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Senior Handbook


Our Mission St Clare’s College is a Spirited Learning Community.

St Clare’s is Spirited: →→ Based on the Gospel →→ Enlivened by the Spirit →→ Open to life, change and challenge →→ Valuing consultative, cooperative processes →→ Preparing students to take an active role in the community →→ Enthusiastic, hopeful and empowering →→ Committed to justice.

St Clare’s is a Catholic Community: →→ Of students, parents, staff and teachers →→ Which affirms, nurtures and empowers all members →→ Committed to love, peace, joy and hope →→ Building the Kingdom of God →→ Developing young women to reach their potential →→ Open to the poor.

The Learning Program at St Clare’s: →→ Is holistic →→ Offers diversity →→ Promotes high achievement →→ Is open to new educational developments →→ Values the uniqueness of each individual →→ Strives for the spiritual, physical, emotional, intellectual and aesthetic development of all students.

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Contents Principal’s Message 

4

Aims 

5

Principles for Learning 

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Teaching and Learning Principles 

8

The ACT College System 

9

The Australian Curriculum 

15

Senior Courses 

16

Course Requirements at St Clare’s College

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English 

19

English (T)  Literature (T)  Essential English (A/M) 

Languages  Continuing French (T)  Continuing and Advanced Japanese (T)  Continuing Italian (T/A) 

Mathematics  Tertiary Mathematics Courses  Specialist Mathematics (T)  Specialist Methods (T)  Mathematical Methods (T)  Mathematical Applications (T)  Accredited (A) Mathematics Courses  Essential Mathematics (A)  Contemporary Mathematics (A/M)  General Methods of Assessments (T/A)

Physical Education and Health  Exercise Science (T/A)  Physical Education (A/M)  General Methods of Assessments 

Religious Studies  Religious Studies (T/A/M)  CHC14015: Certificate I in Active Volunteering (Release 2) RTO no.88009  CHC24015: Certificate II in Active Volunteering (Release 1) RTO no.88009 

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19 20 20

21 21 22 23

24 26 26 27 27 28 29 29 30 30

31 31 33 34

Science  Biology (T/A)  Chemistry (T)  Earth and Environmental Science (T/A) Physics (T) 

39 39 41 42 46

Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE) 48 Australian and Global Politics (T/A/M) Business (T/A/M)  Economics (T)  Geography (T/A/M)  Ancient History (T/A/M)  Modern History (T/A/M)  Legal Studies (T/A/M)  Psychology (T/A/M)  Sociology (T/A/M)  Behavioural Science (T/A/M)  Social and Community Work (A/V) 

49 51 52 53 55 56 58 59 60 61 62

Technologies64 Information Technology (T/A/M/V) 64 Textiles and Fashion (T/A/M/V) 67 Hospitality Studies (T/A/M/V) 70 Food Science and Management (T) 74 Design Technology and Graphics (T/A/M) 77

The Arts

79

Dance (T/A/M)  80 Drama (T/A/M)  83 Media (T/A/M)  87 Music (T/A/M)  90 Visual Arts (T/A/M)  94 Photography (T/A/M) 96

Attendance

98

Responsibilities

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Assessment and Reporting

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35 35 37 38

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Principal’s Message Welcome to St Clare’s College where we have been welcoming students for more than 50 years! St Clare’s College is an inclusive, caring, Catholic community where learning is valued and students are given opportunities to grow in all dimensions of their life. Modelled on the life and teachings of Jesus and inspired by the example of St Clare in its policies and practices, the College is committed to providing a safe and empowering environment for all students. The College offers a strong academic program as well as a number of vocational courses in Years 11 and 12. In Years 7 and 8 the Foundation Studies Program enables all students to experience a wide range of courses to provide a sound basis for making future academic decisions. The Pastoral Care Program promotes the spiritual and social development of students as well as supporting their learning needs. The social justice, volunteering and outreach programs are key focus areas for the St Clare’s community.

the academic program including: debating, drama, dance, music, a wide range of sports and leadership development programs. The College has professional dedicated staff who have the best interest of the students at heart. The staff maintain their currency in teaching and learning by attending professional learning workshops and conferences on a yearly basis. We look forward to a long association with all of our families and hope that your time at St Clare’s College is enjoyable and rewarding. Brad Cooney, Principal

Student leadership has a high profile in the College through the Student Representative Council and the strong House system. There are many opportunities for students to participate in extra–curricular activities that complement 4

Senior Handbook


Aims Educational Aims of St Clare’s College St Clare’s College is a Catholic school committed to providing a holistic education for young women. It aims to provide a supportive and just environment in which young women can develop spiritually, academically, socially and physically into confident and capable members of the broader community.

Upon completion of her studies at St Clare’s College each student should have had the opportunity to: Grow in love and understanding of God, self and neighbour through: →→ participation in the prayer life of the College as well as in formal Religious Education courses →→ learning about and modelling Christ’s teachings →→ developing empathy with the needs and experiences of people within and beyond her own community, especially those who are in need or disadvantaged, through experiential learning and participation in activities with a social justice focus →→ developing an understanding, appreciation of and respect for diverse cultures and traditions, including religious traditions →→ developing a reverence for life, and an understanding and appreciation of our stewardship of the natural physical environment →→ active participation in all areas of learning and seeking to achieve success through personal challenges. Develop her knowledge and skills and acquire an appreciation of learning through: →→ the experience of a rich and varied curriculum →→ gaining sound academic and study skills appropriate to her level of study →→ being in an environment that promotes a positive approach to and love of learning →→ being encouraged to become an independent and self-motivated learner →→ participating actively in the learning process and working collaboratively with others as well as independently →→ experiencing how learning can occur in many different environments and through the use of technologies →→ being given opportunities to develop a range of skills including aesthetic, sporting, creative, emotional, analytical as well as literacy and numeracy skills which form the basis of many other life skills.

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Reach intellectual potential through: →→ using her gifts and talents to the best of her ability →→ being able to communicate her ideas both orally and in writing →→ developing research and investigative skills →→ using current technologies to advance her learning →→ taking responsibility for her learning and the organisation of her studies →→ utilising fully the human and material resources available to her →→ selecting courses that challenge her appropriately and meet her future needs and current interests. Develop a strong sense of community and personal awareness through: →→ showing respect and courtesy to others and supporting others in times of personal need →→ employing effective interpersonal skills and an understanding, appreciation and tolerance of differences →→ utilising appropriate conflict resolution and stress management skills →→ participating in and being supportive of College and community activities →→ gaining essential knowledge about herself and her environment and the interaction between people and the environment →→ developing an awareness of the importance of an active and healthy lifestyle on her spiritual, emotional and physical development and well-being. Demonstrate taking responsibility for her own actions and decisions through: →→ behaving in a manner that brings credit to herself and the College at all times →→ respecting the property of the College and others in the community →→ avoiding dangerous and unsafe practices →→ showing the ability to solve problems and deal with change effectively →→ understanding her personal potential for contributing to the community →→ being honest and fair in her dealings with others.

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Principles for Learning “Teaching has an extraordinary moral depth and is one of humankind’s most excellent and creative activities, for the teacher does not write on inanimate material but on the very spirit of human beings” The Catholic School on the Threshold of the Third Millennium. #19

St Clare’s College is a Spirited Learning Community which engages Heart Head Hand through: →→ Promoting independence, interdependence, self-motivation and a love of lifelong learning →→ Ensuring that students’ needs, backgrounds, perspectives and interests are reflected in our curriculum →→ Making authentic connections with communities and practice beyond the classroom →→ Challenging and supporting students to develop deep levels of thinking and application →→ Being dynamic and responsive to change →→ Ensuring that assessment practices are an integral part of teaching and learning →→ Creating pioneering learning spaces and opportunities →→ Creating supportive, inclusive and productive learning environments →→ Acknowledging and celebrating the professional richness of our teaching and learning community.

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Teaching and Teaching and Learning Principles Learning Principles

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St Clare’s islearning a spirited learning community committed to engaging St Clare’s College isCollege a spirited community committed to engaging the ‘head, heart and hands’ all students. theof‘head, heart and hands’ of all students.

HEAD Being dynamic and responsive to change. teaching and learning.

LEARNING “ ... what a child can do today with assistance, she will be able to do by herself tomorrow.”

“Teaching has an extraordinary moral depth and is one of humankind’s most excellent and creative activities, for the teacher does not Lev Vygotsky, Interaction Between write on inanimate material but on the very Learning and Develo spirit of human beings.” Lev Vygotsky, Interaction Between Learning and Development

“ ... what a child can do today with assistance, she will be able to do by herself tomorrow.”

The Catholic School on the Threshold of the Third Millennium, paragraph 19

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St Clare’s College A Spirited Learning Community Seek Wisdom

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The ACT College System Introduction After choosing to enrol in Years 11 and 12 at St Clare's College, a student must then choose a package of courses to follow over the next two years. This booklet provides an overview of the proposed Senior Courses for 2019. The package chosen may be either a Tertiary Package leading to the award of an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate and an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) or a Standard Package leading to the award of an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate. Within both packages students may also obtain Vocational Certificates.

General Terminology The ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies (BSSS) The ACT BSSS, also known as the Board, is responsible for the certification of all senior college studies. For further information regarding the BSSS please refer to their website: www.bsss.act.edu.au

ACT Senior Secondary Certificate The ACT Senior Secondary Certificate (SSC) is awarded following a program of full-time study completed over Years 11 and 12. It certifies that students have demonstrated achievement that prepares them for the workforce or further study. This certificate is issued at the end of Year 12 to all students who have completed an approved program of studies in Years 11 and 12. The ACT Senior Secondary Certificate records all units and achievement grades.

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Course Pattern Standard Package A Standard Package for a Senior Secondary Certificate will be awarded on completion of an educational program approved by the college as having a logical pattern of study and which includes the equivalent of at least 17 standard units. This package must contain: →→ A minimum of four (4) A, T, M, H, C or E courses (see below for further information regarding the meaning for each course) →→ At least 12 Standard units are classified as T, A, M, H, C or E →→ At least three (3) different course areas of which at least two (2) must be A, T or M courses.

Tertiary Package A Tertiary Package is a package of courses which allows a student to meet the requirements for entrance into tertiary institutions. Students must: →→ Complete the equivalent of 20 standard units of which 18 units must be T, A, H, M, C or E courses →→ Complete their studies across four (4) different course areas The accredited units must be arranged into courses to form at least the following patterns: →→ Five (5) majors; or →→ Four (4) majors and one (1) minor; or →→ Three (3) majors and three (3) minors →→ Completion of the ACT Scaling Test (AST) in Year 12 →→ Studies would normally be completed in no fewer than four semesters.

Course Frameworks Course Frameworks provide the basis for the development and accreditation of courses and a common basis for assessment, moderation and reporting and for accommodating national changes in general and vocational education in curriculum and assessment. Each Course Framework includes the Rationale and Goals of the Course, Guide to the Selection of Content, Pedagogy, Assessment Criteria, Achievement Standards, Moderation Procedures and Bibliography.

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Course A course is made up of a combination of units; for example, the Physics course consists of four semester-length units. Courses have the following classifications: Accredited (A) Course →→ A course which has been accepted by the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies as being educationally sound and appropriate for students in Years 11 and 12. Accredited courses are awarded grades only and cannot be counted towards a student’s Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR). Tertiary (T) Course →→ A course which has been accepted by the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies as one which prepares students for higher education. Tertiary courses are awarded grades and course scores and can be counted towards a student’s Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR). Modified (M) Course →→ An Accredited (A) course which has been modified to provide appropriate educational outcomes for students who satisfy specific disability criteria. H Course →→ An ‘H’ classification is given to a Year 11 and 12 course, which is designed and accredited by an Australian higher education provider and where successful completion of the course will be recognised towards an undergraduate degree with that provider. H courses may contribute to a student’s ATAR calculation and the units may contribute to the college course. C Course →→ ‘C’ classification is given to a Board accredited vocational education and training program appropriate for students in Year 11 and 12, which is delivered and assessed by Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) approved by the BSSS and registered by the ACT Accreditation and Registration Council under the Australian Quality Training Framework. Vocational (V) Course →→ A vocational program leads to a vocational Certificate or Statement of Attainment as defined by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF). The content of the vocational program is based on the competencies defined in the relevant Training Package and follows the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF). Vocational programs accredited by the Board may be classified as A, T, M, or C. Structured Workplace Learning (SWL), where students spend time in the workplace, may be part of a Vocational Education Course and are classified as W units. Registered (R) Unit or Course →→ A Registered (R) unit or course has gained College Board and BSSS approval. R courses and R units are usually designed to further the student’s social, cultural, sporting and/or personal development. R units may be registered with values which are multiples of 0.1 (i.e., 5.5 hours) of a standard unit. A Registered unit or course is only awarded a Pass (P) grade if completed satisfactorily.

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E Course →→ ‘E’ classification is given to a Board registered course, which leads to a nationally recognised vocational qualification and is delivered by an external Registered Training Organisation. Major and Minor Courses →→ Courses are studied either as 'majors' or ‘minors’. A major is obtained by completing four standard units of a course, that is, studying it for all of Years 11 and 12. A minor is obtained by completing two (2) standard units of a course, that is, studying it for only one year. This could be in Year 11 or Year 12. Major/Minor and Double Major Courses →→ In some courses it is possible to do more than four (4) standard units. A student completing six (6) units gains a 'major/minor' in the subject. Eight (8) units provide a 'double major'.

Standard Unit A semester unit delivered over a minimum of 55 hours and a maximum of 63 hours, has a value of ‘one standard unit’. At St Clare’s College all courses in Years 11 and 12 have a minimum of 60 hours.

Unit Grades: Student achievement in A, T and M courses is reported on the ACT Senior Secondary Certificate on a 5 point A to E scale based on the A - E grade standards described in the Course Frameworks. Generally across all Course Frameworks, as well as representing the Course Framework specific unit grade descriptions, the letters A, B, C, D and E may be understood to indicate: A: awarded to students who have demonstrated a very high level of knowledge and understanding of the full range of concepts and principles of the unit. They have shown evidence of a very high level of cognitive and practical skill in a wide range of assessment situations B: awarded to students who have demonstrated a high level of knowledge and understanding of the concepts and principles of the unit. They have shown evidence of a high level of cognitive and practical skill in a range of assessment situations C: awarded to students who have demonstrated a sound level of knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts and principles of the unit. They have shown evidence of a sound level of cognitive and practical skill in most assessment situations D: awarded to students who have demonstrated a limited knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts and principles of the unit. They have shown evidence of a limited level of cognitive and practical skill in assessment situations E: awarded to students who have demonstrated a very limited knowledge and understanding of the basic concepts and principles of the unit. They have shown evidence of a very limited level of cognitive and practical skill in assessment situations

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Other possible grades on an ACT Senior Secondary Certificate are Pass, Participated, Status and Recognition. Pass:

awarded in R, E and C units when a student has satisfactorily completed the unit and achieved at least some of the competencies (C, E units).

Participated: awarded in C units when a student has met the attendance and assessment requirements but achieved none of the competencies. Status:

awarded when a student has been unable to complete the unit through illness or misadventure and the college does not have enough evidence to award a grade.

Recognition: awarded when a student has completed some year 11/12 studies in other jurisdictions. Unit grades for H units will be awarded by the university, using the descriptors from that university. These grades include High Distinction, Distinction, Credit, Pass, Ungraded Pass and Conceded Pass.

Unit Score The standardised score awarded at the end of a semester in each Unit studied. Scores are standardised to historical parameters. Unit Scores contribute to a Course Score at the end of Year 12. Scores and Rank Order in each unit are posted in the meeting room adjacent to the Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment office at the end of each semester.

Course Score The score awarded at the completion of a T-course. Each unit is assessed as it is undertaken. The best 80% of unit scores combine to give the course score. The score indicates ranking in the course in relation to other students in the course. Course scores in each course are scaled using the college’s AST results.

Tertiary Entrance Statement Students who complete a Tertiary Package are awarded a Tertiary Entrance Statement (TES) which reports the student’s Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) and information on the tertiary courses the student studied.

Aggregate Score This is the score which will be used to determine the ATAR. An aggregate score is provided only if the student has completed a Tertiary Package. It is calculated by adding the best 3.6 scaled course scores, that is, the best three major scaled course scores and 0.6 of the fourth. The fourth may be a minor course. An Australian Tertiary Admission Rank is calculated from the student’s aggregate score.

Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) The Australian Tertiary Admission Rank places all ACT students in rank order. The ATAR is used by universities to determine admission to university and to faculties. It is a percentile ranking which indicates how a student has performed compared to other Year 12 students.

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ACT Scaling Test (AST) Towards the end of Year 12, in September, all students in the ACT who wish to undertake Tertiary studies at some time in the future or are likely to want an ATAR, must sit the AST. The AST is a test of general scholastic ability which aims to measure a student’s capacity for tertiary study. Students sitting the AST are required to perform three distinct tasks: →→ Multiple Choice Component. This test comprises of approximately 80 questions in 2 ¼ hours. The multiple choice questions are based on a variety of material drawn from the Humanities, Social Sciences, Sciences and Mathematics and measure a student’s ability to reason, comprehend, interpret and make inferences from a variety of verbal and quantitative material. →→ Short Answer Response Component. This is a test of thinking and reasoning, and students will be asked for interpretation, explanation and justification of a point of view. The stimulus material may be a prose passage, a quotation, a graph, a table containing words or numbers, a poem, a picture or a map or any combination of these. The major elements in the test will cover the following: Comprehending and Interpreting, Dealing with Information, Thinking Critically, Drawing Conclusions, Solving Problems, and Evaluating and Responding. There will be several questions and the material will be drawn from a wide variety of subject areas, but is not aimed at subject specialists and should be accessible to all senior secondary students. Responses will vary in length from a few words to a paragraph. →→ Essay Writing Component. The essay writing component requires a student, in a 2 ½ hours testing session, to produce an extended piece of prose writing.

Useful BSSS publications Available on the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies website www.bsss.act.edu.au are: →→ What Certificates Could You Obtain? →→ What’s the AST? →→ What’s the ATAR? →→ What’s Plagiarism? How you can avoid it. →→ Your Rights to Appeal.

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The Australian Curriculum The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) have developed Senior Secondary Australian Curriculum for English, Geography, History, Mathematics and Science. The ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies (BSSS) has now accredited the courses for delivery in colleges. St Clare’s College began implementing the BSSS approved Senior Secondary Australian Curriculum in 2015 in English and History. In 2016 Geography, Mathematics and Science courses were implemented at the College.

Course Packages Choosing Courses In planning a program of senior study, students are encouraged to consider not only their postsecondary objectives but to choose courses that relate to their interests and abilities. Students usually achieve better at the subjects they are interested in rather than those they ‘need’. Entrance to most universities requires a satisfactory ATAR as well as meeting the entry requirements of different faculties. The ACT system is designed to be flexible in that the score in any of the T courses can be used towards the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank. All subjects have equal standing. Mathematics Courses, however, are studied at different levels and results are moderated between courses. Students should avoid over-specialisation. The best preparation for a place in the workforce or further study is a broad general education. Students who do well at university are people who are able to think critically, who can write and speak with coherence and intelligence and who have an understanding of the world and their place in it. Advancement in the workforce is available to those who can speak, read and write with ease and confidence and who have a useful general knowledge of their world. Students should also consider placement in a Technical and Further Education (TAFE) institution at the completion of Year 12. TAFE Courses are valuable qualifications in their own right and Associate Diploma Courses can provide credit towards a degree at a university. The Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) is a valuable alternative for post-college education and unless there is a reasonable expectation of succeeding in four Tertiary courses, students are best advised to opt for a non-tertiary package. The college provides counselling and advisory services to assist students in career and course choices; however, it remains the student's responsibility to ensure that courses and units selected are appropriate to their further needs. Students are to: →→ Ascertain vocational requisites and relevant prerequisites before establishing a course pattern →→ Check that their package meets the requirements of this college and of the Senior Secondary Certificate →→ Ensure that additional requirements for entry into tertiary institutions are met where a student intends to proceed to further study →→ Ensure that the Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment is consulted before any change in course, even when that change is to a different level within a course →→ Ensure that changes are only made after consultation between students, parents, teachers, and the Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment.

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Senior Courses Minimum selection of 5 courses plus Religious Studies There are also a wide range of Registered Units available which students may have accredited as part of their ACT Senior Secondary Certificate.

