Page 1

ST C

Junior Course Guide

E EG

RE’S COLL A L


St Clare’s College is a Spirited Learning Community. St Clare’s is Spirited: →→ Based on the Gospel →→ Enlivened by the Spirit →→ Open to life, change and challenge →→ Valuing consultative, cooperative processes →→ Preparing students to take an active role in the community →→ Enthusiastic, hopeful and empowering →→ Committed to justice. St Clare’s is a Catholic Community: →→ Of students, parents, staff and teachers →→ Which affirms, nurtures and empowers all members →→ Committed to love, peace, joy and hope →→ Building the Kingdom of God →→ Developing young women to reach their potential →→ Open to the poor. The Learning Program at St Clare’s: →→ Is holistic →→ Offers diversity →→ Promotes high achievement →→ Is open to new educational developments →→ Values the uniqueness of each individual →→ Strives for the spiritual, physical, emotional, intellectual and aesthetic development of all students.


Contents Principal’s Message 

02

Years 9 and 10 Courses 

22

Educational Aims 

03

Choosing a Pattern of Study 

23

Principles for Learning 

04

Curriculum at St Clare’s College 

05

Selecting Subjects Selection Rules Year 9 and 10 Pattern of Study 

23 23 23

Years 7 and 8 Year 9 Year 10

05 05 05

Years 11 and 12

05

Specialised Terms 

06

Curriculum  Faculty Areas Pre-Requisites Unit Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

Inclusive Education  The Wisdom Program (Years 7 to 10)

06 06 06 06 06

07 07

Years 7 and 8 Courses 

08

Accelerated Reader Program 

09

What is Renaissance Home Connect

10

Maths Pathway  Maths Pathway Classroom The Student Interface Parent Portal Supporting Maths Learning at Home

Growth Mindset  Brainology Curriculum Overview Research Background Overview Achievement and Motivation Research on Learning and the Brain Intervening Approach: Teaching a Growth Mindset Pilot Study Results Guiding your Child’s’ Growth Mindset Additional Resources

PAT Testing Skills  PAT Reading PAT Maths

11 12 12 13 13

14 14 14 14 15 15 16 17 18

Arts and Languages  The Arts  Dance Drama Media Arts Music Photography Visual Arts

Languages  French Italian Japanese

Studies of Society and Environment  Civics and Citizenship Economics and Business Geography

Technologies  Design and Technology Fashion and Textile Technology Food Technology and Hospitality Graphic Design Digital Technology

24 24 25 26 27 28 29 31

32 33 34 35

37 38 38 39

40 41 42 43 45 46

Inclusive Education 

49

The Seeker Program

49

Elective Selection Forms 

50

19 19 20

01


Principal’s Message Welcome to St Clare’s College where we have been welcoming students for more than 50 years! St Clare’s College is an inclusive, caring, Catholic community where learning is valued and students are given opportunities to grow in all dimensions of their life.

Modelled on the life and teachings of Jesus and inspired by the example of St Clare in its policies and practices, the College is committed to providing a safe and empowering environment for all students. The College offers a strong academic program as well as a number of vocational courses in Years 11 and 12. In Years 7 and 8 the Foundation Studies Program enables all students to experience a wide range of courses to provide a sound basis for making future academic decisions.

The College has professional dedicated staff who have the best interest of the students at heart. The staff maintain their currency in teaching and learning by attending professional learning workshops and conferences on a yearly basis. We look forward to a long association with all of our families and hope that your time at St Clare’s College is enjoyable and rewarding.

The Pastoral Care Program promotes the spiritual and social development of students as well as supporting their learning needs. The social justice, volunteering and outreach programs are key focus areas for the St Clare’s community. Student leadership has a high profile in the College through the Student Representative Council and the strong House system. There are many opportunities for students to participate in extra–curricular activities that complement the academic program including: debating, drama, dance, music, a wide range of sports and leadership development programs.

02

Brad Cooney Principal


Educational Aims St Clare’s College is a Catholic school committed to providing a holistic education for young women. It aims to provide a supportive and just environment in which young women can develop spiritually, academically, socially and physically into confident and capable members of the broader community. Upon completion of her studies at St Clare’s College each student should have had the opportunity to: Grow in love and understanding of God, self and neighbour through: →→ participation in the prayer life of the College as well as in formal Religious Education courses →→ learning about and modelling Christ’s teachings →→ developing empathy with the needs and experiences of people within and beyond her own community, especially those who are in need or disadvantaged, through experiential learning and participation in activities with a social justice focus →→ developing an understanding, appreciation of and respect for diverse cultures and traditions, including religious traditions →→ developing a reverence for life, and an understanding and appreciation of our stewardship of the natural physical environment →→ active participation in all areas of learning and seeking to achieve success through personal challenges. Develop her knowledge and skills and acquire an appreciation of learning through: →→ the experience of a rich and varied curriculum →→ gaining sound academic and study skills appropriate to her level of study →→ being in an environment that promotes a positive approach to and love of learning →→ being encouraged to become an independent and self-motivated learner →→ participating actively in the learning process and working collaboratively with others as well as independently →→ experiencing how learning can occur in many different environments and through the use of technologies →→ being given opportunities to develop a range of skills including aesthetic, sporting, creative, emotional, analytical as well as literacy and numeracy skills which form the basis of many other life skills.

→→ developing research and investigative skills →→ using current technologies to advance her learning →→ taking responsibility for her learning and the organisation of her studies →→ utilising fully the human and material resources available to her →→ selecting courses that challenge her appropriately and meet her future needs and current interests. Develop a strong sense of community and personal awareness through: →→ showing respect and courtesy to others and supporting others in times of personal need →→ employing effective interpersonal skills and an understanding, appreciation and tolerance of differences →→ utilising appropriate conflict resolution and stress management skills →→ participating in and being supportive of College and community activities →→ gaining essential knowledge about herself and her environment and the interaction between people and the environment →→ developing an awareness of the importance of an active and healthy lifestyle on her spiritual, emotional and physical development and well-being. Demonstrate taking responsibility for her own actions and decisions through: →→ behaving in a manner that brings credit to herself and the College at all times →→ respecting the property of the College and others in the community →→ avoiding dangerous and unsafe practices →→ showing the ability to solve problems and deal with change effectively →→ understanding her personal potential for contributing to the community →→ being honest and fair in her dealings with others.

Reach intellectual potential through: →→ using her gifts and talents to the best of her ability →→ being able to communicate her ideas both orally and in writing 03


Principles for Learning “Teaching has an extraordinary moral depth and is one of humankind’s most excellent and creative activities, for the teacher does not write on inanimate material but on the very spirit of human beings” The Catholic School on the Threshold of the Third Millennium. #19

St Clare’s College is a Spirited Learning Community which engages Heart Head Hand through: →→ Promoting independence, interdependence, self-motivation and a love of lifelong learning →→ Ensuring that students’ needs, backgrounds, perspectives and interests are reflected in our curriculum →→ Making authentic connections with communities and practice beyond the classroom →→ Challenging and supporting students to develop deep levels of thinking and application →→ Being dynamic and responsive to change →→ Ensuring that assessment practices are an integral part of teaching and learning

04

→→ Creating pioneering learning spaces and opportunities →→ Creating supportive, inclusive and productive learning environments →→ Acknowledging and celebrating the professional richness of our teaching and learning community.

“ ... what a child can do today with assistance, she will be able to do by herself tomorrow.” Lev Vygotsky, Interaction Between Learning and Development


Curriculum at St Clare’s College St Clare’s College prides itself in developing and delivering an excellent curriculum catering for the learning needs of a wide range of students.

Students are encouraged to become active learners and take increased responsibility for their own learning. The formal curriculum delivery is complemented by a diverse range of opportunities, allowing students to experience learning in a variety of settings through excursions, guest speakers, use of ICT, participation in competitions and collaborative research opportunities.

of one semester must be studied from The Arts, for example, Dance, Drama, Music, and Visual Arts and one semester from Technologies, for example, Food Technology, Textile Technology, Design Technology and Information Technology. Other elective subjects include French, Italian, Japanese, History, Geography, Business and Economics, and Civics and Citizenship.

Integral to the College is the importance placed on learning, and a focus on each and every student working to achieve to the very best of their ability.

Year 10

Years 7 and 8 The Foundation Program in Years 7 and 8 provides students with a rich and rewarding curriculum to begin their secondary school journey. Students study the core subjects: Religious Education, English, Mathematics, Science, Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE), Languages, and Physical Education and Health throughout both Years 7 and 8. Complementing these studies all students have the opportunity to experience various elective subjects contained within the Arts (Dance, Drama, Music and Visual Arts) and Technologies (Information Technology, Design Technology, Food Technology, and Textile Technology). Throughout Years 7 to 10 students will investigate Business and Economics, and Civics and Citizenship in Australia. They will have the opportunity to explore the political and legal systems, question what is citizenship, and endeavour to understand aspects of diversity and identity in the 21st century society. At the conclusion of the Foundation Program, students have been exposed to an exciting, enriching and stimulating curriculum providing each student with the opportunity to make considered choices for Year 9.

Year 9 In Years 9 students are able to partake of a curriculum that provides greater development in both core and elective areas of study. Students have the opportunity to broaden their skills and knowledge in each area of study while developing collaborative and critical thinking techniques. Religious Education, English, Mathematics, Science, Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE), and Physical Education and Health form the core subjects that are studied every semester. Year 9 studies bring the excitement and anticipation of electing subjects. Students have the opportunity to select three subjects from the vast array of elective areas. Of these three subjects, a minimum

Delving deeper with their academic studies, students in Year 10 continue with a challenging program consisting of core and elective subjects. The selection of elective studies does not, in Year 10, require students to complete a semester of study from specific areas. At this stage in their academic development students will be able to partake of a wide curriculum to enhance their areas of interests, challenge their abilities and better inform their future choices. Year 10 is a critical academic midpoint to a student’s extraordinary academic experience at St Clare’s College.

Years 11 and 12 In Years 11 and 12 students continue on their academic pathway to optimise their skills for participation in an ever-increasing complex and dynamic world beyond St Clare’s College. All students study Religious Studies and English and many students undertake one of the different courses available in Mathematics. The array of subjects available to students offers diverse learning opportunities in a supportive environment that embraces critical thinking, growth mindset and visible learning principles. The majority of courses throughout the senior years can be studied at a Tertiary (T) or Accredited (A) level with some courses on offer as Vocational (V), which provide students the opportunity to gain nationally recognised qualifications. Throughout these two years, students generally study five courses each semester. The attainment of the Senior Secondary Certificate is a justifiable reward for a commitment to learning and recognises the growth students have experienced during this vital developmental period. The curriculum at St Clare’s College provides students with a dynamic enriching pathway upon which a Catholic holistic education experience can be realised.

05


Specialised Terms

Curriculum

Subject

The curriculum is defined as all the learning experiences planned and organised by St Clare’s College. This may also be thought of as the total learning that students experience at St Clare’s College.

Subject is the word used to describe the traditionally separate areas of learning such as: English, Mathematics, Music, etc.

Faculty Areas Subjects and units may be categorised into broad areas of learning. These are said to have a similarity in terms of skills and concepts. At St Clare’s College, nine faculties are defined: 1) Religious Education 2) English 3) Mathematics 4) Science 5) Studies of Society and the Environment (SOSE) 6) Physical Education and Health 7) Arts and Languages 8) Technologies 9) Inclusive Education

Pre-Requisites A pre-requisite is the satisfactory completion of a unit prior to being permitted to undertake a further related unit.

06

Unit In Years 9 and 10, a Unit is defined as a semester length combination of lessons, assignments and work organised around a particular theme or series of topics with a coherence of purpose.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards Across Foundation to Year 10, achievement standards indicate the quality of learning that students should typically demonstrate by a particular point in their schooling. The sequence of achievement standards in each subject describes progress in the learning areas, demonstrating a broad sequence of expected learning.


Inclusive Education

St Clare’s College caters for special needs students by the provision of a specialist Inclusive Education Faculty. Special Needs students are widely defined at St Clare’s College. They may be gifted and talented students requiring extension work, students who have difficulty with their work, students for whom English is a second language, students who are temporarily in need due to illness or injury, or students with disabilities. Special provision may be made by resourcing such students within their normal classes or by their enrolment in The Wisdom Program, The Seeker Program or small classes created in a core subject. Parents are invited to make an appointment with the Inclusive Education Faculty if they think their daughter would benefit from resource assistance. Inclusive Education at St Clare’s College is based on the following beliefs:

The Wisdom Program (Years 7 to 10) The Wisdom Program is a targeted literacy and numeracy intervention program. It aims to assist students who have difficulty accessing the curriculum to further develop numeracy and literacy skills that will support them with their studies. Students are identified to attend the program through academic testing and data driven evidence. Identified students in Years 7 and 8 engage in the Wisdom Program in place of a specialist language class. For Years 9 and 10 the Wisdom Program is built into the elective structure. Parents and guardians can opt for their daughter not to engage in the program permitting enrolment in a chosen language study and extended involvement in the College elective program.

