods including making their own thinking more visible.

Learning Intentions: Research demonstrates that teachers who are clear about what they want their students to learn as a result of each lesson have a greater impact on their students’ results. Learning intentions describe what it is we want students to learn in terms of skills, knowledge, attitudes, and values within a particular lesson. Well written learning goals will always explain what the students need to understand and what they

Strong Teacher-Student Relationships: Teacher-Student relationships shape the way our students think and act in school and in the classroom. Good relationships lead to students feeling more positive about learning, classwork and school in general. A strong Teacher-Student relationship also fosters risk taking in learning and mistakes and a growth mindset for learning.

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

This is not new or revolutionary information about teaching and learning, however, it does highlight fundamental concepts and skills necessary for keeping a focus on learning and helps us to begin to build a shared language and understanding with colleagues about what learning looks, feels and sounds like in our context. By providing our academic staff with ongoing professional learning opportunities to develop these core principles, we aim to encourage a culture of classroom observation to enhance the quality teaching and learning that is happening at St Clare’s College.

Best Wishes Brad Cooney Principal

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Athletics Carnival

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Tidings – March 2019


“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

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From the Desk of the AP Pastoral Care and Wellbeing

Child Safe Advocacy Protecting young people and ensuring their safety and wellbeing in our community is a priority. We all have a responsibility for safeguarding children and young people and have a framework for child protection which includes policies, procedures, codes of conduct and tools that ensure we are responsive and listen to young people and prioritise their right to safety.

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Staff recruitment practises are rigorous with regard to background checking, screening and selection and all teachers must be registered with the Teacher Quality Institute (TQI) and all staff and visitors that come into direct contact with our students must have a Working With Vulnerable People (WWVP) card. Our Child Safe Advocate, Mr Zac Holmes has led all staff in the latest Mandatory Reporting training and staff are also trained in Reportable Conduct, Confidentiality and Privacy. Our Executive team are all experts in conducting investigations.

Tidings – March 2019


Bus Network Information As you may be aware, at the beginning of Term 2, Transport Canberra will begin operating the new school bus network. Please log onto the Transport Canberra website to ascertain specific arrangements for your daughter including routes and stops. The Link for St Clare’s is: http://files.transport.act.gov.au/ Schools_20190304/st_clares_ college.pdf The following changes will occur upon implementation of the new network. •

St Clare’s College has secured direct school route coverage (designated school services not public services) on the new network that are broadly consistent with existing route coverage. All services will have new route numbers, which are the same for both AM and PM services.

Buses will stop less frequently along routes. Please check these stops carefully via the Transport Canberra Website.

Timings for services in the AM and PM will change for all Transport Canberra services.

In general, PM services from St Clare’s will leave earlier, requiring students to be organised and prompt in the afternoon. We will work with the students to ensure that this is achievable.

Transport Canberra are yet to notify us of the afternoon departure bays. Staff will provide extra assistance to students during the transition to the new timetable.

Please ensure that you and your daughter understand the changes to the network and how to access school services beginning of Term 2.

Summarised table of all St Clare’s College AM School services (indicating arrival time at the College), starting Monday 29 April.

Summarised table of All St Clare’s College PM School services (indicating departure time), starting Monday 29 April.

Arrival Time

Bus Route No.

Leave Time

8.31am

R 2 from Fraser

3.30pm

8.34am

2005 from Weston Creek Terminus

2006 to Cooleman Court

3.30pm

2007 to Woden

8.35am

2006 from Waramanga

3.32pm

2009 to Lyons

3.32pm

2011 to Mawson

8.33am

2008 from Tuggeranong

3.32pm

2010 to Phillip

8.35am

2004 from Theodore

3.32pm

2001 to Kambah

8.40am

2001 from Kambah

3.33pm

8.40am

2002 from Tuggeranong

2005 to Weston Creek Terminus

3.35pm

2003 to Gordon

8.40am

2003 from Gordon

3.38pm

2008 to Tuggeranong

8.40am

2009 from Lyons

3.40pm

R 2 to Fraser

8.42 am

2011 from Mawson

3.41pm

2002 to Tuggeranong

8.43am

2010 from Phillip

3.44pm

2006 to Cooleman Court

8.43am

2007 from Woden

3.45pm

R 2 to Fraser

Bus Route No.

Winter Uniform The school holidays will be a good time to dust off the winter uniform and check that it is ready for Term 2. The College uniform requirements can be found on our website www.stcc.act.edu.au Don’t foregt that the College Blazer is compulsory for Terms 2 and 3. Natalie Dickie Assistant Principal Pastoral Care and Wellbeing

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

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From the Desk of the AP Curriculum and Assessment

Data Driven Evidence Based Teaching in Schools – The Wisdom Program: There is an increasing awareness of the need for education to respond to growing specialised knowledge and technology transforming the way people work and relate to each other. Education faces the challenge to provide people with the skills needed in an information society. The ability to learn, collaborate and solve problems in a digital environment has become crucial. Education must adjust with an emphasis on information and technological skills. And while the nature of education and its role are changing, there is also a need to rethink the way education is measured and monitored. Consideration should also be given to the use of assessment data to

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inform and advance the teaching and learning of twenty-first century skills. Preparing students for twentyfirst century citizenship and employment calls for a broadened curriculum taught in schools to capture: •

New ways of thinking - focusing on creativity and innovation, critical thinking, problemsolving, decision-making, learning to learn and the development of metacognition.

Looking at ways of working together – concentrating on communication, collaboration and teamwork.

Ways of using new tools – looking at information and ICT literacy.

Ways of living productively in the world – specifically citizenship, life and career development, personal and social responsibility.

General capabilities in the Australian Curriculum play a significant role in realising the goals set out in the Melbourne Declaration that identifies essential skills for twenty-first century learners in literacy, numeracy, information and communication technology (ICT), thinking, creativity, teamwork and communication. The Melbourne Declaration describes individuals who can manage their own wellbeing, relate well to others, make informed decisions about their lives, become citizens who behave with ethical integrity, relate to and communicate across cultures, work for the common good and act with responsibility. General capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions that together with curriculum content in each learning area assist students to live and work successfully in the twentyfirst century. General capabilities are addressed through the learning

Tidings – March 2019


areas and offer opportunities to add depth and richness to student learning. Many capabilities find natural homes in specific learning areas, but can be applied, adapted, strengthened and extended in other learning areas. While the need for twenty-first century skills is recognised, teaching these skills is often disconnected from content compromising the likeliness of successful outcomes. Central to twenty-first century teaching is a developmental model of learning, which influences teaching to build on and scaffold existing knowledge bases for each student. This approach is evidence based and requires people to work towards advanced ordered and deeper thinking and problem solving, along with a heightened level of reasoning and collaboration. A twenty-first century teaching approach, where different starting points, readiness for instruction, learning targets, and requirements for support of the students are acknowledged, enables individual learning needs to be met. Informed grouping of students, acknowledging diversity and individuality among the students is a likely outcome from targeted and differentiated learning activities and experiences.

