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UNIVERSIT Y MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2019

THREE

JOURNEYS. PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

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SHARED CONNECTION. THE POWER OF ST. KATE’S


HONORS AND AWARDS CEREMONY

The Rauenhorst Ballroom was filled with joy as Maakwe Cumanzala ’19 (seated center) received the University’s highest award, the Mary E. McCahill Memorial Award. Baomi Phung ’19 (right) received the Dean of Students Award.

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT BETH HALLORAN VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS TOCCARA STARK MAOL’09, EdD EDITOR KAYLA FORBES MBA’17 DESIGNER MOLLY ORTH

CONTRIBUTORS KATE BARRETT JILL BRAUN RUTH HAAG BROMBACH ’60 BETH RIEDEL CARNEY ’82 SARAH PARK DAHLEN KARA DEMARIE MLIS’16 MICHELLE HUEG ’07, MLIS’13 MANDY IVERSON ELIZABETH L. JOHNSON MLIS’18 SARA KEIS LINDSAY MADRYGA NATALIE MANION AMY MULLOWNEY ’19 MICHELLE MULLOWNEY ’17

LINDSEY FREY PALMQUIST ANUPAMA PASRICHA KELLY POVO ’09 SIRI RAASCH SHARON ROLENC JON SCHULTZ SARAH VOIGT PHOTOGRAPHERS KATE BARRETT NATALIE GROSE ’20 MARA LANDON ’20 SHARON ROLENC REBECCA SLATER ’10

ADDRESS CHANGES 651.690.6666 alumnae@stkate.edu ONLINE mag.stkate.edu


UNIVERSIT Y MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2019

F EAT U R E S

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Katie Couture

Student designs hit the runway at Katwalk BY MICHELLE MULLOWNEY ’17

A Conversation with Alumnae: A Reflection Across Generations Three alumnae reveal the shared threads that unite them as Katies BY JILL BRAUN

PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

ABOUT THE COVER

Allie Oelfke ’13, Leah Mtegha ’07, and Amy Lindgren ’83 (below, left to right) explore the similarities in their academic and career paths on page 16. PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

TH E CO M M O NS 2

FROM THE PRESIDENT

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KATIES IN ACTION

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AROUND CAMPUS

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BOOKMARK

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CLASS NOTES

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IN MEMORY

BACK COVER

St. Catherine University Magazine is published three times a year by the Office of Marketing and Communications. No part of this publication may be reprinted without permission. St. Catherine University was founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet in 1905. Learn more: stkate.edu/ourhistory

KATIE DIARY

S P E CI A L 32

2019 ALUMNAE AWARDS


PHOTO/SHARON ROLENC

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SEEN HERE IN LYON, FRANCE NEXT TO THE GRAVE OF MOTHER ST. JOHN FONTBONNE, CSJ, FOUNDRESS OF THE CSJS, ARE (BOTTOM LEFT, CLOCKWISE) SUMMER SCHWINTEK ’22, MAEVE MCDEVITT ’22, ANDREA DUARTE-ALONSO ’19, HANNAH SLANIKA ’19, PRESIDENT ROLOFF, MARY PALIN ’20, ANASTASIA ROUSSEAU ’22, YESENIA SALAZAR ’20, MOLLY MCMAHON ’20, TRAM LAM ’21, AND STEPHANY RIVERA ’19.

From the President All that you touch, You Change. All that you Change, Changes you. The only lasting truth Is Change. God Is Change. – Octavia E. Butler, Parable of the Sower I strongly believe that each of us is changed through the pursuit of knowledge — through an education that births a transformation of our cognitive, emotional, and even physical self. This is one of the fundamental reasons our incredible faculty and staff commit themselves to working in higher education and with students. The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet understood the power of change — and faith — when they helped women escape a life of poverty through the skill of lacemaking. Educating women to change our systems revealed new, self-empowered pathways previously inaccessible. These are the roots of St. Catherine University — women, Catholic, and liberal arts — which we foster each day through our mission to educate women to lead and influence. I was fortunate this past spring to journey to Le Puy, France, on a pilgrimage with members of our St. Kate’s community. As I walked in the footsteps of the Sisters, I could not help but reflect on the beginning of my own journey to St. Kate’s, and how this institution has changed me many times throughout my life. For more than 114 years, each of us — students, graduates, faculty,

staff, trustees, donors, parents, community partners — have touched St. Kate’s in one way or another, changing it as it grew into the wonderful institution it is today. And as a result, we have all been changed as well, creating a shared connection among us. This issue explores the transformation some of us have experienced at St. Catherine — how the University changes us, and how we have changed it. You’ll read how three alumnae across different generations uncover surprising similarities despite their assumed differences, and how dedication to academic, career, and civic achievements can be found through following your passions. You’ll see how a group of graduate occupational therapy students’ perspectives evolve through a direct, hands-on connection to their field and patients in Peru. Additionally, you’ll read how many of our students and graduates, including this year’s Alumnae Award winners, personify the CSJ tenet to love thy neighbor without distinction. Collectively, these stories emphasize the important and influential work that takes place every day on our campuses that sends ripples of change into our world. In a time of change in our world, at our University, and in ourselves, I feel beyond blessed to share in the strong community at St. Kate’s. It is in the community we find here and in our lives that provides us the hope and strength to move forward and continue to transform our systems to make the world better for us all. ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76

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KATIE COUTURE BY MICHELLE MULLOWNEY ’17

ashion students saw their one-of-a-kind garments come to life on the runway during Katwalk, the annual fashion show organized by the St. Kate’s student Fashion Association. The May show featured full design lines from eight graduating seniors and included designs from nine juniors. This year’s Katwalk — a featured 2019 Fashion Week Minnesota event — emphasized sustainability, presenting students’ zero-waste, repurposed, re-engineered, and upcycled designs. Katwalk is the culmination of the skills and creativity students hone in the fashion and apparel programs, which are offered through the Apparel, Merchandising, and Design department within St. Kate’s School of Business. Students are responsible for every aspect of the show, including event planning, promotion, design development, and management of modeling talent. See the Katwalk 2019 Look Book at stkate.edu/lookbook.