English English (T)

Essential English (A/M)

Literature (T)

Languages French Continuing & Advanced (T) Italian Continuing & Advanced (T/A)

Japanese Continuing & Advanced (T)

Mathematics Contemporary Mathematics (A/M) Essential Mathematics (A)

Mathematical Applications (T)

Mathematical Methods (T)

Specialist Mathematics (T)

Specialist Methods (T)

Physical Education and Health Exercise Science (T)

Physical Education (A/M)

Religious Studies Religious Studies (T)

Religious Studies (A/M)

Active Volunteering (C)

Biology (T/A)

Chemistry (T)

Earth & Environmental Science (T/A)

Human Biology (T/A)

Physics (T)

Science

SOSE Australian & Global Politics (T/A/M) Business (T/A/M)

Business Administration (A/V/M)

Economics (T)

Geography (T/A/M)

History (T/A/M)

Legal Studies (T/A/M)

Psychology (T/A/M)

Social & Community Work (A/M/V)

Graphic Design (T/A/M)

Hospitality (T/A/M/V)

Sociology (T/A/M)

Technology Design Technology (T/A/M)

Information Technology (T/A/M/V) Textiles (T/A/M/V)

The Arts Dance (T/A/M)

Drama (T/A/M)

Media (T/A/M)

Music (T/A/M)

Photography (T/A/M)

Visual Arts (T/A/M)

T A V C M

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Tertiary study level Accredited study level Vocational Study level Accredited Vocational study level Modified study level

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Course Requirements at St Clare’s College All students are expected to undertake courses in Religious Studies and English in the two years of senior secondary education at St Clare’s College. Religious Studies may be taken as a major or minor. The Religious Studies minor can only be obtained through successful completion of academic study in one semester in both Year 11 and Year 12. Students are to be enrolled in six (6) courses in Year 11 and a minimum of five (5) courses in Year 12. Students who elect the Religious Studies minor will study a minimum of 5.5 courses across both Year 11 and Year 12. Students completing an ASBA (Australian School Based Apprenticeship) will study fewer courses than those indicated. A Tertiary Package student could include one Accredited (A) courses in their package. Should students choose to complete two Accredited courses within their Tertiary package they must be aware that the four Tertiary courses completed throughout Years 11 and 12 will count towards their ATAR. Students should attempt courses that provide them with the greatest opportunities and with the optimum learning experiences (i.e. at the highest level at which they can be successful). Each student at St Clare's College is expected to show a commitment to the study program she selects. Each student should attempt courses appropriate to her needs, abilities and interests. Students must seek approval from the Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment to join or leave a unit.

Vocational Education at St Clare's College St Clare’s College is a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) accredited to deliver nationally recognised Vocational Education Courses. The following Vocational Education (or V) Courses are offered: →→ Certificate I in Active Volunteering CHC14015 →→ Certificate II in Active Volunteering CHC24015 →→ Certificate II in Applied Fashion Design and Technology MST20616 →→ Certificate II in Community Services CHC22015 →→ Certificate II in Information, Digital Media and Technology ICT20115 →→ Certificate I in Hospitality SIT10216 →→ Certificate II in Hospitality SIT20316 →→ Certificate II in Kitchen Operations SIT20416 →→ Certificate II in Social and Community Work From their study of these courses, students can achieve a nationally recognised Certificate. Alternatively, if they do not satisfy all the requirements for a Certificate, they will receive a Statement of Attainment outlining the competencies achieved. For further information on these courses, please consult the relevant subject sections of this course guide and the VET handbook.

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Australian School Based Apprenticeship (ASBA) Students at St Clare’s College are able to undertake an Australian School Based Apprenticeship (ASBA) as part of their senior studies. This usually involves completing components of on-the-job training combined with off-the-job training. Opportunities are available in a wide variety of fields including Business Administration, Hairdressing, General Construction, Animal Services and Retail. Further information in relation to ASBAs can be obtained by contacting the VET Coordinator.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) at St Clare's College The Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) process enables students to seek acknowledgment of experience and skills they possess that are required in a particular Vocational Education Course. Students applying for RPL supply evidence to support their application and will generally be required to attend an interview where they will discuss their skills with an experienced teacher and relate them to the Course. Students who believe they may be eligible for RPL should discuss this in the first instance with their teacher. They can then apply for the RPL through the VET Coordinator. Students are encouraged to seek any help needed for their application from their teacher, the relevant Faculty Coordinator, the VET Coordinator or the Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment. If the application is successful, the student will be credited with the relevant competencies. If the application is unsuccessful, the student has the right to appeal against the decision.

Registered (R) Units Registered units exist to recognise student involvement in the many aspects of the College’s extracurricular activities. Students are encouraged to consult the relevant Faculty Coordinator or the Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment for detailed information on units. Any Registered Unit completed will appear on the student’s ACT Senior Secondary Certificate.

The Role of the Teaching and Learning Coordinator The Teahing and Learning Coordinator assist students in Years 11 – 12 in a variety of ways including: →→ the development and administration of the exam block →→ providing counselling around study related matters and future pathways →→ delivers study skills and AST preparation programs leading teams of staff to write and deliver study skills programs and AST preparation program →→ collection and reporting of medical documentation pertaining to student illness to relevant staff.

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English In 2018 students in Year 11 and 12 will study units developed from the Senior Secondary Australian Curriculum. The courses offered are: English (T), Literature (T) and Essential English (A). All courses should enable students to develop: →→ skills in listening, speaking, reading, viewing and writing →→ their capabilities to create texts for a range of purposes, audiences and contexts →→ their understanding and appreciation of different uses of language →→ their ability to communicate appropriately using Standard Australian English in a range of contexts →→ their critical and analytical skills →→ their ability to respond personally, critically and imaginatively to a range of texts drawn from Australian and other historical, contemporary and cultural contexts and traditions.

English (T) Course Description English focuses on developing students’ analytical, creative and critical thinking and communication skills in all language modes. It encourages students to engage with texts from their contemporary world, with texts from the past and with texts from Australian and other cultures. Such engagement helps students develop a sense of themselves, their world and their place in it. →→ Unit 1: Communication of Meaning →→ Unit 2: Representation Through Text →→ Unit 3: Comparative Texts →→ Unit 4: Perspectives

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Literature (T) Course Description Literature focuses on the study of literary texts, developing students as independent, innovative and creative learners and thinkers, who appreciate the aesthetic use of language, evaluate perspectives and evidence, and challenge ideas and interpretations. Literature explores how literary texts shape perceptions of the world and enable us to enter other worlds of the imagination. In this subject, students actively participate in the dialogue and detail of literary analysis and the creation of imaginative and analytical texts in a range of modes, mediums and forms. →→ Unit 1: Ways of Reading and Creating →→ Unit 2: Intertextuality →→ Unit 3: Power of Literature →→ Unit 4: Literary Perspectives

Essential English (A/M) Course Description Essential English focuses on consolidating and refining the skills and knowledge needed by students to become competent, confident and engaged users of English in many contemporary contexts including every day, community, social, further education, training and workplace contexts. Essential English is designed to provide students with the skills that will empower them to succeed in a wide range of post-secondary pathways. →→ Unit 1: Comprehending and Responding →→ Unit 2: Making Connections →→ Unit 3: Understanding Perspectives →→ Unit 4: Local and Global

General Methods of Assessment Teachers will develop assessment tasks from each of the following task types: analytical, creative and oral. Teachers will use the following criteria from the current English Framework to assess student achievement: →→ An ability to respond critically to texts and logically justify viewpoint →→ Effective and competent use of language for a range of purposes and audiences →→ Imagination and originality →→ Ability to locate, synthesise and reference material from various sources →→ Control of appropriate medium.

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Languages Continuing French (T) Course Description This is a course for students who have successfully completed Year 10 French or equivalent, and who now wish to consolidate and increase their knowledge of, and fluency in, the language. It may also suit students from a limited native speaking background whose language may be non-standard. The course has been developed by French teachers in Canberra and is in use in most schools in the ACT. It has been written to comply with the Languages Course Framework. Therefore it is an activitiesbased course, designed to foster both verbal and written communication in French.

Enrolment Advice Year 10 French or equivalent. Students who have met the BSSS languages eligibility guidelines have the opportunity to undertake the Advanced French Course.

Unit Description The course is flexibly structured to cater for students in a composite class of Years 11 and 12. It is arranged in units with each unit focusing on a different topic representing a broad spectrum of interests and language, for example, ‘The Individual’s Experience’, ‘The World Around Us’, ‘Lifestyle and Traditions’, etc. Each unit contains specific communication goals and attention is given to developing lexical skills and accurate use of grammar. Socio-cultural awareness and understanding is an integral part of the course and issues are discussed in French as much as possible.

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General Methods of Assessment: At the start of each semester students are given the assessment procedures together with a description of content for the unit. Continuous assessment will occur, with specific activities which will assess the student's performance in the following areas: →→ speaking →→ responding (reading and listening) →→ writing Students will be expected to perform a number of activities under test conditions and tests may include several different types of activities. Students will be graded according to the criteria of the course.

Continuing and Advanced Japanese (T) Course Description This is a course for students who have successfully completed Year 10 Japanese or equivalent, and who now wish to consolidate and increase their knowledge of, and fluency in, the language. The course has been developed by Japanese teachers in Canberra and is in use in most schools in the ACT. It has been written to comply with the Languages Course Framework. Therefore it is an activitiesbased course, with activities designed to foster communication, both verbal and written, in Japanese.

Enrolment Advice Year 10 Japanese or equivalent. Students who have met the BSSS languages eligibility guidelines have the opportunity to undertake the Advanced Japanese Course.

Unit Description The course is structured to cater for students in a composite class of Years 11 and 12. It is arranged in units, each unit focusing on a different topic representing a broad spectrum of interests and language, for example, ‘Society and Community, ‘Lifestyle and Traditions’, ‘The World Around Us’, etc. Each unit contains specific communication goals and attention is given to developing lexical skills and accurate use of grammar. Learners will continue the study of kanji. Socio-cultural awareness and understanding is an integral part of the course and issues are discussed in Japanese as much as possible.

General Methods of Assessment At the start of each semester students are given the assessment procedures together with a description of content for the unit. Continuous assessment will occur, with specific activities which will assess the student's performance in the following areas: →→ speaking →→ responding (reading and listening) →→ writing Students will be expected to perform a number of activities under test conditions and tests may include several different types of activities. Students will be graded according to the criteria of the course.

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Continuing Italian (T/A) Course Description This is a course for students who have successfully completed Year 10 Italian or equivalent, and who now wish to consolidate and increase their knowledge of, and fluency in, the language. It may also suit students from a limited native speaking background whose language may not be standard. The course has been developed by Italian teachers in Canberra and is in use in most schools in the ACT. It has been written to comply with the Languages Course Framework. Therefore it is an activitiesbased course, with activities designed to foster communication in Italian.

Enrolment Advice Year 10 Italian or equivalent. Students who have met the BSSS languages eligibility guidelines have the opportunity to undertake the Advanced Italian Course.

Unit Description The course is flexibly structured to cater for students in a composite class of Years 11 and 12. It is arranged in units, each unit focusing on a different topic representing a broad spectrum of interests and language, for example, ‘The Individual’s Experience’, ‘Society and Community’, ‘Lifestyle and Traditions’, etc. Each unit contains specific communication goals and attention is given to developing lexical skills and accurate use of grammar. Socio-cultural awareness and understanding is an integral part of the course and issues are discussed in Italian as much as possible.

General Methods of Assessment At the start of each semester students are given the assessment procedures together with a description of content for the unit. Continuous assessment will occur, with specific activities which will assess the student’s performance in the following areas: →→ speaking →→ responding (reading and listening) →→ writing Students will be expected to perform a number of activities under test conditions and tests may include several different types of activities. Students will be graded according to the criteria of the course.

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Mathematics A senior secondary education in Mathematics aims to provide students with the skills and information needed to deal successfully with mathematical aspects of their future study at tertiary institutions and day-to-day life experience. The prerequisites stated in the following sections provide students with a strong recommendation that will enable a pathway for mathematical success. A realistic view of a student’s level of achievement in Mathematics now, as well as the level of need for this subject in post-secondary studies, should be taken into account when selecting the appropriate level for the student concerned. Should a student’s situation find her departing from the stated prerequisite, a written application addressed to the Mathematics Coordinator stating the reasons for exemption and consideration for enrolment should reach the Mathematics Coordinator at the College no later than the beginning of Semester 1, in the year in which the student is to begin her studies in Year 11. St Clare’s College implemented the Australian Curriculum Senior Mathematics courses in 2016. The following is a list of the Mathematics courses on offer: →→ Mathematics

(T)

→→ Specialist Methods

(T)

→→ Mathematical Methods

(T)

→→ Mathematical Applications (T) (Incorporating the Australian Curriculum General Mathematics course)

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→→ Essential Mathematics

(A)

→→ Contemporary Mathematics

(A)

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While Mathematics is not compulsory at the senior secondary level it is strongly recommended that students completing a Tertiary (T) package of study with a view to earning an Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR), complete at least a minor in Mathematics. It is further recommended that any student wishing to move from Mathematical Methods in Year 11 should enrol in Mathematical Applications in Year 12, while those students moving from Mathematical Applications in Year 11 should enrol in Essential Mathematics in Year 12. The recommendation to study at least a minor is to help the student keep in touch with mathematical ideas and processes which may in turn assist her in her execution of the AST examination. This examination has a quantitative component in its multiple choice section. The AST is used to moderate students’ scores across the ACT and is compulsory for any student wishing to earn an ATAR. The first four courses listed above have Tertiary (T) accreditation, while the remaining two courses have Accredited (A) status only. Members of the Mathematics Faculty recommend the appropriate course for their students entering Year 11. This information is available for use at the enrolment interview, if the student has not already discussed the matter with her teacher. All courses except Specialist Mathematics (T) may be studied as a major or a minor course. Specialist Mathematics (T) may be studied as a major-minor or double major course. In order to study a majorminor or double major course in Specialist Mathematics, both Specialist Methods and Specialist Mathematics need to be studied, a major in each producing a double major at Specialist Mathematics and a major in Specialist Methods with a minor in Specialist Mathematics producing a major-minor course in Specialist Mathematics. A major at the highest level is earned through studying a major in Specialist Methods. For more details on content covered in these courses, please refer to the Mathematics Faculty Handbook which is available on the St Clare’s College website. All Mathematics Courses operate under the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies Mathematics Course Framework. The following extract has been taken from the ACT BSSS Mathematics Course Framework. It describes the intended student outcomes for mathematics courses: “All courses based on this Course Framework should enable students to develop: →→ Understanding of concepts and techniques drawn from mathematics and statistics →→ Ability to solve applied problems using concepts and techniques drawn from mathematics and statistics →→ Capacity to choose and use technology appropriately →→ Reasoning and inquiry in mathematical and statistical contexts →→ Interpretation of mathematical and statistical information →→ Capacity to communicate in a concise and systematic manner using appropriate Mathematical and statistical language.” [ACT BSSS Mathematics Framework Board Endorsed, 2013, p3]

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Tertiary Mathematics Courses Standardised Mathematics Scores Unit scores from each of the Tertiary (T) Courses in Mathematics (Specialist Mathematics, Specialist Methods, Mathematical Methods and Mathematical Applications) are combined together onto the one scale. Meshing procedures are held in Semester 1 of Year 11. A meshing test or common assessment questions between courses or a combination of both are used to facilitate placing the unit scores from each of the T Maths courses on the one scale. Historical parameters are also used as a basis on which to standardise all scores before combining them. The standardised scores are used to calculate a Mathematics course score, which may contribute to the student’s Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank (ATAR).

Specialist Mathematics (T) Course Description This T course is designed for students who intend subsequent tertiary study in quantitative disciplines requiring a strong, deep understanding of mathematics, such as mathematical studies, actuarial studies, physical sciences, engineering, computer sciences or economics. For accurate information about tertiary courses, prerequisites and assumed knowledge, students should consult current publications from the institutions or providers. The Specialist Mathematics Course emphasises the development of a sophisticated understanding of abstract concepts and the ability to deal rigorously with extended logical arguments. Mathematical relationships and techniques are taught in ways that provide students with the opportunity to reason inductively and deductively, to make inferences and generalisations and communicate their mathematical understandings confidently. Students are provided with opportunities to analyse complex problems arising in both theoretical and practical situations.

Enrolment Advice Australian Curriculum: Mathematics 10A or equivalent with an A or B grade.

Unit Description Topics include: combinatorics, vectors in two- and three-dimensions, geometry, trigonometry, matrices, real and complex numbers, functions and sketching graphs, integration and applications of integration, rates of change and differential equations and statistical inference. The broader courses of major-minor and double-major offer a correspondingly wider opportunity for the student to cover more material. For more detail please refer to the Mathematics Faculty Handbook.

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Specialist Methods (T) This T course is designed for those students who wish to study at the highest level of secondary Mathematics but do not wish to commit to a major-minor or double major. Specialist Methods is a major or a minor course only. Because of the time limitation it will not offer the scope of the major-minor or double major course but it will, like the Specialist Mathematics course described above, teach students relationships and techniques which will provide them with the opportunity to reason inductively and deductively, to make inferences and generalisations and communicate their mathematical understandings confidently. Students are provided with opportunities to analyse complex problems arising in both theoretical and practical situations. In those topics which are common to both the Specialist Methods and Mathematical Methods courses, it is intended that there be a greater depth and breadth of treatment in the Specialist Methods course. This is provided by more emphasis on structure and proof, by incorporating harder, more abstract questions and more challenging assessment items. Students studying a major in Specialist Mathematics over Years 11 and 12 will cover the content of Specialist Methods which is at a greater depth and breadth of treatment than in the Mathematical Methods course. Extension occurs through covering additional areas, more challenging questions are posed and assessment is more demanding. The units in the major course are sequential.

Enrolment Advice Australian Curriculum: Mathematics 10A or equivalent with an A or B grade.

Unit Description Broadly, the content includes functions and graphs, Arithmetic and Geometric sequences and series, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, differential and integral calculus, counting and probability, discrete and continuous random variables and applications of these topics. The units are offered sequentially. For more detail please refer to the Mathematics Faculty Handbook.

Mathematical Methods (T) Course Description This T course is designed for students who intend subsequent tertiary study in disciplines in which a sound and broad knowledge of Mathematics is required, such as the behavioural sciences, the social sciences, applied sciences, teacher training or business. It emphasises the acquisition and understanding of abstract mathematical concepts, relationships and techniques, incorporating practical explorations and meaningful applications. Students are provided with opportunities to analyse and solve real world problems, and to communicate their reasoning through logical arguments.

Enrolment Advice Australian Curriculum: Mathematics 10A or equivalent with a B or C grade.

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Unit Description The content includes functions and graphs, Arithmetic and Geometric sequences and series, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, differential and integral calculus, counting and probability, discrete and continuous random variables and applications of these topics. The units are offered sequentially. For more detail please refer to the Mathematics Faculty Handbook.

Mathematical Applications (T) (incorporating the Australian Curriculum General Mathematics course)

Course Description This T course is designed as a suitable preparation for general tertiary entry or for students intending tertiary study in areas where mathematical content is not emphasised. The course is intended to present Mathematics as an organised body of useful knowledge and provides students with the skills and confidence necessary to apply this knowledge to practical situations. The content, therefore, need not be prescriptive but does need to develop the students’ ability to think logically and communicate succinctly.

Enrolment Advice Australian Curriculum: Mathematics 10 or equivalent with an A or B grade.

Unit Description This is a course in discrete Mathematics. It covers a range of areas, including consumer arithmetic, algebra and matrices, shape and measurement, univariate and bivariate data analysis, applications of trigonometry, linear equations and their graphs, growth and decay in sequences, graphs and networks, time series analysis, loans, investments and annuities, networks and decision mathematics and applications of these topics. The units are offered sequentially. For more detail please refer to the Mathematics Faculty Handbook.

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Accredited Mathematics Courses The Accredited (A) Mathematics courses are designed to provide students with opportunities for continuing mathematical growth. The purpose of the courses is to provide an appropriate mathematical background for students who either wish to enter occupations or continue training in areas that require the use of basic mathematical and statistical techniques. The courses focus on mathematical skills and techniques that have direct application to everyday activity and the treatment of topics contrasts with the more abstract approach taken in the Mathematics (T) courses. While the two courses may contain similar core topics, these will be treated and assessed more rigorously in the Essential Mathematics course than in the Contemporary Mathematics course. Students enrolling in these courses could bring a wide variety of mathematical experiences from previous studies. These courses are for students who are not studying a T package or who are enrolled in a T package but do not wish to study Mathematics at the academic level required for the T-accredited courses, because they do not have the necessary prerequisites. Students enrolled in Mathematics (A) courses include those students who may wish to enter the workforce on attaining the required number of points in their senior studies, students enrolled in Australian School Based Apprenticeships (ASBAs) who need to spend part of their time on a work site and the rest on campus and T students in other disciplines who wish to keep in touch with Mathematics, for example, to assist their preparation for the AST examination.