Building trusting student teacher relationships and closely matching learning experiences with students’ abilities and interests, encouraging student voice or independent learning, and developing students’ awareness of their own learning are key teaching strategies that can promote the learning of twenty-first century skills. The symbolic relationship between assessment, teaching and learning also needs to be acknowledged. Participation in assessment procedures to refine and improve performance and skills are pivotal to the twenty-first century learning experience.

Assessment should be an ongoing process of teaching and learning, with strong consideration given to a persons’ skills and knowledge, reflection of understanding and areas of improvement, use of feedback to identify areas for practice and exploration, along with monitoring progress towards new skills and improved proficiency. Twenty-first century teaching and learning tasks are frequently open-ended; involve unbounded sets of information, and ongoing redefinition of task goals. Students need to develop skills to establish and adapt goals to available information, seek out relevant and valid information for the task, and continually monitor their own progress. The teachers’ role is to set highly motivating tasks with achievable goals, and provide sufficient structure and scaffolding based on an understanding of the students’ interests and needs. Twenty-first century teaching draws upon principles of targeted and differentiated instruction into classroom practice creating a good fit between students and their learning experiences. Teachers in differentiated classrooms draw upon strategies such as small-group instruction that are helpful in targeting learning tasks, enabling students to shape their own learning goals and to select materials and information of relevance to the task; presenting materials at a variety of reading levels; personalising rubrics and independent studies; and developing learning contracts and task options with common learning goals. The role of the teacher is to provide effective structure through smaller groups based on like abilities or to provide opportunities for peer mentoring that can be informed by the measurement of twenty-first century skills. Teachers can use student assessment data as a foundation for planning a targeted and differentiated teaching sequence.

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

St Clare’s College, like many thousands of schools in Australia and around the world, has invested in and administered the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) Progressive Achievement Tests (PAT) in Mathematics; Reading; Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar. ACER is committed to creating and promoting researchbased knowledge, products and services to improve learning. The PAT approach focuses on assessing and monitoring student growth over time and is underpinned by an understanding that students of the same age and in the same year of school can be at very different points in their learning and development. Informed by a growth mindset, this approach is geared towards teaching to the needs of the individual learner to advance the progress of every student, regardless of their starting point. Parents would have recently received information from the College regarding their daughters PAT results. PAT, along with NAPLAN, data assists the College in generating learning readiness reports that have been used to make informed decision around the introduction of a targeted literacy and numeracy intervention program known as the Wisdom Program. This program aims to assist students in advancing their numeracy and literacy skills that will support them with their studies. Identified students in Years 7 and 8 are invited to engage in the program in place of a specialist language class. In Years 9 and 10, the program is built into the elective structure. Parents can opt for their child to not readily engage in the program permitting enrolment in a chosen language study and extended involvement in the College elective program. The Wisdom Program requires teachers to actively review and interpret PAT and NAPLAN reports to identify, plan and implement differentiated learning in the classroom to foster greater skill development and student success.

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can be differentiated to best meet the learning needs of students who are working at different stages of proficiency. It can also be used to reflect on ways to organise the classroom to support small group instruction, and to identify pairings of students to foster opportunities for mentoring and scaffolding of new knowledge with more capable peers, or to allow students at a similar stage of learning to work together. Similar learning intentions can be used for clusters of students who are working at the same generalised stage of proficiency.

When reviewing learning readiness reports and setting targets for future learning, teachers are asked to consider: •

What does the student know how to do?

What does the learning readiness report tell us about the student’s strengths and abilities?

What is the student on the verge of learning?

What might the student do with scaffolding, modeling, or the support of a more capable peer?

What sorts of learning intentions should be established to challenge this student?

What sorts of experiences and instruction would be most useful in helping the student make progress?

How many students in this class have similar patterns of skill and understanding?

Visually, learning readiness reports help to identify groups of students operating at the same stage, calling for teachers to consider: •

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How many students are working at each stage of skill and understanding? How can I use this information to adjust teaching activities to suit the skills and knowledge

students at each stage most need to develop and practice? •

What can be improved or adjusted to make sure that all students benefit from instruction?

Learning readiness reports are geared to support planning and decisions about how to provide targeted learning experiences for students and to set realistic but challenging goals for teaching and learning. Students’ can also be given these reports to obtain feedback on their current skills and understanding, and provide information on how to improve their knowledge and performance. For students advancing, it is helpful to look ahead to the next stage of progression to identify the skills and abilities the student is working towards. Scaffolding and modeling, can empower the teacher and student to use this information as a way of setting targets for learning. Teachers are challenged to view a students’ stage on the report as not an achievement level, but rather a point of intervention that they can draw on to make decisions about the best possible learning program for the student. Identifying what types of experiences or materials they should provide, and how to challenge their students with interesting and achievable materials should also be a consideration. Class reports can be used to identify how teaching

The use of assessment to inform teaching has major consequences for classroom practice, requiring teachers to recognise a range of abilities and to teach accordingly. Rather than teaching all students as though they are working at the same level, teachers must use targeted instruction, where students at various levels are taught different skills and knowledge, determined by their readiness to learn. Teaching needs to be directed at all students to avoid students becoming disengaged and disruptive. The challenge for educators is to identify students’ emerging skills and provide the right support at the right time at the right level. Teachers need to be able to identify the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) in the area of learning being mastered. Interpretation of student test scores is the starting point for planning and instruction but has implications’ as this is an area of development for most teachers who require training to use test score data to identify a students’ point of readiness. Advancing outside the Wisdom Program, professional learning in this space will be a key priority moving forward and will bring great value to the collective teaching and learning experience here at St Clare’s College. Dearne Marrapodi Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment

Tidings – March 2019


What is happening in Religious Education?