PHOTOS/MARA LANDON ’20

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DESIGNER: LETICIA ROSALES CHASE ’20 MODEL: ICELINE J. KING ’21

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DESIGNER: GAOXUE NANCY YANG ’20 MODEL: NENG N. K. YANG

DESIGNER: DALLAS K. HER ’21 MODEL: DALLAS K. HER ’21

DESIGNER: KHARMIA L. SCHANKS ’20 MODEL: KALEA V. OTT ’20

DESIGNER: SYDNEY R. SCHUMANN ’19 MODEL: BRIANA ALMILLA

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DESIGNER: PATRICIA MALEC ’20 MODEL: PATRICIA MALEC ’20

DESIGNER: LETICIA ROSALES CHASE ’20 MODEL: LETICIA ROSALES CHASE ’20

DESIGNER: SABRINA AHMED ’20 MODEL: VIKY MOUA

DESIGNER: COURTNEY M. HRABAK ’19 MODEL: ASIA PALACLOS

DESIGNER: APPAREL DESIGN SEMINAR CLASS TEAM OF 2019 MODEL: MEGAN MANN

DESIGNER: KHARMIA L. SCHANKS ’20 MODEL: CASEY MAGER

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DESIGNER: CLAIRE SCHIERMAN MODEL: BIZZY STEPHENSON

DESIGNER: KACHIA LEE ’19 MODEL: MERCEDES HENG ’22

DESIGNER: GAOXUE NANCY YANG ’20 MODEL: JOUA VANG ’22

DESIGNER: SYDNEY R. SCHUMANN ’19 MODEL: CHINA EUBANKS

DESIGNER: APPAREL DESIGN SEMINAR CLASS TEAM OF 2019 MODEL: JENAE JENKINS

DESIGNER: PATTERNMAKING CLASS TEAM OF 2019 MODEL: ELIZABETH K. BEUNING ’21

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SUMMER 2019

PHOTOS/KATE BARRETT

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BUILDING WHEELCHAIRS AND LEARNING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF FAMILY-CENTRIC CARE FROM LOCAL OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS WERE AMONG THE HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS YEAR’S MAOT TRIP TO YANCANA HUASY. EMILY DELANEY MAOT’19; EMILY HOHENSHELL ’18, MAOT’19; MEGAN MILLER ’18, MAOT’19; HAYLEY NEID ’18, MAOT’19; KARA NELSON ’18, MAOT’19; AND KYLA ROMAN MAOT’19 MADE THE TRIP, WORKING THROUGH ELEANORE’S PROJECT, A NONPROFIT STARTED 16 YEARS AGO BY TAMARA KITTELSON-ALDRED ’75.

Katies in Action

MAOT students build wheelchairs and patient-centered skills BY SARAH VOIGT

In early March, six students from St. Kate’s Master of Arts in Occupational Therapy (MAOT) program boarded a plane bound for Peru. They spent a week working with Eleanore’s Project, Inc., at Yancana Huasy, focused on wheelchair seating and 24-hour postural care for children with disabilities and their families. The experience greatly impacted the students’ future careers with not only technical knowledge, but first-hand awareness of the impact their work can have on a child’s quality of life. Yancana Huasy is a parish and school located in Canto Grande of San Juan De Lurigancho in Lima and dedicated to building strong families, especially those belonging to children with disabilities. With a kindred mission to improve the lives of children with disabilities through education and innovative projects, Eleanore’s Project began 16 years ago and is named in honor of Tamara Kittelson-Aldred ’75 and her husband Rick’s daughter. The organization supports Yancana Huasy’s work through collaboration with local occupational and physical therapists, providing individualized wheelchairs and postural care to children. Associate Professor Kate Barrett has made this trip seven times before, and while the students change each time, the learning remains consistent. “For many students, they’re learning how to think critically and use readily available resources to address the needs of children and families,” said Barrett. “Students have the opportunity to help make wheelchair cushions and seat backs from scratch.” Families visiting Yancana Huasy receive a familycentric approach with instruction and ongoing support, so they can carry out their children’s postural care at home. The trip from home to clinic can take hours, and they return every six months for follow-up visits, where wheelchairs are adjusted to match the children’s growing bodies.

Over her years visiting Lima, Barrett has seen the program expand. “The sustainability of the project has grown into a fully functioning wheelchair clinic year-round,” Barrett explained. “Our time in Peru with Eleanore’s Project serves to bolster the partnership, infuse resources, and build upon the existing collaboration.” St. Kate’s MAOT program has partnered with Eleanore’s Project for 12 years. The service project’s impact and student benefits are best articulated in the students’ reflections on the trip:

“Working in a different country taught me that my perspectives and ideas about care for the client are not the most important. The family and the client have final say in the care they receive, even if it is not the care or approach I, or other therapists on the team, would recommend. Meaningful occupations, environmental circumstances, and perspectives on health vary, so it is important to use cultural humility when working with different populations.” —Kyla Roman MAOT’19 “This experience has provided me with insight about empathy, the importance of building rapport with families, and the value of sustainable partnerships and programs.” —Emily Delaney MAOT’19 To learn more about Eleanore’s Project, visit EleanoresProject.org.

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STAFF AND ALUMNAE VOLUNTEER FOR MOVERS AND SHAKERS TO HELP STUDENTS DURING MOVE-IN DAY.

VOLUNTEER SUMMIT September 7, 2019 Celebrate volunteers and explore upcoming opportunities.

Katie Volunteer Program A volunteer program that offers flexible options and new ways to get involved.

Learn more at stkate.edu/volunteer.

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Around Campus MBAs DON’T PROTECT AGAINST GENDER DISCRIMINATION, BUT THEY COULD HELP How much does an MBA help a woman advance her career and salary? Not as much as it could, as Michelle Wieser, PhD, interim dean of St. Catherine University’s School of Business, discovered in a study she led for the Forté Foundation. Data from her study show a very positive return on investment from the MBA for women, with a 63% average salary increase from their last pre-MBA job to their first post-MBA position. Despite the significant increase, the first phase of the study revealed that women in their first post-MBA jobs still earn less than similarly qualified men, but the income gap narrows from pre-MBA salary levels. The study also found that minority MBA graduates overall had lower career satisfaction than non-minorities in two areas: their current salaries and career progression since obtaining an MBA.

EVENING WITH THE ARTS “While [Octavia] Butler illuminates our failures, she also helps us chart a course for the future, a path that embraces change and listens to the wisdom of the marginalized. And this is what I know St. Kate’s strives to be — a place that listens to and takes seriously new, fresh ideas, and especially ideas from women,” said Associate Professor Allison Adrian, speaking to a full room at the Catherine G. Murphy Gallery, in her introduction to Evening with the Arts. On April 26, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower — the novel Adrian referenced — transformed the O’Shaughnessy stage in its theater adaptation, “Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower: The Concert Version.” The performance rendition of Butler’s work was only one art form featured as part of Evening with the Arts, which invited alumnae to celebrate the rich landscape of arts flourishing at St. Kate’s. Before proceeding to the O’Shaughnessy, the evening opened in the Gallery with a reception. Music faculty member Adrian introduced a vocal performance by St. Kate’s student Cierra Buckner ’19, followed by a dance piece choreographed and performed by Tumelo Khupe ’20. Attendees also took in the studio art exhibitions on view: Professor Emerita Patricia Olson’s career retrospective spanning her 40 years as an artist; and visiting studio art Assistant Professor Christina Spiker’s Nostalgic Femininity, a curation of 19th-century Japanese woodblock prints. Also featured were Curious, a juried exhibition showcasing the work of graduating senior Amanda Grove ’19, and other students’ pieces from this year’s Ariston.