Essential Mathematics (A) Course Description In the Essential Mathematics (A) course, students are provided with opportunities to interpret information, make informed decisions and to experience success in their learning of Mathematics. Students have the opportunity to present structured solutions to problems using the standard techniques of problem solving and modelling.

Enrolment Advice Australian Curriculum: Mathematics 10 or equivalent with a C or D grade.

Unit Description The content includes percentages, ratio, rates, measurement, algebra, graphs, collecting, representing and comparing data, time and motion, scales, plans and models, probability and relative frequencies, earth geometry, time zones, loans and compound interest and application of these topics.

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Contemporary Mathematics (A/M) Course Description This course is intended to allow a sector of the student population to continue their study of Mathematics. This sector includes those students who have experienced difficulty in their study of Mathematics in Years 9 and 10. Contemporary Mathematics (A) provides students with opportunities to interpret information in written, numerical, tabular or graphical form, make informed decisions based on their interpretations and to experience success in their learning in Mathematics.

Unit Description The content for this course is presented using a thematic approach. The topics taught form a large selection from the following: numeracy in the workplace (for example, income and payroll maths, workplace problem solving, mathematics for Industry and VET; financial numeracy (for example, money management, banking and financial loans); numeracy skills for living (for example, budget, tenancy, mathematics of transport and travel); numeracy skills required for maintaining personal and supporting others’ health. It includes, maths relating to nutrition, diet, medication and exercise.

Enrolment Advice Australian Curriculum: Mathematics 10 or equivalent with a D or E grade. This course is not intended for students who in Year 10, have achieved “at standard� for the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics or for students in Years 11 or 12, moving out of a T minor in Mathematics.

General Methods of Assessment (T/A courses) At the start of each semester, students are given an Assessment Outline showing the content and assessment tasks with their weightings. The grade descriptions for each Mathematics course are provided in this Outline, together with conditions for completion of assessment and other relevant information. The assessment items may consist of tasks of a supervised or unsupervised nature, i.e. of a test or non-test type. The tests may consist of multiple choice items, questions requiring a short answer or an extended answer. The non-test tasks may include modelling, investigations, problem solving, journals, portfolios, presentations or practical activities, of a group or individual nature.

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Physical Education and Health Exercise Science (T/A) Course Description Exercise science examines theories of the biological, physiological, biomechanical and psychological, the interrelationship and influences on performance and participation in physical activity. Students develop insights into the science underpinning sports performance and movement. When students undertake practical activities in Exercise Science they gain knowledge through experiential learning. This course prepares students for further study and provides pathways into careers such as physiotherapy, sport and injury prevention, fitness training and allied health. NB. This course does not include recreational participation in sporting and other physical activities. At times, students will be required to wear suitable attire for participation in physical activities.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for this course, though a sound knowledge and awareness of current sporting issues and practices is an advantage.

Unit Description - Year 11 Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body In the unit, Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body students will examine and explore the structure and function of musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems and analyse how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of physical activity. Students will investigate these systems from a cellular to systemic level allowing them to develop and understanding of how each system acts as an enabler or barrier to physical performance.

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Factors Affecting Performance In the unit, Factors Affecting Performance students will examine the physiological, psychological and behavioural theories that influence athletic performance. Students will be introduced to factors affecting performance and develop basic insights into the science underpinning the management of sports injuries and athletic mindset. Students will examine and explore how the extent and intensity of sports participation relates to the incidence of sports injuries and explore a range of technical and scientific approaches for maintaining the physical and mental well-being of athletes.

Unit Description - Year 12 Preparation for Training and Performance In the unit, Preparation for Training and Performance students investigate the factors that influence sports performance. Students will critically analyse the effectiveness of training and nutritional guidelines and how they contribute to the improvement of athletic performance. Students will explore a variety of training and nutritional principles to develop an understanding of the varying needs of community target groups and elite athletes. The Body in Motion In the unit, The Body in Motion students will explore the biomechanical and physiological principles involved in analysing and interpreting the body in motion and energy production. Students will apply a variety of methods used to analyse movement patterns and examine the physiological adaptations to exercise. Students will investigate the biomechanical and physiological factors that influence athletic performance. Negotiated Study A Negotiated Study unit has an important place in senior secondary courses. It is a valuable pedagogical approach that empowers students to make decisions about their own learning. A negotiated study unit is decided upon by a class, group(s) or individual student in consultation with the teacher and with the Principal’s approval. The program of learning for a negotiated study unit must meet all the content descriptions as appears in the unit.

General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment include written tests, research assignments/reports, laboratory practical tasks, oral presentations, fieldwork and survey reports. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge, understanding and application →→ Skills

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Physical Education (A/M) Course Description participation in physical activity. Students develop knowledge, understanding and skills, including physical literacy competencies, to support them to be resilient, to strengthen their sense of self, to build and maintain relationships, and to make decisions to enhance their health and physical participation. Physical Education Studies provides students with skills and knowledge to learn about and practice ways of maintaining active healthy lifestyles and working with others and improve physical and team skills through theory and practical activities. It assists students in preparing for lifelong physical wellbeing. Research studies show adolescents with fundamental sports skills are more likely to continue physical activity later in life. This course aims to promote and develop such skills, values and positive attitudes to physical activity in, about and through movement. This has the potential for students to enhance their own health and well-being in varied and changing contexts. The study of Physical Education Studies provides possible pathways to further study in vocational areas for employment as a trainer, coach or in voluntary community coaching as well as providing foundations for life-long health.

Enrolment Advice Students must have demonstrated a genuine interest in Physical Education during their high school years. Excelling at Physical Education is not a prerequisite.

Unit Description Please be reminded that units are derived from a combination of two modules below. Sport Skills Acquisition: Students explore the acquisition and development of sports skills and apply processes and theories associated with skill acquisition and refinement. They respectfully and safely participate in activities in a diverse range of sports, building self-efficacy. Leisure & Recreation This unit develops student’s understanding of physical activity, recreation and sport from a participatory perspective. Students explore activities focused on improving fitness, personal, emotional and physical wellbeing and the importance of lifelong physical activity Building and Improving Teams Students explore and develop skills associated with the enhancement of teams. They will learn about factors which affect performance and implement strategies used to support players’ emotional, social and physical development. They safely participate and apply concepts during a diverse range of activities promoting teamwork and collaboration.

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Sport, Activity, Culture and Society Students explore a range of sports and physical activities that contribute to individual, societal and cultural identity. They participate in and reflect on how a variety of physical activities and culturally diverse individual and team sports impact personal, societal and national identity. A Negotiated Study: A Negotiated Study unit has an important place in senior secondary courses. It is a valuable pedagogical approach that empowers students to make decisions about their own learning. A negotiated study unit is decided upon by a class, group(s) or individual student in consultation with the teacher and with the Principal’s approval. The program of learning for a negotiated study unit must meet all the content descriptions as appears in the unit.

General Methods of Assessment The variety of activities included in this course requires a considerable number of different assessment techniques: →→ Practical Work: student demonstration of skills such as fitness testing procedures, warm-ups etc., skills tests, peer assessment, self-evaluation, peer coaching and participation. →→ Assignments: field work reports, essay assignments, research projects, worksheets and logbooks. →→ Tests: oral tests, short answer, essay type or open book tests, skills tests, and pre and post fitness tests.

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Religious Studies Religious Studies (T/A/M) Course Description At St Clare's College in Years 11 and 12 the Religious Studies course is designed to enable students to understand and respond to the theology, traditions and teachings of the Catholic Church within the context of contemporary society. Religious Studies is compulsory at St Clare's College and is offered as either a Tertiary (T) course or an Accredited (A) course. Students at St Clare’s must undertake Religious Studies in both Year 11 and Year 12; hence, the minimum requirement would be a minor course undertaken as one semester unit in both senior years. All courses of study comprise units chosen from a selection available for Year 11 and Year 12. Students are free to select the units they are most interested in and combine them to make up either a minor, major, major/minor or double major package. Units of work are developed from the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies (BSSS), Religious Studies A and T Course, Type 2.

Unit Descriptions for Year 11 World Religions This unit is intended to offer a study of the religions of the world in a manner that is comparative, factual, and fair-minded, whilst at the same time recognising the profound, perhaps mystical nature of the practices and experiences of the believer. It is a study about religion which invites the students to reflect on their own experiences, and examine questions raised by the presence of the other in contemporary society. Youth Spirituality and Christian Ministry In this unit on youth spirituality and Christian ministry students will explore a contemporary vision for spirituality and ministry focused on the young believer; the relationship between faith and mission and growth in spirituality.

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Social Justice The students will explore the following topics: the foundations, principles, origins and teachings of social justice and human rights in various religious tradition; the applications of social justice to human needs such as human rights, poverty, hunger, sexism, work related issues, globalisation, fair trade, slavery, discrimination and the environment; the role of religious communities, governments, private organisations, individuals in dealing with social justice issues; justice issues specific to Australian society and an examination of at least two (one national and one international) current situations and the range of social justice issues that are inherent. Introductory Philosophy This introductory unit approaches philosophy in terms of three basic issues: being, knowing and acting. Philosophy continually asks questions about these issues. Different philosophers will provide differing answers to these issues. The unit will also enable students to survey and analyse the changes philosophy has undergone in response to the larger changes in human history. Religion, Worship and the Arts This unit provides an overview of how religious and spiritual concepts have been expressed through various artistic media and imagery with reference to their historical and cultural contexts. The overview could be centred in the Christian tradition, supported by appropriate art forms in a variety of genres and contexts. Students will examine both sacred and secular artworks in order to understand and appraise the religious ideas evoked by the art.

Unit Descriptions for Year 12 Encountering Ethical Issues In completing this unit students will cover an introduction to the ethical thinking of Western philosophers, the resulting views of the nature of the human person as taught by these philosophers, the Judeo/Christian ethical sources and teachings and modern concepts of being human. A range of contemporary ethical issues will also be studied as part of the unit. Search for Meaning In this unit, students explore the nature of religion and religious experience and investigate the expression of religion and spirituality in contemporary Australia. They are encouraged to examine a range of responses to ultimate or fundamental life questions which may give meaning to human existence. In examining the religious response to these questions, students are encouraged to explore the expression of indigenous spiritualties and at least one major world religion. Religion and the Media This unit is a study of the way religions are represented and constructed in contemporary media. It will provide students with the opportunity to critically evaluate the way religion, religious themes and religious figures are presented in the news and current affairs, film, music, websites and advertising. Religion and Politics This unit analyses how political systems have changed, progressed and advanced through history. It examines how religious thinking, the hunger for individual justice and the ascent of human rights, have affected political systems and the rights of the individual to participate in political decision making. It considers how the enlightenment period affected the development of democratic constitutions and explores similarities and differences between democracy and theocracy. The unit

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also examines religious and political philosophies and movements and their contribution to peace and conflict, as well as the impact of globalisation on religious freedom and human rights. Religion, Psychology and Relationships In this unit students will examine religious, spiritual and psychological perspectives about being human and human behaviour, including understanding of cognitive, physical, social, emotional and intellectual development. Psychological theories, concepts and perspectives that inform our understanding and awareness of religious and spiritual beliefs will be explored in detail. Students will examine the capacity of the psychological, spiritual and religious perspectives to influence, positively and negatively on faith development, spirituality, happiness, relationships and wellbeing. Christian Service This unit will help students understand the origins and role of Christian Service from scripture, church teachings, and the inspirational foundation figures of agencies of Christian Service. It is also anticipated that their understanding will be further developed by the application of the ‘Service Learning’ model. Furthermore, for those students who elect to do the Certificate 1 or 2 in Active Volunteering there is an alignment between requirements of the certificate and the learning and assessment covered in the Christian Service unit. (See below for details of the Cert. 1 and 2 in Active Volunteering).

General Methods of Assessment Each unit in the senior Religious Studies course normally has three assessment tasks which are, in their type, the same or very close to those in all the other units offered in the same semester. These three task types are usually: For T units: →→ a research essay

(30%)

→→ a creative, oral presentation or seminar task

(35%)

→→ an in-class task

(35%)

For A units: →→ a research report

(30%)

→→ a creative, oral presentation or seminar task

(50%)

→→ an in-class task (20%) In each of the three assessment tasks students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and understanding; and →→ Skills.

CHC14015: Certificate I in Active Volunteering (Release 2) RTO no.88009 Five (5) units of competency are required for award of this qualification: →→ Four (4) core units →→ One (1) elective unit

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→→ Plus 20 hours of volunteer work →→ Students must demonstrate competence over the two (2) standard units through the collection of a portfolio of evidence. (A student guide is published on the BSSS website) Assessment of competence must be comprehensive with evidence collected over time in a range of volunteering tasks and/or settings. Appropriate assessments include volunteering projects; observations; case studies; interviews and third party on the job assessment reports.

Enrolment Advice This course is designed for students interested in active volunteering within the ACT community. It focuses on the fundamental skills and underpinning knowledge to work with people in a range of volunteering contexts including sport, environment/conservation, human rights, seniors, arts and/or service.

Unit Description This program has been designed in consultation with Volunteering ACT. This organisation is able to support colleges in implementing this program. They can run a volunteering induction program that includes interviewing students and assisting them with referrals to organisations. They also run volunteering management programs; these will be useful for teacher/assessors in implementing this C course.

CHC24015: Certificate II in Active Volunteering (Release 1) RTO no.88009 Nine (9) units of competency are required for the award of this qualification: →→ Five (5) core units →→ Four (4) elective →→ plus 40 hours of volunteer work. Assessment of competence must be comprehensive with evidence collected over time in a range of volunteering tasks and/or settings. Appropriate assessments include volunteering projects; observations; case studies; interviews and third party on the job assessment reports.

Enrolment Advice This course is designed for students interested in active volunteering within the ACT community. It focuses on the fundamental skills and underpinning knowledge to work with people in a range of volunteering contexts including sport, environment/conservation, human rights, seniors, arts and/or service.

Unit Description This program has been designed in consultation with Volunteering ACT. This organisation is able to support colleges in implementing this program. They can run a volunteering induction program that includes interviewing students and assisting them with referrals to organisations. They also run volunteering management programs; these will be useful for teacher/assessors in implementing this C course.

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Science Biology (T/A) Course Description Biology is the scientific study of living organisms and the environment in which they live. It is a multi-disciplinary science, which draws on concepts from Physics, Mathematics, Chemistry and the Earth Sciences. Biology has many levels of organisation from the biochemistry of the cell to the dynamics of the biosphere. The study of Biology enhances understanding of the natural world and the place of people and other organisms within it. This includes knowledge and curiosity about human life and health, how humans interact with the natural world and the need to sustain the complex interactions that make possible the diversity of life on Earth. Developments in technology, including biochemistry and biotechnology, have presented society with the need to make decisions about a range of public issues such as conservation, management of resources, genetic engineering, reproductive technology and medical research. The study of Biology should assist students to make informed decisions in such controversial areas and help them to contribute to informed debate. This course would be an excellent basis for further studies in areas such as conservation, environmental science and engineering, sports science, forestry, veterinary science, physiotherapy, genetics, nursing, teaching or medicine. Biology aims to develop students’: →→ sense of wonder and curiosity about life and respect for all living things and the environment →→ understanding of how biological systems interact and are interrelated; the flow of matter and energy through and between these systems; and the processes by which they persist and change →→ understanding of major biological concepts, theories and models related to biological systems at all scales, from subcellular processes to ecosystem dynamics Senior Handbook

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→→ appreciation of how biological knowledge has developed over time and continues to develop; how scientists use biology in a wide range of applications; and how biological knowledge influences society in local, regional and global contexts →→ ability to plan and carry out fieldwork, laboratory and other research investigations including the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data and the interpretation of evidence →→ ability to use sound, evidence-based arguments creatively and analytically when evaluating claims and applying biological knowledge →→ ability to communicate biological understanding, findings, arguments and conclusions using appropriate representations, modes and genres.

Enrolment Advice A good background in Mathematics and Science at Year 10 level is expected. Students should be competent in English language skills.

Unit Description In Biology, students develop their understanding of biological systems, the components of these systems and their interactions, how matter flows and energy is transferred and transformed in these systems, and the ways in which these systems are affected by change at different spatial and temporal scales. There are four units: →→ Unit 1: Cells and Multicellular organisms →→ Unit 2: Biodiversity and Interconnectedness →→ Unit 3: Heredity & Continuity of Life →→ Unit 4: Maintaining the Internal Environment. Units 1 and 2, students build on prior learning to develop their understanding of relationships between structure and function in a range of biological systems, from ecosystems to single cells and multicellular organisms. →→ In Unit 1, students investigate the interdependent components of the cell system and the multiple interacting systems in multicellular organisms. →→ In Unit 2, students analyse abiotic and biotic ecosystem components and their interactions, using classification systems for data collection, comparison and evaluation. In Units 3 and 4, students examine the continuity of biological systems and how they change over time in response to external factors. They examine and connect system interactions at the molecular level to system change at the organism and population levels. →→ In Unit 3, students investigate mechanisms of heredity and the ways in which inheritance patterns can be explained, modelled and predicted; they connect these patterns to population dynamics and apply the theory of evolution by natural selection in order to examine changes in populations. →→ In Unit 4, students investigate system change and continuity in response to changing external conditions and pathogens; they investigate homeostasis and the transmission and impact of infectious disease at cellular and organism levels; and they consider the factors that encourage or reduce the spread of infectious disease at the population level.

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General Methods of Assessment Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and understanding →→ Critical thinking →→ Investigative skills →→ Communication skills →→ Effective work practices. Assessment task types can include: log book, practical report, scientific poster, research assignment, seminar/oral/electronic presentation, project, essay, models, unit tests, quizzes and practical skills test.

Chemistry (T) Course Description This course has been designed to meet the needs of a variety of students. It provides the necessary background for courses, at a tertiary level, in which chemistry is assumed or recommended as background knowledge. These courses can be as diverse as Engineering, Veterinary Science, Physiotherapy, Medicine, Dietetics, Nursing and Pharmacy and may be of interest to those wishing to include a science in their tertiary package. While fostering an interest in and enjoyment of the subject, this course encourages students to improve the awareness of the place and role of chemistry and its relationship to themselves, the environment and society. Chemistry aims to develop students’: →→ interest in and appreciation of chemistry and its usefulness in helping to explain phenomena and solve problems encountered in their ever-changing world →→ understanding of the theories and models used to describe, explain and make predictions about chemical systems, structures and properties →→ understanding of the factors that affect chemical systems, and how chemical systems can be controlled to produce desired products →→ appreciation of chemistry as an experimental science that has developed through independent and collaborative research, and that has significant impacts on society and implications for decision making →→ expertise in conducting a range of scientific investigations, including the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data and the interpretation of evidence →→ ability to critically evaluate and debate scientific arguments and claims in order to solve problems and generate informed, responsible and ethical conclusions →→ ability to communicate chemical understanding and findings to a range of audiences, including through the use of appropriate representations, language and nomenclature.

Enrolment advice A good background in Mathematics and Science at Year 10 level is expected. The study of Chemistry assumes competency in communicating in English.

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Unit Description In Chemistry, students develop their understanding of chemical systems, and how models of matter and energy transfers and transformations can be used to describe, explain and predict chemical structures, properties and reactions. There are four units: →→ Unit 1: Chemical Fundamentals →→ Unit 2: Molecular Interactions and Reactions →→ Unit 3: Equilibrium, Acids and Redox Reactions →→ Unit 4: Structure, Synthesis and Design. In Unit 1, students use models of atomic structure and bonding to explain the macroscopic properties of materials and to predict the products and explain the energy changes associated with chemical reactions. In Unit 2, they continue to develop their understanding of bonding models and the relationship between structure, properties and reactions, including consideration of the factors that affect the rate of chemical reactions. In Units 3 and 4, students further develop their knowledge of chemical processes introduced in Units 1 and 2, including considering energy transfers and transformations, calculations of chemical quantities, rates of reaction and chemical systems. →→ In Unit 3, students investigate models of equilibrium in chemical systems; apply these models in the context of acids and bases and redox reactions, including electrochemical cells; and explain and predict how a range of factors affect these systems. →→ In Unit 4, students use models of molecular structure, chemical reactions and energy changes to explain and apply synthesis processes, particularly with consideration of organic synthesis; and they consider current and future applications of chemical design principles.

General Methods of Assessment Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and understanding →→ Critical thinking →→ Investigative skills →→ Communication skills →→ Effective work practices. Assessment task types can include: log book, practical report, scientific poster, research assignment, seminar/oral/electronic presentation, project, essay, models, unit tests, quizzes and practical skills test.