→→ All students have the right to an education that is designed to develop the whole person →→ All students are unique and should have the opportunity to be educated with their peers irrespective of differing abilities and circumstances →→ All students have the capacity to learn and should be provided with opportunities to develop independence and self-esteem

07


Years 7 and 8 Courses

Core Subjects Religion

English

Mathematics

Science

Lanugages: French, Italian or Japanese

Physical Education and Health

The Arts - Dance

Technologies - Design

SOSE - Geography, Civics and Citizenship

The Arts - Drama

Technologies - Food

SOSE - History, Economics and Business

The Arts - Music

Technologies - Textiles

The Arts - Visual Arts

Technologies - Information

Semester Based Subjects

08


Accelerated Reader Program Effective reading is a national priority as part of the Australian Curriculum and a demonstrated competency in this core skill is essential for all subjects across this entire curriculum.

While many reasons for its priority may be apparent, an ability to read effectively contributes to a number of key education outcomes. First, being able to read effectively promotes a student’s self-esteem—a trait so essential for the education medium. Second, effective reading provides motivation for students to want to increase their reading fluency and, in doing so, enhance their desire to pursue this skill, their comprehension abilities and their vocabulary. Third, reading is essential to engaging the curious mind and creating a ripple effect for other educative pursuits in their thirst for knowledge. Finally, education research demonstrates that students who read regularly each day are far more likely to attract the benefits flowing from that reading and be successful, than students who do not. All students at St Clare’s College from Years 7 – 9, are engaged in the Accelerated Reader (AR) program. This Program works by identifying a students’ Zone of Proximal Development – known as ZPD - which is essentially a selection of books that will not only be matched to their ability, but will also both challenge them and actively develop their vocabulary. Each student will select books that are within this range and, when they have finished that book, will take a short, electronic quiz that assesses their understanding of what they have read. This assessment technique enables us, as teachers, to frame meaningful discussions with all stakeholders about your daughter’s reading capabilities and allows targeted strategies to be developed on a case-by-case basis.

Before commencing the AR program, each student will complete a STAR reading assessment. This assessment is used to determine a student’s reading level through a computer based assessment program that uses computer-adaptive technology. Questions asked as part of this program continually adjust to the student’s responses. If the student’s response is correct, the difficulty level is increased. If the student cannot answer a question, or answers incorrectly, the difficulty level is reduced. The assessment uses multiple-choice questions and takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. Book Level (BL) abilities are reported using the Advantage TASA Open Standard readability formula, which reflects the difficulty of the text. The assessed levels range on a scale from 0.5 to 13.5. Books are chosen based on the ZPD range recommended for each student by the STAR Reading assessment. Every book that has an AR practice quiz is given a points value. AR points are based on the number of words a book uses, which is usually reflected in the length of a book. Students earn a percentage of points according to their achievement on the assessment. An interest level table has been developed (see page 10) as part of the AR program, which determines the appropriateness of a book for particular age groups based on content and themes. These interest levels are recommendations only, and teachers and parents are advised to use their best judgement when guiding the selection of books by students. 09


Interest Level

Age

LY – Lower year

5–8

MY – Middle Years

9 - 13

UY – Upper Years

14+

BL 4.0 IL LY Pts 14.0

Renaissance Home Connect is connecting parents and extending practice. Renaissance Home Connect improves the school-to-home connection by allowing parents and students to log in to a website and view the student’s reading and maths practice and progress towards targets. Access to online results promotes discussion between parents and students, which motivates students and can make reading and maths practice even more effective. In addition, parents can specify up to six email addresses to receive automatic updates on their child’s maths and reading progress.

BL 4.0 IL LY Pts 14.0

The examples contained in this table have a BL of 4.0 since both are deemed to have short sentences and vocabulary that is simple. Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman is intended for older students. The Enormous Crocodile by Roald Dahl for younger students. AR points will be collated as part of the St Clare’s College monitoring protocols. Students in these relevant Year Groups (7 to 9) will undertake their 20 minute reading sessions within school and we encourage students to read regularly at home for a minimum of 20 minutes a day. The students will also undergo further testing throughout the year to provide both the student and their teachers with data that to support their learning. St Clare’s College will inform parents/carers of their daughter(s) progress through a variety of means. This will include reports and access to the Renaissance Place Home Connect website. The Renaissance Learning product information can be located at: www.renlearn.co.uk

What Is Renaissance Home Connect?

10

Renaissance Home Connect gives parents and students a snapshot of the student’s Accelerated Reader progress, including average percentage correct on quizzes, number of points earned and ATOS book level. My Bookshelf Parents and students can see all the books the student has read. Clicking a book shows details about it, such as book level, word count and points. Connecting Parents Through Email After receiving an initial letter with access information, parents click Email Setup and enter their name and email address to receive automatically generated emails about their student’s progress in reading. Emails are sent when the student takes an Accelerated Reader quiz.


Maths Pathway

At St Clare’s College, we believe: Every child can grow in Maths →→ Levels are far less important than growth. We can’t change what your child has or hasn’t learned in the past, but we can make sure they achieve as much growth as possible from this point forward. →→ No matter where a child sits on the learning continuum, every child is capable of making progress and demonstrating success in Maths. Students should learn the right Maths for them →→ Because different students have different learning needs, it doesn’t make sense for them to all learn the same thing at the same time. →→ Learning the right Maths at the right level, at the right time, means your child will experience the most growth possible. →→ Your child will always be learning exactly what they are ready to learn. Students should have ownership over their learning →→ Students should understand what they are doing well and what they need to improve by developing a deep understanding of the Maths they learn. →→ Students should be developing the skills to be effective independent learners.

→→ Every student should receive regular feedback from their teacher about their learning. All students have a right to experience success in Maths →→ Success is not defined by a level or a grade. →→ Success in Maths means: »»

Continual improvement

»»

Aiming for and achieving personal bests

»»

Challenging yourself

»»

Using mistakes as learning opportunities

The Maths Pathway program diagnoses student position in the Mathematics curriculum journey and then opens up a range of mathematics topics tailored to individual student level of learning. Students access the Mathematics curriculum at the right level for them, enabling them to participate in topics which sequential learning has previously made difficult for them. The role of the teacher in this process is to guide completion of Mathematics modules, facilitate small group mini lessons, lead whole class rich learning tasks (based on scaffolded Australian Curriculum grade level skills) and work with your daughter to set and assess regular learning goals. The program involves fortnightly formative assessment, in the form of written and online quizzes. This relieves the pressure of ‘high-stakes

11


assessment’ and gives students regular feedback on their learning. The focus of the fortnightly quizzes is primarily Growth, but accuracy and effort is also measured. Students are expected to complete six modules per fortnight to receive 100% effort. Mastery of topics requires 100% accuracy. Mastery of three modules per fortnight will equate to 100% Growth for that learning cycle, which means that the student is on track to complete one year’s learning in 12 months. What we have found is that most students are regularly achieving more than 100% Growth, willingly engaging in more work than is required and mastering more than is minimally expected.

The Student Interface Timeline of Activities:

Introduction to each module:

To engage fully in this program, it is essential that students have a fully charged and operational device every lesson, which can maintain charge throughout the school day. It is also preferable if students have access to at least two browsers. Maths Pathway, like many programs, does not function optimally on Internet Explorer.

Maths Pathway Classrooms Teachers spend less time lecturing

Module Selection:

→→ Instead of lecturing to the whole class at one time, your daughter’s teacher will deliver lessons to smaller groups of students, giving them more focused attention and time to ask questions. →→ Your daughter will meet one-on-one with their teacher every fortnight to get feedback on their progress and set goals for their learning.

Instructional videos linked to each module:

→→ Teachers have more information about exactly what your daughter needs to learn, which enables them to provide exactly the right guidance when needed. Students develop a Growth Mindset →→ Because teachers focus on individual growth rather than comparing your daughter to their peers, every student can feel successful in the learning they are undertaking. →→ Students are encouraged to work to their full potential and will never be ‘held back’, or feel that the topic moves ahead before they are ready.

Students will be required to bring the following equipment to each class: →→ Fully charged device

Maths is related to the real world

→→ Headphones

→→ Teachers are focused on developing student value of the Maths they learn and by enabling them to see how it links to the world around them. Every student will complete learning tasks that explore how mathematical concepts are applied in the real world.

→→ A4 grid exercise book

Students are encouraged to think →→ Students have some choice over what they learn, which helps them to build independence. →→ At times they will be encouraged to discover multiple solutions to the same question or explore different ways of finding the same solution. 12

Essential Equipment

→→ Red and blue/black pens →→ Pencil, eraser and sharpener →→ Ruler →→ Protractor →→ Calculator Although your daughter will access their individual learning activities via their device, the work they do will still be written in an exercise book. Technology is used mainly to organise and differentiate the work that students receive. It does not mean that your daughter is being taught by a computer program – in fact, the


teacher will actually be able to spend more time seeing to the individual needs of all students in the class.

Parent Portal Parents will be able to see their daughter’s recent learning and their curriculum grid through the Parent Portal.

The ‘Curriculum Grid’ gives an overview of the whole junior maths curriculum. It is a display of where your daughter is up to in her learning journey, in terms of previous, current and future learning.

Access to the Parent Portal is through your daughter’s login. Login information for parents will be distributed in class, when the Parent Portal has been activated.

Supporting Maths learning at home Support a growth mindset

When parents first login, they are asked to fill in the Parent / Carer details, so that they may receive notifications when their daughter gets test results.

→→ Avoid using language that implies that it’s possible to be inherently ‘good’ or ‘bad’ at Maths, whether talking about your daughter, yourself or anyone else. →→ Praise your daughter’s effort, not just her results. →→ Remind your daughter of areas other than Maths (sport, learning an instrument etc) where continual effort has resulted in improvement and success. Remind your daughter that mistakes are good →→ Help children to see mistakes as an opportunity to learn and grow.

Parents also have access to their daughter’s growth, effort and accuracy results; recent learning and the curriculum grid.

→→ Remind your daughter that many things in life that are worth achieving will not be achieved on the first try. →→ Talk to your daughter about the importance of resilience not just in Maths, but in life. Discuss your child’s learning with them regularly →→ Log in to the Parent Portal to track your daughter’s learning.

‘Recent Learning’ gives an overview of all the modules your daughter has attempted. It also indicates the completion date, strand, substrand, level and whether or not it has been mastered. This is the most comprehensive indicator that your daughter is filling in the gaps in previous maths understanding.

→→ After a test, talk to your daughter about their learning – What do they feel they did well this time? What will they need to focus on for next time? What study skills have they been working on? →→ Focus on your daughter’s growth above all else. →→ If you are concerned at any point about your daughter’s learning, contact their Maths teacher to discuss. If you would like to access more information on the program, Maths Pathway has a very informative parent’s page, which can be found at: https://help.mathspathway.com/hc/en-us/ categories/202589688-I-m-a-parent

13


Growth Mindset Information from the Brainology Parents Guide

Brainology Curriculum Overview The goal of the Brainology curriculum is to help children develop a growth mindset. Children with a growth mindset think of their intelligence as something that they can develop through learning and study rather than as something fixed. Cultivating a growth mindset can help increase a child’s sense of self-efficacy and motivation to learn. We help children develop a growth mindset by teaching them how the brain functions, learns and remembers, and how it changes physically when we exercise it through study and learning. In addition, we provide a practical set of skills for tackling academic challenges by showing them how to apply this knowledge to their school work. Brainology is designed as a challenge-based, interactive multimedia instructional program. In an introduction plus for ~30 minute units, children follow animated teenage characters Chris and Dahlia as they tackle various problems in their most difficult subjects. They visit the lab of eccentric brain scientist Dr. Cerebrus and learn about the basic structure and function of the brain: how thinking occurs, how learning and memory work, how to develop and change the brain, and how to improve these ideas through interactive activities and exercises. Throughout the program they reflect on their challenges and their learning through an E-Journal. The goal is for them to understand that they have great, untapped potential and that the development of their mental ability is largely within 14

their own control, and to provide them with study habits and skills that will help them take action.

Research Background Overview During adolescence, students are at risk for underachievement, particularly in the areas of mathematics and sciences. Over the past two decades, the main goal of two of the Brainology co-founders, Carol S. Dweck, PH.D., and Lisa Sorich Blackwell, PH.D., has been to research what helps students achieve highly, and to apply the lessons learned to improving their motivation and achievement.

Achievement and Motivation In Drs. Dweck and Blackwell’s research, we have found that the beliefs and attitudes held by students when they begin junior high school have a strong influence on their achievement in mathematics over these critical years. In particular, the research found that students who believed that their intelligence was something that they could develop and increase - what we term a growth mindset - also held many other positive attitudes. First, believing that their ability could be increased, they valued learning as a goal, even when it involved hard work or initial errors. They also believed in the efficacy of effort - that is, they viewed effort in a positive way and felt that they have the ability, through their own efforts, to learn and master new material up to standard. When they had difficulty in a subject, they made more


constructive, mastery-orientated explanations rather than just saying, “I’m not smart enough,” or “I just can’t do math,” they explained their difficulty as due to lack of effort or inadequate strategy. Then they responded with more positive, effort-based strategies to work harder and spend more time on the subject instead of giving up. Even more striking, students with a growth mindset had an upward trajectory in mathematics grades over seventh and eighth grade, while those who viewed their intelligence as a fixed quality did not/ This was true even through students had equal levels of prior achievement: students who believed that their intelligence was malleable did better than did equally able students who viewed their intelligence as an unchangeable, fixed quality. This was true for students at all levels of ability (see Figure 1 below). Our research, as well as that of others, has shown that students who hold a growth mindset use more sophisticated strategies in their coursework. For example, they use more complex cognitive and meta-cognitive strategies- those that involve active and deeper-level processing of material, and self monitoring of the learning process.