Released in April, the second phase of the research revealed that holding an MBA does not eliminate gender inequalities, such as a pay gap, but experiences in business school do help MBA graduates advocate and partner with their employers to take steps toward addressing gender inequality at work. These combined efforts appear to be having a positive impact on reducing gender inequality in the workplace. Read the Forté Foundation’s press release about the study at stkate.edu/forte.

AMANDA GROVE ’19

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FEAST OF ST. JOSEPH

PHOTOS/MICHAEL FERGUSON

On March 20, 2019, our community celebrated the Feast of St. Joseph, honoring the founders of St. Catherine University, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. President Roloff said that the day served as a way to honor our heritage and to connect with the incredible women who have carried forward the mission and passion of the Sisters for more than three centuries.

ICELINE KING ’21

STUDENTS PRESENT AT WORLD AND NATIONAL CONFERENCES

The Sisters of St. Joseph trace their roots back to 1650 in Le Puy, France, where a group of six women dedicated themselves to following the work of Jesus and welcoming all without distinction. The joyous day of celebration carried this spirit through a prayer service, local nonprofit service projects, a musical procession, and a soup supper.

All 11 teams in the 2018 cohort of St. Kate’s Summer Scholars program were accepted to present at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research in April 2019, continuing a 100% acceptance rate. The undergraduate student and faculty teams collaborated on research in a breadth of topics, such as economics, ASL and interpreting, and public health. Just one month later, Iceline King ’21 presented at the 2nd annual World Congress on Undergraduate Research at the University of Oldenburg in Germany. King’s presentation was notable for being rooted in theology. When asked how undergraduate research has impacted her career direction, King said, “Conducting research solidified my passion for observing and understanding people, while giving me skills to recognize trends in systemic behavior. When I graduate, I would like to work in an industry that focuses on understanding and improving the human condition through research.” In addition to King’s oral presentation, Colleen Carpenter, associate professor in theology, participated as a faculty discussant and represented St. Kate’s graduate programs, and Cynthia Norton, director of Collaborative Undergraduate Research at St. Kate’s, presented a poster about the program.

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BLANKET MAKING SOUP SUPPER

EMPTY BOWLS


KACHIA LEE ’19 KRIEGER SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT Kachia Lee ’19, the third in her family to graduate from St. Kate’s, is the 2018–2019 Judith Gorman Krieger Scholarship Award recipient. This scholarship is awarded to a student who exemplifies a humane, compassionate, and loving way of life. “Kachia Lee’s community contributions are a beautiful reflection of the Krieger Scholarship’s focus on generosity,” said Sharon Doherty, director of the Abigail Quigley McCarthy Center for Women, mission chair for women’s education and a member of the Scholarship selection committee. “A double major in apparel design and fashion merchandising, Kachia connects her talent and knowledge to community needs. Among other contributions, she developed a program to teach sewing and mending to the diverse community members at Rondo Public Library in St. Paul.” Judith Gorman Krieger ’63 inspired those around her with her spirit for life. Her friends Lois Gross Rogers ’63 and John Rogers established this scholarship in Krieger’s name to honor her memory and perpetuate her example of compassion for others. View one of Lee’s designs modeled on the catwalk in “Katie Couture” page 7.

ELIZABETH KULA ’19 BRIANA MIDDLETON ’19 HONORS AND AWARDS The St. Kate’s community celebrated academic excellence at the Honors and Awards ceremony on April 30. Students were celebrated for their academic and leadership achievements, including inductees into the 24 active academic honor societies, the recipients of scholarships, and departmental honors. Culminating the ceremony were the six All-University Student Leadership Awards acknowledging leadership, outstanding loyalty and service, and contributions to the St. Kate’s mission. Read more at stkate.edu/2019awards.

SPRING 2019 COMMENCEMENT The class of 2019 welcomed 1,070 Katies to the alumni family at Commencement ceremonies on May 24 and 25. The College for Women commencement speaker was Hala Bahmet ’92, Emmy-nominated costume designer for the NBC prime time show “This Is Us.” The College for Adults speaker was Penny Oleson ’04, attorney at Fredrikson & Byron law practice. The Graduate College speaker was Virginia Carroll Stoffel ’77, past president of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA).

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2019 CAMPUS COMPACT SUMMIT GIVES HONORS On April 10, St. Kate’s welcomed member campuses of the Minnesota Campus Compact for the annual statewide summit, convening civic and community engagement stakeholders. During the luncheon, President ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76 brought state-level recognition to four St. Kate’s examples of leadership and community-building. Sadia Farah ’19 was honored with the Presidents’ Student Leadership Award in recognition of authoring a St. Kate’s religious accommodation policy for the University. Zaynab Abdi ’20 was named one of 10 Newman Civic Fellows in recognition of her leadership work with organizations such as the Civic Engagement Collective, Minnesota Peace Project, and Green Card Voices. Professor Elizabeth Otto received the Presidents’ Civic Engagement Steward Award for her incorporation of community engagement work into her courses. The Rondo Community Library was recognized with the Presidents’ Community Partner Award for its diverse community support through a multitude of programs. The library is a steadfast partner of St. Kate’s, offering opportunities for students to connect with the community through service-learning and volunteer work.

SADIA FARAH ’19 ZAYNAB ABDI ’20

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WILDCAT ROUNDUP FALL AND WINTER SEASON 2018–19 Basketball Audra Clark ’19 finished her record-setting career as the All-Time Career Points and All-Time Career Assists Leader. Clark joined teammate Danica Cambrice ’20 on the MIAC All-Conference Team. Sam Orth ’22 earned All-MIAC Rookie Team Honors.