Earth and Environmental Science (T/A) Course Description Earth and Environmental Science is a multifaceted field of inquiry that focuses on interactions between the solid Earth, its water, its air and its living organisms, and on dynamic, interdependent relationships that have developed between these four components. Earth and environmental scientists consider how these interrelationships produce environmental change at a variety of 42

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timescales. To do this, they integrate knowledge, concepts, models and methods drawn from geology, biology, physics and chemistry in the study of Earth’s ancient and modern environments. Earth and environmental scientists strive to understand past and present processes so that reliable and scientifically-defensible predictions can be made about the future. Earth and Environmental Science aims to develop students’: →→ interest in Earth and environmental science and their appreciation of how this multidisciplinary knowledge can be used to understand contemporary issues →→ understanding of Earth as a dynamic planet consisting of four interacting systems: the geosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere →→ appreciation of the complex interactions, involving multiple parallel processes, that continually change Earth systems over a range of timescales →→ understanding that Earth and environmental science knowledge has developed over time; is used in a variety of contexts; and influences, and is influenced by, social, economic, cultural and ethical considerations →→ ability to conduct a variety of field, research and laboratory investigations involving collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, and interpretation of evidence →→ ability to critically evaluate Earth and environmental science concepts, interpretations, claims and conclusions with reference to evidence →→ ability to communicate Earth and environmental understanding, findings, arguments and conclusions using appropriate representations, modes and genres.

Enrolment Advice A good background in Mathematics and Science at Year 10 level is expected. Students should be competent in English language skills.

Unit Description In Earth and Environmental Science, students develop their understanding of the ways in which interactions between Earth systems influence Earth processes, environments and resources. There are four units: →→ Unit 1: Introduction to Earth Systems →→ Unit 2: Earth processes →→ Unit 3: Living on Earth →→ Unit 4: The Changing Earth. In Units 1 and 2, students are introduced to the Earth system model and to the ways in which the Earth spheres interact and are related by transfers and transformations of energy. →→ In Unit 1, students examine the evidence underpinning theories of the development of the Earth systems, their interactions and their components. →→ In Unit 2, students investigate how Earth processes involve interactions of Earth systems and are inter-related through transfers and transformations of energy. In Units 3 and 4, students use the Earth system model and an understanding of Earth processes, to examine Earth resources and environments, as well as the factors that impact the Earth system at a range of spatial and temporal scales.

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→→ In Unit 3, students examine renewable and non-renewable resources, the implications of extracting, using and consuming these resources, and associated management approaches. →→ In Unit 4, students consider how Earth processes and human activity can contribute to Earth hazards, and the ways in which these hazards can be predicted, managed and mitigated to reduce their impact on Earth environments

General Methods of Assessment Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and understanding →→ Critical thinking →→ Investigative skills →→ Communication skills →→ Effective work practices. Assessment task types can include: log book, practical report, scientific poster, research assignment, seminar/oral/electronic presentation, project, essay, models, unit tests, quizzes and practical skills tests.

Human Biology (T/A) Course Description Human Biology covers a wide range of concepts relating to the structure and function of the human body. Students learn how integrated regulation determines how individuals maintain homeostasis and survive in changing environments. Reproduction and the development of the foetus are studied to discover how genetic variation makes each human a unique individual. Students will also investigate new scientific discoveries to gain an understanding of the causes of human dysfunction and the novel treatments that are used to combat disease. The subject matter of this course is founded in scientific knowledge and understanding that has been gained through systematic inquiry and research. It introduces them to the technical language of the discipline and to key concepts around the structure and function of the human body. Therefore, scientific literacy is treated as a core underlying principle to the development of a deep understanding in the subject. As a Senior Secondary subject, Human Biology provides skills that enable students to make informed decisions about career pathways. It provides a foundation for Tertiary studies in the fields of Medicine and Allied Health including for example nursing, nutritional health, occupational therapy, osteopathy, para-medicine and physiotherapy. Furthermore, the course develops skills and knowledge that prepare students to become responsible citizens. Human Biology aims to develop students’: →→ Interest in, and appreciation of, human biology and its usefulness in helping to explain human health and solve problems encountered in their ever-changing world →→ Understanding of major human biological concepts, theories and models related to human systems from the level of tissue anatomy and physiology to large-scale human health →→ Appreciation of knowledge relating to the human body structure and functions, and how integrated regulation allows individuals to survive and thrive in a changing environment

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→→ Appreciation of how human biology knowledge has developed over time and continues to develop; how scientists use human biology in a range of applications; and how human biological knowledge influences society in local, regional and global contexts →→ Ability to plan and carry out laboratory and other research investigations including the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, macroscopic and microscopic materials, and the interpretation of evidence →→ Ability to critically evaluate and debate scientific arguments and claims in order to solve problems and generate informed, responsible and ethical conclusions →→ Ability to communicate human biology concepts to a range of audiences, by discussing findings, developing arguments and drawing conclusions through the appropriate use of representations, multimodal mechanisms and platforms.

Enrolment Advice A good background in Mathematics and Science at Year 10 level is expected. Students should be competent in English language skills.

Unit Description In Human Biology, students develop their understanding of biological systems, and cover a wide range of ideas relating to the functioning of the human body. There are four units: →→ Unit 1: The essentials of human life →→ Unit 2: The Ageing human body →→ Unit 3: Human health and the environment →→ Unit 4: Treating the human body In Unit 1: The Essentials of Human Life students are introduced to the study of human embryonic tissue and its specialisation and development as well as the health implications and the latest developments in gene therapy and stem cell research. The anatomy and physiology of epithelial, connective, muscular and nervous tissues will provide a strong basis for the study of the human body. In Unit 2: The Aging Human Body students study the human body from reproduction, through foetal development and each stage of aging. The diseases and conditions which affect humans at different stages of development provide a wealth of topics to investigate. In Unit 3: Human Health & the Environment students examine the relationship between environmental conditions and human health, focusing on physical, biological, chemical and social risks. The issue of mental health is an increasingly important area of study and the variety of conditions are dealt with respectfully. In Unit 4: Treating the Human Body the students investigate the traditional methods of diagnosing illnesses and treatment regimes. Students will also examine cutting edge techniques and new developments that will potentially allow for treatment of a larger range of ailments.

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General Methods of Assessment Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and understanding →→ Critical thinking →→ Investigative skills →→ Communication skills →→ Effective work practices. Assessment task types can include: log book, practical report, scientific poster, research assignment, seminar/oral/electronic presentation, project, essay, models, unit tests, quizzes and practical skills test.

Physics (T) Course Description This course provides knowledge of basic concepts in Physics which will lead to an appreciation of the place of physics in the wider world and its interaction with science and society. It also provides practical experiences and develops analytical, research and mathematical skills. It provides the necessary background at Tertiary level for courses in which Physics is assumed or recommended background knowledge. These disciplines can be as diverse as Entomology, Architecture, Physiotherapy, Engineering, Applied Science and Medicine. Physics aims to develop students’: →→ appreciation of the wonder of physics and the significant contribution physics has made to contemporary society →→ understanding that diverse natural phenomena may be explained, analysed and predicted using concepts, models and theories that provide a reliable basis for action →→ understanding of the ways in which matter and energy interact in physical systems across a range of scales →→ understanding of the ways in which models and theories are refined and new models and theories are developed in physics; and how physics knowledge is used in a wide range of contexts and informs personal, local and global issues →→ investigative skills, including the design and conduct of investigations to explore phenomena and solve problems, the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, and the interpretation of evidence →→ ability to use accurate and precise measurement, valid and reliable evidence, and scepticism and intellectual rigour to evaluate claims →→ ability to communicate physics understanding, findings, arguments and conclusions using appropriate representations, modes and genres.

Enrolment Advice A good background in Mathematics and Science at Year 10 level is expected. Students should also be competent in English language skills. Students choosing Physics would normally be expected to be studying Specialist Mathematics or Mathematical Methods in Year 11.

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Unit Description In Physics, students develop their understanding of the core concepts, models and theories that describe, explain and predict physical phenomena. There are four units: →→ Unit 1: Linear motion and waves →→ Unit 2: Thermal, nuclear and electrical physics →→ Unit 3: Gravity and electromagnetism →→ Unit 4: Revolutions in modern physics. In Units 1 and 2, students investigate energy, motion and forces, building on the ideas introduced in the F–10 Australian Curriculum: Science. →→ In Unit 1, students describe, explain and predict linear motion, and investigate the application of wave models to light and sound phenomena. →→ In Unit 2, students investigate energy production by considering heating processes, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, and investigate energy transfer and transformation in electrical circuits. In Units 3 and 4, students are introduced to more complex models that enable them to describe, explain and predict a wider range of phenomena, including, in Unit 4, very high speed motion and very small scale objects. →→ In Unit 3, students investigate models of motion in gravitational, electric and magnetic fields to explain how forces act at a distance, and use the theory of electromagnetism to explain the production and propagation of electromagnetic waves. →→ In Unit 4, students investigate how shortcomings in existing theories led to the development of the Special Theory of Relativity, the quantum theory of light and matter, and the Standard Model of particle physics.

General Methods of Assessment Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and understanding →→ Critical thinking →→ Investigative skills →→ Communication skills →→ Effective work practices. Assessment task types can include: log book, practical report, scientific poster, research assignment, seminar/oral/electronic presentation, project, essay, models, unit tests, quizzes and practical skills test.

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Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE) SOSE subjects offer students many opportunities to engage with authentic learning experiences and topics that are contemporary, often featuring in current news events. Our courses integrate skills and content to allow students to apply critical thinking and communication skills that are applicable to many faculty subject areas. SOSE based topics also frequently appear as AST subjects in the short response and longer writing task, providing students with a solid general knowledge base to discuss key issues. SOSE subjects allow students a segway into a wide range of higher and/or further education options and some courses can be combined to form a major or a double major to provide flexibility and choice. →→ Australian and Global Politics →→ Business →→ Economics →→ Geography →→ Ancient History →→ Modern History →→ Legal Studies →→ Sociology →→ Psychology →→ Social and Community Work Most courses offered in SOSE are combined Year 11 and Year 12 classes. Some classes may also be offered as a morning class option subject to demand. Course units are subject to change due to teacher specialisms or student content clashes. The following Tertiary (T) courses are meshed for scaling processes: →→ Legal Studies, Business, Economics and Geography →→ Ancient History, Modern History and Religious Studies →→ Psychology and Sociology 48

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Australian and Global Politics (T/A/M) Course Description Australian and Global Politics is the study of power, influence, authority, legitimacy, conflict and political systems at both national and global level. Through this study, students explore concepts, institutions, processes and practices in a political context in order to investigate, question, critically analyse and evaluate their personal view of national and global political issues, problems, movements, events and the forces that shape these and responses to them. By analysing power and political systems, students become informed active citizens who are empowered to engage in shaping society’s collective future. Students develop their knowledge and understanding about how political systems impact on the lives of citizens. Students appreciate the complex and interconnected nature of many political issues and develop the capacity to interpret competing and contestable claims regarding those issues. Australian and Global Politics provides students with the opportunity to develop their skills in research, analysis and evaluation of information. Through the use of logical and coherent arguments, students will explore the implications and consequences of decisions made by individuals, organisations and governments. As students critically analyse the use and application of contemporary power, they recognise that political ideals can be problematic to achieve in practice when considered in the context of resistance, revolutions, international relations and domestic and global order constraints. Students develop an appreciation of the diversity of human attitudes and beliefs within and across cultures and gain understanding about the significance of politics and governance. This course may lead to further study in Politics and a range of other areas.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course.

Units →→ Power, Politics and Political Thought →→ Comparative Politics-Democracies →→ Oligarchy and Authoritarianism →→ International Relations →→ Negotiated Study

Organisation of content Power, Politics and Political Thought This unit introduces students to the key concepts of power, authority and legitimacy that underpin the way decisions are made by States, Nation States, groups and individuals. The unit is designed to enable students to explore and develop an understanding of the historical philosophical ideas, values and ideologies behind democracy which underpin politics in modern and contemporary contexts. In this unit students will consider questions about the nature of politics, democracy and the impacts of ideas and ideologies on political structures, institutions, processes and practices. The unit will look

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at the reasons why people seek political power, the characteristics of successful political activists, leaders and movements and how these ideas inform changing perceptions about social issues and engage broader political participation in social movements to effect change. Comparative Politics-Democracies This unit will enable students to explore the concepts and practices underpinning modern, established national and global democratic states. Students will interpret the principles and historical factors that lead to development of liberal and social democracy as well as investigate the nature and structures and institutions of the political systems in countries such as Australia, the United States, India or Japan. Students will examine federalism, protection of rights and freedoms, doctrine or responsible government, liquid democracy, a free and fair electoral system, political participation in elections, the provision of a legitimate mandate to govern, doctrine of state sovereignty, the party system (big and small government) and the influence of pressure and lobby groups. Students will also examine and interpret commentary on current political issues both within Australian and globally. Dictatorship, Oligarchy and Authoritarianism This unit will enable students to explore the ideas and practices underpinning modern political systems throughout the world, the significance of changing political systems in a range of contexts; from monarchial, dictatorial and authoritarian forms as well as emerging democracies. The difference between democratic and other forms of government, both legitimate or illegitimate, and their relative influences on social, cultural, moral, political and economic systems. Students will interpret the principles and historical factors that lead to development of the ideologies, which underpinned the need for change and revolutionary action as well as investigate the nature, structures and institutions of the political systems choosing from electives that cover political ideas and or case studies of different systems such as; Russia, China or other countries. Students examine the conflict between authoritarian government and democratic aspirations. Students will examine and interpret commentary on current political issues. International Relations This unit explores the key concepts of sovereignty, nation, and international order through a study of actors, institutions and systems in international relations. Students are able to investigate these concepts in the context of foundational ideas, Australia’s Role on the World Stage, the quest for peace through global governance, conflict and threats in global security, and the interconnectedness of the economy in global politics. Negotiated Study A negotiated study unit has an important place in senior secondary courses. It is a valuable pedagogical approach that empowers students to make decisions about their own learning. A negotiated study unit is decided upon by a class, group(s) or individual student in consultation with the teacher and with the approval from the AP Curriculum & Assessment. The program of learning for a negotiated study unit must meet all the content descriptions appearing in the unit. A Negotiated Study in Australian and Global Politics course may constitute two electives from other Australian and Global Politics units or a study negotiated with the teacher.

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General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment include: business simulations, seminars, portfolio of practical exercises, written tests, research assignments/reports, oral and digital presentations. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate →→ Knowledge and Understanding →→ Skills

Business (T/A/M) Course Description Business is the study of the essential planning requirements ranging from a small business to the broader roles of management, finance, human resource management, marketing, e-business, ethical practices, sustainability and the impacts of implications of the future business environment. Students develop their knowledge and understanding of the structure and operation of Business models. They examine the relationship between theory and practice including the role of stakeholders and decision-making. Students develop insights into the ways and the impact of change on the business environment. Students develop the skills to create innovative solutions to business problems. They will research and analyse information to present logical and coherent arguments through an inquiry approach to learning. Students will assess the ethical implications and consequences of a changing business environment. Skills implicit in the study of Business empower students to communicate in a variety of contexts. The Business course provides continuity with many pathways into tertiary and industry studies.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 3: Planning for Current Context Unit 4: Business Challenges

2020 Unit 1: Changing Business Environment Unit 2: Relationship Management

Business Units: Unit 1: Changing Business Environment In this unit students study business and its dynamic environment. Unit 2: Relationship Management In this unit students study the relationship between businesses, its customers, the wider business environment and its increasing importance for business longevity.

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Unit 3: Planning for Current Context In this unit students study the range of tools and strategies utilisied by business to plan for success. Unit 4: Business Challenges In the unit students study the importance for business to be responsive to change from the internal and external environments.

General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment include: business simulations, seminars, portfolio of practical exercises, written tests, research assignments/reports, oral and digital presentations. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate →→ Knowledge and Understanding →→ Skills

Economics (T) Course Description Economics is a study of the actions of individuals and societies, particularly as they relate to choices about satisfying needs and wants, and the utilisation of scarce resources. It uses theories and models to attempt to explain these behaviours. Students develop their knowledge and understanding of the structure and operation of Economic models. They examine the relationship between theory and practice including the role of stakeholders and decision-making. Students develop insights into the ways and the impact of change on the economic environment. This course examines representations and interpretations of economic issues. Students develop the skills to create innovative solutions to Economic problems. They will research and analyse information to present logical and coherent arguments through an inquiry approach to learning. Students will assess the ethical implications and consequences of a changing commercial environment. Skills implicit in the study of Economics empower students to communicate in a variety of contexts.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 1: Economics Unit 2: Economics

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Economics Units: Unit 1: Economics In this unit, students will study economic concepts, models and relationships. This unit examines the choices which all individuals, firms, institutions, markets and governments attempt to address as they confront the problem of satisfying their unlimited wants with limited resources. Students develop the ability to apply economic theory to current real world events. Unit 2: Economics In this unit, students will continue the study of economic theories and concepts as applied to the free market. This unit exams macroeconomic and microeconomic theories as business and governments attempt to address economic issues of cost, benefits and intervention. Unit 3: Economics In this unit students will further examine the role of economic decisions and policies on conflicting issues. This unit examines government intervention in a free market at a national and international level. Unit 4: Economics In this unit students will study the implications and pace of economic programs. This unit examines the impact of globalization, population, trade and development of nations.

General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment may include business simulations, case studies, portfolio tasks, scenarios, research assignments, oral presentations, business plans and exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate →→ Knowledge and Understanding →→ Skills

Geography (T/A/M) Course Description The study of Geography draws on students’ curiosity about the diversity of the world’s places and their peoples, cultures and environments. It enables students to appreciate the complexity of our world and the diversity of its environments, economies and cultures. Geography provides a structured, disciplinary framework to investigate and analyse a range of challenges and associated opportunities facing Australia and the global community. These challenges include rapid change in biophysical environments, the sustainability of places, dealing with environmental risks and the consequences of international integration. Students apply geographical inquiry through a more advanced study of geographical methods and skills in the senior years. They learn how to collect information from primary and secondary sources such as field observation and data collection, mapping, monitoring, remote sensing, case studies and reports. Fieldwork, in all its various forms, is central to such inquiries as it enables students to develop their understanding of the world through direct experience.

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Geography promotes students’ communication abilities by building their skills of spatial and visual representation, and interpretation, through the use of cartographic, diagrammatic, graphical, photographic and multimodal forms. In addition, students communicate their conclusions by traditional written and oral means.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 2: Sustainable Places Unit 3: Land Cover Transformations

2020 Unit 1: Natural and Ecological Hazards Unit 4: Global Transformations

Geography Units Unit 1: Natural and Ecological Hazards This unit focuses on identifying risks and managing those risks to eliminate or minimise harm to people and the environment. Students examine natural hazards including atmospheric, hydrological and geomorphic hazards such as storms, cyclones, tornadoes, frosts, droughts, bushfires, flooding, earthquakes, volcanoes and landslides. They also explore ecological hazards such as environmental diseases/pandemics (toxin-based respiratory ailments, infectious diseases, animal-transmitted diseases and water-borne diseases) and plant and animal invasions. Unit 2: Sustainable Places This unit examines the economic, social and environmental sustainability of places. While all places are subject to changes produced by economic, demographic, social, political and environmental processes, the outcomes of these processes vary depending on local responses and adaptations. Students examine how governments, planners, communities, interest groups and individuals try to address these challenges to ensure that places are sustainable. They also investigate the ways that geographical knowledge and skills can be applied to identify and address these challenges. Unit 3: Land Cover Transformations This unit focuses on the changing biophysical cover of the earth’s surface, its impact on global climate and biodiversity, and the creation of anthropogenic biomes. It integrates aspects of physical and environmental Geography to provide students with a comprehensive and integrated understanding of processes related to land cover change, and their local and global environmental consequences. Students will examine and evaluate the ways people seek to reverse the negative effects of land cover change. Unit 4: Global Transformations This unit focuses on the process of international integration (globalisation) as a conceptual ‘lens’ through which to investigate issues in human geography and integrates the sub disciplines of economic and cultural geography, and political geography. This unit provides students with an understanding of the economic and cultural transformations taking place in the world today, the spatial outcomes of these processes, and their political and social consequences. It will better enable them to make sense of the dynamic world in which they will live and work. It will also allow them to be active participants in the public discourses and debate related to such matters.