Research on Learning and the Brain In the same period of time, research has shown that the brain is in fact much more malleable than previously thought. It was once believed that teh brain did not grown new cells, and that there were severe limitations on the malleability, or neuropsychiatric of the brain after childhood. But in the past few decades, research has shown that learning causes substantial changes in the brains of both animals and human beings throughout life.

Learning goals

Thinking occurs in the brain through the chemical communication of nerve cells connected in a complex network. With learning, the cells of the brain develop new connections between them, and existing connections become stronger. Studies in neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and brain imaging have shown that when people practice and learn new skills, the areas of the brain responsible for those skills actually become larger and denser with neural tissue, and that new areas of the brain become active when performing related tasks. Furthermore, it has been found that the brain continues to grown new nerve cells, or neurons, daily, and that this process speeds up when a lot of active learning is occurring, Thus, the brain has the capacity to develop throughout life. However, this development depends on the stimulation of challenge and learning. This fact makes it all the more critical that students be given challenging material and motivated to apply effort and take an active role in learning.

Intervening Approach: Teaching a Growth Mindset Would it be possible to improve students’ motivation and achievement by teaching them a growth mindset? In a pilot study, we did just that by teaching middle school students about what has been learned about the flexibility of the brain to develop and grow new networks with challenge and learning. We then examined changes in their motivation and mathematics achievement over the year of the intervention, comparing them with a similar group of students in the same school who did not receive this intervention.

Positive effort-based strategies

Increasing Math scores across junior high school

Growth Mindset

Belief in efficacy of effort

Mastery orientated effort-based explanation

Figure 1 How beliefs and goals promote higher mathematics achievement as shown in prior research.

15


Pilot Study Results Gains in motivation: We asked teachers to assess changes in their students’ classroom motivation over the period of the intervention. Note that in the pilot study we taught the growth mindset intervention to students outside of their class periods, and teachers did not participate in the intervention. Thus, teachers were unfamiliar with the content of the intervention, and they did not know which of their student had received instruction in the malleable brain. Yet teachers cited significantly more of the students who had received the growth mindset training as showing positive change in their effort and interest in (see figure 2). Following are some comments from teachers about these students: “M. was performing far below grade level. During the past few weeks, she had voluntarily asked for extra help from me during her lunch period in order to improve her test-taking performance. Her grades drastically improved from failing to an 84 on the most-recent exam.” “Lately I have noticed that students have a greater appreciation for improvement in academic performance. R. was performing below standards, but now he has learned to appreciate the improvement from his grades of 52, 46, and 49 to his grades of 67 and 71. He valued his growth in learning Mathematics.” “Your workshop has already had an effect. L., who never puts in any extra effort and often doesn’t turn in homework on time, actually stayed up late working for hours to finish an assignment early so I could

review it and give him a chance to revise it. He earned a B+ on the assignment (he had been getting C’s and lower.” “Several students have voluntarily participated in peer tutoring sessions during their lunch periods or after school. These students were passing when they requested the extra help and motivated by the prospect of sheer improvement.” Gains in Math Achievement: The mathematics grades of all students in the study had been declining prior to the intervention. However, after the intervention, the grades of those students who learned about the growth mindset (experimental group) took an upward turn, while those of their fellow students who did not receive this curriculum continued to decline (see Figure 3 on the following page).

References Blackwell, L., Trzesniewski, K., & Dweck, C. (2007). Implicity Theories of Intelligence Predict Achievement Across an Adolescent Transition: A Longitudinal Study and an Intervention. Child Development, Vol. 78, No. 1, pp. 246-263. Dweck, C. (2006). Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. Random House: New York

Acknowledgements The quoted research was funded by grants from the William T. Grant Foundation and the Spencer Foundation.

Figure 2 Teacher-rated change in students’ classroom motivation (effort, interest in learning) following intervention. (Note: Experimental group was taught lesson on malleable intelligence.)

16


Figure 3 Math grade curves over period of intervention (T1 = spring 6th, T2 = fall 7th, T3 = spring 7th)

Guiding Your Child to the Growth Mindset

The Danger of Praise

It is important that the adults around the child are well versed on and embrace the growth mindset. They need to be able to guide their children in their everyday life, and model the behaviour that the growth mindset advocates.

No parent thinks “I wonder what I can do today to undermine my children, subvert their effort, turn them off learning, and limit their achievement.” Of course not! They think “I would do anything, and give anything, to make my children successful.” Yet many of the things they do boomerang. Their helpful judgements, their lessons, their motivating techniques often send the wrong message. In fact, every word and action sends a message. It tells children - or students or athletes - how to think about themselves. It can be fixed mindset message that says: “You have permanent traits and I’m judging them.” Or it can be a growth mindset message that says: “You are developing person and I am interested in your development.”

Of particular relevance to parents is the topic of praise, which we briefly discuss below. If you would like a more in-depth discussion of this and other growth mindset topics, we highly recommend our co-founder Carol Dweck’s book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. Additional resources are listed at the end of this section.

The Mindsets Dr. Carol Dweck’s research shows that a person’s mindset profoundly affects the way this person leads his or her life. It determines behaviour, which has significant consequences. →→ Fixed mindset: The belief that one or more of your basic qualities are set in stone. This mindset creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over by undertaking efforts with low risk and high probability of success. Students with a fixed mindset will frequently lose interest in a subject when it becomes difficult. →→ Growth Mindset: The belief that your basic qualities can be cultivated through your own effort and that we don’t know the upper bounds of what anyone can accomplish with years of passion, toil and training.

Messages About Success Listen for the message in the following examples: →→ “You learned that so quickly! You’re so smart!” →→ “Look at that drawing. Martha, is he the next Picasso or what?” →→ “You’re so brilliant, you got an A without even studying!” If you’re like most parents, you hear these as supportive, esteem-boosting messages. But listen more closely. See if you can hear other messages, the ones that children hear: →→ “If I don’t learn something quickly, I’m not smart.” →→ “I shouldn’t try drawing anything hard or they’ll see I’m no Picasso.” →→ “I’d better quit studying or they won’t think I’m brilliant.”

17


Messages About Failure

Healthy Praise

Nine-year-old Elizabeth was on her way to her first gymnastics meet. Lanky, flexible, and energetic, she was just right for gymnastics, and she loved it. Of course, she was a little nervous about competing, but she was good at gymnastics and felt confident of doing well. She had even thought about the perfect place in her room to hang the ribbon she would win.

After seven experiments with hundreds of children, we have clear findings that praising children’s intelligence lessons their motivation and harms their performance. Instead of praising the talent and intelligence, focus on your child’s effort and behaviour. For example: rather than saying, “You are very smart for getting an A in math”, you can say “You must have tried very hard to get an A in math.” This puts the praise on the effort and the behaviour rather than on the outcome, the A in math. Upon failure, you could say “I know how you feel. It’s disappointing to have your hopes up and to perform your best but not make the squad, but it happens to everybody and we must take it as a learning experience. If this is something that you really want, then it’s something you’ll really have to work for, as with everything else in life. We can try different approaches and learn from them to find the way to success.” This approach allows you to console and empathize with your child. It also gives your child the opportunity to grow from her failure and teaches her that through hard work and effort she can undertake lifelong learning and self-improvement.

In the first event, the floor exercise, Elizabeth went first. Although she did a nice job, the scoring changed after the first few girls and she lost. Elizabeth also did well in the other events, but not well enough to win. By the end of the evening, she had received no ribbons and was devastated. What would you do if you were Elizabeth’s parents? 1) Tell Elizabeth you thought she was the best. 2) Tell her she was robbed of a ribbon that was rightfully hers. 3) Reassure her that gymnastics is not that important. 4) Tell her she has the ability and will surely win next time. 5) Tell her she didn’t deserve to win.

Additional Resources

There is a strong message in our society about how to boost children’s self-esteem, and a main part of that message is: protect them from failure! While this may help with the immediate problem of a child’s disappointment, it can be harmful in the long run. Why? Let’s look at the five possible reactions from a mindset point of view and listen to the messages:

→→ Dr. Carol Dweck’s book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, which includes a chapter on Parents, Teachers and Coaches. The book’s website is: http://www.mindsetonline.com/

→→ The first (you thought she was the best) is basically insincere. She was not the best - you know it, and she does too. This offers her no recipe for how to recover or how to improve. →→ The second (she was robbed) places the blame on others, when in fact the problem was mostly with her performance, not the judges. Do you want her to grow up blaming others for her deficiencies? →→ The third (reassure her that gymnastics doesn’t really matter) teachers her to devalue something if she doesn’t do well in it right away. Is this really the message you want to send? →→ The fourth (she has the ability) maybe the most dangerous message of all. Does ability automatically take you where you want to go? If Elizabeth didn’t win this meet, why should she win the next one? →→ The last option (tell her she didn’t deserve to win) seems hard hearted under the circumstances. And of course you wouldn’t say it quite that way. But that’s pretty much what her growth-minded father told her.

18

For additional resources on these topics you many want to read:

→→ A summary of the research that led to Brainology: https://www.mindsetworks.com/ websitemedia/info/brainology_intro_pres.pdf →→ How Not to Talk to Your Kids: The inverse power of praise, New York Magazine cover article, Feb 17 2007: http://nymag.com/news/ features/27840/ →→ The secret to Raising Smart Kids, Scientific American, Dec. 2007: http://www.sciam.com/ article.cfm?id=the-secret-to-raising-smart-kids


PAT Testing Skills PAT Reading Comprehension: Retrieving directly stated information Retrieving directly stated information requires students to locate and understand one or more discrete pieces of explicitly stated information in the text. The focus is on finding and recognising the meaning of a piece of information rather than on understanding how this information might fit into the larger meaning of the text. The extent to which students understand the meaning of a piece of information is usually assessed by their capacity to put this information into their own words or recognise a reworded version of the information. The skills students use in retrieving directly stated information underpin the skills of interpreting explicit information and interpreting implied information, as students have to first locate the relevant information in order to interpret it and they need to find the relevant clues or evidence on which to base their inference. Comprehension: Interpreting explicit information Interpreting explicit information requires students to locate and interpret explicitly stated information. Students may need to interpret the meaning of a phrase, summarise information or make links or connections between pieces of information. Interpreting explicit information tends to focus on the meaning of the whole text, paragraph or section of the text and the way ideas are connected and related as distinct from retrieving directly stated information, which focuses on the location and understanding of discrete pieces of information. Comprehension: Interpreting implied information Interpreting implied information requires students to recognise an idea that is suggested or implied by the text but is not explicitly stated. Students often need to combine information from scattered clues to infer the meaning. The focus is on understanding what the clues or evidence in the text implies. Generalisations about all or part of the text and ideas that underpin the text, but are not explicitly stated, are also classified as interpreting implied information. For example, the main idea of a text may not be explicit in a heading or in the opening sentences, so students may need to gather clues and hints to work this out. Generalising about the key attributes of a character across an extended piece of text and making judgments to differentiate details from key qualities, when these are not explicitly identified, also requires students to make inferences based on evidence in the text. The skills students use when retrieving directly stated information are also required for interpreting

implied information, as students have to locate the relevant clues before they can interpret them. Students may also have to interpret explicit information as part of the evidence that supports an inference. Comprehension: Reflecting on the text Reflecting on the form or content of the text requires students to bring some external knowledge to the text. Reflecting on the form of the text is about the technical features of the text. It is concerned with structure and linguistic features, including stylistic devices and print conventions. Students need prior knowledge in order to name them. They also need to know what the relevant criteria might be if they are required to evaluate them. Reflecting on the content of the text is about the meaning of the text. Students may be required to evaluate the quality of an argument or its bias, the coherence of a plot, the plausibility of a character’s actions or anything else concerned with reflecting on the meaning of the text. Students need to know the relevant criteria or appropriate personal values to use in evaluating the content of the text. Reflecting questions in PAT The reflecting questions in PAT Reading Comprehension are mainly about reflecting on the form. Reflecting on the content is usually about students’ personal evaluations of the text or opinions about the efficacy of the writer’s craft where students provide evidence from the text to support their evaluations of a text. It is not possible to assess reasons for personal evaluations of a text in the multiple-choice format of PAT Reading Comprehension. Students are asked to make and justify evaluations of texts in these teaching and learning activities because this is an important component of reflecting on texts.

Decoding and concepts of print Reading comprehension and decoding Reading comprehension is the competency that is required to extract meaning from visually presented material, most commonly text. Proficiency in reading comprehension, therefore, involves both understanding language (comprehension) and understanding the symbolic representation of language as written text (decoding). The three early reading skills of phonological awareness, phonics and fluency are considered together as decoding. Simple concepts of print have also been included in this scale. The way decoding skills develop, and the time it takes to master decoding, vary greatly among languages. Emerging decoding skills support reading simple texts. It is not possible to begin reading texts

19


independently with understanding until decoding has been mastered to the point of automaticity and fluency, but decoding with automaticity and fluency does not, in itself, ensure understanding. Decoding skills

Number and Algebra: Money and financial mathematics

The decoding strand describes the abilities that enable readers of English to initially distinguish and manipulate sounds in words, to link letters and groups of letters to sounds, and eventually to read text fluently with appropriate speed, pauses, volume and pronunciation. Decoding also involves the awareness of concepts of print; that is, the knowledge and understanding of how texts work, what to read, in what order and in what direction, and knowledge of very basic elements of punctuation.