The last time I wrote about Religious Education (RE) at St Clare's (Tidings Edition 7, 2018) I introduced the idea that, regardless of your religious affiliation, RE can be a fascinating topic that stretches students in ways that other topics do not. I proposed that the study of RE can aid students in developing religious literacy which helps them to engage in respectful dialogue in an increasingly globalized world; RE gives students opportunities to explore the big questions of life in a safe environment and encourages students to step back from the prevailing culture and become agents of positive change. Along with these positive outcomes, staff of the RE faculty are committed to providing

engaging learning experiences and developing academic skills that will serve your daughter well into the future. Our focus on InquiryBased Learning is designed to develop skills in research, critical analysis, synthesis, evaluation, collaboration, communication and critical reflection on learning. All of these skills have been identified as valuable skills for the working world of the future.

completing her assessment task for RE. She had prioritised the work of other subjects and so had left her task to the last minute. When I asked her about this, she replied that her parents supported this attitude and did not mind if she received a poor mark.

Religious Education has changed!

RE is valued by our school community and is considered fundamental to the Catholic Identity of our school.

RE is a rigorous, academic subject, and grades from RE will be recorded on your daughter's Year 10 certificate. In senior years, Religious Studies is a Board of Senior

As parents and carers your attitudes towards RE can have a lasting impact on your daughter's engagement with this subject. A few days ago I interacted with a student who was having difficulty

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

Whether this is an accurate representation of these parents' attitude or not, it is worth pointing out to all parents that:

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Secondary Studies endorsed course which contributes towards Tertiary students' university admissions ranking in most cases.

Excellent pedagogical practice

We aim for students to develop a critical appreciation of the Catholic tradition and an empathetic understanding of the religious beliefs and practices of others. We invite students to consider, reflect and be changed by their learning experiences.

The RE classroom is not: »»

simply a place for transferring religious facts and knowledge

»»

merely a sociological study of the "phenomenon" of religion

»»

a study of values-driven philosophy of religion.

Religious Education is a way of learning to live intelligently in a religiously diverse world.

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In the Religious Education classroom we:

Focus on learners and their learning We acknowledge the reality of students’ lives, identify levels of thinking and build on the attributes each student brings to the religion classroom. We seek to develop a community of thinking that stimulates and supports genuine, active and authentic learning. Establish clear learning intentions and success criteria We seek to build a classroom that engages and challenges students. We place a high emphasis on evaluating and activating student involvement in ongoing responsive cycles of learning and teaching. Learning is more than listening. Teaching is more than telling. We allow for authentic educational processes and genuine student engagement.

Responding with feedback to move learning forward Effective learning in the religion classroom is advanced by informative feedback. Learning is facilitated when learners are given timely and rich information regarding their performances and achievements and how to improve.

We use language that is invitational and educational to better engage students in learning. In this way, teachers provide students with the freedom to respond in ways that do not assume a programmed response (Brennan and Ryan, 1996). Acknowledgement: The text in this article relies heavily on the paper "A reconceptualised approach to the Religion Curriculum from the Brisbane Catholic Education office at http://www.rec.bne.catholic. edu.au/The%20Shape%20of%20 Religious%20Education/Pages/AReconceptualist-Approach-to-theReligion-Curriculum.aspx

Maryellen Moore Religious Education Coordinator

Tidings – March 2019


Year 7 Reflection Day

Our Liturgical Theme “Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” (Esther 4:14) formed the basis for Year 7’s first Reflection Day. Session 1 involved learning more about St Clare by participating in a scavenger hunt around the school and collecting letters to spell out the qualities of St Clare. Our Pastoral Care Leaders then spoke about What it means to Seek Challenges, Community, Creativity, Culture, Faith, Friendship, Knowledge, Leadership, Opportunities, Spirit, Sport and Success at St Clare’s. Then with our Pastoral Care Leaders each student identified how St Clare is a role model for us today and how we can instill her qualities into our everyday lives.

illustrating the importance of sharing our God given gifts with all we meet. They then went on to explain how we often face many challenges in Year 7 and a way of coping with these trails is to identify the value of those around us and learn to work as a team. Session 3 with the support of their Pastoral Care Leaders looked at who Year 7 are at the moment and who they wish to become by Year 12 2024. Our concluding Liturgy highlighted that we need to have God in our lives, as our faith will give us the strength to achieve the things, we never thought possible. Marie Manning Mission and Ministry Coordinator

Session 2 began with activities that helped us get to know members of our Year 7 cohort. Our Youth Ministry team performed a drama

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

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Lego Build Challenge On Tuesday 26 March students from Years 7 to 10 participated in the St Clare’s College LEGO Build Challenge. In three teams the students worked together to plan and build the NASA Apollo Saturn V LEGO kit. The fastest team completed the kit in just over 3 hours. As well as building the Saturn V at the end of the day the teams gave a presentation on the Saturn V which went towards the final team score.

Students’ thoughts about the Lego Build Challenge “Today I really enjoyed being able to work as a team with people from other grades which I would normally not talk to. It was really nice to meet new people and as we all took part in the project, we were all able to bring out our strengths to create the final product. It was interesting how whenever we encountered a difficulty, we were all able to come up with a solution to the problem and quickly move on instead of lingering on the issue. The building and construction of the set was also really fun as I haven’t had the chance to build anything with LEGO for a long time. It was a nice change from the usual school routine and gave fantastic opportunities to be able to work as a team and have the chance to do some hands-on learning while building the LEGO set.” Svetlana Ross (Year 10) Well done to all the teams involved in the day. There will be another LEGO Build Challenge in Semester 2 in which the teams will design a structure that will include a mechanical component. Juliette Major ICT Coordinator

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Tidings – March 2019


Visual Art and Photography Retreat

From Friday 29 to Sunday 31 March a selection of Years 10, 11 and 12 Visual Art and Photography students departed for The Pines, Turros Heads which was the location for the inaugural Visual Art and Photography Artist Retreat. Students had the opportunity to develop their art practice through a series of intensive workshops and activities. Students explored creating landscapes, installations, portraits and used a wide range of mediums such as ink, charcoals, lead, pastels and digital cameras. On arrival students were straight into activities, “getting to know you” exercises followed by a robust theory session based on exploring the purpose and meaning of art. Taking a break from the wet weather, students walked to the beach and took photos of the ocean. Students also collected a variety of objects as stimulus for their initial drawing session. Students were challenged by a life drawing session after dinner.

Saturday was a full day of workshops and practice. Photography students worked on lighting and environmental portraits. Art students began working on their small artist books using text and images as a response to their beach walk. On Saturday evening all students began large drawings taking a small object collected from the surrounding landscape and enlarging it to A2 paper, working with lead pencil only, to concentrate on their observation skills to incorporate detail. On the final day, students woke before dawn to walk to the beach to capture the sunrise and then returned for breakfast. Students then packed up, debriefed and reflected on the weekend. The feedback was incredibly positive.