BRITTANIE SAMSONA WITMER ’19

Cross-Country Riley McMahon ’21 finished in 15th place at the 2018 MIAC Cross-Country Championship for All-Conference honors. McMahon’s finish landed her in the No. 7 spot in the Wildcat record books. The team was recognized as the top team GPA in the conference and placed fourth in Division III. Dance The Wildcats took first place at regionals, earned a Judge’s Choice Award for choreography and placed first in the poms competition. Golf Sydney Busker ’19 led the Wildcats to place first at the Cobber Fall Invite and finished in second place individually. Olivia Matzke ’21 earned a spot on the MIAC All-Tournament Team. The team finished in fourth place at the Fall Championship. Hockey Four seniors earned MIAC All-Conference honors. Soccer This season, the Wildcats were undefeated at home for the first time in program history, placing fourth in the MIAC and eighth in the NCAA Central Region. Swimming and Diving The Wildcats placed 11th in the 2019 NCAA Division III Swimming and Diving National Championships. Jordyn Wentzel ’22 earned four AllAmerican honors, and Maggie Menso ’22 earned three. Wentzel also was named the MIAC Swimmer of the Year, and Gabby Page ’19 named Diver of the Year. The team placed third at the MIAC Championships and earned the top GPA in Division III. Tennis Bri Dorr ’20 and Alisha Wiedmeier ’20 went to the 2018 ITA Division III Midwest Regional Championship. Wiedmeier advanced to the consolation semifinal match.

MAGGIE MENSO ’22 Indoor Track and Field Elsie Lundquist ’20 was named to the USTFCCCA Division III All-Region Team following her first-place finish in the triple jump at the MIAC Championships. Lundquist joined Tori Thompson ’19 and Riley McMahon ’21 on the MIAC All-Conference Team. Volleyball Six players earned MIAC Academic All-Conference Honors. Read Wildcat news at stkatesathletics.com.

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ALLIE OELFKE ’13

LEAH MTEGHA ’07

AMY LINDGREN ’83

3M GLOBAL CHANNEL SERVICES, INC. MARKETING AND SALES ANALYST

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA CARLSON SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT EVENT COORDINATOR

PROTOTYPE CAREER SERVICE PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY ALUMNAE NETWORK AT 3M CO-CHAIR BS, HEALTHCARE SALES

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THE GREENCLEAN CREW OWNER AND FOUNDER BS, MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SUMMER 2019

NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT COLUMNIST AUTHOR OF THE POCKET JOB SERIES BA, ENGLISH


A CONVERSATION WITH ALUMNAE:

A Reflection Across Generations BY JILL BRAUN

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T

he beauty of our journey in life lies not only in where we come from and where we are going, but also in those intrinsic virtues we gain that enrich our experiences along the way. We recently sat down with three generations of alumnae for a conversation about how St. Catherine University inf luenced their journeys. Although they were meeting each other for the first time and are each on their own unique path, the discussion led to the inherent commonalities that make them all Katies.

DRIVEN TO SUCCEED: FINDING YOUR WAY TO ST. KATE’S Allie Oelfke ’13: I grew up in a Minneapolis suburb and started my education at a community college close to home to get a few credits under my belt. I became interested in nursing and began considering my options. A family friend introduced me to St. Kate’s. I really admired her and already had a good impression of the University. When I was accepted and transferred, I quickly realized I was definitely interested in healthcare, but not necessarily nursing. I had an amazing experience working with my advisors and faculty to discover which path was right for me. With a more intimate learning environment and smaller class sizes, etc., I had the freedom to do some exploring and eventually landed on healthcare sales — a degree I’m putting to good use today! Leah Mtegha ’07: My journey here started from much farther away, in my home country of Malawi, Africa. It’s interesting there. After secondary school, there are only about five government-run universities that serve the

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entire population. It’s very competitive, and you have to pass a rigorous test to get in. When I didn’t pass, my father was certain that my education was over and encouraged me to find a job. I quickly set out to prove him wrong. I always believed that there was something more for me than the status quo, and I didn’t want to settle. That was my drive, and I pushed until I could find a way. I was very diligent and applied everywhere I could, including in South Africa and the United Kingdom. My search eventually led me to St. Kate’s. While growing up, I attended an all-girls, Catholic boarding school, so the Catholic tradition and focus on women were appealing to me. I felt that — although I was coming from a different country — this would help me feel more at home. Amy Lindgren ’83: I was in the first generation in my family to pursue college. I knew I wanted to go to an ACTC (Associated Colleges of the Twin Cities) school. I understood the relationship between the five schools and


My expectation coming to St. Kate’s was that my education would prepare me to use my voice regardless of the professional path I chose — and it has. –ALLIE

thought it would be a good value to enroll at one and have options to take classes at the others. At 17, and paying my own way, I was independent and entrepreneurial by necessity — working multiple jobs and pursuing several of my own businesses. In fact, I operated and closed two businesses while I was a student. In total, I held about 50 jobs both on and off campus in the seven years it took to finish my degree. Hustling like that was just about the only way I could afford rent and tuition. I took advantage of the opportunity to transfer into the Weekend College, when it started a few years later. I ultimately became a re-entry program adult student so I could finish my degree while working toward my professional goals — like starting the two businesses I still operate today, 35 years later. Leah: Yes, working was a big part of my educational journey as well. When I arrived in 1997, I was 20 years old, making my own way in a new country with no family. Even though I was classified as a traditional day student, my major was an evening-and-weekend program, so that allowed me to work full-time and was so helpful. Allie: Me too! I worked two jobs as a receptionist and nanny almost daily, and I took evening classes. It was a juggle at the time, but I’m proud of this experience. I think this helped me develop my grit. I know what it takes to work hard, manage my time, and achieve my goals. I don’t feel entitled to anything.

KATIES AT THE CORE: IMPACT OF ST. KATE’S ON YOUR JOURNEY Leah: Coming to St. Kate’s from Africa was a little shocking. I was like, “Where are all the black people?” Looking back on it now, my St. Kate’s education gave me more of a global perspective about what life is like across cultures than I might’ve expected at first. It’s an understanding that, for most of us, our plights are more alike than we realize — regardless of where we come

from. As human beings, we all deal with many of the same challenges in life. It really opened my eyes to social justice issues in Minnesota and beyond, and how we can address them. As a result, I started volunteering and giving back. I currently serve on the Board of the African Development Center, an organization that helps African immigrants start their own businesses, buy homes, and be financially savvy in the U.S. Allie: St. Kate’s also enhanced my perspective of the world and has proven to be very valuable in my international sales career. I learned a lot about the Hmong community in my Global Search for Justice classes, for example, and understanding the culture helps me work more effectively in Southeast Asia. My theology classes also helped me appreciate and respect people with different histories and worldviews. And of course, thanks to the focus on women, I believe I’m more empowered to overcome obstacles in my professional career — I’m not afraid to ask for what I want. Amy: The Reflective Woman and Global Search for Justice core curricula were not initiated yet when I was here. Back then, St. Kate’s had a focus on writing and communication, which I’m very grateful for as those skills have been critical to my professional success. Interestingly though, I did develop a stronger voice as a woman in other ways. The early 1980s was such a different time for St. Kate’s, for the Catholic church, and for women. One year, I learned that three women had become pregnant and left school. I didn’t think that was fair, and was frustrated that the health center didn’t address birth control for students. Not growing up Catholic, I didn’t understand all of the issues at the time. They were, of course, upholding the values of the Church. Even so, I continued to advocate for what I believed to be a critical, basic need in a college made up entirely of women. We met resistance, as you might imagine, but we persisted and started the Feminist Interest Group in 1980. Then, with the support of Campus Ministry and other key folks, we eventually launched the Women’s Resource Center, the precursor to the Abigail Quigley McCarthy Center for Women. We wanted to create a safe space