Money and financial mathematics is a sub-strand of Number and Algebra in PAT Maths. It refers to students’ proficiency with handling Australian currency (mainly coins, but also some notes). It also refers to students’ familiarity and proficiency with financial transactions relevant to everyday life. At the lower bands, this is mainly within the context of making purchases and the calculation of change. At the higher bands, contexts extend to profit and loss, percentage discounts, and saving and borrowing, including ideas of simple and compound interest.

Decontextualised contexts and the early years

A student within a given achievement band is typically able to handle skills at and below that band.

When it comes to responding to questions about a text, familiarity and context make an enormous difference for students in the early years of school. It is likely that a student would find it more challenging to respond to a question in an online multiple-choice format than they would to generate a response to their classmate or teacher. For that reason, some of the skill illustrations linked to the PAT Early Years Reading test questions may appear in a higher PAT band than they would if the question were delivered in a more familiar context. If students are successful in demonstrating a skill in the highly decontextualised format of an online assessment, they are likely to have a good grasp of that skill.

PAT Maths Number and Algebra: Whole number operations Whole number operations is a sub-strand of Number and Algebra in PAT Maths. It refers to the four basic arithmetic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. These are the fundamental operations that form the basis of much of the mathematics that people are called to do in their everyday life. Students need to be able to recognise situations in which these operations are relevant and work with these operations flexibly and efficiently. A student within a given achievement band is typically able to handle skills at and below that band. Number and Algebra: Fractions and decimals Fractions and decimals is a sub-strand of Number and Algebra in PAT Maths. This content area involves working with quantities expressed as fractions, decimals or percentages and the relationships between these. At the higher bands, although not directly related to the title ‘fractions and decimals’, this set of support materials has also been expanded to include ratios and proportional reasoning, index notation and surds.

20

A student within a given achievement band is typically able to handle skills at and below that band.

Number and Algebra: Patterns and algebra Patterns and algebra is a sub-strand of Number and Algebra in PAT Maths. At the lower bands, it involves simple ideas of count and order such as one-toone correspondence, counting and skip counting; using simple ordinal language and finding missing numbers in simple number sequences and number sentences. As students progress up the scale, they extend visual and numerical sequences to find future terms; describe rules for given sequences; use pronumerals in place of unknown values or variables; work with linear and simple quadratic expressions; solve linear equations; expand and factorise linear and simple quadratic expressions; and describe relationships using words, symbols, table and graphs. A student within a given achievement band is typically able to handle skills at and below that band. Measurement and Geometry: Measurement Measurement is one of the two sub-strands of the Measurement and Geometry strand within PAT Maths. Measurement involves the concepts of length, area, volume, capacity, mass, time and temperature. Important skills in measurement include the ability to use clocks, timetables and calendars to solve problems, the ability to read and interpret a variety of different types of measurement scales, the ability to convert between metric units, and the exploration of relationships between length, area and volume for a variety of shapes and objects, including the application of these relationships to solve problems in context. At the upper bands of achievement, proportional reasoning is an essential cognitive skill in order to effectively solve problems involving circle properties and trigonometric ratios.


A student within a given achievement band is typically able to handle skills at and below that band. Measurement and Geometry: Geometry Geometry is one of the two substrands of the Measurement and Geometry strand within PAT Maths. Geometry comprises several key ideas and these include, the concept of shape, referring to the recognition, visualisation and description of key features of common two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects. Navigation through a space, including the ability to use language to describe direction and position; and the ability to read, interpret and construct maps at varying levels of complexity and detail. Symmetry, including an understanding of the main symmetrical relationships (reflection, rotation, translation) in a variety of contexts. In the middle and upper achievement bands, the idea of similarity and the enlargement transformation are also introduced. The relationship between line and angle, in particular, the angle relationships associated with triangles, quadrilaterals, parallel lines and transversals are explored.

decimals and percentages, are also recognised and the complexity of events and experiment explored is gradually increased from simple to compound events or one-step to multi-step processes. At the upper bands of achievement, students also use a wider variety of structured diagrams and tables such as Venn diagrams, two-way tables and tree diagrams to list the sample space of a given experiment and explore and analyse the outcomes of probability experiments. A student within a given achievement band is typically able to handle skills at and below that band.

Statistics and Probability: Statistics Statistics is one of the two sub-strands of the Probability and Statistics strand within PAT Maths. At the lower bands of achievement, students’ experience with statistics is limited to very simple interpretations of everyday, familiar data using simple tables, tally charts, picture graphs, column graphs and simple pie graphs. As students progress in their understanding, they begin to work with more complex data (both categorical and numerical) and can use a wider range of means to display this data including line graphs, scatter plots, dot plots, twoway tables, Venn diagrams, stem-and-leaf plots and box plots. At the upper bands of achievement, students can accurately identify and describe general trends in a data set and can calculate the mean, median and mode of grouped data. A student within a given achievement band is typically able to handle skills at and below that band. Statistics and Probability: Probability Probability is one of the two sub-strands of the Statistics and Probability strand within PAT Maths. At the lower bands of achievement, students’ understanding of chance is limited to very simple descriptions of everyday, familiar chance events using informal terms such as ‘even chance’, ‘good chance’ and words such as ‘impossible’, ‘unlikely’, ‘likely’ and ‘certain’. As students progress in their understanding, they begin to assign numerical values (fractions) to describe chance for simple experiments such as tossing a coin, picking an object from a bag or rolling a dice. With further progress, equivalent forms for assigning probabilities, such as

21


Years 9 and 10 Courses

Core Subjects Religion

English

Mathematics

Physical Education and Health

Science

SOSE - History

Italian

Japanese

Year Long Electives French

Year Long or Semester Based Electives SOSE – Civics and Citizenship

SOSE – Economics and Business

SOSE – Geography

The Arts - Dance

The Arts - Drama

The Arts - Media

The Arts - Music

The Arts - Photography

The Arts - Visual Arts

Technologies - Design Technology

Technologies - Fashion and Textile

Technologies - Food

Technologies - Graphic Design

Technologies - Hospitality (Year 10)

Technologies - Digital

Inclusive Education - The Wisdom Program

Inclusive Education - The Seeker Program

For students wishing to participate in the Inclusive Education electives: The Wisdom Program or The Seeker Program, specific requirements will need to be met before a student can be placed in these classes.

22


Choosing a Pattern of Study Selecting Subjects

Minimum Requirements

Enrolment in Years 9 and 10 involves choosing a package of semester and year length subjects over two years of study. This two-year package is planned for nearing the conclusion of Term 2 of Year 8.

→→ All students will study Religious Studies, English, Mathematics, Science, History and Physical Education and Health in Year 9 and in Year 10. These are referred to as Core Subjects.

It is important to have a pathway in mind over the two years when making subject choices and the overall balance of the package should be considered.

→→ Students must study:

In reading this information, it is hoped that students will be able to select subjects that suit their needs, challenge them academically, expand their interests and lay a strong foundation upon which to build a sound program of study in Years 11 and 12.

→→ Students wishing to study a language are required to elect their chosen language for the entire year. Semester length study of language is not possible.

Selection Rules General Students are enrolled in nine subjects each semester – six core and three elective subjects. This pattern of study is shown in the table below.

»»

One Technologies subject in Year 9

»»

One Arts subject in Year 9

→→ Students may choose to study a subject for more than one semester, that is, for the entire year or over both years of study in Years 9 and 10. Year long study is the preferred option at St Clare’s College as this will provide students with deeper learning and skills building opportunities.

Year 9 and 10 Pattern of Study 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Year 9 Semester One

English

Maths

Science

Religion

History

PE & Health

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

Year 9 Semester Two

English

Maths

Science

Religion

History

PE & Health

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Year 10 Semester One

English

Maths

Science

Religion

History

PE & Health

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

Year 10 Semester Two

English

Maths

Science

Religion

History

PE & Health

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

Elective Choice

Students will elect three (3) Reserve options for each semester in Year 9 and Year 10. It is essential that the Reserves for each Elective be placed in order of preference. Each Faculty has identified the units of study that will be available throughout 2020 and 2021. A brief description has been provided to assist in student understanding of each unit. It is essential that students take note of units of study that may require prerequisites. For example, Hospitality, is only available for study in Year 10 and is a year long study. Please make sure you and your daughter read the information outlining each unit of study. Careful consideration must be made to select subjects of student interest, which will provide development of knowledge and skills, depth of study and enable students to grow and be challenged in an enriching environment. Provision for changing of electives will be limited if at all possible.

23


Arts and Languages

The Arts The Performing Arts electives for Years 9 and 10 at St Clare’s College are designed to be flexible and cater to a diverse range of student needs and interests. To this end, all courses within the Performing Arts may be offered at a foundation, continuing or extension level. The manner in which these levels are catered for and delivered within Dance, Drama, Music and Media varies slightly depending on the individual structure and needs of each subject area. Specific pathways have been listed for each Arts subject.

Subject Dance

Drama

Media

Music

Photography

Visual Arts

24

Units Covered Jazz Dance

Musical Madness

Contemporary Dance

It’s Showtime

Foundations in Drama

From Page to Page

Scripted Drama

Play Building and Performance

Photo Journalism

Film

Advertising

Digital Media Radio

Singers and Songwriters

Eclectic Australia

Musical Theatre

Film Music

Introduction to Photography

Self and Identity/ The Power of images

Identity and Portraiture/ Light & Shadow

The Story of Photography/Themed Portfolio

Visual Arts 1

Visual Arts 3

Visual Arts 2

Visual Arts 4


Dance Dance units are aligned to the ACARA achievement standards. By the end of Year 10, students analyse the choreographer’s use of the elements of dance, choreographic devices, form and production elements to communicate choreographic intent in dances they make, perform and view. They evaluate the impact of dance from different cultures, places and times on Australian dance. Students choreograph dances by manipulating and combining the elements of dance, choreographic devices, form and production elements to communicate their choreographic intent. They choreograph, rehearse and perform dances, demonstrating technical and expressive skills appropriate to the genre and style. Unit: Jazz Dance Key Learning Outcomes

→→ Uses technology to reflect historical and cultural perspectives of Contemporary Australian dance →→ Apply modern dance technique and performance skills Content ‘Contemporary Dance’ is a dance unit designed to give students a strong foundation in the skills and techniques of contemporary dance. This is complemented with group working activities that focus on compositional elements while devising their own works. The content summary is as follows: →→ Technique: Modern Dance →→ Composition: Elements of Dance (body awareness and relationships) →→ Theory: Application of music editing programs to accompany composition work. Assessment

This unit will enable students to:

Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks:

→→ Apply style-specific dance techniques and performance skills in jazz dance

→→ Contemporary dance technique

→→ Explore and develop choreographic elements to communicate intent using the jazz style

→→ Journal

→→ ICT assignment

→→ Analyse, reflect and evaluate choreography and the cultural impact of jazz.

→→ Composition tasks.

Content

Key Learning Outcomes

‘Jazz Dance’ is a dance unit designed to give students a strong foundation in the skills of jazz and basic hip-hop dance. Students will learn about the development of dance from the 1800’s to today whilst experiencing the technique in practical classes. This is complemented with group working activities that focus on compositional elements while devising their own works. The content summary is as follows:

This unit will enable students to:

→→ Technique: Introductory Jazz Dance →→ Composition: Body action, dynamics and space

Unit: Musical Madness

→→ Apply style-specific dance techniques and performance skills in Musical Theatre. →→ Manipulate and combine the elements of dance, choreographic devices, to communicate their choreographic intent using the Musical style. →→ Analyse, reflect and evaluate choreography and the impact of Musical Theatre on Australian Dance. Content

→→ Journal

‘Musical Madness’ is an elementary dance unit designed to give students exposure to the skills and techniques of Theatrical Jazz dance and appropriate performance opportunities. Students will learn about the development of the musical genre whilst experiencing practical classes and repertoire of musicals. This is complemented with group working activities that focus on compositional elements while devising their own works. The content summary is as follows:

→→ Composition tasks

→→ Technique: Musical Theatre

→→ Research brochure.

→→ Composition: Elements of Dance (Time and Rhythm)

→→ Theory: The history of Jazz from African Slavery to current video. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Jazz technique

Unit: Contemporary Dance Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to:

→→ Theory: History of specific musicals on stage and screen.

→→ Use the elements of dance to communicate choreographic intent 25


Assessment

Drama

Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks:

Drama units are aligned to the ACARA achievement standards.

→→ Musical Theatre dance technique

By the end of Year 10, students analyse the elements of drama, forms and performance styles and evaluate meaning and aesthetic effect in drama they devise, interpret, perform and view. They use their experiences of drama practices from different cultures, places and times to evaluate drama from different viewpoints. Students develop and sustain different roles and characters for given circumstances and intentions.