“I learned that life drawing isn’t as intimidating as it seems.” Bronwyn “I learned that art takes a lot of time and effort, and can take the form of many thing” Paris “I learned that there can be beauty in anything, from a flower to a smokers box.” Elliott “It’s been a really successful weekend. When can we do it again?” Madeline Thank you to Ms Toni Smith and Ms Meredith Barnes for creating and leading these workshops. We are already looking forward to the next retreat in 2020! Vanessa Johnson Art & Languages Coordinator Toni Smith and Meredith Barnes Art Teachers

“Such a great learning experience, made heaps of new friends.” Toni “I about a lot of different materials that I hadn’t used before.” Dana

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

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Tidings – March 2019


“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

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Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad Three teams of St Clare’s College students in Years 10 to 12 competed in the Australian Computational and Linguistics Olympiad (OzClo) at the ANU. We started preparation sessions in the first few weeks of terms, practicing working out some of the past problems together in groups. Upon arrival the group were treated to a delicious afternoon tea and an opening speech by the ANU coordinator with a special appearance by the founder. The girls were then challenged to a set of problems which involved

different languages, over a two hour period. Group work, problem-solving and leadership were the winners on the day, amongst the three teams of four students. All three groups placed in the bronze category. We would like to thank Juliette Major for organising the afternoon and the ANU for hosting us on the day. Lisa Bourne and Sonia Conte Language Teachers

Women in Economics of benefit for young people in the upcoming budget.

On Wednesday 27 March, the senior Economics class travelled to the National Press Club in Barton to attend the Women in Economics Network: 2019 Federal Pre-Budget Forum and lunch. This was a fantastic opportunity for the students to be a part of the audience. The group was addressed by three prominent Australian female economists discussing their views on what should, and should not be, in the 2019 Federal Budget.

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Among other things, the speakers addressed the need for tax reform in order to accommodate intergenerational gaps, and that the economic impact of driving to work is 53cents per kilometre travelled. One student, Matilda Maher, directed a question to the panel during the forum seeking clarification about the impact of the budget for young people. The consensus from the experts was that there was likely to be little

Overall, the invitation to the forum provided great insight and inspiration for the students to see like-minded women involved in Economics, and to speak to many different people about career prospects in this industry. Perhaps one day in the future we will see one of the students in attendance presenting at the forum. We would like to offer a huge thank you to Tony Westmore at Australian Business Economists for the invitation and opportunity to attend the event. Stephanie Campbell Teacher of Economics and Business

Tidings – March 2019


Australian War Memorial Box During Weeks 5 to 7, students from various Year 10 History classes were able to utilise the Australian War Memorial Box on World War II. Students were able to look at and dress up in uniforms, as well as view medals, photos and documents about this period of time. This activity enhanced their learning about this topic. Other memorial boxes will be utilised by Year 9 and 10 History classes throughout the year on topics such as World War I, the Vietnam War and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Service to war. Caroline Blackshaw SOSE Teacher

Around Oz Tour

Year 9 Geography students participated in the "Around Oz" tour at the National Botanic Gardens. The class was divided into two groups. The students gained a range of information about biomes in Australia by looking at various plants and their growing characteristics. Students were able to identify, touch and smell various plants from the rainforest, deserts, mallee woodlands, Sydney Basin and Tasmanian areas, just to name a few. This supplemented work covered in class about Australian biomes and provided a practical way for students to identify and classify plants. Caroline Blackshaw SOSE Teacher

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this� Esther 4:14

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Debating

In Week 2 of this term I walked into the Flexible Learning area at lunchtime to a meet with students who might be interested in participating in debating this year. I was delighted to be greeted by a room full of students ranging from eager Year 7s to experienced debaters in Year 12. Once the information had been provided regarding the days and times on which the competitions run and the availability of those interested determined, 23 students registered for the debating season. Training sessions are run after school with the assistance of two coaches both of whom are university students and wellseasoned debaters themselves. There are three teams in Year 7/8, one in Year 9 and two in Years 11/12, most consisting of four students. In order to develop their debating skills, the students rotate

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their speaking positions and take turns as “fourth speaker”; who can provide written rebuttal during a debate but cannot speak.

They are being exposed to issues of social, economic and political concern. Some of the topics debated so far include:

The St Clare’s teams have acquitted themselves exceptionally well so far. The fourth round of debates occurs in Week 9 and to date every team has won at least one debate! It is a pleasure to witness the improvement in the students’ skills and the enthusiasm they display at the debates and at training is infectious

That we should hold parents responsible for crimes committed by their children.

The debaters are learning to think critically while also gaining confidence in public speaking. The ability to respond quickly to arguments and think on your feet can be an enjoyable but nerve-wracking experience! An additional benefit of being involved in debating is that the students are increasing their knowledge about the world beyond their own.

That we should introduce a quota for people under the age of 30 in parliament. That we regret the increasing popularity of true crime documentaries. The coaches have been very impressed with the engagement shown by the students and frequently comment on their natural ability and intelligence. Let’s hope many of our teams progress to the finals! Manette Johnson English Coordinator

Tidings – March 2019


Birrigai Defence Integration On Tuesday 12 March ten Years 7/8 Defence students attended an integration activity day at Birrigai Outdoor Education Centre.

Students from six other schools in the Canberra region attended the day. The activities included flying fox, giant swing and team rescue. It was a day filled with adventure, fun and resilience building activities. Many students faced challenges and interacted with students from various schools to build relationships, and a sense of community and belonging for the day. Sarah Huntly Defence School Mentor

ANU Guest Speaker single, vertical and/or double undergraduate degrees was discussed as well as the range of opportunities for research. Tim encouraged the students to think about their potential and what inspires them when thinking about what they’d like to pursue post Year 12. The students had time to ask questions at the end of the session.

