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UNIVERSIT Y MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

Giving is an expression of our analysis of what the world needs.

–JEAN WINCEK, CSJ, ’62

THE SPIRIT OF GIVING IS ALIVE AND WELL AT ST. KATE’S.


EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT BETH HALLORAN VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING AND COMUNICATIONS TOCCARA STARK MAOL’09, EdD

EDITOR SARA BERHOW DESIGNER MOLLY ORTH CONTRIBUTORS JILL BRAUN RUTH HAAG BROMBACH ’60 BETH RIEDEL CARNEY ’82 KARA DEMARIE MLIS’16

KAYLA FORBES MBA’17 SARA KEIS MARA LANDON ’20 NATALIE MANION AMY MULLOWNEY ’19 JAYNE STAUFFER ANDY STEINER KRISTEN WUNDERLICH PHOTOGRAPHER REBECCA ZENEFSKI SLATER ’10

ADDRESS CHANGES 651.690.6666 alumnae@stkate.edu ONLINE mag.stkate.edu


UNIVERSIT Y MAGAZINE

FALL 2018

F EAT U R E S

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The Legacy of Generosity

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Philanthropy – it’s not just for the Gateses

A tribute to the inspirational gift given by St. Catherine University’s founders.

With a broadened philosophy of giving, anyone can be a philanthropist. BY ANDY STEINER

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The Legacy and Promise Behind Named Scholarships

St. Catherine University awards 270 named scholarships to its students. Learn the stories behind the names. PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

St. Catherine University Magazine is published three times a year by the Office of Marketing and Communications with the St. Kate’s Mag Advisory Board. No part of this publication may be reprinted without permission. St. Catherine University was founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet in 1905. Learn more: stkate.edu/ourhistory mag.stkate.edu/advisoryboard

TH E CO M M O NS 2

FROM THE PRESIDENT

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BOOKMARK NEW

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AROUND CAMPUS

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BY THE NUMBERS

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CLASS NOTES

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IN MEMORY

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A NOTE FROM A KATIE

BY JILL BRAUN OPENING CELEBRATION

St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter addressed the St. Catherine community at the September 2018 Opening Celebration. With Mayor Carter are Sakeena Futrell-Carter ’03, President ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76 and Ikram Koliso ’17, a member of the mayor’s staff. PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS


PRESIDENT ROLOFF SHARES A MOMENT OF GRATITUDE WITH ROSALIND GEFRE, CSJ, AT A MARCH 2018 CELEBRATION TO THANK AND HONOR THE SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF CARONDELET. PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2018


From the President Is it true?

When you give, do you receive? And do you receive more in return than what you gave? I believe it is true. When we are generous, we start a chain of positive reactions much like the Coca-Cola commercial: the ad where one person gives another person an icy, cold bottle of Coke, and they give it to another, and another, and eventually the person who gave their Coke away first receives one back in the end. It is no different when you give to St. Kate’s. When you give, you engage in a chain reaction of positive actions. The result is a multiplier effect that, when harnessed, can have significant results. Higher education is one of the places we can vividly see this multiplier effect that we all benefit from as citizens. College graduates not only improve their own economic and personal well-being, but they have a positive impact on our economy. We know college graduates earn significantly more than high school graduates. And let’s not forget the positive benefits to society and the economy, which include lower crime rates, increased economic mobility, stronger civic participation, improved health outcomes, and greater life expectancy. As a women’s college, St. Catherine University is an excellent investment. According to the Women’s College Coalition, students who attend a women’s college graduate in four years or less at a higher rate than those at coed institutions, and they are almost twice as likely to complete a graduate degree. Students who graduate from St. Kate’s experience the greatest change in average annual earning compared to their families among Minnesota’s 17 private colleges.1 The return on investment for St. Kate’s is stronger than ever. I often say that our students need to do the work themselves, but they don’t do it alone. Each of us supports the efforts of St. Kate’s students through the

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giving of our time, talent and treasure. While each of these is important, the latter—treasure—is especially important. Financial gifts help fuel our future through scholarships and other financial supports for students, enhance classrooms and research, provide important student services, and support our incredible faculty. The result is an academic experience that prepares students to become leaders who leave their mark and have an influence wherever they go. All of our students in the College for Women receive either merit aid, need-based aid or both from St. Kate’s. (This is in addition to any loans or grants they receive from outside sources.) Did you? If you did, have you paid it back? Many of our alumnae/i are very clear that this is their intent, and it is a powerful, generous idea. As we start this new academic year, I ask that you make an investment in St. Kate’s and donate on Give to St. Kate’s Day, November 14. Every gift matters, and your support is needed. It is our collective opportunity to pay it back so more can go forward like you and I did. Your gift to St. Kate’s is an investment in our collective future. And it is a bright future indeed. ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76, MBA

Equality of Opportunity Project, July 2017

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PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

The Legacy of Generosity Though St. Catherine University has had many donors throughout its history, none have given more than our founders, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Among the multitudes of gifts given by the Sisters, one of their most generous was the gifting of the Minneapolis campus property to the University in 2017. This visionary gift positions St. Kate’s for a strong and prosperous future, a legacy that will impact generations of students to come. Established in 1881 as St. Mary’s School of Nursing, the Minneapolis campus was later

named St. Mary’s Junior College. In 1986, St. Mary’s merged with St. Kate’s, making the University the oldest healthcare educator in Minnesota. Owned by the Sisters for 130 years, the Minneapolis campus property was gifted to St. Catherine University in 2017. The CSJs continue to find new and creative ways to partner with St. Kate’s, forever fostering our mission to educate women to lead and influence. Their contributions are daily felt by all, and we are ever grateful for their insight, foresight and dedicated leadership.