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I don’t always know what I will face in life, but when challenges arise, it’s so great to come back and reflect on the strength that St. Kate’s has instilled in me. –LEAH

LEADING AND INFLUENCING, THEN AND NOW: HOW YOUR EDUCATION PREPARED YOU FOR THE FUTURE

for all women to discuss issues of importance in their lives, including sexuality and sexual identity. We started Violence Against Women Week — also controversial at the time — and brought in speakers to educate students about dealing with domestic violence situations. Looking back, it was an interesting dynamic. I was a young woman negotiating with women in leadership positions. This experience empowered me to use my voice effectively with anyone in a position of power throughout my life, regardless of gender, and to never give up on something I believe in.

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Amy: Advocating for and developing the Women’s Resource Center was perhaps the most influential part of my St. Kate’s journey. As a working-class, nonCatholic student, who was somewhat disengaged from traditional campus activities, it was a part of campus that I felt absolutely rooted in because it reflected my values. We created something that helped people, and I’ve been doing the same thing with my own careercounseling business for more than 30 years. I’m working with people to find the right jobs and advance their careers, and I’ve also created jobs for my employees. It’s all really rewarding. Allie: Similar to Amy’s experience, my expectation coming to St. Kate’s was that my education would prepare me to use my voice regardless of the professional path I chose — and it has. This has been so valuable, especially in sales, which is historically a maledominated profession. Having women leaders from 3M speak in my classes allowed me to see that it is possible for women to drive sales, business, and excellence in all they do. I also learned early in my business classes about the correlation between preparation and demonstrating competence. This skill has helped me immensely as I grow in my career, and it has enabled me to speak up confidently in rooms full of men. Leah: I agree, the confidence I gained at St. Kate’s is invaluable. Just coming from a different country forced me to get out of my comfort zone and persevere. But because of how my mentors prepared me and encouraged me to believe in myself, I’ve had the ability to pursue and secure great jobs at organizations like Wells Fargo, HealthPartners, and the University of Minnesota. And even though I didn’t know what my journey would hold when I graduated, I knew that I was going to start something — and I did! In addition to my role managing events at the University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management, I am also an entrepreneur. I founded my own green cleaning business in 2013 and it continues to thrive today.


Students know that when they come here, they aren’t just going to be taking classes for the sake of getting a degree. They are rooted in something larger. –AMY

ALL ROADS LEAD HOME: WHAT ST. KATE’S MEANS TO YOU NOW Leah: St. Kate’s will always be a part of my story. It represents a dream I had since I was young, and it is a source of strength. When I feel discouraged, I think about coming to pursue my education at St. Kate’s from Malawi. If I can do that, I can do anything! In fact, every so often, I will come back to campus and just sit by the Dew Drop Pond to relieve my anxieties. I don’t always know what I will face in life, but when challenges arise, it’s so great to come back and reflect on the strength that St. Kate’s has instilled in me.

Allie: My family has taken Christmas photos by the pond! For me, St. Kate’s represents community in a larger sense than I think I would’ve found elsewhere. I had a tremendous amount of support — not only graduating, but also securing my position at 3M. Now, I co-chair the St. Catherine University Alumnae Network at 3M, and I help current students envision what their futures can look like if they work hard. I speak in the classroom, help with the career fair, and connect students to other alumnae at 3M. Empowering current Katies to pursue their dreams is a way I can give back to the community that helped get me where I am today. Amy: As you might imagine, the campus has physically changed a lot since I graduated in the 1980s. But truthfully, St. Kate’s represents one of the most stable things in my life. Coming from a relatively unstable family background, the fact that St. Kate’s still physically exists and upholds the same values as it did when I attended is incredibly important to me. The University today still has a really strong ethical core: social justice, service, community. And although there aren’t nearly as many CSJs physically on campus and on the faculty today, you can still really feel their presence in the mission. Students know that when they come here, they aren’t just going to be taking classes for the sake of getting a degree. They are rooted in something larger.

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Bookmark REVIEWED BY ELIZABETH LEANNE JOHNSON MLIS’18

All You Can Ever Know is Nicole Chung’s memoir exploring the meaning of her adoption journey. It was odd to review this book because Chung and I share such similar life experiences. We are both Asian-American females who were adopted by white parents at the young age of two and a half months. We even share details like our red-haired mothers and gray-haired fathers. Of course, there are dramatic differences too. Chung is Korean, while I am Vietnamese. She is more than 10 years older than me, was born in the U.S., and grew up in the Pacific Northwest. I was raised in the suburban Twin Cities and was born in Vietnam. She also views her adoption journey through a very different lens. Chung wrote an adoption story that begins when most end — after the child is placed in the arms of welcoming parents. She wrote of a childhood filled with racism and isolation, feeling like an outsider and wishing she was white. She persistently wondered about her biological family, and these feelings crystallized into a decision to search for her birth parents.

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“What I have gained from Chung’s searingly honest book is an appreciation for how dissimilar adoptees’ experiences are.” Chung displays respect for all the people in her adoption story, and compassion saturates every page. She changes throughout her journey — from pain and disappointment to a quest for information and acceptance. She is direct, brave, vulnerable, and wise. Early in the book, she encouraged adopted people to tell their stories, “and let no one else define these experiences for us.” My adoption story, experiences, and feelings are incredibly different from Chung’s. Before I ever understood what the word meant, I knew I joined my family by adoption. My parents talked with me about


it openly and honestly. For me, it was not the source of pain and uncertainty that it was for Chung. My journey is not about my adoption, but it’s about my personhood. What interests me, and what I strive to gain are insights about my gender, my race (being a person of color in a field largely populated by white people), my romantic relationships, my friendships, and my family. Adoption is low on my list of concerns. What I have gained from Chung’s searingly honest book is an appreciation for how dissimilar adoptees’ experiences are. Mine is so different from hers, and I have no doubt other individuals who joined their families by adoption have other thoughts and insights. All You Can Ever Know is an emotionally truthful and wonderfully written memoir. All readers with an interest in identity, heritage, connection, and family will find something relatable and thoughtprovoking here.