→→ Research assignment →→ Journal →→ Composition task. Unit: It’s Showtime Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Demonstrate the technical and expressive skills appropriate to the genre and style →→ Use and analyse the elements of dance, choreographic devices, form and production elements to communicate choreographic intent →→ Evaluate the impact of dance from different cultures, places and times on Australian dance.

Unit: Foundation Drama

Content

Key Learning Outcomes

In this unit students will be involved in a choreographic project for the Youth Dance Festival. The class will compose a five-minute dance piece relating to a given theme. Students will also be involved in choosing costumes, make-up, lighting and music for the dance. Students will be performing at the Canberra Theatre with many students from other schools. It is a great opportunity to be involved in a high quality production in a professional theatre. There may be further performing opportunities during the unit but this major project is complemented with practical classes focusing on contemporary and jazz techniques, compositional work and the study of basic notation – the art of documenting movement. A Summary of the content is as follows:

This unit will enable students to:

→→ Technique: Jazz and Contemporary Dance →→ Composition: Dance Festival focus; smaller project exploring dance actions and style →→ Theory: Application of specific theatre production aspects, such as costuming, makeup, programming and reading and writing of basic dance notation. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks:

26

They perform devised and scripted drama in different forms, styles and performance spaces. They collaborate with others to plan, direct, produce, rehearse and refine performances. They select and use the elements of drama, narrative and structure in directing and acting in order to engage audiences. They refine performance and expressive skills in voice and movement to convey dramatic action.

→→ Develop and sustain characters and uses performances skills in a range of theatrical forms →→ Collaborate with others to select and use the elements of drama, narrative and structure in the creation of performances →→ Analyse and evaluate the way in which the dramatic elements are manipulated to create meaning and effect. Content Foundation Drama is an introductory drama unit exploring the dramatic elements through mime, characterisation, improvisation and play building activities. You will draw on research and your own experiences to create characters and develop scenarios in a range of theatrical styles with the opportunity to create a dramatization for a specific target audience. You will also learn to use the actor’s tools of voice, movement and imagination. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Individual performance skills task

→→ Jazz and/or contemporary technique

→→ Devised scenarios and improvisations

→→ Written portfolio including analytical, reflective and research tasks

→→ Research and reflective writing tasks.

→→ Composition task

Key Learning Outcomes

→→ Notation exam

This unit will enable students to:

→→ Public performance that explores theme and group collaboration.

→→ Collaborates with others to select and use the elements of drama in a range of theatrical styles

Unit: Scripted Drama


→→ Develops and sustains characters and uses performances skills appropriate to specific styles →→ Analyse and evaluate the way specific theatrical styles are manipulated to create meaning. Content This unit will take your acting skills to new depths. You will learn how to transform into character through an understanding of subtext and motivation and its relationship to action on stage. You will learn about character analysis and basic directing skills and apply these to the creation and presentation of scripted theatre in a range of theatrical styles. You may also be introduced to the forms and conventions of classic and modern tragedy. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Group or individual activities exploring the rehearsal process and script interpretation →→ Group performance drawing on unit skills and concepts →→ Individual performance drawing on unit skills and concepts →→ Reflective, analytical and research based written tasks. Unit: Play Building and Performance Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Collaborate with others to manipulate play building conventions and dramatic elements in the development of devised works →→ Sustain performance skills within particular theatrical styles in the presentation of devised work for a target audience →→ Analyse and interpret dramatic structures within artistic work/s to inform their own theatre making process Content This unit will be highly creative and will concentrate on contemporary issues where you will select, research and organise material to culminate in an exciting integrated arts presentation. You will learn a range of play building and performance techniques and apply these to the creation of original work for a target audience either at St Clare’s or in the wider community. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Analytical and reflective writing tasks →→ Practical work/s in progress exploring the creative development of major performance →→ Major performance for specific target audience.

Unit: From Page to Stage Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Use rehearsal processes and the dramatic elements to analyse and interpret scripts to performance standard →→ Sustain performance skills appropriate to specific theatrical styles in the presentation of scripted work →→ Analyse and interpret the role of production and design elements within artistic works to inform their theatre making process. Content This unit will provide you with the opportunity to develop a play to production standard. You will learn how performance and design elements work together to form a unified production through the process of developing a play for a live audience. Your play will be selected in negotiation with your teacher and you will have opportunities to explore audition techniques, rehearsal processes and the integration of technical elements such as lighting, set and costume. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Analytical and reflective writing tasks →→ Practical work/s in progress exploring the creative development of major performance →→ Major performance for specific target audience.

Media Arts Media Courses in Year 9 and 10 are aligned to the ACARA achievement standards. By the end of Year 10, students analyse how social and cultural values and alternative points of view are portrayed in media artworks they make, interact with and distribute. They evaluate how genre and media conventions and technical and symbolic elements are manipulated to make representations and meaning. They evaluate how social, institutional and ethical issues influence the making and use of media artworks. Students produce representations that communicate alternative points of view in media artworks for different community and institutional contexts. They manipulate genre and media conventions and integrate and shape the technical and symbolic elements for specific purposes, meaning and style. They collaboratively apply design, production and distribution processes. Unit: Media Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Use technical skills and knowledge of Media Arts to produce work for specific audiences. 27


→→ Apply design and production processes to the exploration and development of media artworks. →→ Analyse and evaluate how the codes and conventions of media are manipulated in social and cultural contexts. Content In this unit students will refine and extend their understanding and use of structure, intent, character, settings, points of view, genre conventions and media conventions in their compositions. They will make and respond to media arts independently and in small groups. They will explore media as an art form through representation, manipulation of genre and media conventions and the analysis of media artworks. Students will explore meaning and interpretation, forms and elements and social, cultural and historical influences of media arts, including Indigenous perspectives. They will consider the local, global, social and cultural contexts that shape purpose and processes in production of media artworks. They will evaluate the social and ethical implications of media arts. Students will extend their knowledge in the use of film technique and methods as they use technologies to create and deconstruct media artworks. They will analyse the way in which audiences make meaning and how audiences interact with and share media artworks.

Unit: Singers & Song Writers Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Rehearse and perform with confidence, expression and stylistic integrity →→ Manipulate the elements of music to create and publish works that reflect the style of specific genres →→ Describe and evaluate features of musical style. Content ‘Singers & Songwriters’ caters for the instrumentalist and the vocalist. This unit allows students to learn about and develop performance skills, be it as an instrumentalist or a vocalist. It is here that you will examine the history of contemporary music through the eyes of singers and songwriters, learn how to create your own works and perform contemporary music genres. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Musicology task comparing the use of musical elements in contemporary covers →→ Composition in a contemporary genre

Assessment

→→ Performance of a contemporary piece.

Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks:

Key Learning Outcomes

→→ Prepared seminar on media artwork deconstruction →→ Major production →→ Process Diary.

Music By the end of Year 10, students analyse different scores and performances aurally and visually. They evaluate the use of elements of music and defining characteristics from different musical styles. They use their understanding of music making in different cultures, times and places to inform and shape their interpretations, performances and compositions. Students interpret, rehearse and perform solo and ensemble repertoire in a range of forms and styles. They interpret and perform music with technical control, expression and stylistic understanding. They use aural skills to recognise elements of music and memorise aspects of music such as pitch and rhythm sequences. They use knowledge of the elements of music, style and notation to compose, document and share their music.

Unit: Musical Theatre This unit will enable students to: →→ Rehearse and perform with confidence, expression and stylistic integrity →→ Manipulate the elements of music to create and publish works that reflect the style of specific genres →→ Describe and evaluate features of musical style. Content Not a year goes by without a musical being staged all around the world. In fact one of the most exciting avenues of entertainment for many people would be experiencing a musical. This unit will explore the many and varied aspects of a musical from the early years of ‘Showboat’ through to the most recent, such as High School Musical and ‘Wicked’. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Musicology task involving the discussion of musical elements in creating a successful musical song →→ Compose a piece of music suitable for a musical →→ Performance of a piece from a musical.

28


Unit: Eclectic Australia Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Rehearse and perform with confidence, expression and stylistic integrity →→ Manipulate the elements of music to create and publish works that reflect the style of specific genres

→→ Musicology task analysing how the functions of film music have been expressed through the manipulation of musical elements →→ Compose music to accompany a silent film to reflect the functions of film music →→ Performance of a piece of film music in any genre.

Photography Year 9 Semester 1: Introduction to Photography

→→ Describe and evaluate features of musical style.

Key Learning Outcomes

Content

→→ Develop and refine photography production skills applying composition conventions with purpose to communicate to a particular audience.

‘Eclectic Australia’ unit aims to illustrate the talent, richness and variety of the contemporary Australian music scene. It is divided into two areas: art music (classical music) and popular music. Students will study a number of different examples by leading Australian composers and performing artists of the 21st Century. You will encounter many different musical styles that illustrate the diversity of music in Australia today. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks: →→ Musicology task whereby a contemporary Australian composer or artist is selected and their use of musical elements in one of their representative pieces is discussed →→ Composition of an original work that reflects Australia →→ Performance of a piece of Australian repertoire. Unit: Film Music Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Rehearse and perform with confidence, expression and stylistic integrity →→ Manipulate the elements of music to create and publish works that reflect the style of specific genres →→ Describe and evaluate features of musical style. Content Are ‘Jaws’, ‘Star Wars’, and ‘The Piano’, ‘Forrest Gump ’remembered for their scripts or for their music? This unit will explore the role of music in film, from silent film through to the large blockbusters of today. Experience the thrill of putting your own interpretation to a scene through creating the music. Music makes a film enjoyable, thrilling, accessible and touching. Study how the functions of film music are merged with the musical elements by some of the most current film score composers.

→→ Plan and create photographic artworks for a range of purposes using appropriate production processes and technologies with refined understanding. →→ Create photographic and/or media representations to identify, communicate and examine social and cultural values and beliefs, including those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. →→ Evaluate and analyse photographic artwork identifying the technical conventions, meaning, themes and ideas and how these contribute to audience engagement and perceptions. Content In this unit students are introduced to the foundations of photography practice, making and analysis. Students plan and create photographic artworks for a range of audiences and purposes and begin developing their technical skills with the camera and editing software. Students also identify and implement the elements and principals of photography. The analysis of photographic artwork and exploration of photographic history forms the foundation of the theory component of this course. Essential Questions: →→ What is the purpose of my photography? →→ What and to whom am I communicating through photographic images? →→ How do social, cultural and ethical values past and present influence and inform my photography? →→ How can I best represent ideas using the formal elements and principles of photography and learned technical skills →→ How can I appropriately use technologies with consideration to ethics and sustainability? Assessment

Assessment

→→ Practical Work: 70%

Students will be assessed on their ability to fulfil unit outcomes based on the following tasks:

→→ Theory: 30%

29


Year 9 Semester 2: Identity and Portraiture/Light & Shadow Key Learning Outcomes →→ Develop and refine photography production skills applying composition conventions with purpose to communicate to a particular audience. →→ Plan and create photographic artworks for a range of purposes using appropriate production processes and technologies with refined understanding. →→ Create photographic and/or media representations to identify, communicate and examine social and cultural values and beliefs, including those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. →→ Evaluate and analyse photographic artwork identifying the technical conventions, meaning, themes and ideas and how these contribute to audience engagement and perceptions. Content In this unit students will explore and evaluate portraiture, the important and effect of light and shadow and the history of photography. Towards the end of the unit, students will have the opportunity to create and evaluate a themed based portfolio of work. Students will continue developing their technical skills with the camera and editing software, in particular the use of compact cameras and Photoshop. The analysis of photographic artwork and exploration of photographic history forms the foundation of the theory component of this course. Essential Questions: →→ What is portraiture? →→ What and to whom am I communicating through photographic images? →→ Why is light and shadow essential in photography? →→ How can I best represent ideas using the formal elements and principles of photography and learned technical skills? Assessment →→ Practical Work: 70% →→ Theory: 30% Year 10 Semester 1: Self and Identity/The Power of Images Key Learning Outcomes →→ Develop and refine photography production skills applying composition conventions with purpose to communicate to a particular audience.

30

→→ Plan and create photographic artworks for a range of purposes using appropriate production processes and technologies with refined understanding. →→ Create photographic and/or media representations to identify, communicate and examine social and cultural values and beliefs, including those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. →→ Evaluate and analyse photographic artwork identifying the technical conventions, meaning, themes and ideas and how these contribute to audience engagement and perceptions. Content In this unit, students evaluate, analyse and create images recognising the social, cultural, personal, historical and ethical influences on artist intention and audience interpretation. Students create photographs with purpose to communicate to a particular audience exploring themes and ideas. Students develop and refine photography production skills using learned technical and compositional conventions. Essential Questions: →→ What is portraiture? →→ What and to whom am I communicating through photographic images? →→ How are photographers influenced by society, political issues and ethics? →→ How can The Frames form the foundation of written analysis? Assessment →→ Practical Work: 70% →→ Theory: 30% Year 10 Semester 2: The Story of Photography/ Themed Portfolio Key Learning Outcomes →→ Develop and refine photography production skills applying composition conventions with purpose to communicate to a particular audience. →→ Plan and create photographic artworks for a range of purposes using appropriate production processes and technologies with refined understanding. →→ Create photographic and/or media representations to identify, communicate and examine social and cultural values and beliefs, including those of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. →→ Evaluate and analyse photographic artwork identifying the technical conventions, meaning, themes and ideas and how these contribute to audience engagement and perceptions.