As part of the new Senior PC Program we hosted our first guest speaker session this week. Senior students from St Edmunds College took up our invitation to join us for this event. Timothy Laif, an ex-St Edmunds student and Science graduate from ANU, presented a dynamic

session to over 50 students on the new direct application process, the subject areas of study available, the accommodation options, scholarships, internships both domestic and international bases, student exchange program, clubs and associations to join. The current flexibility in packaging

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

The option to make applications through UAC still exists. The closing dates for ANU direct applications is 31 May, so most students are now off to the Virtual Open Day site to do a bit of exploration! You’ll find this site at https://virtualopenday. anu.edu.au/ Kym Darmody Years 11 and 12 Coordinator

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From our Japanese Exchange Students

“Hello. My name is Haruka. I’m a Japanese exchange student. I arrived in Australia in January, but I stayed at Gold Coast for three weeks and went to the English school before come to Canberra. Where stayed for 10 weeks. When I came to Canberra, I didn’t know about Canberra well. However, I love Canberra now. My favourite things to do is to visit to sightseeing spot, walking with dogs, and to watch the wild animals. I was so surprised because the wild kangaroos lived near my home. I could see wild wombat. Canberra is beautiful, and has a lot of nature cannot be compared to my town. Thanks to my friends and teachers, I could get used to school life. In Japanese school, teachers come to

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my class and students study same room all day. However, school in Australia, we have to move each class. At first, it was very hard to move classes because St Clare’s is very big, so I usually got lost. But teachers and friends helped me when I was troubled. At first, I was so nervous because I worried about making friends, but I could make a lot of friends because they were very kind. Some students would say to me konnichiwa when we pass each other. It made me so happy, thank you! Through the Japanese classes, I learned about Japanese is difficult language, but the St Clare’s students speak Japanese very well. I am happy that many students are interested in Japan. If you visited Japan, please come my hometown

Yokohama. It is a great city as good as Canberra. Australian people are very kind. Especially, my host family. They made me feel like a part of their real family. All experiences in Australia I will treasure. When I return to Japan, I will tell my friends about Australia. I absolutely will not forget all experience in Australia.” Haruka Muto Japanese Exchange Student “Thank you very much to all the nice students, teachers and the families for hosting me. I’d like to tell you about what surprised me about the differences between Japanese school and Australian school. I was surprised

Tidings – March 2019


Exchange Program Italian Exchange Program Canberra WAATI (ACT) Are you in Years 10-12? Have you ever wanted to travel overseas and experience a different culture? Have you ever thought about being an exchange student in Italy? Did you answer yes to these questions? Then the Italian Exchange Program WAATI (ACT) is for you!

that the Australian school uses white boards and computers in the classroom. We usually use blackboards and notebooks. I would rather use white boards because when I use the blackboard, I use chalk and it makes my hands so dirty. I also think that using a computer is a good idea. I hope I can use my computer in the class. My school doesn’t have recess. I think taking a rest between class is important. My school has many kinds of clubs. Students don’t have to belong to a club but most students join in a club. I play softball for about three hours every day after school. I was surprised that this school doesn’t have clubs like my school. My school has a class the same as

PC class. We call that class HR and the class is in the morning. In HR, my teacher makes announcements and prays. And I have to clean my class room after school. I am glad that many students are studying Japanese and interested in Japan. I’m grateful to see the kind host families. I have a very valuable experience of going to a local school and home staying without adult Japanese. I have this experience because many people support me. I will do my best and improve my English ability.” Chisaki Kitami Japanese Exchange Student

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

8 weeks spent in Italy

Stay with an Italian family

Attend an Italian school

Experience a winter Christmas

Competitively priced

Organised through your Languages department

Open to any Year 10-12 student at St Clare’s College

“I highly recommend and encourage others to take this leap of faith and go on the WAATI exchange to Italy as it is honestly such a worthwhile and beneficial experience. I have learned to become more confident in myself, more independent and openminded.” Gabrielle Gregoire (Year 12 student) For further details, please contact Sonia Conte in the Languages Department Sonia.Conte01@stcc.act.edu.au Sonia Conte Languages Teacher

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Commissioning Mass for Youth Ministry

On Wednesday 13 March our 2019 Youth Ministers were officially commissioned at a Mass celebrated by Father Tony Percy. Each Youth Minister received a blessing from Father and a Holy Spirit Badge from our Faith and Community Leader for 2019 Elena Catanzariti. Our Music Ministry

Captain Grace Carton and our St Vincent de Paul Captains for 2019 also received their badges and blessings.

and determine what our mission statement and goals will be as we administer to the college community.

Following the Mass our Youth Ministry Team which consists of 35 members this year took time out to plan for the year ahead

Many thanks to all those present on the evening especially Father Tony. Marie Manning Mission and Ministry Coordinator

Project Compassion

Our Year 10 SRC representatives Sophie Bailey and Olivia Maher along with Ms Sarah Johnston represented our College at the Project Compassion Launch. The students participated in Mass celebrated by the Archbishop followed by a reception where they had the opportunity to interact with the Archbishop and representatives from our Catholic Colleges in the Diocese. On Thursday 14 March Sister Ivy spoke to our Youth Ministry team about the importance of giving Lent 100% this year. Her talk focused specifically on how all money raised can assist those less fortunate than ourselves and who do not have ready access to many of the basic we take for granted including clean drinking water. Marie Manning Mission and Ministry Coordinator

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Tidings – March 2019


Students lose their locks for The Leukaemia Foundation St Clare’s College joined more than 20,000 Aussies in participating in the World’s Greatest Shave during March. On Tuesday 19 March a number of courageous St Clare’s students and a staff member had their hair cut or shaved to support the Leukaemia Foundation. Three students: Kathryn Diwell (Year 12), Erin Burke (Year 11) and Matilda Mercer (Year 7) as well as Ms Angela Crompton all shaved their hair for the cause. While Sophie O’Donnell (Year 12), Kathryn Liston (Year 12), Catherine Knox (Year 11), Tyler Ryan (Year 11), Kara Murphy (Year 11), Sarah Goodwin (Year 11), Laura Olmos (Year 10) and Caitlyn Hill (Year 8) cut at least 20 cm off their hair to donate to make wigs for cancer patients. A large number of the St Clare’s student body gave up their lunchtime to watch and support the students and Ms Crompton cut and shave their heads. The students could also show their support by wearing crazy hair styles and having their hair sprayed in various colours. On the day Matilda, the youngest participant, had a unique change of hair dresser to Bec Cody current Labor Member for the Murrumbidgee. Bec said “As someone who knows all too well how cancer can effect people, being involved in Matilda’s shave was amazing. For someone so young to be committed to helping others was an honour.” Marie Manning Mission and Ministry Coordinator

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

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Harmony Day On Thursday, 21 March, St Clare’s embraced the different cultures which make up our community with Harmony Day celebrations. In the spirit of this, teachers wore traditional dress from their country of origin or orange clothing, while students wore orange accessories to showcase the official colour of Harmony Day. Throughout the day there were many opportunities for students to get involved from drawing different flags or translating ‘Everyone Belongs’ into different languages with chalk in the quad. They could also mark their country/countries of origin by placing a pin on a world map or watch a Tinikling dance performance in the quad, followed by the opportunity to learn the steps to this dance; while music in different languages was being played in the cafeteria. The results from the Harmony Day Culture Survey were also published revealing that around 19% of students were born overseas and 47% of students can speak a language other than English. In the library, there was a special display of books that involved different cultures, as recommendations for students to read. The highlight of the day was certainly the annual Harmony Day Cake Competition. Judging happened at Recess followed by eating at lunchtime. Congratulations to Georgia Owens and Emily Bennett (Year 7) for winning the competition, Molly Western (Year 7) who came second and Isabella Condemi (Year 8) who came third. Cristina Munoz Social Justice Captain