Associate Professor Sarah Park Dahlen on the importance of transracial adoption books told in their #OwnVoices. This semester I assigned Nicole Chung’s All You Can Ever Know in my LIS 7220 Library Materials for Young Adults course. This is an especially fantastic book for young adult (YA) readers because most children’s and young adult books about transracial adoption are not written by transracially adopted persons. My students related to different aspects of Chung’s story, depending on whether they themselves are an adopted person, know an adopted person, or know people of color who have experienced racist microaggressions. As someone who is not adopted, but researches adoption and is now married to an adopted person, I am acutely aware of the power imbalances in telling stories about adoption. My students read #OwnVoices adoption stories so they can prepare to serve communities with transracially adoptive families, and Chung’s memoir is one of the best texts for this.

Elizabeth Leanne Johnson MLIS’18 is employed as a media specialist with the Osseo Area Schools. Like author Nicole Chung, she is an Asian-American who was adopted as an infant by Caucasian parents.

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SUBMIT A CLASS NOTE CONTACT US Online: stkate.edu/alumni Phone: 651.690.6666 Email: alumnae@stkate.edu facebook.com/katiealumni @StKatesAlums

Class Notes EVENING WITH THE PRESIDENT In April, Katies gathered for the Evening with the President event with President ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76 to hear highlights from the academic year and connect with one another. The celebration included learning about the new Katie Volunteer Program and honoring this year’s alumnae award winners Shunu Shrestha ’07, Bao Vang ’91, and Helen Wagner ’69. The evening also featured a champagne toast to recognize and thank the dedicated members of the Alumnae Council for their service to the University and fellow graduates.

1969

KATHLEEN LATTERELL DOLAN ’69 was reelected in November 2018 to the Casper College District Board of Trustees in Casper, Wyoming. She also received the Trustee Leadership award in 2015 from the Wyoming Association of Community College Trustees. Dolan has retired from the University of North Dakota, having served as an adjunct faculty since 1993 in its occupational therapy satellite program housed at Casper College.

1986

KRISTINE KUBES ’86 earned a doctorate from the University of Minnesota Law School. She is CEO of Kubes Law Office in Minneapolis.

JEAN WILHELMY JUELICH ’85

KRISTINE KUBES ’86

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RADIOGRAPHY STUDENTS MCKENZIE FOXHOVEN ’19 (LEFT), VANESSA FRANKOT MILLER ’19, AND MAX MACEMON ’19 CELEBRATE THE COMPLETION OF THEIR DEGREES AT THE COLLEGE FOR ADULTS COMMENCEMENT ON MAY 24, 2019.

COMMENCEMENT 2019 1990

CYNTHIA SWEENEY ’90 was appointed editor of The Weekly Calistogan, in Calistoga, California in July 2018. Previously, Sweeney freelanced in Hawaii for 23 years, and worked as a reporter at North Bay Business Journal in Northern California for three years.

1995

MELISSA MUSICH CHIODO ’95 was selected as the new police chief of Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota. Chiodo, a Minneapolis Police commander, is currently one of only three MPD women serving in a sworn appointed position. PHOTO/ MINNEAPOLIS POLICE DEPARTMENT.

1994

LYNN HAEHNEL MATTSON ’94 was profiled for Top Women in Finance in the newspaper Finance & Commerce. Mattson is the chief operating officer at Best & Flanagan.

IVANNA CAYKO FRITZ ’95 will be inducted into the 2020 Montana Forensic Educators Association Coaches Hall of Fame. Fritz is a speech and debate assistant coach at Glacier High School in Kalispell, Montana, and has coached teams to win 13 state championships. She was also named Class AA coach of the year in 2013. HEIDI WOODBURY GUNDERSON ’95 was elected mayor of Vadnais Heights, Minnesota, in November and officially assumed the role in January 2019.

2000

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SUMMER 2019

JANE REXWINKEL ARNOLD MAOT’00 was appointed as the new ambulatory vice president of clinic operations for UnityPoint Clinic in March. In this role, Arnold will hold executive responsibility for the operations of the eight clinics in Sioux City, Iowa.


2002

KATIE CAMPBELL ’02 won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Innovation for her work as a lead producer on “Battle Ready: The Military’s Environmental Legacy in the Northwest,” an expansive and interactive online piece about the United States military’s environmental impact on the area. PAUL SCHNELL MAOL’02 was appointed commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Corrections by Governor Tim Walz. Schnell is also an adjunct professor of social work and leads safety training for social work students.

2003

CAROL JACKSON MLIS’03 was featured in the Library Journal’s 2019 Movers & Shakers under the category “Advocates” for her work providing programming at Ramsey County Library, which fosters community engagement on social justice and inequity topics.

CAROL JACKSON MLIS’03

2005

ERIN MURPHY MAOL’05 was the keynote speaker for St. Kate’s winter 2018 Commencement in December. Murphy is a former gubernatorial candidate and former majority leader of the Minnesota House of Representatives.

2006

LINDSAY WOGSTAD DUBBLEBEE ’06 was featured in the Star Tribune’s Movers & Shakers after taking a new position as a director at SkyWater Search Partners, the Minnetonka-based executive recruiting firm. KATE MARION FISHER ’06 returned to Nichols Kaster law firm in the fall of 2018 as the case development attorney for its Civil Rights and Impact Litigation Group.

2007

BECKY BLACKHAWK ’07 obtained a Master of Science in nursing education from Mount Saint Mary’s University in Los Angeles. She then accepted a full-time tenure track professorship in nursing at College of the Desert in Palm Desert, California.

2009

BETHANY KRUEGER MAOL’09 was hired as general manager of the Prouty Project in January 2019. JESS MCCAFFERTY ’09 married Meagan Moering in Boise, Idaho in December 2018. KELLY RAE TRISKO VO ’09 and husband Nathaniel welcomed son Vincent Le in December 2018.

VINCENT LE

KATE MARION FISHER ’06

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2010

PAMELA SAN MIGUEL ’10 received the Young Professional Award from the National Commission on Correctional Health Care in October 2018. This award recognizes new and upcoming leaders in the correctional healthcare field who lead by example, take initiative, demonstrate a strong work ethic, and inspire others through his or her commitment to quality healthcare. San Miguel works as the nurse manager for Ramsey County Correctional Facility.