Content In this unit, students continue developing Photoshop skills and are introduced to DSLR cameras. They explore and analyse the history of Photography and will interpret and recreate iconic photographic images. Students analyse both Photographers and key works. They continue to develop and refine photography production skills using learned technical and compositional conventions. During the second term, students have the opportunity to create and evaluate a themed based portfolio of work. Essential Questions: →→ How can The Frames form the foundation of written analysis? →→ What is the History of Photography and how does this influence you?

of different artistic mediums including drawing, painting, printing making, sculpting and digital art and design. In each unit your class will negotiate with your teacher to select a particular theme and style that you wish to explore. You will refine your technical skills through a range of teacher directed activities and explore and develop your ideas and responses to themes and styles through your visual diary, using this to shape your own body of student directed work for an end of semester exhibition. You will use research into art from various historical eras and cultures and visits to local galleries to enrich and inform your art making process. Assessment →→ Practical Work: 70% →→ Visual Diary/Written Work: 30%

→→ What and to whom am I communicating through photographic images? →→ How can I best represent ideas using the formal elements and principles of photography and learned technical skills? Assessment →→ Practical Work: 70% →→ Theory: 30%

Visual Arts Visual Arts Courses in Year 9 and 10 are aligned to the ACARA achievement standards. By the end of Year 10, students studying Visual Arts evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others’ ideas. They identify influences of other artists’ on their own artworks. Students manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks. Visual Arts is offered to students across four semesters in Years 9 and 10 and is divided into general and specialised units. Units: Visual Arts 1 - 4 Key Learning Outcomes The Visual Arts Units should enable students to: →→ Refine use of materials, techniques and/or technologies in the production of their work →→ Implement visual conventions to represent and develop concepts in the production of their own artwork →→ Identify, analyse, research and evaluate their own work and that of others. In these units you will have the chance to develop and grow your artistic talents through a wide range

31


Arts and Languages

Languages

Students have been participating in the study of French, Italian or Japanese throughout Years 7 and 8. It is possible to continue this study in Years 9 and 10. The study of a language is a yearlong elective.

Subject French

Italian

Japanes

Units Covered French 3

French 5

French 4

French 6

Italian 3

Italian 5

Italian 4

Italian 6

Japanese 3

Japanese 5

Japanese 4

Japanese 6

Assessment in Languages Students will be assessed on their ability to achieve the specific outcomes of the unit using a variety of assessment strategies. A balance must be kept between writing, responding (reading and listening comprehension) and oral interaction. A socio-cultural component will also be included.

32


French Unit: French 3 Key Learning Outcomes →→ communicate with others orally and through writing →→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts

→→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the influence of French on English vocabulary →→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language. Content In this unit students will study language related to:

→→ further their socio-cultural and geopolitical awareness of French society and learn about the education system

→→ describing clothes and colours, fashion parades and comparing clothes

→→ research travel throughout France, gaining an appreciation of France’s natural beauty

→→ housework, sending invitations, party food and parties.

→→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the influence of French on English vocabulary

Students will also study the following aspects of French culture:

→→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language.

→→ French fashion and perfume

→→ music, films, future plans and school bands

→→ French designers

Content

→→ French television programs

In this unit students will study language related to:

→→ Iconic French cars.

→→ describing people, both physical and personal characteristics

Unit: French 5

→→ ordering food and drinks, including using the polite form

→→ communicate with others orally and through writing

→→ holidays

→→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts

→→ houses, rooms, furniture

Key Learning Outcomes

→→ transport

→→ develop an understanding of the French media and compare French and Australian television cultures

→→ school life, class representatives and personal qualities, school reports, student exchanges and linguistic tours.

→→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the influence of French on English vocabulary

Students will also study the following aspects of French culture:

→→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language.

→→ French holiday destinations and tourist sites

Content

→→ French websites

In this unit students will study language related to:

→→ different types of French houses

→→ health and describing how one feels

→→ the city of St Etienne

→→ diet and healthy lifestyles

→→ the Asterix theme park

→→ visiting the doctor

→→ French public holidays

→→ presenting statistics

→→ the French Education system.

→→ giving up smoking

Unit: French 4

→→ shopping for food in France

Key Learning Outcomes

→→ fresh food and grocery shopping

→→ communicate with others orally and through writing

→→ simple and more complex French recipes

→→ French cities and places of interest

→→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ deepen their understanding of French fashion and designers

→→ meeting someone for dinner. Students will also study the following aspects of French culture: →→ seasonal foods →→ regional French food specialties

33


→→ origins of French food

Content

→→ French contributors to medical research

In this unit students will study language related to:

→→ French political figures

→→ describing people: both physical and personal characteristics

→→ French history →→ Asterix. Unit: French 6 Key Learning Outcomes →→ communicate with others orally and through writing

→→ the polite form of register →→ holidays and leisure →→ houses: rooms, furniture →→ Italian cities and places of interest.

→→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts

Students will also study the following aspects of Italian culture:

→→ respond to poetry, songs or films that relate to Paris

→→ different types of Italian houses

→→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the influence of French on English vocabulary →→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language. Content In this unit students will study language related to: →→ French cars, car parts and repairs →→ driving and obtaining a driver’s licence →→ work experience, part-time jobs, resumés, letters of application →→ French beaches, French holiday destinations, travelling by train, Paris sites. Students will also study the following aspects of French culture: →→ different types of cars →→ French web site - Citroën →→ different types of jobs →→ La Côte d’Azur →→ Le TGV →→ Paris.

Italian

→→ Italian holiday destinations and tourist sites →→

the city of Milano

→→ Mirabilandia theme park →→ Italian language websites. Unit: Italian 4 Key Learning Outcomes →→ communicate with others orally and through writing →→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ gain an understanding of the historical and cultural significance of the manufacturing of motorcycles in post-war Italy →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language →→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language. Content In this unit students will study language related to: →→ school life, reports and exchanges →→ transport →→ class representatives and personal qualities

Unit: Italian 3

→→ pastimes and leisure activities: parties, music concerts, bands and singers

Key Learning Outcomes

→→

→→ communicate with others orally and through writing

Students will also study the following aspects of Italian culture:

→→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts

→→ Italian public holidays

→→ gain an understanding of Italy’s national parks and reserves →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language →→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language.

34

→→ ordering food and drinks

shopping for a present.

→→ popular means of transport in Italy with an emphasis on the scooter (mopeds) →→ Il Festivalbar – an Italian rock festival →→ tourism - trekking in the ‘Cinque Terre’ National Park →→ Italian education system and school reports.


Unit: Italian 5

Content

Key Learning Outcomes

In this unit students will study language related to:

→→ communicate with others orally and through writing

→→ Italian history from the start of the Iron Age

→→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ gain an understanding of the widespread usage of proverbs in the Italian culture →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language

→→ Italian history and the Renaissance →→ Italian cars, car parts and repairs →→ obtaining a driver’s licence. Students will also study the following aspects of Italian culture: →→ turning points in Italian history

→→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language.

→→ the legacy of Da Vinci and other great Italian artists

Content

→→ the creation and rise of opera

In this unit students will study language related to:

→→ Italian neo-realist cinema

→→ health and describing how one feels

→→ Italy’s contribution to the development of the car and some famous makers

→→ diet and healthy lifestyles →→ visiting the doctor →→ presenting statistics →→ giving up smoking →→ Italian food shops →→ St Valentine’s Day →→ fresh food and grocery shopping →→ table settings →→ simple and more complex Italian recipes →→ meeting someone for dinner. Students will also study the following aspects of Italian culture: →→ the vegetarian diet →→ seasonal foods →→ the Mediterranean diet →→ regional Italian food specialties →→ Italian sayings and proverbs. Unit: Italian 6 Key Learning Outcomes →→ communicate with others orally and through writing →→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ deepen their understanding of the Renaissance and Italian opera →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language →→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language.

→→ Italy’s passion for car racing.

Japanese Unit: Japanese 3 Key Learning Outcomes →→ communicate with others orally and through writing →→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ develop an appreciation of youth culture and the fine arts of Japan →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language →→ develop a greater understanding of their own language. Content In this unit students will study language related to: →→ transport →→ verb tenses →→ descriptions of family and counting people →→ likes, dislikes and abilities →→ personal milestones for Australian and Japanese teenagers →→ describing one’s childhood →→ some important celebrations in Japan →→ languages and nationalities →→ talking about what people are doing now →→ the recognition and use of a greater number of kanji →→ the katakana script.

35


Students will also study the following aspects of Japanese culture: →→ school clubs →→ traditional leisure activities and their role in today’s Japan.

→→ colours →→ saying more precisely where things, people and animals are located

Unit: Japanese 4

→→ asking for permission and advising against doing certain things

Key Learning Outcomes

→→ expressing the purpose for going somewhere

→→ communicate with others orally and through writing

→→ describing things that happened in the past

→→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ develop an understanding of youth culture in Japan →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language →→ develop a greater appreciation of features of their own language. Content In this unit students will study language related to: →→ languages and nationalities →→ talking about what people are doing now →→ inviting and accepting or declining invitations →→ suggesting alternatives →→ arranging outings →→ ordering in a restaurant →→ shopping and prices →→ the recognition and use of a greater number of kanji →→ the katakana script. Students will also study the following aspects of Japanese culture:

→→ basic kanji. Students will also study the following aspects of Japanese culture: →→ the traditional role of women in Japanese society and Geisha →→ issues for modern Japanese women. Unit: Japanese 6 Key Learning Outcomes →→ communicate with others orally and through writing →→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ develop an appreciation of traditional Japanese life →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language →→ develop a greater appreciation of their own language. Content In this unit students will study language related to: →→ the weather and listening to forecasts →→ expressing wishes and wants →→ ordering food in a restaurant

→→ festivals and iconic Japanese companies.

→→ counting different objects

Unit: Japanese 5

→→ describing how something looks

Key Learning Outcomes

→→ the seasons

→→ communicate with others orally and through writing

→→ shopping

→→ obtain information by listening to and reading a variety of texts →→ develop an appreciation of traditional life and modern, evolving Japan →→ develop an appreciation of how language is learned and the systematic nature of language →→ develop a greater appreciation of their own language. Content In this unit students will study language related to: →→ describing people’s appearance and parts of the body 36

→→ describing pets and numbers of animals

→→ using and understanding plain speech in less formal situations. Students will also study the following aspects of Japanese culture: →→ Zen Buddhism and its influence on Japanese society →→ Samurai ideals - their role in WWII and The Cowra Breakout.


Studies of Society and Environment

Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE) provides students with the skills necessary to be active and informed critical thinkers. It allows them to understand the world around them and to participate in and contribute to the wellbeing and sustainability of the environment, the economy and society. SOSE fosters a commitment to lifelong learning and active global citizenship. SOSE electives offered in Years 9 and 10 embrace the disciplines of Geography, Economics & Business, Civics & Citizenship and follow the Australian Curriculum. All of these electives are great preparation for study at a higher level in senior years.

Subject

Units Covered

Civics and Citizenship

Who runs this country?

Politics and Law in the Asia-Pacific

You can make a difference!

Australia’s place in the World

Economics and Business

A Trading Nation

Economic Performance

It’s Your Business

The Big Idea

Biomes and Food Security

Geographies of Human Wellbeing

Geographies of Interconnections

Environmental Change and Management Coasts

Geography

37


Civics and Citizenship There are four units of study available in the Civics and Citizenship Elective curriculum.

→→ Questioning and Research

→→ Who runs this country?

→→ Problem Solving and Decision Making

→→ You can make a difference!

→→ Communication and Reflection

→→ Politics and Law in the Asia-Pacific

→→ Analysis, synthesis and interpretation

→→ Australia’s place in the World

Economics and Business

Who runs this country? Who runs this country focuses on how Australians are represented and protected through our political and legal system. Students investigate the role of political parties, independents and the government as our representatives and how government policy is shaped and developed. They identify key features of Australia’s court system and how courts apply and interpret the law including key principles of the justice system, including rule of law. You can make a difference! You can make a difference investigates how the media and global trends are shaping contemporary Australian society. Students explore how and why individuals and groups participate in and contribute to civic life and what influences their political choices. Through a selection of case studies, students consider how citizen’s choices and attitudes to diversity are shaped by a range of media, including social media. Politics and Law in the Asia-Pacific Politics and Law in the Asia-Pacific explores Australia’s system of government through comparison with another system of government in the Asian region. Students investigate key features and values of Australia’s political and legal systems by undertaking case studies to identify how well different countries uphold the rights of citizens. Students explore the role of the High Court in detail, including its importance in interpreting the Constitution. Australia’s place in the world Australia’s Place in the World examines Australian Government’s role and responsibilities at a global level, including its participation in international organisations and the United Nations. Students explore issues such as peacekeeping and the provision of foreign aid as well as challenges to and ways of sustaining a resilient democracy and cohesive society. A case study of Australia’s international legal obligations and how they shape Australian law and government policies, including in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples will be studied. Assessment For all Civics and Citizenship Units, the content is organised into two strands: Civic and Citizenship Knowledge and Understanding and Civics and Citizenship Skills. Students will be assessed in:

38

→→ Citizenship and Civics knowledge and understanding

There are four units of study in the Economics and Business Elective curriculum: →→ A Trading Nation →→ It’s Your Business →→ Economic Performance →→ The Big Idea A Trading Nation A Trading Nation focuses on Australia’s trade and our place within the rising economies of Asia and broader global economy. They investigate the activities of transnational corporations in supply chains and global business activities using case studies such as Cocoa production and garment manufacturing. Students explore scams as an example of a financial risk and look at how the different products offered by banks can help them achieve their financial goals. It’s Your Business It’s Your Business is a practical unit that integrates the theoretical concepts of business and economics to a practical situation. Students will make decisions about business planning, marketing and organization to develop their creativity, problem-solving and lateral thinking skills. The unit culminates in Market Day which showcases products students have produced, marketed and then have the opportunity to sell. Economic Performance This unit focuses on economic and business concepts by considering Australia’s economic performance and standard of living using key indicators. The ways governments manage economic performance to improve living standards is explored, along with the reasons why economic performance and living standards differ within and between economies. Student’s investigate the the responsibilities of various participants in a workplace and the role of the federal and state governments in legislating to improve the conditions of workers. The Big Idea The Big Idea exposes students to social enterprise as a business structure. They consider how business can address issues such as inequality to improve living standards locally and globally. Students explore strategies based around corporate social responsibility and the use of social media


as a business tool. The unit culminates with the development and pitch of their own social enterprise idea.