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General Methods of Assessment Assessment task types may include: fieldwork, visual displays, data analysis, oral presentations, tests, essays, reports, media presentation, map work and exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Geographical Inquiry and Skills →→ Geographical Knowledge and Understanding

Ancient History (T/A/M) Course Description Ancient History stimulates students’ curiosity and imagination and enriches their appreciation of humanity and the value of the ancient past. It shows how the world and its people have changed, as well as the significant legacies that exist into the present. The study of ancient civilisations illustrates the development of some of the distinctive features of contemporary societies, for example, social organisation, systems of law, governance and religion. Ancient History is also concerned with the possible motivations, and actions of individuals and groups, and how they shaped the political, social and cultural landscapes of the ancient world. Students are introduced to the complexities of reconstructing the past using often fragmentary evidence from a range of literary, documentary, architectural and archaeological sources, and the skills associated with the analysis and evaluation of historical sources. Students develop increasingly sophisticated historiographical skills and historical understanding, from their analysis of interpretations and representations of the ancient world to their close study of features and structures of ancient societies.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course. The course is designed to allow students to pursue their interest(s) in Ancient and/or Modern History. History is currently offered on two lines, enabling students to achieve a Double Major in History. Units from each course (Ancient and Modern) maybe combined to form a major in History.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 3: People, Power and Authority Unit 4: Reconstructing the Ancient World

2020 Unit 2: Ancient Societies Unit 1: Investigating the Ancient World

Ancient History Units: Unit 1: Investigating the Ancient World This unit provides an introduction to the nature of the remaining evidence of the ancient past and issues relevant to the investigation of the ancient world. The unit involves an investigation of the evidence for an ancient site, individual, group or event and how it has been interpreted and represented. Senior Handbook

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Unit 2: Ancient Societies This unit examines how people lived in the ancient world through an investigation of the remaining evidence. The unit focuses on the study of significant features of ancient societies, such as slavery, the family, beliefs, rituals and funerary practices. Unit 3: People, Power and Authority This unit examines the nature and exercise of power and authority in ancient societies in key periods, with reference to the evidence of significant political, military, religious and economic features. The study of an individual as part of this unit enables study of the influence of the ‘individual’ on events and developments. Unit 4: Reconstructing the Ancient World This unit focuses on a significant historical period to develop an understanding of the relevant institutions, practises, key events and individuals of the period, in the context of a wide range of sources. This unit allows for greater study of the challenges associated with the interpretation and evaluation of evidence.

General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment include Historical Investigation/ Depth Study, Source Analysis, Document Study, Empathetic Responses, Critical Responses and Exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ investigation →→ interpretation →→ communication

Modern History (T/A/M) Course Description Modern History enhances students’ curiosity and imagination and their appreciation of larger themes, individuals, movements, events and ideas that have shaped the contemporary world. The themes that run through the units include: local, national and global conflicts and their resolution; the rise of nationalism and its consequences; the decline of imperialism and the process of decolonisation; the continuing struggle for the recognition of human rights; the transformation of social and economic life; the regional shifts in power and the rise of Asia; and the changing nature and influence of ideologies. Students are introduced to the complexities associated with the changing nature of evidence, its expanding quantity, range and form; the distinctive characteristics of modern historical representation; and the skills that are required to investigate controversial issues that have a powerful contemporary resonance. Students develop increasingly sophisticated historiographical skills and historical understanding in their analysis of significant events and close study of the nature of modern societies.

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Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course. The course is designed to allow students to pursue their interest(s) in Ancient and/or Modern History. History is currently offered on two lines, enabling students to achieve a Double Major in History. Units from each course (Ancient and Modern) maybe combined to form a major in History.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 1: Understanding the Modern World Unit 2: Movements for Change in the 20th Century

2020 Unit 3: Modern Nations in the 20th Century Unit 4: The Modern World since 1945

Modern History Units: Unit 1: Understanding the Modern World This unit provides an introduction to significant developments in the modern period that have defined the modern world, and the ideas that underpinned them such as liberty, equality and fraternity. Unit 2: Movements for Change in the 20th century This unit examines significant movements, developed in response to the ideas studied in Unit 1 that brought about change in the modern world and that have been subject to political debate. The unit focuses on the ways in which individuals, groups and institutions have challenged authority and transform society. Unit 3: Modern Nations in the 20th century This unit examines the ‘nation’ as the principal form of political organisation in the modern world; the crises that confronted nations in the 20th century; their responses to these crises, and the different paths they have taken to fulfil their goals. Unit 4: The Modern World since 1945 This unit focuses on the distinctive features of the modern world that emerged in the period 19452010. It aims to build students’ understanding of the contemporary world - that is, why we are here at this point in time.

General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment include Historical Investigation/ Depth Study, Source Analysis, Document Study, Empathetic Responses, Critical Responses and Exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ investigation →→ interpretation →→ communication

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Legal Studies (T/A/M) Course Description Legal Studies explores the law, and its institutions and processes, in a social, economic and political context allowing students to investigate, question, and evaluate their personal view of the world and society’s collective future. Students develop their knowledge and understanding about how legal systems impact on the lives of citizens, seek to balance the rights and responsibilities of individuals, the community, and governments, in an effort to achieve justice and equality for all. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of laws, institutions and processes, and consider opportunities for reform. Legal Studies provides students with the opportunity to develop their skills in research, analysis and evaluation of information. Through the use of logical and coherent arguments, students will explore the implications and consequences of decisions made by individuals, organisations and governments. Students will communicate their insights in a range of modes and mediums.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 1: Crime, Justice & the Legal System Unit 2: Civil Law & Resolution of Disputes

2020 Unit 3: Law, Government & Society Unit 4: International Relations & the Law

Legal Studies Units: Unit 1: Crime, Justice & the Legal System In this unit, students study the complexity and limitations of the criminal justice system in achieving justice. Through the use of a range of contemporary examples, students investigate criminal law, processes and institutions and the tension between community interests and individual rights and freedoms. Unit 2: Civil Law & Resolution of Disputes In this unit, students study the rights and responsibilities that exists between individuals, groups and organisations and the resolution of civil disputes through courts and other mechanisms. Through the use of a range of contemporary examples, students investigate civil law, processes and institutions, and develop an appreciation of the role of civil law in society. Unit 3: Law, Government & Society In this unit, students study legal rights and responsibilities in everyday life from different political, economic and social perspectives. Through the use of a range of contemporary examples, students investigate how the law attempts to balance the rights and responsibilities of the individual with the best interests of the wider community.

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Unit 4: International Relations & the Law In this unit, students study the significance of Australia’s international legal and political responsibilities from different political, economic and social perspectives. Through the use of a range of contemporary examples, students investigate how the law attempts to balance the rights of individual states with their responsibilities in the wider global community.

General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment may include dispute resolutions, case studies, in-class essays, research essays, document studies, oral presentations and exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate →→ Knowledge and Understanding →→ Skills

Psychology (T/A/M) Course Description Psychology is the study of the human mind and behaviour. Students develop an understanding of themselves and others by exploring the interactions between the individuals and groups as well as the roles of biological and environmental factors. The study of Psychology enables learners to understand how individuals think, feel and act within different contexts. Such knowledge has the potential to empower and enhance individual abilities and facilitate awareness of the human condition, along with tolerance and respect for others. Students develop their knowledge and understanding of theories, concepts and perspectives to explain cognition and behaviour. They analyse the nature and purpose of psychology and develop insights into types of behaviour across a range of contexts.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 1: Individual Differences Unit 2: Into the Mind

2020 Unit 3: Psychology of Wellness Unit 4: Psychology in Society

Psychology Units: Unit 1: Individual Differences This unit examines individual differences in human cognition and behaviour to explain individual human behaviour as an outcome of influences and interactions. Through their studies, students explore the nature of the individual and how these differences relate to society.

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Unit 2: Into the Mind This unit examines the biological basis of human cognition and behaviour to explain how individuals respond to the environment as an outcome of biological influences and interactions. Through their studies, students explore how heredity, environmental and biological factors influence behaviour. Unit 3: Psychology of Wellness This unit examines the factors that influence physical and mental wellbeing to explain how health can be positively and negatively affected by biological and environmental influences and interactions. Through their studies, students explore how heredity, environmental and biological factors influence physical and mental wellbeing. Unit 4: Psychology in Society This unit examines the role of psychology in society to explain how humans think act and feel in a social setting. Through their studies, students explore how individual perceptions and interaction influence social relationships.

General Methods of Assessment A variety of methods of assessment are used in Behavioural Science. Assessment tasks may include: experimental reports, film studies, research reports, oral presentations, case studies and exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and Understanding →→ Skills

Sociology (T/A/M) Course Description Sociology is the study of how individuals and groups think, feel, and behave. Students develop an understanding of themselves and others by exploring the roles and interactions between individuals and society. Students develop their knowledge and understanding of theories, concepts and perspectives to explain behaviour. They analyse the nature and purpose of Sociology and develop insights into types of behaviour across a range of contexts in society. This course enables students to understand how individuals function within different contexts. Such knowledge has the potential to empower and enhance individual abilities and facilitate awareness of the human condition, along with tolerance and respect for others.

Enrolment Advice There are no formal prerequisites for students to study this course.

Units Proposed Units of study 2019 Unit 2: Sociology of Social Justice Unit 3: Cultural Icons

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2020 Unit 1: Identity Unit 4: Power and Institutions

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Sociology Units: Unit 1: Identity This unit explores society on the individual level: the ways people define themselves and their relationships with others. The electives in this unit provide students with opportunities to study the myriad of ways that society classifies and categorises people at an individual and small group level, and how individuals can be constrained and empowered through their identification with such labels. Unit 2: Sociology of Social Justice This unit explores social issues that lend themselves to activism and debate: issues of equality, justice and fairness on a social scale. The electives in this unit provide students with opportunities to explore all sides of these issues, to develop the skills and acquire the information to make informed decisions about issues that affect them. Unit 3: Cultural Icons This unit explores all levels of culture: the ideas, institutions and practices that define the ways we communicate and interact with each other. The electives in this unit provide students with opportunities to study the ways that ideas shape social life, from mass communication to everyday recreation activities. Unit 4: Power and Institutions This unit explores the superstructure of society: the social institutions and systems that determine the structure of society on a macro level, and in turn influence life on a micro level. The electives in this unit provide students with opportunities to study the ‘big picture’ of society, and explore the ways in which their lives are shaped by forces outside of their control.

General Methods of Assessment A variety of methods of assessment are used in Behavioural Science. Assessment tasks may include: film studies, case studies, journal articles, research essays, experimental reports, oral presentations and exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and Understanding →→ Skills

Behavioural Science (T/A/M) Course Description This course allows students to achieve a major in Behavioural Science, studying from the disciplines of Psychology and Sociology. The opportunity to group together a variety of units provides students with greater flexibility in their units of study and in some circumstances it may be beneficial to student ATAR calculations. All units from these courses may be included in a Behavioural Science course providing there is no duplication of content.

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Key information: This course is presented under the Behavioural Science Course Framework 2015. The course consists of a combination of units from the following courses: →→ Psychology A/T/M 2017-2021 →→ Sociology A/T/M 2017-2021 All units from these courses may be included in a Behavioural Science course providing there is no duplication of content.

Enrolment Advice Students cannot directly elect the Behavioural Science major as a course of study. They must elect to study Psychology and Sociology. Students who wish to complete a major in Behavioural Science must study a combination of four units from within the Psychology and Sociology disciplines. For example, students may wish to study three semesters of Psychology and one semester of Sociology, or two semesters of both Psychology and Sociology. The decision to request for a Behavioural Science major should be discussed with the Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment to ensure the point scores of the units studied are beneficial to completing a Behavioural Science major, rather than using separate course scores.

General Methods of Assessment A variety of methods of assessment are used in Behavioural Science. Assessment tasks may include in class essays, research essays, experimental reports, oral presentations and exams. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge and Understanding →→ Skills

Social and Community Work (A/V) CHC22015: Certificate II in Community Services (Release 1) RTO no.88009 Course Description This course is designed for students interested in exploring a range of social and community service sectors including Children’s Services, Disability, Aged Care and Youth Work. It focuses on the fundamental skills and underpinning knowledge to pursue further training and work in a range of careers that involve working with people. Social and Community Work is a vocational course that provides entry level training for students interested in working in the sector. It will also provide a pathway to higher-level qualifications in disability, aged care, early childhood education and care, and youth services. Students will develop interpersonal and communication skills vital for working with people. They will also develop critical skills in the areas of human rights, and social justice.

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The community services industry has undergone major reforms in the areas of service delivery and demand. This has been driven by a move to a person centred and consumer directed approach to work in the sector. These major changes have resulted in job redesigns and the emergence of new job roles. Students entering the community services sector are increasingly required to work in multidisciplinary teams, collaborating with other professionals to implement ‘wellness’ models of health and well-being. Volunteers make significant contributions to society, including the community services sector. Students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of volunteering activities, which promote lifelong contributions to the local and global community. Students will learn to work within ethical and legislative requirements with clients who have increasingly complex needs and require tailored care and support approaches that reflect increasing client choice.

Enrolment Advice There are no prerequisites to enter this course.

Units To gain a Certificate II in Community Services a suggested implementation pattern is: 2019 Semester 1: Work in Community Services Semester 2: Interact with Children

2020 Semester 1: Work with Young People Semester 2: Disability and Aged Care

General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment include: →→ Off-the-job practical activities →→ Assignments →→ Excursions and group work →→ Work placements →→ Orals →→ Workshops and group activities →→ On-the-job practical activities.

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Technologies Information Technology (T/A/M/V) ICT20115: Certificate II in Information, Digital Media and Technology (Release 2) RTO no.88009 Information Technology may be studied as a major or a minor course. The study of a major course is required to gain a full VET Certificate and Statement of Attainment is awarded for the competencies completed in a minor course.

Course Description This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire and apply information technology skills to a variety of situations and problems. Students study nationally recognised competencies and on successful completion of all competencies students will receive a Certificate II in Information, Digital Media and Technology – a nationally recognised vocational certificate. This course develops practical skills in computer handling and is suitable for beginners and for those who have had some experience in high school or at home. Students will become confident in everyday use of computers and will be exposed to a wide range of other computer uses. In many areas of the course, the topics will be the same whether students are undertaking the A or T unit. The difference will be in the depth of understanding that is required, the amount of teacher guidance that is provided, and the level of cognitive tasks that are the focus of assessment items. To receive the Certificate II in Information, Digital Media and Technology the following packaging rules apply: 14 units of competence are required to complete the qualification, including 7 core competencies, 7 elective competencies. 1 week of Structured Workplace Learning (SWL) is highly recommended. The course can be studied as: Tertiary (T), Vocational Tertiary (VT), Accredited (A) or Vocational Accredited (VA). The T and VT courses contribute to the attainment of an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) at the end of Year 12.

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Unit Description The following semester units can be delivered at the teacher’s discretion to meet the requirements of the course: Digital Media Foundations, Audio and Video The emphasis of this unit will be on the development and presentation of digital media audio and video files. Students will examine a variety of software and peripheral devices to produce media in a variety of contexts. Students use technology to capture, record, store and organise digital media. Students will be helped to develop teamwork strategies to assist with problem solving in groups. They will be encouraged to communicate information and ideas about digital recording, editing and production. Website Design Emphasis should be placed on hand coding HTML and CSS as this will provide a strong understanding of the language and will assist when using web creation software. It will also ensure the course is rigorous and intellectually demanding. A key point of difference between the T and A unit is the creation of JavaScript code. The T unit requires students to write their own JavaScript to perform simple low level programming actions, such as rollovers or form processing. In the A unit, students will likely want to do this too but they should not be assessed on this area of the unit. Students are likely to access online materials to help with their understanding of the unit goals so it is important to ensure that they do not access out-dated information, especially sites that use non-CSS styling. Robotics and Intelligent Systems Students will determine how a current information system functions and assess what users would like to see in a new system. Students investigate a variety of robotic systems and programming controls including Drones, VEX, LEGO Mindstorms and Ardunio. Students learn to control and program robotic systems, research and investigate robots used in industry and design and build robotics systems. Computer Games Programming and Design It is expected that teaching and learning strategies will draw on students’ prior experience with and intrinsic interest in games by providing opportunities for students to link the theory topics to examples of games they know. Theoretical concepts should be illustrated by examining real games and through interactive demonstrations. To produce their own game, students could choose an approach based on their prior experience with programming environments. Some degree of originality would be expected in the topic and structure of the game. Digital Media, Graphics and Animation Students will gain an understanding of digital 2D graphics including vector and raster graphics, image creation, capture, enhancement, and transformation techniques using various software programs. They will be equipped to create interactive animations controlled by the application of scripting language and devise animated characters capable of movement and expression.

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3D Modelling, Animation and Texturing This unit will allow students to use a range of simple and complex 3D modelling techniques to animate 3D objects, cameras, lights, materials and textures for a range of application. They will produce their own animations for various contexts which could include film, video games, engineering and design. Students will learn and apply the concepts of shading, lighting, virtual cameras, materials, textures and texture mapping to apply 3D modelling and texturing. Systems Analysis and Design The Systems Development Life Cycle will be applied by students in this unit to design, implement, test and evaluate systems that specifically meet end user requirements. With this comes an investigation into the social, ethical and occupational issues associated with systems development and students will explore the organisational roles and skills involved in this.

CUA20215 Certificate II in Creative Industries (Release 1) RTO no.88009 This unit is being trialled with instructors from the Academy of Interactive Entertainment and supervision from College staff as a Registered Unit. The Certificate II course covers 3D Modelling, Animation and Texturing using industry standard software and is run outside of school hours at the College. The emphasis will be on the development and presentation of items using 3D animations. Students will examine a variety of software and peripheral devices to produce graphics and animation modules, to be used in larger productions in a variety of contexts. Emphasis will also be given to the acquisition and development of practical skills related to the production of 3D animations and then transferring and building on the acquired skills in designing solutions to problems. Use should be made of a variety of problems to enable students to apply the appropriate design methodologies. Students will be helped to develop teamwork strategies to assist with problem solving in groups. They will be encouraged to communicate ideas and information about digital imaging using appropriate terminology. Students may examine the use of on-line tutoring and demonstration programs as an efficient and economical means of gaining information about technological advancements in the production of 3D animations.

Structured Workplace Learning (SWL) (0.5 unit) Structured Workplace Learning can be undertaken on successful completion of at least one standard unit of this course. Students need to complete a minimum of 27.5 hours in a Vocational Placement to obtain credit for this unit (0.5). This unit should enable students to: →→ consolidate learning and demonstrate competence in an IT industry environment →→ provide workplace evidence that can contribute to the measurement of competencies →→ develop personal, technical and social skills to enhance their performance as an IT employee →→ work individually and as a team member to achieve organisational goals in an IT workplace

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General Methods of Assessment Methods of assessment include in-class practical tasks, projects, tests and oral presentations. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ knowledge, understanding, application, analysis and evaluation →→ planning, designing, creating and implementing →→ communication and interpersonal skills →→ flexible, adaptive and creative thinking

Textiles and Fashion (T/A/M/V) MST20616: Certificate II in Applied Fashion Design and Technology (Release 2) RTO no.88009 Fashion Design and Textiles may be studied as a major or a minor course. The study of a major course is required to gain a full VET certificate and a Statement of Attainment is awarded for the competencies completed in a minor course.

Course Description Fashion encompasses the latest or most admired styles, shapes and forms in clothing and interiors. In this course students will have opportunities to develop creative potential through the medium of textiles while gaining an understanding of the employment opportunities in the exciting world of the fashion industry. The design process is an integral part of the course. A design brief will be used for all practical work and visual process diaries and portfolios that follow the design process will be compiled during the course. This process is an individual creative response. It involves researching the parameters of a topic, continuous analysis, designing a suitable solution, making a product and finally evaluating it. The design process encourages skill development associated with ideas generation, problem solving, communication, project management as well as analytical and lateral thinking. It enhances creativity, problem solving skills, portfolio presentation, documentation of research and processes, as well as practical skills. These skills are all valuable in a wide range of educational and vocational contexts. Tertiary institutions may require a portfolio presented at an interview for admission to a course of study. Portfolios which follow the design process may be a valuable tool for entry. Students will have opportunities to go on excursions to investigate how the Fashion and Textile Industries operate and to explore the career options available in these and related industries. The course can be studied as: Tertiary (T), Vocational Tertiary (VT), Accredited (A) or Vocational Accredited (VA). The T and VT courses contribute to the attainment of an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) at the end of Year 12. As a Vocational course, it is based on specific units of competency (knowledge and skills) from the National Training Package. Students are assessed in these competencies through both written and practical work. Upon satisfactory completion of all elements of the vocational course studied as a Major, students will obtain a Certificate II in Applied Fashion Design and Technology. This is a nationally recognised qualification. Students who complete less than this will obtain a Statement of Attainment outlining competencies achieved.

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This course aligns well with the structure of the course and the broad design interests of students who will seek work or further study at the Canberra Institute of Technology, University of Canberra or Australian National University.