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Tidings – March 2019


Walk for Epilepsy On Sunday 24 March, Epilepsy ACT held it’s annual Walk for Epilepsy in order to raise funds and awareness. The date this year coincided with the National Purple Day for Epilepsy. The walk is in its third year 260 people attended the walk, 100 more than last year! St Clare’s College had six students volunteer for the event as helpers on the raffle, lolly jar competition, and cheeky neuron stall. Epilepsy ACT would like to thank the students for giving up their Sunday to volunteer. Erin Burke Year 12

Share the Dignity labelled with your house, located at the Kindness Corner in the cafeteria. There is a house challenge to see which house can bring in the most donations! It is important to remember that every woman deserves the dignity so many of us take for granted and we want your help in order to benefit women in crisis. Your small act of kindness could assist a woman from the 85,000+ women that need our help this year. This April, St Clare’s will again launch the Share the Dignity campaign. Share the Dignity is a women’s charity that collects thousands of sanitary items such as pads, tampons and personal hygiene products for women experiencing homelessness, poverty and domestic violence.

Their monthly Dignity Drives rely on donations from individuals like you to give to Australia’s most vulnerable women. We are asking YOU to start buying some of these items and bring them to school from Week 1 of Term 2. Please leave them in the big box at Student Admin area, or the boxes

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

Small dignities make a big difference. Thanks in advance! Atka, Grace and Juliana Year 12

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Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander News

A number of exciting initiatives have been undertaken throughout Term 1: •

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pastoral Care has occurred every Tuesday in C107. On Thursday 21 February we held an introduction afternoon tea and Personalised Learning Plan (PLP) meeting in the Staff Common room for all families, students and staff. This was a great opportunity to meet with Year 7 families and reconnect again with other families. Parents and students collaborated and developed their own PLP, and this was communicated to teachers to assist students in improving their personalised learning goals. Parents will be contacted in the near future if they haven’t completed the PLP for their daughter for Years 7 to 9.

Lunches have occurred periodically between Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students, a friend and the Contact Teacher. This is a great time to meet up, discuss upcoming events and socialise with students. The next lunch will occur on Tuesday 9 April after PC in C107.

On 4 March there was a Contact Teachers Network Day. This was a great opportunity to network and discuss new strategies for teaching, as well as distribute Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural competency days information for staff.

Staff discussed the nine domains of the National School Improvement Goals for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Education in a staff meeting on 18 March. It was great to get feedback on what we are achieving and where to go in the future.

Brea Rodgers attended the Tennis Try a day on 27 March. Brea was able to meet with Evonne Goolagong- Cawley and hear her inspirational story.

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Tutoring has been occurring periodically with students. Parents and students have also been made aware of Maths tutoring every Monday in W103, Languages tutoring every Tuesday lunch 2 in P108, Wednesday The Student Success Program in library from 3.30pm - 4.30pm and the cross-age tutor program.

I look forward to continuing in this role and providing opportunities in Term 2. Caroline Blackshaw Contact Teacher for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education

Tidings – March 2019


Music Lessons Julia Clancy will be offering group beginner Violin and Viola lessons starting Term 2, 2019. The group lessons will consist of 3 or more students per lesson and the cost will be shared making it an affordable option. Group lessons start at $15.00 per 30 min. If you are interested in either group or private tuition for term two please get in touch before the end of Term One. Julia’s email address is julia.k.clancy@gmail.com and her mobile number is 0406 137 240. All students are welcome from Year 7 to 12! Vanessa Johnson Arts and Languages Coordinator

Fees Reminder

Level 1 Coaching Courses St Clare’s College, in conjunction with ACT Cricket and ACT Touch, is hoping to run Level 1 coaching courses in both sports throughout the first half of Term 2. It is anticipated that these will be free courses combining online material and practical sessions with a duration of approximately 4 to 6 hours. It is envisaged that we will run the practical components of these courses across a couple of afternoons after school at the College. These courses would be open to all members of the community

(students, siblings of students, parents/carers, teachers etc). I am looking to gauge numbers of prospective participants so if anyone has an interest in participating in these courses could you please email me with an expression of interest at your earliest convenience. From here we will then look to lock some specific dates in. david.garrity@stcc.act. edu.au or 02 6260 9458 #thetimeisnow David Garrity Sports Facilitator

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

Fees are now due for payment in full unless arrangements have otherwise been approved by the College. If you have an arrangement in place, please ensure that the instalment payments are sufficient to have your account paid in full by the end of this year. Please contact the College Fees Office on 6260 9461 if an adjustment is needed. Accounts Clerk

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2019 Swimming Carnival

The 2019 St Clare’s College Interhouse Swimming Carnival raised the bar once again for pomp, pageantry and unbridled house spirit. Throw in a bit of swimming here and there and a great day out was had by all. To the victors the spoils and in that sense both Makara and Kipara were the spoiled children as the both came away with trophies at the end of the day. Makara claimed the Championship trophy from Wirana who were literally hot on their heels a mere five points adrift, whilst there was clear water back to Wareen in third. In the battle for the Spirit Cup Kipara, “they have spirit yes they do, they have spirit how ‘bout you?” just kept the fast finishing Japara Jaws (who were looking to put the bite on them at the finish!) at bay in the war cries to remain the last house with their head above water by a mere handful of points. Makara’s mighty 12 Years swimmers laid a very solid point scoring platform down with number one seed Ruby-May Vivian duking it out with Amy Brandenburger of Wareen in all events to rack up the points. Both girls came away with championships. In the 14 Years

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Amy Gasnier set the only record of the day, as well and the fastest 50 freestyle time of 28.39 seconds (yes, 28.39!) as part of another dual in the pool with Patrice Parker. This pair went one two all day with Amy adding backstroke and butterfly to her haul, whilst Patrice claimed the breaststroke. Ashley Patton (13 Years), 2018 SCC Swimmer of the Year Habibat Ogunbanwo (15 Years) and Brooke Levay (Opens) claimed clean sweeps of all four strokes in their respective ages, amazing their peers with superhuman (some would say Collingwoodesque!) feats of speed and power, whilst also earning themselves a very, very busy day at the ASC Championships a few weeks later. In the 16 Years SCC Swim Team veteran Kayla Jones took all but the freestyle title being upstaged by the fresh out of retirement Emma Thomson by the smallest of margins (.15 of a second!). As the balloons were popped, banners were rewrapped and the bunting came down on another great whole school community event congratulations go to all involved for excellent participation, organisation and energy.