Geographies of Human Wellbeing

→→ Economics and Business Knowledge and Understanding

Geographies of Human Wellbeing investigates the different concepts and measures of and differences in the wellbeing of populations within and between countries and globally. Students consider different strategies implemented to improve wellbeing and promote a sustainable future. The role of international, national governments and nongovernment organisations’ initiatives are analysed, using case studies drawn from Australia and across the world.

→→ Questioning and Research

Assessment:

→→ Interpretation and Analysis

For all Geography Units the content is organised into two strands: Geographical Knowledge and Understanding and Geographical Inquiry and Skills. Students will be assessed in:

Assessment: For all Economics and Business Units the content is organised into two strands: Economics and Business Knowledge and Understanding and Economics and Business Skills. Students will be assessed in:

→→ Economic reasoning, decision-making and application →→ Communication and Reflection.

Geography There are four units of study in the Geography Elective curriculum: →→ Biomes and Food Security →→ Geographies of Interconnections →→ Environmental Change and Management →→ Geographies of Human Wellbeing.

→→ Geographical knowledge and understanding →→ Observing, questioning and planning →→ Collecting, recording, evaluating and representing →→ Interpreting, analysing and concluding →→ Communicating →→ Reflecting and responding

Biomes and Food Security Biomes and Food Security focuses on investigating the biomes of the world, their alteration and significance as a source of food and fibre, and the environmental challenges and constraints on expanding food production in the future. It examines the competition for land use and the challenges that this poses for food security and problems of sustainability feeding the world’s population. Geographies of Interconnections Geographies of Interconnections explores on how people’s choices and actions are connected throughout the world in a wide variety of interconnections. They examine the interconnections through the products people buy and the effects their production has on places and their environments. Students will discover some of the technologies that have allowed us to travel, use the Internet, discover where our laptops, phones and tablets are made and increase communication to remote and rural communities globally. Environmental Change and Management Environmental Change and Management focuses on a study of environment and environmental change in Australia and one other country. Students apply human-environment systems thinking to understand the causes and consequences of the change. Using geographical concepts and methods, they evaluate the management strategies used to mitigate the impacts of environmental change for a chosen environment in one or more countries of the world.

39


Technologies

Subject

Units Covered

Design and Technology

Design for Living

Design for Production

Sense of Design

Designing Furniture

Fashion and Textile Technology

Understanding Fabrics

Fashion and Costume Design

Interior Design and Soft Furnishings

Haute Couture

Basic Skills of Food Technology

Bakery Delights

You Are What You Eat

International Cuisine

Logos and Identity

Magazine Design

Photoshop for Graphic Design

Packaging and 3D Design

Hospitality

Not available to Year 9 Students

Introduction to Hospitality

Digital Technology

Multimedia

Dynamic Databases

Introduction to Programming

Computer Operations

Food Technology

Graphic Design

40


Design and Technology Unit: Design for Living Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ generate and explore creative ideas in visual form →→ exhibit sensitivity and skill in the use of materials and techniques →→ understand and apply design elements and principles

will learn the techniques of technical drawing so you can develop and communicate your ideas and discover how to use different workshop tools and machinery to construct your designs. Find out how to evaluate your own and other designs – what the differences are between good and bad design. This unit may include excursions such as visiting a gallery or workshop to see relevant exhibitions or to participate in practical work at an appropriate location. Assessment

→→ demonstrate appropriate and safe work practices

Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions.

Content

Unit: Design for Production

How do we use design to solve problems found in our environment? In this unit you will learn how to apply a design process to solve practical design problems. You will learn the techniques of technical drawing so you can develop and communicate your ideas and discover how to use different workshop tools and machinery to construct your designs. Find out how to evaluate your own and other designs – what the differences are between good and bad design. This unit may include excursions such as visiting a gallery or workshop to see relevant exhibitions or to participate in practical work at an appropriate location.

Key Learning Outcomes

→→ research, analyse and respond to works of Art or Design

Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: Sense of Design Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ generate and explore creative ideas in visual form →→ exhibit sensitivity and skill in the use of materials and techniques →→ understand and apply design elements and principles →→ research, analyse and respond to works of Art or Design →→ demonstrate appropriate and safe work practices. Content What is design and how does a designer work? In this unit you will learn how to apply a design process to solve practical design problems. You

This unit should enable students to: →→ generate and explore creative ideas in visual form →→ exhibit sensitivity and skill in the use of materials and techniques →→ understand and apply design elements and principles →→ research, analyse and respond to works of Art or Design →→ demonstrate appropriate and safe work practices. Content In this unit you will learn how to apply a design process to solve practical design problems. You will learn the techniques of technical drawing so you can develop and communicate your ideas and discover how to use different workshop tools and machinery to construct your designs. You will be required to follow design processes to explore and solve ideas for a design brief and you will study the work of relevant designers for inspiration and ideas. This unit may include excursions such as visiting a gallery or design workshop to see relevant exhibitions. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: Designing Furniture Key Learning Outcomes This unit should enable students to: →→ generate and explore creative ideas in visual form

41


→→ exhibit sensitivity and skill in the use of materials and techniques →→ understand and apply design elements and principles →→ research, analyse and respond to works of Art or Design →→ demonstrate appropriate and safe work practices. Content Have you ever wished that you could design and make your own furniture such as a display cabinet for your collections, a decorative table or a blanket chest? In this unit you will learn the secrets of furniture design and construction techniques. You will learn how to design, produce and make your own individual piece of furniture. For a really professional look you will explore special decorative features, painted and stained finishes, wood carving in relief or moulded edges. This unit may include excursions such as visiting a gallery or design workshop to see relevant exhibitions. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions.

Fashion and Textile Technology Unit: Understanding Fashion and Textiles Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ select and use commercial patterns and identify pattern shapes →→ select appropriate fabrics for design projects →→ apply suitable construction techniques for different fabric types using the sewing machine →→ understand the production and properties of fibres and fabrics →→ apply the design process to investigate, generate and evaluate possible solutions to design briefs. Content In this unit you will develop essential skills for garment construction. With an introduction to appropriate techniques for handling different fabrics and you will gain an understanding of the structure of woven, knitted and non-woven fabric and the properties of different fibre types. Throughout the unit you will have the opportunity to select your own unique commercial patterns and fabrics and you will learn to apply the most appropriate construction techniques for your design choices.

42

Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: Interior Design and Soft Furnishings Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ understand the psychology of colour and colour schemes →→ represent interior design ideas in 2D and 3D →→ develop spacial awareness for interior design →→ investigate ideas and inspiration and generate and evaluate design ideas →→ apply construction and production skills in the context of soft furnishings →→ understand the production and properties of fibres and fabrics →→ develop construction skills using the sewing machine. Content This unit will introduce you to the power of colour. You will have the opportunity to explore this design element in the context of an interior space and investigate how your choices contribute to the overall feel and vibe of a room. You will become familiar with the restrictions of space and learn to design creative solutions to solve these problems. Not only will you engage in the design of interior spaces, you will also have the opportunity to create a soft furnishing item using the sewing machine which will fit within your designed space. The opportunities are endless and you have control of the outcomes! Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: Fashion and Costume Design Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ investigate construction techniques to achieve shape on the body →→ identify the impacts of the fashion industry on the environment and recognise sustainable solutions →→ identify economic and social impacts of the fashion industry


→→ apply appropriate construction techniques for unique design and fabric choices

Food Technology and Hospitality

→→ understand and investigate a design brief and apply the design process to devise solutions

Key Learning Outcomes

Content This unit allows you to extend your construction abilities whilst also learning valuable skills in designing unique and original fashion. You will explore pattern shapes and the techniques used to make two dimensional pieces form a three dimensional garment. The unit gives you flexibility to create your own styles and select your own fabrics and you can extend into applying sleeves, collars, darts, gathering, frills, peplums, linings and so much more. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: Haute Couture Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ select styles, fabrics and accessories for high fashion →→ investigate international designers and their concepts →→ use, adjust and alter commercial patterns to design garments →→ design for specific end uses →→ use a wide variety of specialty fabrics made from both woven and knit constructions →→

compile a folio documenting the design process.

Content Haute Couture is French for ‘high fashion’ and describes the beautiful one-off garments you might see at a wedding, formal, race day or walking down the red carpet at the Oscars. You will be introduced to a range of international Haute Couture designers and have the opportunity to investigate what goes into one of their one-off garments. In this unit you will have the opportunity to select your own special occasion for which to design and you will be guided through the most appropriate construction techniques to complete a high quality Haute Couture garment. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions.

Unit: Basic Skills of Food Technology This unit will enable students to: →→ understand and follow the basic techniques used in food preparation →→ understand basic nutrition →→ follow the design process in the creation of healthy meals →→ identify basic food groups Content Enjoy learning how to prepare, cook and present tasty, healthy meals and snacks while following the design process. You will work with a variety of ingredients from all the basic food groups and learn correct food handling and preparation skills. The importance of choosing food wisely to promote sound nutrition is taught in this unit. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: You Are What You Eat Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ prepare and present food to promote good health practices →→ follow the design process in the creation of healthy meals →→ understand the importance of a balanced diet in relation to Australian Food Models →→ use Information Technology to analyse nutritious meals →→ study the diseases caused by inappropriate food choices. Content In this unit you will learn to make links between health and wellbeing and the food we eat. You will have the opportunity to create a range of meal and snack options while exploring the effects and benefits that each ingredient can have on the body. You will explore a range of safe food practices and learn new techniques to prepare, cook and present recipes. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. 43


Unit: Bakery Delights Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ develop contemporary knowledge and understanding of bakery and pastry products →→ learn to prepare, cook, present and store baked products →→ apply bakery skills in a safe and hygienic environment →→ design and present food products →→ understand the nutritional value of ingredients used in baked products →→ analyse the nutritional value of products using IT →→ manage time effectively and meet deadlines →→ work cooperatively within a small group Content In this unit you will use a variety of cooking and preparation methods to make a selection of bakery products such as breads, cakes, biscuits, scones and pastries. Products will be developed suitable for people with gluten and lactose intolerances. Make some of your favourite baked products and analyse their content on the computer program, ‘Food Choices’, to find out what you are really eating. This unit will enable students to develop pastry and bakery ‘know how’ in an engaging and interactive way. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: International Cuisine Key Learning Outcomes

Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions.

Introduction to Hospitality – Year Long Course *Hospitality – Vocational Education and Training Pathway, RTO No. 88009 For those students planning a career in Hospitality, completion of the Introduction to Hospitality course in Year 10 is ecommended. The course content will be from the Tourism, Travel and Hospitality National Training Package (SIT) and allow interested students to gain a SIT10216 Certificate I in Hospitality upon successful completion of the course. Students who do not successfully complete all Certificate I competencies will be awarded a Statement of Attainment. This is a nationally recognised certificate. The course must be enrolled in for a year during Year 10 to allow adequate completion of the course. Unit: Hospitality Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ care for food and prepare and store it safely →→ understand the importance of hygiene and safety procedures in a commercial kitchen

This unit will enable students to:

→→ use various methods of cooking to prepare a range of dishes within a set time frame

→→ understand the influences of other cultures on the development of food choices in Australia

→→ develop a knowledge of portioning and plating food in an attractive manner

→→ understand the relationship of culture, religion and food availability on the development of cuisine styles

→→ use a variety of commercial equipment within a fully operational commercial kitchen

→→ investigate the cuisine of various countries and develop an appreciation of the social customs of those countries →→ investigate a variety of ingredients suitable for the preparation of cultural foods →→ prepare meals which have influenced Australian cuisine. Content Australian food habits will be explored, starting with the indigenous Australians through to the

44

multicultural cuisine of today. During practical lessons you will have the opportunity to use some bush tucker ingredients as well as experience the cuisines of other cultures.