Unit Description The following semester units can be delivered at the teacher’s discretion to meet the requirements of the course: Textiles for Interiors Students will learn about the concepts of design and apply these to aesthetically pleasing and functional product design. This unit also looks at interior decoration and design influences. Students will be provided with the opportunity to experiment with textiles in the context of interior design. The properties and characteristics of fibres and fabrics needed for interiors as compared to those used for apparel is explored in this unit. Fashion Design and Illustration Design is an integral part of our lives. In this unit art, history, culture and the environment provide the stimulus for designing embellished fashion and textile goods. This unit looks at where our clothes come from and how they are made. Fashion illustration and visual communication techniques will be investigated including the use of Adobe Illustrator to present design ideas. Students undertake highly autonomous projects to meet a broad design brief based on a chosen source of inspiration. Designing for Clients The demonstration of creativity and innovation in the design and development of a niche range of products is a key component of this unit. The student assumes the role of a designer to develop products to suit specific client needs. The psychology of fashion, the role of the couturier designer, and customising garments will also be covered in this unit. There will be a focus on designing for specific client needs and the presentation of these designs to clients. Working with Textiles Designers must understand the fabrics and textiles they are working with so they can select appropriately to enhance their design ideas and push the boundaries of possibilities. Textile fibres, yarn structures and cloth construction techniques form the basis of this unit. To enable successful results when creating designs the designer must also understand their client’s needs and wants. Design briefs will provide opportunities for experimentation with a wide variety of textile materials including the making of fabric such as felt. Creativity will be demonstrated through the production of an original or innovative fabric. Marketing a Designer Label The fundamentals of starting a small designer business will be investigated. Establishing and registering a business name, structure of the business, methods of operation, management of resources and presentation of product will be analysed. The success of any industry is largely dependent upon its marketing strategy. Marketing techniques, including types of advertising, will be explored in both a theoretical and practical way. The identification of a target market group and its implications will be discussed. Leading Design Houses and fashion retailers will be investigated to illustrate this topic. Recycle and Reuse This unit focuses on the impact of textile products on the individual, society and the environment. A design brief will be used to construct a “new” textile article using recycled materials.

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Fashion, Textiles and Society The development of the Australian Fashion and Textiles industries will be the basis for this unit. The link between cultural influences and clothing styles will be researched and be used as a guide for the practical task. Cycles of fashion and influences on fashion trends will be explored. Prerequisites There are no formal prerequisites for entry to this course but basic machine skills are an advantage.

General Methods of Assessment Assessment is continuous and cumulative, using the criteria as outlined in the BSSS Course Framework. At the beginning of semester students are given a unit outline showing the unit content and assessment tasks with their weighting. Assessment tasks for each unit may include: →→ practical application (constructing garments and soft furnishings) →→ research assignments/essays →→ portfolio and design brief application →→ tests →→ oral presentations →→ excursion reports. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ knowledge, understanding and application →→ creativity and problem solving skills and organisational skills →→ analysis, synthesis and evaluation →→ effective communication →→ technical skills →→ work practices.

Structured Workplace Learning (SWL) 0.5 unit Students may participate in the SWL component of the course if it is pursued as a vocational education course. Students can spend one week per year in approved workplaces to gain experience in the fashion/textile industry. The experience of Structured Workplace Learning should: →→ empower students with first-hand information about the world of work, particularly related to the fashion/textile/retail industries →→ provide contact with particular host organisations and their employees →→ provide opportunities to experience aspects of the workplace e.g. conditions of employment, working as part of a team, developing communication skills with work colleagues, superiors and clients, managing several tasks concurrently and developing a work ethic.

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Hospitality Studies (T/A/M/V) SIT20316: Certificate II in Hospitality (Release 2) RTO no.88009 SIT20416: Certificate II in Kitchen Operations (Release 1) RTO no.88009 Hospitality Studies may be studied as a major or a minor course. The study of a major course is required to gain a full VET certificate and Statement of Attainment is awarded for the competencies completed in a minor course. The Certificate III in Hospitality is delivered in the tertiary stream only and in connection with CIT.

Subject Rationale The hospitality industry contributes significantly to the Australian economy and employs a large number of people. The industry has an ongoing commitment to training in both customer service and technical areas. The industry employs large numbers of young people in full-time and part-time jobs. There are many part-time employment opportunities in this industry, making it particularly attractive to people.

Course Description The hospitality course has been developed in response to the needs of the industry and to the availability of relevant training and education opportunities. Hospitality Studies can be studied as Tertiary (T), Vocational Tertiary (VT), Accredited (A) or Vocational Accredited (VA). The T and VT courses contribute to the attainment of an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) at the end of Year 12. As a Vocational course it is based on units of competency from the National Tourism, Hospitality and Events Training Package SIT. Students are assessed in these competencies through both written and practical work. Various field trips are undertaken to develop and update hospitality industry knowledge. The hospitality course provides students with opportunities to extend their knowledge through research and examination of industry concepts, workplace cultures and practices. The following skills will be developed relevant to the Tourism and Hospitality Industry: team work, critical analysis, independent thinking and evaluative skills, self-reliance, personal responsibility for occupational health and safety for themselves and others, environmental issues and interpersonal communication. Through the application of concepts, skills, process and self-reflection, students will develop a deep understanding of the industry. This course has been developed for students who: →→ would like to gain employment skills to enable them to move directly into work from school →→ wish to do further courses in hospitality at CIT →→ intend to go on to tertiary study and wish to have some background knowledge and practical skills in this employment area →→ wish to transfer work habits and skills developed to other employment areas.

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Course goals This course should enable students to: →→ understand the structure of the hospitality industry, its workplace culture and practices →→ to communicate effectively and develop management skills to lead industry experiences →→ apply knowledge and skills in practical situations →→ gain an awareness of the social, economic, legal, cultural and environmental impact of hospitality →→ research, analyse, and present information →→ gain knowledge and understanding of vocational pathways and training opportunities; and develop appropriate attitudes and values.

Nationally Recognised Qualifications As a Vocational course, it is based on specific units of competency (knowledge and skills) from the National Training Package. Students are assessed in these competencies through both written and practical work. Upon successful completion of the hospitality course students will gain a qualification that has national recognition. The following nationally recognised qualifications will be awarded to students who successfully complete all units of competency in Year 12: →→ SIT20316 Certificate II in Hospitality →→ SIT20416 Certificate II in Kitchen Operations →→

SIT30616 Certificate III in Hospitality (delivered through CIT)

Students who do not complete all of the required competencies receive a Statement of Attainment for the competencies they achieve.

Structured Workplace Learning Structured Workplace Learning is the workplace component of a nationally recognised industry specific VET in schools program. It provides supervised learning activities contributing to an assessment of competence, and achievement of outcomes and requirements. To be eligible for the Certificate II in Hospitality and Certificate II in Hospitality in Kitchen Operations students must undertake Structured Workplace Learning. This consists of 12 shifts, some of which may be achieved during school based functions. ASBA students will automatically receive recognition of Structured Workplace Learning. To be eligible for Certificate III in Hospitality students must undertake Structured Workplace Learning. This consists of 36 shifts, which may be achieved through an ASBA, industry placements and school based events. The study of Certificate III in Hospitality requires the students to complete some competencies through CIT who will sign off on the completion of the certificate in collaboration with St Clare’s College.

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Students entering the course who can demonstrate specific competencies will be eligible to apply for recognition of prior learning. RPL is the determination, on an individual basis, of the competencies obtained by a learner through previous training, work experience etc. RPL may be granted for individual Units of Competence where the evidence is sufficient to do so. For RPL to be awarded, the units of competency must be demonstrated in the hospitality context. Those students who believe that they are eligible should contact their Subject Teacher, Assistant Principal Curriculum, VET Coordinator or Faculty Coordinator for more details. Senior Handbook

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Employment opportunities This course provides underpinning knowledge and skills for students who are interested in pursuing a career in hospitality and related industries. The qualifications gained have direct pathways to further training. A number of students will also undertake this course who want employability skills in the local and overseas hospitality industries while they travel and study.

Unit description A/VA Stream Hospitality Essentials This is the introductory unit for the Senior Hospitality (A, VA) course. Students will work in a fully equipped trade kitchen while preparing a wide range of food products. They will learn the important aspects of hygiene and food safety, kitchen safety and how to use and care for catering food preparation equipment. Students will develop a sound basis of knowledge about all aspects of the hospitality industry. Hospitality Procedures In this unit students will focus on working effectively with others while producing dishes using the basic methods of cookery. Students will learn how to maintain the quality of perishable items and how to clean and maintain a commercial kitchen. Students will learn the different ways food may be cooked and how a chef incorporates the different methods of cooking in menu planning. Café Service Students will focus on food and beverage service. Social and cultural differences will be studied to enable a thorough understanding of cultural requirements from a food service perspective. Students will provide food and beverage service on selected days within the college premises in the dining room. The students will work in a simulated hospitality workplace for assessment purposes. Students will be assessed on preparation, restaurant luncheons and associated catering activities. Assessment will include front of house (waitress) and back of house (chef) activities. Leadership in Café Training The focus on food and beverage service within a simulated café/restaurant environment will be continued in this unit. Students will learn how to prepare and serve espresso coffee as well as the financial transactions of café. Students will provide food and beverage service on selected days within the college premises in the dining room. Assessment will include front of house (waitress) and back of house (chef) activities. T/VT Stream Industry Essentials This is the introductory unit for the Senior Hospitality (T, TV) course. Students will work in a fully equipped trade kitchen while preparing a wide range of food products. They will learn the important aspects of hygiene and food safety, kitchen safety and how to use and care for catering food preparation equipment. Students will analyse and synthesise information relating to hospitality management contexts.

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Hospitality Industry Service Procedures In this unit students will develop their management skills and work effectively with others to plan, organise, lead and evaluate a food and beverage service. Students will investigate the effects of processing on the nutritional value and structure of food and use this knowledge to plan, organize and prepare dishes to meet diverse customer needs and resource constraints. Hospitality Service Management Students will focus on service situations in this unit and implement and evaluate quality practices in running a function or event. They will plan, organize and prepare food and beverages for multiple customers within commercial time constraints. Students will have the opportunity to take on leaderships roles in which they need to communicate effectively with colleagues and customers. Managing a Training Café Students will investigate changing attitudes, niche markets, trends and emerging technologies in the hospitality industry and use this information to design and implement appropriate procedures and practices for running a casual café. Students will develop skills to manage a training environment by implementing training, monitoring progress, analyzing performance and providing human resourse solutions. Prerequisites SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety is required for all units and will be covered at the beginning of each unit where required. The first two units in each stream are prerequisites for the corresponding Major course. Students will be expected to wear and maintain a chef’s uniform or waiter’s uniform where and when appropriate.

General Methods of Assessment At the beginning of semester students are given a unit outline showing the unit content and assessment tasks with their weighting. Assessment is continuous and cumulative. Students will be assessed on the degree to which they demonstrate: →→ Knowledge, understanding and application →→ Analysis, synthesis and evaluation →→ Technical skills →→ Management and work practices →→ Communication skills Practical work is ongoing demonstration of practical skills throughout the semester. Theory requirements may include an assignment, a test, research projects and/or workbooks.

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Food Science and Management (T) Subject rationale This course develops an understanding of a diverse and changing world in relation to food as a resource, its management and the safety and sustainability of our food supply globally. This course addresses social, economic and political influences, which impact on decisions about food use, production and consumption. The Food Science and Management course provides a balance between theoretical understandings and practical capacities. It recognises the importance of a practical approach to solving everyday life problems; it also provides students with opportunities to develop management skills involved in the selection and manipulation of resources, along with the skills, attitudes and understandings in a wide range of life roles and choices. Students will have opportunities to explore and develop food related interests and passions. These experiences have the potential to shape personal and professional goals, enhance individual and collaborative problem-solving abilities, and provide foundations for informed decision-making and life choices. This course encourages students to be innovative and enterprising, to display personal creativity, and to refine and express personal values. Students are able to learn through the integration of language, numeracy, science, technology and health perspectives, in a meaningful and practical context. Student Group Employment opportunities The course is designed to cater for two groups of students: →→ Those who intend to proceed to post- secondary studies in the fields of nutrition (eg sports nutrition), nursing, occupational therapy, human movement, media, teaching, business management, dietetics, hospitality studies and food technology. →→ Those who see it as a worthwhile area of study in order to extend their personal interests and knowledge in the ever-changing global environment.

Course Description Course goals The following goals focus on the essential knowledge that students should gain and be able to apply as a result of studying this course. This course should enable students to: →→ demonstrate skills in food preparation procedures, and the role of technology in the promotion of good health →→ understand and appreciate the importance of establishing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle →→ research, analyse, synthesise and evaluate information from a variety of sources →→ make and implement decisions in the changing world of food and resource management →→ manage personal and communal resources →→ undertake work in a collaborative, active and efficient manner →→ communicate ideas and skills effectively and creatively →→ demonstrate initiative, innovation and enterprise.

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Content The concepts of health, nutrition and resource management (and their interrelationships) underpin all units covered in this course. This includes: →→ nutritional aspects of food →→ OH&S →→ effects of media and advertising on consumer behaviour and product choice →→ influence of industry on food production and product choice →→ impact of technologies on the provision of food and the development of a safe food supply →→ local and global availability and sustainability of resources →→ food distribution and social justice. Field trips will be undertaken when appropriate to enhance learning.

Essential skills →→ Food preparation and presentation →→ Safe and hygienic work practices →→ Design Process →→ Research and evaluation →→ Decision-making →→ Managing resources →→ Team work →→ Communication.

Unit description Nutritional Science This unit comprises of Food and Nutrition and Nutrition and Health. This unit allows students to analyse information regarding the role of nutrition in health through exploration of current food guides and the importance of diet. Students then recognise different diets across various culture and religious groups and how various diets can affect health. Food Security and World Resources This unit comprises of Food Security and World Resources and Responsibilities. In this unit students assess the key factors impacting on food production and distribution and compare more economically developed countries to less economically developed countries. This leads to investigation of the ethical responsibilities of governments and non- government aid agencies in improving conditions to reduce global poverty.

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Food Chemistry and Technology This unit comprises of Food Chemistry and Food Technologies. In this unit students compare and contrast the physical and chemical properties of nutrients in food and examine how they interact with the human body. They will investigate the ongoing changes to food through technological development compare the research and technology in response to new food development. Food and Management This unit comprises Business Management and Operational Management. Students investigate and evaluate management processes and apply skills to identify resources relevant to a business. They will apply the management process to food preparation and production through finance and budgeting, sourcing available resources, applying appropriate work procedures, work simplification techniques and small business enterprises. Prerequisites There are no prerequisites for this course. Students may commence the course at any time.

Relationship with other courses There is a minor overlap in the essential learning areas of: Chemistry and Biology, Business Management, and Human Movement, but the concepts are treated with an independent approach.

General Methods of Assessment At the beginning of semester students are given a unit outline showing the unit content and assessment tasks with their weighting. Assessment is continuous and cumulative. Written - may take the form of a research report and/ or essay, experimental scientific reports, field trips, data analysis and design tasks. Oral - would include presentation styles such as seminar, discussion, role play and debating. Web quests, design tasks, PowerPoint presentations, field study would be included to enhance learning in the area.

Assessment Criteria →→ Knowledge and understanding →→ Skills application →→ Effective management and work practices →→ Communication →→ Innovation and creativity.

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Design Technology and Graphics (T/A/M) Course Description This course will be of particular relevance to students with an interest in one or more of the following fields: graphic design, marketing, advertising, industrial design, furniture design, relevant trades and general design related areas. Students will be able to develop their creative and problem solving skills through practical experience and project work. The course is delivered in two streams: The Graphic Design Stream and The Design and Technology Stream. The course can be studied as: Tertiary (T) or Accredited (A)). The T courses contribute to the attainment of an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) at the end of Year 12. Students can study either stream as a major or a minor course; however, the units are sequential.

Course Goals The course goals should enable students to: →→ apply appropriate and enterprising design and problem solving skills in the production of solutions →→ apply quality procedures to the appropriate use of materials and systems →→ use broadly based practical skills relevant to a variety of materials and processes →→ demonstrate communication skills using oral, written or graphical techniques to enhance design and technology capacity →→ work independently and collaboratively in accordance with occupational health and safety principles and industry standards →→ demonstrate ethical decision making and environmental awareness →→ demonstrate an awareness of existing and emerging technologies, career pathways and industry standards

Unit Description Design and Technology Stream The course consists of four semester units. All units have a similar structure and include teacher directed practical exercises designed to teach necessary skills and processes, the study of design conventions and student directed project work. Industrial Design Foundation In this unit students will be introduced to the design process and undertake design project work in a workshop environment. Graphic illustration, working drawings and materials listing will be covered. Students will make and evaluate their design project which may be a storage unit, clock, mirror or game. Design and Manufacture This unit allows students to extend their skills in design, by working on a design process that includes Graphic and Computer Aided Drawing (CAD). This unit allows students to develop and extend their creative and technical skills. Project work may be a lighting device, table, seat or storage unit. Systems Design This unit is designed to explore the student’s ability to design and make systems, and undertake design briefs that explore electronic, computer controlled and structural systems. Students will study a range of systems. Project work in this unit may be a dispenser, kinetic toy, racking system, timing or electronic game. Senior Handbook

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Major Design Project This unit allows students to develop a proposal to solve specific design problems. It allows a choice of design projects while still working through a structured design process. Major design projects may be a furniture piece, storage unit, racking system or musical instrument.

Graphic Design Stream The course consists of four semester units. All units have a similar structure and include teacher directed practical exercises designed to teach necessary skills and processes, the study of design conventions and student directed project work. Graphic Design Foundation This unit will explore basic graphic design fundamentals. Using a design process, students will explore materials for graphic design, freehand sketching and rendering techniques, basic introduction to computer applications for graphics, pictorial, orthographic, perspective drawing, and basic visual perception theory and practice. Tasks may include poster design, rendered objects and products for magazine promotion. Graphic Design Applications This unit explores the world of graphic design processes such as perception theory, composition and spatial organisation, typography, colour theory, digital colour management, printing and publishing. Tasks may include logo and packaging design, product advertising, travel brochures or book jackets. Graphic Design Typography This unit will include the pre-press fundamentals of typography, digital images, scanning and resolution, computer interactive and animation applications, HTML and web design fundamentals. It will also cover emerging trends and styles in Graphic Design. Tasks may include a magazine spread, website design graphics, corporate promotions and advertising. Major Graphic Design Project This unit allows students to negotiate their own design project. An example of a major project task could be designing a full corporate image for a particular client including ticketing, posters, website, T-shirt and cap graphics, media advertising, band VIP passes etc. The design process is an integral part of this unit and includes the development of ideas, research, design solutions and evaluation.

General Methods of Assessment Assessment is continuous and cumulative, using the criteria as outlined in the ACT Course Framework for Design and Technology. Assessment tasks are used to measure the degree to which a student has achieved the assessment criteria/goals of the course. Types of Assessment tasks →→ portfolio/design brief →→ research/written response →→ practical project work.

Assessment Criteria →→ knowledge, understanding and application →→ design process, analysis, synthesis and evaluation →→ technology and communication skills →→ planning and organisation skills. 78

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The Arts The Arts have the capacity to engage, inspire and enrich all students, exciting the imagination and encouraging them to reach their creative and expressive potential. The five Arts subjects in this Course Framework are Dance, Drama, Media, Music, Photography and Visual Arts. Together they provide opportunities for students to learn how to create, design, represent, communicate and share their imagined and conceptual ideas, emotions, observations and experiences. Rich in tradition, the Arts play a major role in the development and expression of cultures and communities, locally, nationally and globally. Students communicate ideas in current, traditional and emerging forms and use arts knowledge and understanding to make sense of their world. In the Arts, students learn as artists and audience through the intellectual, emotional and sensory experiences of the Arts. They acquire knowledge, skills and understanding specific to the Arts subjects and develop critical understanding that informs decision making and aesthetic choices. Through the Arts, students learn to express their ideas, thoughts and opinions as they discover and interpret the world. They learn that designing, producing and resolving their work is as essential to learning in the Arts as is creating a finished artwork. Students develop their Arts knowledge and aesthetic understanding through a growing comprehension of the distinct and related languages, symbols, techniques, processes and skills of the Arts subjects. Arts learning provide students with opportunities to engage with creative industries and arts professionals. The Arts entertain, challenge, provoke responses and enrich our knowledge of self, communities, world cultures and histories. The Arts contribute to the development of confident and creative individuals, nurturing and challenging active and informed citizens. Learning in the Arts is based on cognitive, affective and sensory/kinaesthetic response to arts practices as students explore complex content, skills and processes with developing confidence and sophistication across their years of learning.