2014

BROOKE HENDRICKSON QUEVEDO ’14, MSW’16 married Gabriel Quevedo on October 20, 2018. ASHLEY STENZEL ’14 published a children's book, The ABCs of Women in STEM. The picture book takes a look at some of the amazing women who have contributed to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

2011

2017

JORDAN RICE DAVIES MAHS’17 married Brian Davies on September 8, 2018. COLLEEN HARRELD JOHNSON ’17 married Stephen Johnson on December 8, 2018. BECCA MOOS MAOT’17 was crowned South Wind Princess at the 2019 Saint Paul Winter Carnival. She joined a group of communityand civic-minded individuals who represent St. Paul throughout the year, both locally and nationally, as part of the carnival royal family. PHOTO/WHITE BEAR PRESS.

AMY PERRIN CABALLERO ’11 married Jay Caballero on November 3, 2018. JENNIFER QUAYLE GONDERINGER ’11 married Robert Gonderinger on September 29, 2018. ANNIE PERKINS MAOL’11 secured a seat on the Afton, Minnesota City Council.

2012

LISA JACOBS LAGE ’12 was named head coach of the Austin High School Packers softball team in Austin, Minnesota in March 2019. For the past seven years she was the team’s assistant coach. At St. Kate’s, she played on the Wildcats softball team.

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2016

KELLY MCBRIDE MLIS’16 was hired as director of the Blue Earth County (Minnesota) Library.

BECCA MOOS MAOT’17


DETAIL OF EXTERIOR OF OUR LADY OF VICTORY CHAPEL OF SAINT CATHERINE OF ALEXANDRIA (LEFT) AND SAINT THERESE OF LISIEUX.

In Memory w Our deepest sympathy to the families of the following graduates, faculty and staff members, friends, and supporters of St. Catherine University: Catherine Coté, CSJ w March 2, 2019. Catherine Maley, PhD, friend and associate w February 1, 2019. John Rogoz, former adjunct faculty in business administration w December 22, 2018. Verna Rusler, former staff w January 7, 2019.

All are welcome at St. Catherine University’s annual Memorial Mass, which celebrates the lives of those who have died. Join us at Our Lady of Victory Chapel on Sunday, October 27, 2019.

Phyllis Crain Lueken ’40 w December 19, 2018. Georgine Amberg Boggess ’44 w January 16, 2019. Patricia Galena McCarthy ’45 w November 15, 2018. Ruth Houle Riley ’45 w December 3, 2018. Florence Baskfield Myslajek ’46 w February 19, 2019. Rosemary Koppen Feely ’46 w August 24, 2017. Mary Eileen O’Keefe Schrot ’46 w December 24, 2018. Rose Root Crumb ’46 w December 19, 2018. Agnes Senesac Heider ’46 w February 20, 2019. Kathleen Weiler Stiegler ’46 w November 28, 2018. Betty Laliberte Arnold Wheeler ’47 w December 16, 2018. Kathleen Shea Vagnoni ’47 w January 2, 2019. Patricia Koempel Muller ’48 w March 1, 2019. Lillian Manzavrakos Finley ’48 w March 6, 2019. Leora Schaeffer Windschitl ’48 w February 5, 2019. Kathleen Conway Mattis ’49 w December 18, 2018. Kathleen Kuhle Flynn ’49 w December 8, 2018.

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Kathleen Borden Rooney ’52 w March 17, 2019. Geraldine Mirocha Machowicz ’53 w March 9, 2019. Ruth Rohlik Franta ’53 w January 24, 2019. Colleen Cavanagh Loney ’54 w March 5, 2019. Eleanore Kimlinger Huna ’54 w September 3, 2017. Sally Kreher Haik ’54 w February 12, 2019. Mary Judith Maertz Marquis ’54 w December 22, 2018. Dorothy Rengel Munn ’54 w December 11, 2018. Mary Patricia DeMoully, CSJ, ’55 w January 8, 2019. Delores Findlan ’55 w December 27, 2018. Katharine Grathwol Costa ’55 w February 15, 2019. Mary Ellen McDonnell Nemetz ’55 w December 11, 2018. Marie Vornbrock Nelson ’55 w February 24, 2019. Joan Buesgens Joos ’56 w January 31, 2019. Mary Ann Fath, CSJ, ’56 w December 9, 2018. Joan Kehrer Roden ’56 w December 9, 2018. Patricia McKenna ’56, former faculty in nursing w December 28, 2018. Doris Schoening Conzet ’56 w January 20, 2019. M. Eucharista Ward, OSF, ’56 w January 5, 2019. Elizabeth Barry Evon ’58 w January 1, 2019. Charla Burke Gardner ’58 w February 22, 2019. Ann Connolly, ASC, ’58 w January 12, 2019. Rosemary Tikalsky Busch ’58 w February 17, 2019. Sharon Auth Prissel ’59 w March 19, 2019. Darlene Engbarth Wheeler ’59 w April 6, 2017. Theresa O’Brien, CSJ, ’59 w December 13, 2018. Marguerite Mary Nuytten ’60 w January 22, 2019. Joanne Charles Tierney ’61 w January 21, 2019. LaVonne Quade Iverson ’61 w February 5, 2019. Joan Gotzian Finch ’62 w January 15, 2019. Mary Schmid Combal ’62 w January 12, 2019. Mary Catherine Seidel ’62 w December 26, 2018. Patricia Bossman Shaules ’63 w December 10, 2018. Mary Ellen Haskamp Hurley ’64 w February 3, 2019.

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Jean Kivel, CSJ, ’64 w January 1, 2019. Barbara Birch Ciresi ’65 w December 31, 2018. Julie Cwikio Huisheere ’67 w March 17, 2019. Katherine Jannicke Welter ’68 w February 13, 2019. Nancy Dessert ’69 w March 5, 2019. Mary Kissinger Marshall ’71 w January 4, 2019. Kathryn Boese Brever ’72 w March 23, 2019. Mary Anne Murphy Bauer ’73 w December 21, 2018. Marjorie Oknick ’80 w March 4, 2019. Joan Anderson Fierst ’84 w February 20, 2019. Antoinette Arnett ’87 w December 16, 2018. Norene A. Lundwall MAOL’87 w March 8, 2019. Jean Geisenhoff Drumm ’89 w January 1, 2019. Gus William Schloesser, OSC, ’89 w March 2, 2019. Linda Dahlin ’90 w January 21, 2019. Colleen McHale Hoffman ’90 w February 2, 2019. Peggy Hagen Zemba ’91 w February 16, 2019. Jan Marie Schmitz MAED’03 w August 3, 2015. Jacqueline Henry MLIS’07 w February 2, 2019. Tanya Williams, OP, MAT’11 w January 9, 2019.