→→ understand the importance of team work and effective communication in a commercial food preparation environment →→ develop a knowledge of commercial food preparation and presentation →→ prepare and present a range of meals using a variety of food preparation skills →→ identify a range of career opportunities and jobs within the hospitality industry


→→ attempt the vocational competencies: »»

SITXFSA001 Use hygienic practices for food safety (Elective A)

»»

SITXWHS001Participate in safe work practices

»»

SITHCCC003 Prepare and present sandwiches (Elective B)

»»

TLIE1005 Carry out basic work place calculations

»»

BSBWOR203 Work effectively with others*

»»

SITXCCS001 Provide costumer information and assistance

Note: These competencies form part of the requirement for the SIT10216 Certificate I in Hospitality and are from the SIT Tourism, Travel and Hospitality National Training Package. Content The hospitality industry is attracting more and more young Australians into this field of work and study. This course will give students some information about working in this dynamic industry. A variety of commercial menu items will be prepared using commercial kitchen equipment. Safe food handling techniques will be developed during this unit. The different methods of cookery will be used when preparing menu items. This course will give students people skills and assist the development of effective work and personal relationships. A variety of menu items encompassing the latest trends in Australian cuisine will be explored. Students will be introduced to café dining and given opportunities to prepare and serve food for customers in the Chiara Dining Room. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in safe work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions.

Graphic Design Unit: Logos and Identity Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ develop skills in the use of Illustrator for Graphic Design →→ understand the features of corporate identity →→ visually communicate company ideals and values through logo designs →→ critique needs or opportunities to respond to design briefs →→ use technologies to create design solutions →→ visually communicate various creative design ideas

→→ work flexibly to test, select and justify design choices. Content This unit will enable you to engage with Adobe Illustrator as a tool for Graphic Design and gain essential skills for the development of logos to communicate a business. You will be presented with design briefs and be required to engage with processes of visual communication to meet the needs of these briefs. The elements and principles of design will form the underpinning building blocks throughout this highly practical subject as you explore the identity of businesses and entities to create solutions which visually communicate their ideals. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding of design concepts and participate in effective work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. Unit: Photoshop for Graphic Design Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ develop skills in the use of Photoshop for Graphic Design →→ understand the relationship between image and text for effective design →→ critique needs or opportunities to respond to design briefs →→ use technologies to create design solutions →→ visually communicate design ideas →→ work flexibly to test, select and justify design choices. Content Through the use of the program Adobe Photoshop you will learn how to combine text with image for effective Graphic Design. The application of typography to visually communicate combined with the manipulation of images will underpin this unit. You can expect to engage in a range of experiments demonstrating your application of the design process to investigate communication, develop ideas and evaluate solutions. You may have the options to explore graphic design through production of posters and advertising, CD and digital album covers and book covers. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding and participate in effective work practices in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions. 45


Unit: Magazine Design

Content

Key Learning Outcomes

The essential skills of Graphic Design can be employed effectively in a 3D context and this is what this unit will explore. With the application of graphic design to packaging for to 3D objects comes certain constraints and challenges which you will learn to overcome to produce effective promotional and packaging designs. As the future of our planet demands sustainable considerations, you will apply leaned sustainable solutions to your designs for a secure future. Graphic design is essential in our every day lives. Why not learn how to make it effective, practical, eye-catching and sustainable.

This unit will enable students to: →→ develop skills in the use of InDesign for Graphic Design rendering →→ understand the relationship between image, text and layout for effective design →→ critique needs or opportunities to respond to design briefs →→ use technologies to create design solutions →→ visually communicate relevant and creative design ideas →→ work flexibly to test, select and justify design choices. Content InDesign is a program in the Adobe Suite which is essential in the development of effective layouts in Graphic Design. You will learn to use InDesign to render layouts designing brochures before delving into a major project allowing you to create your own magazine as part of a design team. Understand how text and image can be combined effectively for both printed and digital material with careful consideration of layout to achieve a visually pleasing result which communicates an identity. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding of layout and design concepts and to participate in effective work practices both working individually and part of a design team in practical components of the course. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create, relevant and appropriate designed solutions. Unit: Packaging and 3D Design Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to:

Students will be assessed on their ability to apply gained knowledge and understanding of design concepts and a sustainable future. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of the design process to create designed solutions to realise preferred futures.

Digital Technology Unit: Multimedia Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Analyse simple compression of data and how content data are separated from presentation →→ Precisely define and decompose real-world problems, taking into account functional and nonfunctional requirements and including interviewing stakeholders to identify needs →→ Design the user experience of a digital system, evaluating alternative designs against criteria including functionality, accessibility, usability, and aesthetics →→ Plan and manage projects using an iterative and collaborative approach, identifying risks and considering safety and sustainability. Content

→→ critique needs or opportunities to respond to design briefs

In this unit you will learn basic file management skills while you examine the main functions of ICT systems including input and output devices, storage devices, information processing and network data security. You will learn to use a wide variety of programs to meet the task requirements including Photoshop, Flash, Gamemaker and Premier Pro or Windows Movie Maker. You will have the opportunity to plan a project and create a multimedia presentation and computer game through the use of sound, digital photographs, clip art and animation.

→→ use technologies to create design solutions

Assessment

→→ visually communicate various creative design ideas

Students will be assessed on their ability to use the network and software effectively, communicate through the use of multimedia software and display an understanding of effective design and creation principles.

→→ apply skills of graphic design in a 3D context →→ understand the importance of shape, size and space in the application of packaging for 3D products →→ investigate, understand, problem solve and apply sustainable solutions to packaging designs,

→→ work flexibly to test, select and justify design choices.

46

Assessment


Unit: Introduction to Programming

Key Learning Outcomes

Key Learning Outcomes

This unit will enable students to:

This unit will enable students to:

→→ Investigate the role of hardware and software in managing, controlling and securing the movement of and access to data in networked digital systems

→→ Analyse simple compression of data and how content data are separated from presentation →→ Design algorithms represented diagrammatically and in structured English and validate algorithms and programs through tracing and test cases →→ Implement modular programs, applying selected algorithms and data structures including using an object-oriented programming language →→ Plan and manage projects using an iterative and collaborative approach, identifying risks and considering safety and sustainability →→ Design the user experience of a digital system, evaluating alternative designs against criteria including functionality, accessibility, usability, and aesthetics. Content In this unit you will use Python Turtle and Python to learn basic programming techniques. This will allow you to plan, design and evaluate a major project for a Maker project. You will also get to investigate GUI programming using Scratch and Lego Mindstorms, integrate commercial computing packages to create presentations for specific purposes and audiences and investigate programming using Arduino microcomputers. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to create solutions for simple problems. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of a range of software applications to create interactive programs. Information Communication Technology Vocational Education and Training Pathway The Continuing Units in Information Technology are based on the content from the Information and Communications Technology National Training Package (ICA) and allow interested students to gain a Certificate I in Information, Digital Media and Technology upon successful completion of the semester. The units are available in Year 10 only. One semester will allow the completion of the Certificate I. Unit: Dynamic Databases Students will be awarded a ICT10115 Certificate I in Information, Digital Media and Technology upon successful completion of this unit. Students who do not successfully complete all Certificate I competencies will be awarded a Statement of Attainment. This is a nationally recognised certificate.

→→ Precisely define and decompose real-world problems, taking into account functional and nonfunctional requirements and including interviewing stakeholders to identify needs →→ Critically evaluate how well developed solutions and existing information systems and policies take account of future risks and sustainability and provide opportunities for innovation and enterprise →→ Acquire, analyse and evaluate data from a range of sources →→ Design the user experience of a digital system, evaluating alternative designs against criteria including functionality, accessibility, usability, and aesthetics. →→ Attempt the vocational competencies: »»

ICTICT101 Operate a personal computer

»»

ICTICT102 Operate a word processing application

»»

ICTICT103 Use, communicate and search securely on the internet

»»

ICTICT106 Operate a presentation package

»»

ICTICT104 Use digital devices

»»

ICTICT105 Operate spreadsheet application.

»»

ICTICT210 Operate database applications

Content In this unit you will acquire, create and visualise data, create a database and manipulate data. You will develop basic file management skills to enable you to plan, design and evaluate a major project. An introduction to the use of Microsoft Access and Excel will provide you with the necessary skills to create a unique database and you will explore online project management tools as you create. You will explore the functions of real-world databases as a repository that affects future planning and sustainability. You will learn to securely use and communicate using the Internet. Assessment Students will be assessed on their ability to successfully operate a personal computer. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of a range of application software including word processing software, presentation packages and spreadsheet applications to store data, manipulate and present information.

47


Unit: Computer Operations

Assessment

Students will be awarded a ICT10115 Certificate I in Information, Digital Media and Technology upon successful completion of this unit. Students who do not successfully complete all Certificate I competencies will be awarded a Statement of Attainment. This is a nationally recognised certificate.

Students will be assessed on their ability to successfully operate a personal computer. They will be assessed on the degree to which they make effective use of a range of application software including word processing software, digital devices, presentation packages, email and Internet browsers to manipulate and present information.

Key Learning Outcomes This unit will enable students to: →→ Investigate the role of hardware and software in managing, controlling and securing the movement of and access to data in networked digital systems →→ Precisely define and decompose real-world problems, taking into account functional and nonfunctional requirements and including interviewing stakeholders to identify needs →→ Critically evaluate how well developed solutions and existing information systems and policies take account of future risks and sustainability and provide opportunities for innovation and enterprise →→ Create interactive solutions for sharing ideas and information online, taking into account social contexts and legal responsibilities →→ Design the user experience of a digital system, evaluating alternative designs against criteria including functionality, accessibility, usability, and aesthetics. →→ Attempt the vocational competencies: »»

ICTICT101 Operate a personal computer

»»

ICTICT102 Operate a word processing application

»»

ICTICT103 Use, communicate and search securely on the internet

»»

ICTICT106 Operate a presentation package

»»

ICTICT105 Operate spreadsheet application

»»

ICTICT104 Use digital devices.

»»

ICTICT210 Operate database applications

Content In this unit you will develop basic file management skills to enable you to plan, design and evaluate a major project. You will have the opportunity to integrate commercial computing packages to create presentations for specific purposes and audiences. The use of Dreamweaver and online website editors will allow you to create your own web pages and you will examine the main functions of ICT systems including input and output devices, storage devices and information processing.

48


Inclusive Education

The Seeker Program This elective is designed for students in Years 9 and 10 who are interested in self-directed learning, which involves completing projects, which may be inter-disciplinary. Students enrolled in this elective must receive endorsement from at least two teachers and parental approval. Students are required to submit an application for entry into the elective consisting of a proposal outlining the area of study in which they are interested and a project(s) they would like to undertake during the course of the unit. At the conclusion of the semester, students will be required to deliver a presentation to a panel of teachers and/or parents in which they detail their project and the process they have used to complete the project.

49


A Sample Layout of Your Subject Selection

Year 9 Elective Subjects and Units for Semester One 2020 Electives

Select electives to the total value of 6 units (exclusive of your selected Reserves). A semester elective equals 1 unit. A year-long elective equals 2 units. Unit Value Preference 1: Preference 2: Preference 3: Preference 4 Preference 5: Preference 6: Preference 7: Preference 8: Reserve 1: Reserve 2: Reserve 3:

50

I have selected a Technologies subject in my course preferences to fulfil College requirements:

Yes

No

I have selected an Arts subject in my course preferences to fulfil College requirements:

Yes

No


A Sample Layout of Your Subject Selection

Year 9 Elective Subjects and Units for Semester Two 202 Electives

Select electives to the total value of 6 units (exclusive of your selected Reserves). A semester elective equals 1 unit. A year-long elective equals 2 units. Unit Value Preference 1: Preference 2: Preference 3: Preference 4 Preference 5: Preference 6: Preference 7: Preference 8: Reserve 1: Reserve 2: Reserve 3: I have selected a Technologies subject in my course preferences to fulfil College requirements:

Yes

No

I have selected an Arts subject in my course preferences to fulfil College requirements:

Yes

No

51


A Sample Layout of Your Subject Selection

Year 10 Elective Subjects and Units for Semester One 2020 Electives

Select electives to the total value of 6 units (exclusive of your selected Reserves). A semester elective equals 1 unit. A year-long elective equals 2 units. Unit Value Preference 2: Preference 3: Preference 4 Preference 5: Preference 6: Preference 7: Preference 8: Reserve 1: Reserve 2: Reserve 3:

52


A Sample Layout of Your Subject Selection

Year 10 Elective Subjects and Units for Semester Two 2020 Electives

Select electives to the total value of 6 units (exclusive of your selected Reserves). A semester elective equals 1 unit. A year-long elective equals 2 units. Unit Value Preference 2: Preference 3: Preference 4 Preference 5: Preference 6: Preference 7: Preference 8: Reserve 1: Reserve 2: Reserve 3:

53


ABN: 34 447 289 629

02 6260 9400 | stcc.act.edu.au 1 McMillan Crescent Griffith ACT 2603

Profile for St Clare's College Canberra

Junior Course Guide  

The Junior Course guide provides curriculum information on courses in Year 7 through to Year 10. The guide details the elective choices the...

Junior Course Guide  

The Junior Course guide provides curriculum information on courses in Year 7 through to Year 10. The guide details the elective choices the...

Profile for stclares