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Dance (T/A/M) Dance is the language of movement and a unique art form that uses the body as an instrument to represent, question and communicate concepts and ideas. The study of dance enables learners to engage with innovative thinkers and leaders and to experience dance as artists and audience members. In broad terms, learning in Dance involves making and responding. Students learn as artists, by making dance performance that communicates to audiences. They learn as audiences, by responding critically to dance. These actions are taught together as each depends on the other. In the making of dance performances, students learn about the elements of dance, rehearsal, physically preparing the body, application of choreographic, compositional principles, technical and performance skills to engage an audience. In responding to dance performance, students learn about the roles of choreographer, dancer, audience and dance critic. Students will develop an informed critical appreciation of dance works, considering dance practices, elements, genres, styles, techniques and conventions in the construction of meaning. They will interpret, analyse and evaluate the social, cultural and historical significance of dance. The study of dance equips students with life skills while also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses

Course Description The course will enable students to: →→ analyse and evaluate dance performances and understand how meaning is constructed →→ analyse attitudes and values and evaluate the purpose of dance performances →→ understand the influence of historical, social, political and cultural contexts on dance →→ articulate their own ideas and interpret the ideas of others to make dance →→ explore the place and function of dance traditions as well as work from diverse cultural and community groups →→ reflect on the process of creating and presenting dance performances →→ apply choreographic skills to develop and present ideas →→ apply work, health & safety practice (WHS) in the production of dance performances →→ develop their technique and performance skills

Enrolment Advice Dance (T) is designed for students who have experience in dance and for those who wish to pursue dance or a related subject at university level. It is preferable that students have some experience in the techniques of Classical Ballet, Jazz or Contemporary dance. Dance (A) is intended for students who are interested in dance and wish to develop their skills. There are no prerequisites for this course although some previous dance experience and a strong interest are essential.

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Unit Description Dance Foundations This unit focuses on the study of the body and how it moves. Students will be involved in the study of appropriate cultural, social and historical aspects of dance and the related arts. The creative component is examined by students through composition and choreography. The compositional process is explored through improvisation, exploration, selection and the use of stimulus. A variety of choreographic devices, e.g. canon, unison, retrograde, form and motif development are employed throughout this unit. Dance History This unit provides a broad overview of the developments in dance by a study of the beginnings of classical ballet through to the current contemporary choreographers both overseas and within Australia. In the presenting component of this unit, dance technique is explored as too are movement sequences, set dances and a variety of repertoire. Creatively this unit will demonstrate the development of dance knowledge and skill whilst portraying a critical awareness of the dance making process. Contemporary Dance Students will be engaged in the study of specific modern dance pioneers, contemporary choreographers, dance companies and their contribution to contemporary dance in Australia and overseas. Modern and/or contemporary dance technique, movement sequences, set dances and/or repertoire in the style of chosen choreographers will be examined as part of the presenting aspects of this unit. Students will have the opportunity to compose their own works in response to a specific stimulus or in the style of a modern pioneer or choreographer. Theatrical Dance Styles This unit examines the various theatrical dance styles used throughout history. Students will examine cultural origins of specific dance styles as well as study the contribution made by individual choreographers on the world of musicals. The unit allows for students to perform in a theatrical medium such as tap, jazz or other musical theatre dance styles. Compositional work will explore dance styles, themes, concepts or choreographic intent of the musical theatre. World Dance World Dance embraces the origins of dances of particular societies through cultural, historical, ritual, religious and/or social contexts in which they were developed and performed. Students will engage in the performance of traditional sequences and repertoire from the selected cultures as well as have the opportunity to compose works containing cultural influences. Dance Production This unit allows students to be involved in the production element of dance. Students will examine the role of costume, make-up, sets, lighting or administration, within a dance context. Performance and creating elements will demonstrate the holistic understanding by the student of the components required to stage a dance work.

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Dance and the Media This unit explores the relationship between dance and the media to develop an understanding of the impact mass media has on the perception of dance in society. Students will devise their own dance sequences that will consider the limitations and possibilities of photography, film or digital media as a tool for communicating positive or negative messages of dance. Dance in the Community For this unit, students will have the opportunity to work on individual, group or community devised workshops or movement sequences that explore appropriate products for selected community groups. Students will perform for the community works they have composed and explored. Dance in Our Time Students will explore dance in contemporary society, recognising the social, historical and cultural influences on its development. This unit may involve the study of social dance styles from rock ‘n’ roll to the present dance, contemporary social issues that impact upon the development of dance or the study of social issues through choreographic expression, analysis of rock video clips or live performances, the role of dance in the media and the role of dance in contemporary Australian society. Dance in Australia This unit will investigate the influences that have shaped the development of dance in Australia. Students may examine the dance forms and cultures of people from around the world now residing in Australia and the development of dance in Australia. Creatively, students will compose works that are inspired by various dance styles, e.g. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dance, Asian dance and other dances represented by cultural groups in Australia. Self-Directed Studies Students may negotiate to undertake a major project in a specific area of interest. The emphasis in this unit will be on linking research and practical studies to areas of study completed in previous units. For this unit to be studied the student must seek permission from her Dance teacher and the Performing Arts Coordinator.

General Methods of Assessment Dance (T) Assessment instruments may be selected from oral presentations, tests, journal writing, reviews of performances, research and analytical essays and practical exams requiring a demonstration of skill mastery in technique and composition. The criteria upon which students are assessed are categorised as: →→ Making →→ Responding Dance (A) Assessment instruments may be selected from oral presentations, tests, journal writing, reviews of performances, research essays and practical exams requiring a demonstration of skill mastery in technique and composition. The criteria upon which students are assessed are categorised as: →→ Making →→ Responding

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Drama (T/A/M) Drama is the language of humanity and an integral art form. It makes meaning of the world through enactment to represent, question and communicate concepts and ideas. The study of Drama enables learners to engage with innovative thinkers and to experience drama as artists and audience members. In broad terms, learning in Drama involves making and responding. Students learn as artists, by making Drama works that communicate to audiences. They learn as audiences, by responding critically to Drama. These actions are taught together as each depends on the other. In making dramatic performance, students learn about the elements of drama, rehearsal strategies, workshopping, improvising, preparing the body, technical and performance skills to engage and communicate with an audience. In responding to Drama performance, students learn about theory, the elements of production, roles of directors, actors, playwrights, performance styles, presentation of dramatic works, audience and drama criticism. Students will develop an informed critical appreciation of dramatic works, considering drama practices, elements, genres, styles, production techniques and conventions in the construction of meaning. They interpret, analyse and evaluate the social, cultural and historical significance of drama. The study of drama equips students with life skills while also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses.

Course Description Drama is a unique form of artistic expression through which people construct, explore and convey meaning. The drama course provides a wide range of experience in Drama Theory, Theatre History, Theatrical form and Technical and Performance skills. Accredited and Tertiary students will follow a similar program in terms of content. Students studying Drama will: →→ analyse and evaluate drama performances and understand how meaning is constructed →→ evaluate the value and purpose of drama performances →→ understand the influence of historical, social, political and cultural contexts on drama →→ articulate their own ideas and interpret the ideas of others to make drama →→ explore the place and function of theatre traditions including theatrical work from diverse cultural and community groups, contemporary, and/or Indigenous Australian Theatre →→ reflect on the process of creating and presenting drama performances →→ use the elements and conventions of drama to develop and present ideas →→ apply work, health & safety practice (WHS) in the production of drama performances →→ develop their technical and performance skills. Tertiary and Accredited students are accommodated in the same classes. Tertiary and Accredited students will receive the same practical tasks that are marked differently, according to the T and A descriptors. There are some exceptions to this, depending on the level of difficulty of some materials.

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Enrolment Advice Students entering a Tertiary level course should generally have studied Drama in Years 9 and 10. Students entering at Accredited level would find the course more accessible if some performance work had been done previously, but individual negotiations are possible.

Unit Description The specific combination of units offered will be based upon teacher expertise and may vary from year to year. Acting for the Camera Students will examine and explore the history and development of acting for screen and television and the differences between stage and screen. Students will learn basic video operation and terminology, editing, focusing, the size and energy of camera performance, blocking for the camera and understanding the relationship with the crew. This unit will build an awareness of how the student can use camera production techniques to heighten dramatic impact. Actor and Director This unit will allow the student to research and analyse the theories and methods of selected theatre practitioners. Students will be required to review theatre performances as well as analyse and reflect on a variety of scripts and extracts based on the acting styles and theories studied. Improvisation and scripted performance will be used to explore the various techniques of selected practitioners. Australian Theatre Students will be encouraged to reflect on the history, themes, genre and issues within Australian Theatre through research, analysis, discussion and improvisation. This unit will focus on a selection of Australian playwrights with students having the opportunity to workshop and perform in a variety of characters and forms used in Australian Theatre. The Director For this unit the students will need to read a variety of scripts and be able to evaluate and interpret them for performance. The ability to analyse performances to understand the influences of directorial decisions including their own would be required of each student. Students will have the opportunity to conduct activities designed to explore important elements of casting, staging and management of the rehearsal process. Students will need to attend to dramatic problems, be responsible for the shape and style of the performance and guide and prepare performance/s. Dramatic Comedy This unit will focus on the student gaining an understanding of comedic terminology and the ability to use a range of technologies and mediums to support learning and performance in comedy situations. Students will engage in a variety of performance aspects and discussions, and have the opportunity to respond creatively to ‘stimuli’ to develop their understanding of the comic character. Dramatic Explorations To be able to analyse different historical and cultural perspectives in relation to the theatre styles being studied is the focus of this unit. Students will be aware of the use of role characterisation, structure, conflict, dialogue and style in Drama. Students will need to communicate effectively with an audience using production skills and techniques.

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Experimental Theatre This unit will enable students to develop theoretical understanding of experimental theatre. Students will use improvisation, workshops and be able to experiment with a range of innovative theatrical styles such as forum theatre, street theatre, absurdism and ‘happenings’. The unit will culminate with the performance of a piece of experimental theatre. Independent Unit This unit is for Tertiary students only. Students will need to objectively observe, reflect on and analyse the creative process. The student, for this unit, will be working towards the performance of a devised piece as well as demonstrating an understanding of the conventions of theatre through the process of rehearsal and performance. Mask Students will explore the historical development of physical theatre through research, analysis, discussion and improvisation. The exploration of plays where mask is used as a theatrical device will be studied. Students will be able to creatively explore the relationship between mask, movement and character. Modern and Classical Tragedy This unit will enable students to research and reflect on the concept of tragedy from the Greeks to the present and analyse the function of dramatic tragedy in its expression of the human condition. Students will present monologues from classical tragedy texts as well as developing group work into a polished performance. Museum Theatre Students will be able to devise and present performances, inspired by the themes, issues and exhibitions expressed within major cultural institutions. Thorough investigation, research and analysis will be encouraged by all students so they can develop an understanding of the cultural institution and its role within society. Performing Shakespeare Students will acquire a broad practical and theoretical understanding of Shakespearean conventions and terminology. The opportunity will arise for students to perform as an individual and as part of an ensemble. Such performance will arise from the selection of appropriate performance and production techniques in the interpretation and presentation of Shakespearean works. Realism and Beyond This unit will focus on the study of realistic and naturalistic theatre. Students will use improvisation to explore the tenets of Realism and preceding schools of theatre such as Naturalism and Expressionism. It will be necessary for students to read a variety of scripts and evaluate and interpret these scripts for performance purposes. Set and Costume Design Students will research and explore the history of theatre design and understand the relationship between the elements of design. This unit will allow students to understand and use a range of staging and design concepts. Students will also prepare and present completed design work for specific performance pieces.

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Theatre Design and Technology This unit will explore the history, forms and conventions of design and lighting in the theatre, with emphasis on the twentieth century theatre movements and technical evolution. Students will develop a practical and theoretical understanding of the relationship between design and technology in theatre. Through understanding, students will develop and present design concepts for improvised and/or scripted theatrical performances. Theatre for Young People In this unit, students will gain an understanding of and be able to differentiate between children’s theatre and theatre-in-education. The selection of appropriate forms as well as the development of the skills necessary to present children’s theatre will be encouraged throughout the unit. Golden Ages of Western Theatre Students will understand and appreciate some of the main forms and conventions of Western Theatre, from its beginnings in classical theatre to modern times. The opportunity will arise for students to produce spontaneous and polished improvisations that explore the various acting styles, staging conventions and theatrical elements that define theatrical forms studied in this unit. Theatre Lighting and Sound Students will research the history of lighting and sound used in theatre. This unit will allow students to identify, appreciate and critically reflect upon the artistic and aesthetic qualities required of lighting and sound for performances. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to work and learn individually and with others in developing lighting and sound plots, cues and operation in a performance. Theatre Production and Performance This unit will focus on developing student understanding of the general principles of play production from the point of view of a performer, production personnel and/or technical support. Students will develop the capacity to appreciate, respond, analyse, and evaluate both their own and professional productions/performances. Voice and Movement Students will explore the use of the voice and the body as instruments to create sound, shape, atmosphere and character. All students will be encouraged to devise performance pieces that utilise the voice and movement to communicate meaning to an audience. Students will explore the history and development of physical theatre through research, analysis, discussion and improvisation. World Theatre This unit will enable students to evaluate, analyse and interpret material embodying the form and content of theatre from a range of cultures. Students will explore, experiment with and apply performance techniques relevant to world theatre, such as mask work, puppetry, stylised and symbolic movement.

General Methods of Assessment Assessment instruments may be selected from group and individual work, rehearsal, improvisation, workshops, student devised scripts and use of design and technical elements and portfolios of written work. A portfolio consists of a group of tasks (eg essay, class work, oral presentation, assignment, project, etc) each of which assesses the student's performance against the criteria in the Course Framework. The criteria for assessment in Drama (A/T) are: →→ Making →→ Responding 86

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Media (T/A/M) Course Description Subject Rationale Media is a unique art form that influences our perception and understanding of the world. The study of media enables learners to engage with innovative thinkers and practitioners and to experience media as producers and audience members. In broad terms, learning in Media involves making and responding. Students learn as producers, by making media products that communicate to audiences. They learn as audiences, by responding critically to media products. These actions are taught together as each depends on the other. In the making of media products, students learn about media codes and conventions, representation, workflow end-to-end production, technology and the production process, to engage an audience. In responding to media, students learn about origins, influences and theories of communication. In addition, students engage in media production and investigate the role of audience. Students will develop an informed critical appreciation of media products, considering media practices, elements, genres, styles, production, techniques and conventions in the construction of meaning. They will interpret, analyse and evaluate the social, cultural and historical significance of media. The study of media equips students with communication skills while also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses.

Goals This course should enable students to: →→ analyse and evaluate media products and understand how meaning is constructed →→ evaluate the value and purpose of media products →→ understand the influence of historical, social, political and cultural contexts on media →→ articulate their own ideas and interpret the ideas of others to make media products →→ explore the place and function of media traditions as well as work from diverse cultural and community groups →→ reflect on the process of creating and presenting media products →→ apply production processes to develop and present ideas →→ apply work, health & safety practice (WHS) in the creation of media products. Media is offered as a Tertiary or Accredited course. Students in the T course are expected to work at the conceptual level required for tertiary entrance while students in the A course respond in a more practical way.

Enrolment Advice While there are no prerequisites, strong interest, a willingness to give time and continuing individual commitment are essential.

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Unit Description Units will be selected from the following: Media Foundation This unit is recommended as an introductory unit. This unit is designed to provide a foundation for the commencement of media studies. This unit introduces technical, symbolic and narrative elements, as well as production and media issues. This also investigates the codes and conventions applicable to the study of communication theory. It is designed as a generalist unit – in which the basic codes and conventions of media communication and production are identified and developed. It focuses on theory (communication, history, issues) and skill development for the creation of media products in a variety of mediums and a range of genres and target audiences. Documentary This unit is designed to explore the genre of documentary film making. Students will have opportunities to analyse distinctive features of documentary film and evaluate the development of documentary film as a visual and aural record. Students will investigate the impact of pop culture or commercial interests in the role of documentary production. Students will also have opportunities to produce their own documentaries. Process to Production In this unit, students explore the process of developing media to production standard. Students will be required to respond to a client brief through the creation of a media production. Students will apply specific technologies, use presentation skills and apply media theory to develop a production according to a client brief that communicates meaning to a specific target audience. Students are required to have successfully completed at least two standard units of media and demonstrated self-management skills before undertaking this unit. Entry in exceptional circumstances could occur through teacher negotiation and on the basis of presentation of a student portfolio. Video Production Students will begin with the acquisition of practical camera and editing skills, building on skills and knowledge developed through short camera, editing and scripting exercises. This final production of a large piece of work, either individually or as a group, will consist of all documentation, clearances and be screened to a suitable audience. Group-work will be essential in most cases. Groups should undertake the planning, scripting and production of completed tasks and evaluate their products. News & Current Affairs Students will undertake a wide range of news and Current affairs stories and produce them according to the guidelines of the chosen media and target audience. Students will work individually and in groups to create news broadcasts, with full production support. It will be expected that students have access to the internet and news streams to be able to investigate the issues approaches taken. Journalism This unit is a generalist journalism unit. In this unit students will undertake a series of tasks to develop their awareness and understanding of journalism as a whole. It defines journalism and the changing nature of how information is presented in society, both local and international. It examines the effect on society of developments in the delivery and orientation of journalism.

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Animation This unit examines the nature of and concepts related to traditional and computer-assisted animation. Students will view, examine and criticise a range of animated films, study animation production and processes, and produce short animated films. Television This unit explores the media of television through a range of social and historical contexts. Students may be required to analyse the social impact of television and the way it shapes our cultural perceptions, explore the codes and conventions associated with television production, research the historical development of television, explore different types of broadcasting or analyse content, style and/or ethical issues. Students will also have opportunities to apply their understanding to the production of practical work. Television Genre This unit will provide students with opportunities to explore the genre of television and will cover content selected from topics such as narrative structure, devices and techniques, economic and political factors influencing programming and policy, codes and conventions inherent within the genre, social theory related to television, character representations and production and scriptwriting skills. Film, Genres and Cultures This unit explores film within the context of specific cultures and genres. Students will have opportunities to view films from directors and film cultures in order to explore the ways in which role representations, film codes and conventions and production techniques are shaped to convey meaning within specific cultural contexts. Students will also have opportunities to emulate established motifs, styles and techniques through practical production. History and the Development of Film This unit traces the historical development of film, some of its major directors and their impact on the film industry. Students will explore film language, role and the analysis of narrative film, aspects of the mis-en-scene, film styles and the development of film technology. Students will analyse production roles and apply the codes and conventions of film to the process of film production. Film Making This unit is designed to provide students with practical experience in film making. Students will have opportunities to explore production processes and work collaboratively to plan and produce films utilising specialised film equipment.

General Methods of Assessment Assessment instruments may be chosen from major productions, research essays and assignments, reviews, class exercises, in-class essays, seminars, treatments and scripts. The three assessment criteria are: →→ Making →→ Responding

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Music (T/A/M) Course Description Music is a unique art form that records and enriches human civilisation reflecting the development of human cultures. The study of music enables critical thinking and engagement with innovative musicians to experience music as artists and audience members. In broad terms, learning in Music involves making and responding. Students learn as musicians, by making musical works that communicate to audiences. They learn as audiences, by responding critically to music. These actions are taught together as each depends on the other. In making of musical works, students learn about composing, arranging, improvising, music technology, and technical and performance skills to engage an audience. In responding to musical works, students learn about theory, elements of music, origins of music, influences of music, performance styles, technology and being an audience. Students will develop an informed critical appreciation of music, considering music practices, elements, genres, styles, production, techniques and conventions. They will interpret, analyse and evaluate the social, cultural and historical significance of Music. The study of music equips students with life skills while also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses. The study of music will enable students to: →→ analyse and evaluate musical works and understand how its meaning is constructed →→ evaluate the value and purpose of musical works →→ understand the influence of historical, social, political and cultural contexts on music →→ articulate their own ideas and interpret the ideas of others to make music →→ explore the place and function of musical traditions as well as work from diverse cultural and community groups →→ reflect on the process of creating and performing musical works →→ use the elements of music to analyse and interpret musical ideas →→ apply work, health & safety practice (WHS) in the production of music.

Enrolment Advice It is envisaged that this course will address the needs of a range of students who wish to undertake a course of study at a pre-tertiary level. The course caters for a wide variety of students who: →→ would normally have studied music in Years 9 and/or Year 10 or →→ have a basic level of competence and wish to further develop their skills →→ are advanced musicians.

Tertiary Music (T) This course assumes students have a formal knowledge of musical notation, developed literacy and performance skills, and a general knowledge and understanding of some musical styles. The entry level for T courses is Grade 3 from a relevant examination body and is at the discretion of the Principal. This course will allow students to continue the study of music at a Tertiary Institution.

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Extension Tertiary Music (Ex) This course assumes students have a highly developed knowledge and skills base in notation, literacy, performance, composition and appraising. This course will allow for a high degree of specialisation in performance, composition and appraising. The entry level for Extension T Courses is Grade 5 from a relevant examination body and is at the discretion of the Principal. This course will allow the student to continue the study of music at a Tertiary Institution.