Would you like to make a memorial or tribute gift? Please contact 651.690.8725 giving@stkate.edu Contact us to share news of a death 651.690.6666 inmemory@stkate.edu


PHOTO/SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF CARONDELET, ST. PAUL PROVINCE ARCHIVES

MARY ANN FATH, CSJ, ’56 Alumna and longtime St. Catherine University staff member Mary Ann Fath, CSJ, ’56 died on December 9, 2018, at the age of 84. Sister Mary Ann grew up on her family’s farm in De Graff, Minnesota. She entered the Sisters of St. Joseph in 1952, taking her first vows in 1955 and her final vows in 1960. In 1956, she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from St. Kate’s. At no point did she consider what her career within the sisterhood would be, but she did whatever work was needed as it came along. Sr. Mary Ann compiled a life list of jobs that included grading papers in parochial schools, grounds maintenance, tending to the elderly, and making meals for the other Sisters. In 1972, as many Catholic grade schools and high schools began to close, Sr. Mary Ann brought her talents to St. Kate’s, where she worked as a groundskeeper until her retirement in 2016. She was known to many as “Sister John Deere,” a student nickname that acknowledged Sr. Mary Ann’s many years using or driving garden machinery to keep the campus lawns and green spaces trimmed and tidy. Thanks to her long career at the University, Sr. Mary Ann encountered nearly every student who stepped on campus over a 40-plus year span; at the very least, her work touched their lives. A basketball player during her years as a St. Kate’s student, Sr. Mary Ann was always a fan of sports teams at the University. Whether she was cheering on the basketball team, removing snow from the sidewalks, or pacing the sidelines at a soccer match, Sr. Mary Ann was an admired and respected fixture on campus.

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Rising Star Alumnae Award SHUNU SHRESTHA ’07 is dedicated to

Alumnae Award Winners Each year, St. Kate’s recognizes graduates who demonstrate excellence in leadership and service to others. Each award recipient fosters positive growth in our communities, exemplifying the mission of the University. Watch the 2019 Alumnae Awards tribute video at stkate.edu/AwardVideo.

protecting the human rights of women and children at the city, state, and international levels. She embodies the ideals of the University by transforming the very way our communities empower those who are powerless. Shrestha is the City of Minneapolis’ first senior advisor for human trafficking prevention. Her role is to advise the city with new policies and best practices on issues related to human trafficking and all kinds of exploitation. Shrestha worked at the Program for Aid to Victims of Sexual Assault in Duluth, Minnesota, where she oversaw the trafficking prevention program. She was recognized at the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault’s 2018 award gala for her work coordinating the Duluth Trafficking Task Force and helping to develop a regional response to trafficking issues in Northeast Minnesota. She was also honored with the Duluth YWCA’s Women of Distinction award, the Humanitarian Award from the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans, and received special recognition for her work on the Safe Harbor initiative by The Advocates for Human Rights. Prior to coming to the United States in 2003, Shrestha worked in nongovernmental organizations in her native country of Nepal, where she actively worked to promote the human rights of women and children and to end gender-based violence, including trafficking of women and children.

I think [Shunu] has done incredible work and I don’t expect that to stop any time soon. I expect her to grow and to engage more people on a bigger, broader stage and on a deeper level. – KATY EAGLE FORMER COLLEAGUE The Rising Star Alumnae Award is given to an alumna who has graduated in the last 15 years.

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Alumnae Award

Alumnae Award

BAO VANG ’91 knows the meaning of leading and

HELEN WAGNER ’69 gave back as a compassionate

influencing. Her work supports refugee and immigrant families to help them find success in the United States. In doing so, she also encourages those around her to discover their own leadership pathway. Vang is the president and chief executive officer of the Hmong American Partnership (HAP), and has more than two decades of leadership and management experience in business and government agencies. She has been in her role at HAP for more than 10 years. During this time she has grown the organizational budget from $3 million to more than $14 million, serving more than 20,000 clients annually. She has served on the board of various national and local task forces, including appointments from both the governor’s and mayor’s offices. She was recognized by the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders as a Champion of Change. Her business interests reflect the entrepreneurial spirit of the greater Hmong community. She is a 1999 Bush Fellow, and in 2013, was listed in Minnesota Monthly’s 75 Most Influential People in the Twin Cities. She has been given numerous other awards and recognitions over the past decade.

teacher throughout her career. The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet founded the University with the tenet to “serve thy dear neighbor,” which Wagner lives daily. She began her career teaching English in 1973. Wagner joined 3M as a publicity specialist and retired as the head of public relations after a 40-year career at the company’s global headquarters in St. Paul and in New York City. She earned national recognition through the publicity she garnered when 3M collaborated with the American Red Cross to distribute face masks during the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington. Wagner also worked as an adjunct professor at St. Kate’s 1998– 2005, and as a volunteer in numerous roles, including chair of the Alumnae Council 2014–2016. She’s kept service at the forefront throughout her career, serving individuals who are homeless in New York, volunteering as a reading teacher, mentoring young women in life skills, and working with elementary and high school students as a Junior Achievement advisor. She continues to serve on the board of directors of the Landmark Center.

Bao is the type of leader who leads because she wants to create more leaders. She always says that her greatest success would be that people move into other leadership positions. Well you know, Bao is just awesome, and everybody knows it.

Helen has done anything you can think of to help the entities she is trying to serve. She makes all of these things that she does into a fun project, into an enjoyable thing to do. – HELEN MARY HUGHESDON ’68 ALUMNA AND FRIEND

– MAI MOUA COO, HMONG AMERICAN PARTNERSHIP

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Marketing and Communications, Mail 4122 St. Catherine University 2004 Randolph Ave. St. Paul, MN 55105-1750 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

This document dated January 23, 1809, bears the signature of Mother St. John Fontbonne Superior of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Lyon and namesake of the Fontbonne building on our St. Paul campus. Seen here in detail are the signatures of Fontbonne and other

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID TWIN CITIES, MN PERMIT NO. 822

community members witnessing the simple vows of five Sisters into the Lyon diocese congregation, members of which crossed the Atlantic in 1836 to found the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. This photo was captured in March, when students, faculty, and staff traveled to France on a pilgrimage to learn more about the CSJs’ rich heritage.

PHOTO/SHARON ROLENC

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St. Catherine University Magazine Summer 2019