Six houses now plan new strategies to get their names on the next piece of silverware, and with a highly talented team ready to be picked, we wait anxiously for the ASC Championships to see if SCC can go back to back to back.

Congratulations to the 2019 Swim Team on their selection: 12 Years: Amy Brandenburger, Anna Kemp, Ruby-May Vivian, Maehb Wright 13 Years: Ashley Patton, Emily Kite, Angelina Brown 14 Years: Amy Gasnier, Patrice Parker, Charlotte Guthrie, Sarah Bennett, 15 Years: Habibat Ogunbanwo, Aislinn Hawkins, Sarah Wicks, Halle Parker 16 Years: Kayla Jones, Tyler Ryan, Emma Thomson Opens: Brooke Levay, Bethwynn Lacey, Keely Small, Grace Egan #thetimeisnow David Garrity Sports Facilitator

Tidings – March 2019


“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

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St Clare’s Sport

3 x 3 Hustle Lunchtime Basketball Tournament

with 20 seconds to play to take the title.

The Junior competition saw some excellent play throughout the preliminary rounds with the team of Ava Boyes, Lara Stincic and Sophie Brennan (Wonkey Donkeys) going undefeated to be the first team into the final. Hot on their heels was the Year 8 team of Olivia Radulovich, Tori Hayes and Alyssa Enchong (Red and Black) with the solitary loss. Both teams played some razzle dazzle basketball throughout the rounds, splashing 3s at will and excelling with the pick and roll. Not to be outdone were the self-proclaimed Bball Stars from Year 7 (Ava Mooney, Erica Church and Eva Lehmann) who also lit up in matches with great dribble penetration play to finish third on the ladder.

In the Senior competition results have fluctuated with the Year 9 team of Hannah Briskey, Alana Kunovec and Sarah Mooney (Fruit Punch) looking potent, particularly from beyond the arc, whilst the Basketbois (Riley Madsen, Sarah Potter and Iesha Still) have also been super competitive. Currently the Batchenators (Mrs Batch, Ms Chen and Mrs Hawke) are top of the table, Mrs Hawke shooting the lights out some days on their way to big scores.

In a hotly awaited final the Wonkey Donkeys had it all to do, playing a player down due to injury. The Red and Black team used the extra player to advantage slipping the ball inside to the unguarded player for a couple of early lay ups. The score then got out to 10-2 before a Sophie 3 point play followed by Ava’s 3 pointer had the score a point the difference with a minute to go. Red and Black calmly played possession basketball (no 24 second clock here!) before sealing the game with a regulation lay-up

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ACT Women’s Volleyball Autumn Competition Tuesday Nights at Lyneham Hockey Centre It has been a great start by our three teams in this competition,

with both our Senior team (Women’s B Division) and St Clare’s Blue (Junior Division) undefeated after the opening two matches. The St Clare’s Maroon Junior team are also on the scoreboard after a fantastic first victory in only their second ever competitive match against Merici College in Round 2. This is a great result for a team playing in their first tournament, taking an epic 3 setter that went to 27-25 in the third set. The Maroon team demonstrated highly proficient serving forcing the opposition to make the play consistently throughout the match. Cheyenne Crozier, Chelsea Henderson and Molly Western served high percentages whilst Layla Alfares dominated at the net. Some great hustle plays from Kaitlyn Lloyd and Ayushka Khaniya rounded out an excellent all round team performance on the back of excellent coaching from Tash Morrison. The more experienced Blue team are two from two having comfortably defeated both Belconnen VC and Merici in the opening two rounds. The team has excelled with their combination play with consistent passing and great chasing down key factors in the victories. By far and away the strongest serving unit in the competition the team has also defended well when needed.

Tidings – March 2019


Lauren Codd’s, Carolyn Sisley’s and Katherine Kneeshaw’s powerful and deep serving has had the opposition backpeddling often, whilst Rose Graham, Kaitlyn Kelly and Sachi Proctor have shown amazing hustle when the ball is on their side of the net. Add in Sophie Campbell’s steadying influence with the dig, Chelsea Staples consistency and astute coaching from senior students Lucy Trotman and Macey Radburn and the team finds itself humming along. Kudos to the Senior team who are also undefeated after two matches, defeating two Merici teams in the process (double kudos for that!). This team has a number of new players who are finding their feet in a new game and adapting well to the new challenges they have been faced with. The Seniors experienced the quartet of Lucy Trotman, Macey Radburn, Tash Morrison and Eliza Foot have brought a great read of the game and court sense to the team’s play. Add in Eliza’s booming serve and Macey’s deep and accurate serve and opposition teams have found it hard to consistently return. Clare Laffey has also been a shining light in a return to the game. You know you are doing well, as has happened to Clare, when the opposition coach calls a time out simply to break up a six point serving run and her rhythm (you got in their heads Clare ). Newcomers Abbey Osmond, Emma Thomson, Jasmine Jones and Laura Edwards bring great athleticism to the team. We look forward to seeing how this team fares as the competition progresses.

Weekend Netball It is with great pleasure that we announce that St Clare’s College will be entering 15 teams in the upcoming SCNA Winter Netball competition at Deakin Courts. St Clare’s teams will play in the following competitions: •

Four Year 7 teams – three Intermediates Div 4, one Intermediates Div 3

Six Year 8 teams: one Intermediates Div 4, three Intermediates Div 3 and two Intermediates Div 2

Two Year 9 teams: one Intermediates Div 2 and one Intermediates Div 1 3 Senior teams: one Seniors Div 3, one Seniors Div 2 and one Seniors Div 1

All teams and students have been graded via an extensive trial process held over multiple afternoons during the last few weeks. All students who participated in trials have been graded by at least three staff members throughout this process. Team selections were then finalised through meetings of the grading teachers after trials were complete. Special thanks go to the following members of staff who assisted with the grading afternoons and then subsequent grading meetings: Mrs Sepi Hawke, Mrs Lisa Bourne, Mrs Jojo Chen, Mrs Renee McDonald, Mr Patrick Elliott and Mr David Garrity.

“Perhaps you were born for a time such as this” Esther 4:14

Season 2019 will begin on the first Saturday of Term 2. Game times will be as follows: •

12 noon – Intermediates Div 2 and 4

1 pm – Intermediates Div 1 and 3

2 pm – Seniors Div 1 and 3

3.15 pm – Seniors Div 2

Current training times are as follows: •

Monday after school at St Clare’s – All Year 8 teams. Please pick up by 4.45pm

Wednesday after school at St Clare’s – All Year 7 teams. Please pick up by 4.50pm

At time of printing Year 9 and Senior team training times still to be advised.