Accredited Music (A) This course caters for students who wish to pursue music as an interest at a non-tertiary level and who have little or no prior knowledge of musical notation and performance skills.

Unit Description The following seven units are classified as Core Units of study. Baroque Period This unit will enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the major developments and stylistic changes in Baroque musical forms and create composition tasks reflecting these traits. All students will be required, both aurally and in print, to illustrate their appreciation and analytical skills of a variety of works from the periods of study. Students will be required to increase their practical skills through performance at an appropriate standard. Classical Period Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the major developments and stylistic changes in Classical musical forms and create composition tasks reflecting these traits. This unit will require students to appreciate and critically analyse, both aurally and in print, a variety of works from this period. Students will be required to increase their practical skills through performance at an appropriate standard. Romantic Period In this unit students will be able to demonstrate awareness of a wide variety of Western music from the Romantic Period. Students will be required to demonstrate knowledge of the techniques of performing and composing in a variety of styles as well as appreciate, critically analyse and understand a variety of musical works through oral, aural and written expression. Twentieth Century Period Students will be able to demonstrate an awareness of a wide variety of Western music from the Twentieth century. This unit will require students to appreciate, critically analyse and understand a variety of musical works, as well as demonstrate knowledge of the techniques of performing and composing in a variety of styles. Music Fundamentals: An Historical Overview (Beginning Accredited Students only) This unit will enable students to demonstrate a basic understanding of the elements of music including pitch, dynamics, duration and timbre and the historical development of their chosen instrument. Students will need to demonstrate basic techniques on their chosen instrument, using correct posture and application.

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Optional Units Medieval and Renaissance Music Students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of music from the Medieval and Renaissance Period and will be able to appreciate, critically analyse and understand a variety of works from this period and demonstrate knowledge of the techniques of performing and composing. Australian Music This unit will enable students to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the music within our culture, such as, folk, jazz, country, art, Aboriginal, ethnic, and film. Students will be able to appreciate, understand and analyse the compositional styles and techniques of Australian composers. It is expected that all students will demonstrate knowledge of Australian music through the creation, presentation and evaluation of musical works. Jazz Students will be able to critically analyse and recognise both aurally and in print a variety of Jazz forms. From the study of this unit students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the musical, geographical and social origins of Jazz and create composition tasks reflecting this style. Students will increase their practical skills through the performance of a solo. Music for Theatre This unit will enable students to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the role of music in theatre and stage and create compositions and written tasks reflecting their understanding. Students will observe, appreciate, analyse and evaluate music created specifically for the theatre and stage. The examination of the societal, technological and historical impacts on music for the theatre and stage will be studied throughout the course of this unit. Students will increase their practical skills through the performance of solo. Music for Screen Students will demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the function and importance of music to both television and film and the ability to respond and create written and composition tasks reflecting these traits. Students will appreciate, critically analyse, understand and interpret both aurally and in print, a variety of works related to film and television, and respond through oral, aural and written expression. Students will increase their practical skills through the performance of a solo. Popular and Rock Music This unit will allow students to explore and research the history and development of Rock and Popular Music. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements of Rock and Pop through performance and creative tasks. Music of Another Culture This unit will enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the musical, geographical and social origins of the chosen culture. Students will be able to present clear and well researched creative and written tasks reflecting a knowledge and understanding of the characteristics relevant to music of the chosen culture.

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Chamber Music/Small Ensemble The ability to appreciate, critically analyse and recognise, both aurally and in print, a variety of Chamber forms, will be required of all students in this unit of study. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the musical, geographical and social origins of Chamber Music, as well as create composition tasks reflecting their understanding of chamber music. Directed Study (not for minor packages) This unit will allow students to appreciate, critically analyse and recognise, both aurally and in print, a chosen style of music. Students will be able to increase their practical skills through the performance of solo works. The ability to demonstrate an understanding of the musical, geographical and social origins of the chosen topic will be required from all students.

General Methods of Assessment There will be a variety of assessment instruments to suit the needs of each unit of work. Assessment may be in the form of: →→ workshop activities →→ analysis of theatre and concert excursions →→ oral presentations →→ tests (aural and theory) →→ research assignments →→ practical tests on instruments and voice (individual and ensembles) →→ creative work (compositions and arrangements). The criteria used for assessment in Music falls under the three headings of: →→ Making →→ Responding. Through the integrated study of creating, performing and musicology, students will develop an overall understanding of music and acquire the skills necessary for their continued participation in music.

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Visual Arts (T/A/M) Course Description Visual Arts is integral to our lives and is fundamental to how we communicate, express and explore ideas. The study of visual arts enables learners to engage with innovative thinkers and practitioners and to experience visual art as artists and audience members. In broad terms, learning in Visual Arts involves making and responding. Students learn as artists, by making art works that communicate to audiences. They learn as audiences, by responding critically and ethically to art works. These actions are taught together as each depends on the other. In making art works, students learn about the design/artistic process, materials and techniques, technologies and equipment, to produce a finished work. In responding to art works, students learn about concepts, visual literacy, roles of the artist and art criticism. Students will develop an informed critical appreciation of art works, considering formal qualities, styles, production, techniques and traditions in the construction of meaning. They will interpret, analyse and evaluate the social, cultural and historical significance of art. The study of art equips students with life skills while also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses.

Course Goals The course goals should enable students to: →→ analyse and evaluate art works and understand how meaning is constructed →→ evaluate the value and purpose of visual art →→ understand the influence of historical, social, political and cultural contexts on visual arts →→ articulate their own ideas and interpret the ideas of others to make art →→ explore the place and function of artistic traditions as well as work from diverse cultural and community groups →→ reflect on the process of creating and presenting art works →→ use a range of materials, media, processes and technologies to create and produce art works →→ apply work, health & safety practice (WHS) in the production of art works.

Enrolment Advice There are no prerequisites for this course but it is recommended that students have successfully completed Art units in Years 9 and 10.

Unit Description All units have a similar structure and include teacher-directed practical exercises designed to teach necessary skills and technical processes, the study of art theory, and student directed artwork. A visual diary is used to record the development of ideas, experimentation of media, visual references, research and evaluation of work. The study of visual art practices and selected artists may include research, exhibition reports or written responses. The course consists of four semester units, focused on selected media and techniques for personal expression and visual communication. 94

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Exploring Visual Art This unit explores a variety of media, techniques and practices to express ideas in a range of visual forms. This unit introduces painting media such as watercolour, oil and acrylic paint, printmaking techniques such as silkscreen printing and etching and new technologies which explore nontraditional media for making art and design work. Sculpture This unit explores a variety of sculptural media, techniques and practices to express ideas in threedimensional form. This unit introduces sculptural techniques such as modelling, casting, construction and installation, and explores a range of materials to create three-dimensional forms. Drawing This unit explores diverse skills in a range of drawing media, techniques and practices to express ideas in visual form. This unit introduces both traditional and computer based drawing techniques using a range of media such as ink, pencils, graphic pens, pastels, charcoal, and digital software. Portfolio Preparation This unit allows students to explore a range of self–selected media and techniques to extend their technical skills and create a collection of mixed media art/design work as preparation for entry into University courses at the ANU School of Art, University of Canberra, CIT and Design Agencies.

General Methods of Assessment Assessment is continuous and cumulative, using the criteria as outlined in the BSSS Course Framework for Visual Art. Assessment tasks are used to measure the degree to which a student has achieved the assessment criteria/goals of the course. Types of Assessment Tasks →→ visual process diary tasks →→ teachers-directed tasks →→ student-directed tasks →→ formal literacy tasks.

Criteria for Assessment The criteria used for assessment in Music falls under the headings of: →→ Making →→ Responding.

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Photography (T/A/M) Course Description Images are used to represent, question and communicate concepts and ideas. The study of photography enables students to be innovative and to experience photography as producers and as audience members. In broad terms, learning in Photography involves making and responding. Students learn as photographers, by making photographic works that communicate to audiences. They learn as audiences, by responding critically to photographic works. These actions are taught together as each depends on the other. In the making of photographic works, students learn about photographic technology, techniques, equipment and process to engage audiences. In responding to photographic works, students learn about visual literacy and about the role of photographers, audiences and critics. Students will develop an informed critical appreciation of photographic works, considering practices, elements, genres, styles, techniques, conventions and production in the construction of meaning. They explore how Photography influences our perception and understanding of the world. Students will interpret, analyse and evaluate the social, cultural and historical significance of Photography. The study of Photography equips students with life skills while also providing continuity with many tertiary and industry courses.

Course Goals The course goals should enable students to: →→ analyse and evaluate photographic works and understand how meaning is constructed →→ evaluate the value and purpose of photography →→ understand the influence of historical, social, political and cultural contexts on photography →→ articulate their own ideas and interpret the ideas of others to make photographic works →→ explore the place and function of photographic traditions within a range of diverse cultural and community groups →→ reflect on the process of creating and presenting photographic works →→ use photographic materials, processes and technologies to develop and present ideas →→ apply work, health & safety practice (WHS) in the production of works →→ develop their technical skills.

Enrolment Advice There are no prerequisites for entry to Photography (T) and (A). However, all units are sequential.

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Unit Description Foundation Photography This is an introductory unit to traditional and/or digital photography. Unit content includes: camera types, camera controls, darkroom and chemical safety, developing prints, digital software, presenting photographs, introduction to the history of photography and the presentation of a series of student self-directed photographic work. Continuing Photography This unit expands on traditional and/or digital photographic techniques with an emphasis on design elements and principles. Unit content includes the work of photographers with specific reference to composition and design, digital techniques, natural and artificial light and presentation of a series of student self-directed photographic work. Photographic Applications This unit examines the uses of photography in today's society. Unit content includes: history of photojournalism, fashion and advertising photography, set practical exercises relating to some of the following forms of photography - photojournalism, magazine, sport, advertising, fashion and scientific photography, studio lighting, lenses and presentation of a series of student self-directed photographic work. Art Photography This unit emphasises photography as an art form. Unit content includes: history of photography as art - a study of the relationship between photography and art, practical class exercises experimenting with selected techniques such as: collage, photomontage and mixed media works produced by artists in art movements such as Dada, Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Post Modernism and the presentation of a series of student self-directed photographic work.

General Methods of Assessment Assessment is continuous and cumulative and uses criteria as outlined in the ACT Course Framework for Photography and Digital Imaging. Assessment tasks are used to measure the degree to which a student has achieved the assessment criteria/goals of the course. Types of Assessment Tasks →→ visual diary work proposal →→ practical class exercises →→ research /exhibition report →→ assignment and/or written response →→ student self-directed work. Assessment Criteria →→ Making →→ Responding.

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Attendance Absences The College will notify parents if a student is absent by a SMS message. This number will be the mobile number listed for Guardian A (mother, female guardian) on the enrolment form. Parents are asked to contact the College if they would like to make a change or add another number. Students are asked to explain all absences and lateness in writing by using the Absent Note (a copy can be found on the College website under the Publications and Forms section) or via email to attendance@stcc.act.edu.au.

Lateness If a student arrives late to school she must sign in at Student Administration. A note explaining her lateness must be written by a parent/guardian and given to Student Administration the following day.

Leave During the Day If a student leaves during the day for an appointment she must: →→ Bring a note from her parent/guardian to Student Administration →→ Sign back in at Student Administration upon her return from the appointment. With parental approval (given in writing by parent or guardian at the beginning of each school year), Years 11 and 12 students may leave the school grounds for study purposes after 11.00am if they do not have scheduled lessons. Year 11 students are not permitted to leave at 11.00am during Term 1 of Year 11.

Extended Leave — 5 days or more Parents are required to request Approval of Leave from the Principal if the student will be out of the College for five (5) days or more. Request for leave forms can be found on the College website under the Publications and Forms section. After completion, the form can be emailed (or given) to the Principal the.principal@stcc.act.edu.au for approval.

Senior Leave Leave for holidays will not normally be approved in Years 11 and 12. To meet ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies requirements and assist our students to plan, the College has a system for senior leave requests. A form has been designed that enables a student to seek leave from the College and provide the Principal with information about how she will manage scheduled assessment tasks and missed course content during the absence. Prior to requesting leave, students are required to discuss their assessment/s and missed course content with their teachers. They can type all information directly into the Senior Leave Request and Assessment Arrangements Form. The form is printed for signature by individual teachers and a parent or carer prior to submitting to the Principal for their consideration. Once the leave is approved and the student and parent informed, the form will be given to the Student Attendance Officer who will record the details and inform the student’s teachers. Students or parents can obtain the form from the College Website under the About Us → Publications and Forms.

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Senior Agreement All senior students are bound by the expectations listed in the Senior Agreement form. The agreement is signed by the student and the parent/guardian at the start of the school year.

Senior Study and Senior Focus Days Senior Focus days are published in the College Calendar. Attendance on this day is compulsory for students. A Senior Study Day is granted when parent permission is provided. Students may study on or off campus. If studying on campus, all College expectations must be followed including wearing the College uniform.

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Responsibilities Student Responsibilities →→ Students will attend all classes. →→ If a student has an appointment during the day, she is required to bring a note from her parents explaining this and hand it to Student Administration during Pastoral Care time on the morning of the appointment. Student Administration will make the necessary amendments on, SEQTA; however students must sign out at Student Administration before departure. On return, the student must sign back in at Student Administration and amendments to the database, SEQTA, will be made by the Student Administration Officer. Due cause and adequate documentary evidence will be used to determine if the absence will be considered an approved absence. →→ Within three days of returning to school after an absence, students must present a note from parents/guardians to Student Administration explaining the absence. The note must include the date of the absence/s, show due cause and have submitted with it any other relevant documentary evidence for non-attendance. →→ Absences beyond this time will be considered ‘Unapproved’. As per BSSS policy, students who accrue more than 10% of unapproved absences will void the unit of study in which the absences have occurred. →→ If the absence/leave is approved, Student Administration will notify class teachers to enable them to update their class roll. →→ If a student misses an assessment item due to illness, a doctor’s certificate will be required. Upon return to school, it is the student’s responsibility to see her teacher about the missed item and it will be normal practice to request that the student complete an equivalent or alternate piece of assessment. →→ The College’s Semester Reports show the number of approved and unapproved absences. It is important to note that more than six ‘Unapproved’ absences can lead to the student receiving a V (or Void) grade for the Semester Unit. This has serious implications for the award of the Year 12 Certificate as well as for the completion of requirements for university entry for Tertiary students. If a student misses an assessment item and due cause with adequate documentary evidence is not supplied or the absence is not approved, the student will receive a notional zero for the assessment item.

Parent Responsibilities →→ Parents are asked to write a note explaining the absence on the day their daughter returns to school. If an assessment task falls on that day, medical certification will be required. →→ If their daughter has an appointment during the day, which does not require her to miss class time, parents supply a note giving details of the appointment and the expected time away from the College. This note is to be handed to Student Administration in the morning before the student leaves for the appointment.

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→→ Parents are requested to make appointments outside of school time, (for example driving lessons, physiotherapy appointments) and avoid scheduling family holidays or the like during term time. Leave for holidays will not normally be approved. Absences for appointments such as driving lessons will not be approved by the College.

Assessment and Reporting Introduction The Senior College operates under the Policies and Procedures established by the ACT Board of Senior Secondary Studies with regard to assessment procedures and Year 12 Certification.

Students should be aware that: Assessment is a continuous process Each unit of work contains a variety of assessment tasks including, for example, in-class exercises, essays, assignments, practical work and tests. Details of unit assessments are provided in the early stages of each unit. Consistent work is valued Since all units count towards the Year 12 Certificate, those students who achieve consistent work standards will be rewarded. Regular out-of-class study is necessary As most courses in the Senior College are assessed by means of long-term assignments, students need to prepare a program of study which fulfils their unit obligations and assessment requirements. Students should plan for at least 15 hours of out-of-class study per week. Substantially complete assessment tasks Students are required to substantially complete and submit all assessment items that contribute to the assessment for a unit unless due cause and adequate documentary evidence is provided.

The Assessment Process Assessment of a student’s achievement in a unit is determined by the aggregation of performance in several assessment tasks. In Tertiary level courses these tasks provide a set of scores which discriminate between students. In Accredited level courses, grades only are awarded for units. Common practice is that from three to six formal tasks are set within each semester unit.

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Unit Outline For each unit of study, by the end of the second week following commencement of the unit students are to receive a written (hard copy) Unit Outline that states: →→ Course name →→ Unit name →→ Unit value →→ Date (Semester, Year) →→ Summary of the content →→ Assessment tasks →→ Assessment criteria →→ Dates on which the assessment tasks are due →→ Weightings of tasks →→ Student responsibilities →→ Turnitin requirements if necessary →→ VET Competencies (For vocational programs) →→ Training Package qualification name (For vocational programs) →→ Where the following information relevant to the unit can be readily accessed by the student: »»

Grade descriptors

»»

Moderation procedures (internal and external)

»»

Meshing procedures where required

»»

Method of unit score calculation

»»

Penalties for late and non submission of work

»»

Appeals processes

»»

Plagiarism penalties

»»

Course information, including any course requirements and pre-requisites

»»

Procedures for calculating course scores

»»

Drafting Policy.

Where the delivery of the unit is through flexible learning, the Unit Outline must state how the delivery and participation will occur. The published Unit Outline may only be varied by the teacher in exceptional circumstances in consultation with the classes concerned and the Faculty Coordinator. All changes to a Unit Outline must be made in writing. If appropriate, the student should also receive a Training Record Book for vocational programs.

Assessment Tasks For each assessment task specified in the Unit Outline, students are to receive clear statements about what is required and under what conditions it will be undertaken, and the assessment criteria/ marking scheme.

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This includes: →→ Course Title →→ Unit Title and Value →→ Due date or time allowed, as appropriate to the task →→ Weighting, as specified on the Unit Outline →→ Word Limits (if applicable) →→ Clear instructions regarding the nature of the task →→ Clear statement of conditions under which the task will be undertaken →→ Explicit criteria for assessment and/or marking schemes →→ Reference to BSSS policies on penalties for late submission and plagiarism →→ Where work is completed out of class, reference to the requirement for the student to include a statement that the work presented is their own →→ Clear statement where competencies are attached to specific questions or aspects of the task (VET only). These details will normally be specified on a task sheet for out of class assessment instruments or on the test/exam.

Unit Grades and Scores At each stage of the assessment process, unit results are monitored by the Faculty Coordinator and the Assistant Principal (Curriculum and Assessment) and changes are made if necessary. A letter grade from A to E is awarded as the measure of achievement at the end of each unit. The grades awarded are based on each student’s performance against the grade descriptors in the relevant Course Framework. A Unit Score is awarded for each T Unit and indicates a student’s achievement relative to others studying the unit. This score will usually be between 40 and 100 because of the standardising procedures used. Raw scores are standardised to historic parameters with a view to predicting the final score for students in that course once it is moderated by the AST. Unit Scores are used to calculate Course Scores. Standardised Unit Scores are published for students at the end of each semester on the notice board outside the Assistant Principal’s (Curriculum and Assessment) office. Students should check their results and notify their teachers in the first instance if any error appears to have occurred.

Checking of Unit Grades and Course Data At various times during the semester and year, students will be asked to check results and personal details print-outs. Students will be responsible for ensuring the accuracy of personal data recorded and of results. Unit Scores and Grades are particularly important and while the College exercises all care, errors can occur. Students must check all printouts for accuracy and alert the College if enrolment details or results appear to be inaccurate.

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Submission of Assessment Tasks It is the responsibility of the student to submit assessment tasks to the teacher by the due date. The due date may also include a time, e.g. 10.00am or Period 2. Assessment tasks should be handed directly to the teacher, if possible, and be accompanied by a completed Assessment Task Submission Form. All assessment tasks must be submitted as a hard copy unless otherwise stated in the requirements of the task. Upon receipt, the teacher should register the date that the assessment task was submitted by completing the relevant section of the Assessment Task Submission Form. This then generates a receipt for the teacher and student that the task has been submitted. In the event that the teacher is unavailable, assessment tasks may be submitted to the Faculty Coordinator or Assistant Principal Curriculum and Assessment by 3:30pm of the day the assessment is due. The student is required to keep a complete copy of any written task that is submitted as well as their submission receipt. A backup electronic copy or a photocopy is acceptable. The copy must be produced on request and will provide the student with security against loss of or damage to the submitted copy. It is also important that students ensure the security of their work prior to its completion by ensuring that secure electronic and hard backup copies are made. Loss of a task, either electronic or physical, will not generally be accepted as a valid reason for late submission.

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St Clare’s College ABN: 34 447 289 629

07/05/2018

02 6260 9400 | stcc.act.edu.au 1 McMillan Crescent Griffith ACT 2603

Senior Handbook 2018  
Senior Handbook 2018