All new players should by now have had a dress sized and paid for on Qkr (via school website). To assist with our administration it would be greatly appreciated if all intending players could be registered on My Netball by the end of term. Any parents/carers interested in managing their daughter’s team should contact either Mr Garrity or Mrs Hawke as soon as possible. Working With Vulnerable Peoples card is a requirement in this role. David.garrity@stcc.act.edu.au Sepi.hawke@stcc.act.edu.au or phone 02 6260 9458 #thetimeisnow David Garrity Sports Factilitator

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IN THE HEADLINES Australian Athletics Championships

Alexandra to go to Summer Science Camp in Singapore

Emma Dunn (Year 11) and Tia Hatchman (Year 11) competed at the Australian Athletics Championships at Sydney Olympic Park. Well done ladies!

High Distinctions in the BEBAS Challenge

Congratulations to Alexandra Edwards (Year 12) who has been successful in gaining a place at the National University of Singapore Science Summer Camp in July this year. Congratulations to Kayla Walker, Zoe Sugerman and Sarah Rosin (Year 9) for receiving a High Distinction in the BEBRAS Computational Thinking Challenge. The challenge was an opportunity for students to use algorithmic thinking to solve the puzzles, work in new teams and justify their thinking processes. There was a number of distinction, credit and merit certificates awarded to St Clare’s students who participated in the challenge. Well done to all involved.

Little Athletics Championships

Sea Scout Leader Katharine Pearce (Year 8) was a patrol leader at the Cotter Shield in Sea Scouts. She was recognised as an exemplary leader winning an Explorer level award. It is her first year as a patrol leader and she is leading an all boy group. Well done Katharine!

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Sophie Brennan (Year 8) has been selected in the ACT Athletics team to compete at the Australian Little Athletics Championships ( ALAC) in Hobart from 25 - 29 April. Sophie will be competing in the Triple Jump, Long Jump, Discus, Shotput and the 4 x 100m relay.

Contributions are greatly received for any updates on student activities. Content and images can be sent to media@stcc.act.edu.au


Renee Watson

Class of 1995

Renee is a Queanbeyan girl, who has always been excited about the world, understanding it and sharing the joy of science with everyone. St Clare’s provided a great environment for that enthusiasm to turn into a real passion. She was Wibalu Captain in her final year at St Clare’s before heading to ANU to study Biochemistry. It wasn’t all smooth sailing, with a family divorce making life tough for most of Year 12 and first year at University but with the support of some brilliant teachers and friends she made it through. While in her 3rd year at ANU Renee undertook her first science engagement project, working with Canberra Hospital mortuary to create a museum of body parts for educational purposes. In 2000, Renee decided to take a year out and set off on a round-the-world adventure. After some amazing experiences and some close shaves, she found herself in London working for the first National Patient Safety Agency. In 2001, Renee moved to start a new role, at the University of Oxford, establishing the National Translational Cancer Research Network and in 2005 was seconded to help launch an international Malaria Research Network.

Following the birth of her first child in 2006, Renee decided to strike out on her own and launched her first company. WATS.ON continues to support scientific societies to grow and begin making broad social impact. One such organisation was the Oxfordshire Science Festival, which, under Renee’s leadership, grew to over 100 events attracting 30,000+ people. In 2016, Renee started her second business, The Curiosity Box, which sends boxes of fun, hands-on science experiments to kids on subscription. In 2017, Curiosity Box won an Innovation and the WISE Toy of the Year Award; Renee won the Spotlight on STEM Role Model award and was a finalist in the The Women in Business Director of the Year and IoD Startup Director of the Year in 2018 and 2019. In 2018, Renee was named as 1 of 6 women in STEM to watch by Melinda Gates. Renee has set a goal of giving 1 million children a wonder-filled experience of science and is hosting an event at Westminster in 2019 to begin her campaign to make science education fun. Renee refuels her batteries playing touch rugby and is very excited to be representing Europe at the Touch World Cup in Malaysia in May.

Contributions are greatly welcomed from past students. Send 300 words plus a current image to media@stcc.act.edu.au

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Upcoming Events Tuesday 9 April

Thursday 11 April

Friday 12 April

ASC Swimming Carnival at AIS

Easter Liturgy in the College Hall

ANZAC Day Service 2.00-3.30pm in the College Gym

Parent Teacher Interviews 4pm-6pm in the College Hall

Term 1 Concludes

Saturday 13 April to Saturday 20 April

Wednesday 24 April to Saturday 4 May

Monday 29 April

New Zealand Science Study Tour

SWITHC VEX World Robotics Tour

Term 2 Commences

Tuesday 30 April

Wednesday 1 May

Thursday 2 May

Try A Day at St Clare’s

Open Evening

ASC Track and Feild Championships at the AIS

Monday 6 May

Tuesday 7 May

Wednesday 8 May

12&U ACT Swimming Championships at the AIS

School Tours 9 am or 4pm by appointment

13 Years and Over ACT Swimming Championships at the AIS

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Vinnies Trivia Night 6pm-8pm at the College Hall

Whole School Assembly

Tidings – March 2019


Seek WISDOM Excellence in Girls’ Education Since 1965

Key Dates Try a Day at St Clare’s Tuesday 30 April Become a St Clare’s girl for a day! We invite prospective Year 7 students to experience the exciting and enriching opportunities available at St Clare’s College. Please register on our website. Open Evening Wednesday 1 May Our Open Evening is an opportunity for parents and prospective students to look at our facilities and talk to staff and students. The evening will run from 4.30pm to 7.00pm with an information session to be held in the College Hall from 6.00pm-6.30pm.

School Tours Tuesday 7 May or Wednesday 15 May School Tours with the Principal are available by appointment at 9.00am or 4.00pm. Please contact the College to register for a tour. Year 11, 2020 Information Evening Monday 13 May Discover the many courses and leadership opportunities available for senior students at our Year 11 Information Evening from 6.00pm - 7.30pm at the College.

P: 02 6260 9400 | E: enrolments@stcc.act.edu.au | www.stcc.act.edu.au


Contact us (02) 6260 9400 media@stcc.act.edu.au St Clare’s College 1 McMillan Crescent, Griffith ACT 2603 stcc.act.edu.au

Profile for St Clare's College Canberra

Tidings, Edition 3 2019  

Tidings, Edition 3 2019  

Profile for stclares