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With a broadened philosophy of giving, anyone can be a philanthropist. BY ANDY STEINER

W

hat does a philanthropist wear? An expensive dress and pearls? Or a comfortable sweatshirt? Where does one meet a philanthropist? In a high-rise corner suite? Or in a quiet office in an old brick building? At St. Catherine University, where an ethic of giving is bred in the soul, philanthropists come in all shapes and sizes. Here, giving is about much more than writing a check: it’s about how professors teach, how staff support, how graduates work. The St. Kate’s philosophy of giving is about giving back, something that anyone — no matter their background or financial circumstance — can do. To illustrate this point, we asked two campus experts to explain their philosophies of giving. Their responses shatter stereotypes about who can make a difference — and about how that difference can be made.

JEAN WINCEK, CSJ, ’62: GIFTS OF THE HEART Sister Jean Wincek comes from a long line of givers. She’s not descended from the Rockefellers or the Carnegies, but her adopted family — the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet — have been philanthropists since the 1650s, when they first came together to help women in crisis.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2018

PHOTOS/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

Philanthropy – it’s not just for the Gateses


SISTER JEAN WINCEK ’62 AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR JEFF JOHNSON NOT ONLY SHARED THEIR IDEAS ON GIVING WITH US, THEY SHARED GIFTS WITH EACH OTHER IN THE FORM OF A BOOK EXCHANGE.

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Giving really comes from a sense of generosity that comes out of the heart.

“The first Sisters of St. Joseph were women who saw France falling apart,” Sr. Jean explains. “They saw the desperation of women and others in their society, and they said to one another, ‘We’ve got to do something about this.’” Sr. Jean, who recently celebrated 60 years as a CSJ, understands the giving philosophy of this strong group of women who went on to found St. Catherine University better than almost anyone. Since joining the Sisters after graduating high school (she was educated by CSJs from kindergarten through 12th grade) and earning her education degree from the College of St. Catherine, she began a long career as a teacher and a school administrator, dedicating her professional life to serving children and families. From 2009–2017, she was discerned for a leadership position in the St. Paul Province. And as a 27-year member of the University’s Board of Trustees, she committed her time and enviable energy to giving back to her alma mater. After a yearlong “retirement,” she’s now serving on two congregational committees and deciding on her next professional adventure. From Sr. Jean’s perspective, giving and service are intertwined. Though she has no financial resources of her own to give to charity, her life and career have been their own form of philanthropy. Giving, in Sr. Jean’s philosophy, is about serving the community, about loving God and neighbor without distinction and extending that belief into everyday life. “Giving really comes from a sense of generosity that comes out of the heart,” Sr. Jean says. “Giving is an expression of one’s deep beliefs, and where are our deep beliefs rooted? Back in the University.” And a person doesn’t have to be a CSJ to embody the Sisters’ giving philosophy. Sr. Jean says she sees this approach to life in the people who live, work and learn at St. Kate’s. In fact, many of our graduates have this same mindset. They give to St. Kate’s because it prepares tomorrow’s healers and advocates for a better world.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2018

To illustrate her point, Sr. Jean tells the story of a fellow Sister who had an extended hospital stay. When nursing staff came into her room, the Sister would ask, “Where did you get your training?” Many said their degrees were from St. Kate’s. The Katies who came to her room, this Sister recalled, brought a distinct attitude of giving and care to their work. “She noticed a qualitative difference,” Sr. Jean says. “They were compassionate and extended that compassion and care to the world. That is a gift that St. Catherine gives: graduates — female and male — who go out into the world and treat people with compassion and care.” Centuries ago, the CSJs gave by teaching poor women to make and sell lace. Over the years, the Sisters’ philanthropy grew to meet the needs of the time. This flexible approach to giving has been a hallmark of the CSJs, Sr. Jean says, and what has kept their mission strong and their members inspired. In St. Paul, for more than a century, that mission and philanthropy has been tied to the education of women. For the CSJs, Sr. Jean explains, “Giving is an expression of our analysis of what society needs. So if, for instance, we really believe that our society needs women who are leaders who act with integrity, who have a mind toward transforming the world, that becomes one of the beliefs out of which we would give.” If work is a form of philanthropy, it makes sense to focus on the University and its graduates, Sr. Jean says. They are one of the Sisters’ greatest gifts to the world. “Just look at our graduates, who they are,” Sr. Jean says, confidently. “Look at the judges, the people in political office, the leaders. Look at the people who work in all phases of healthcare. They are all giving of their time and their skills, and the world is a much better place because of them.”


JEFF JOHNSON: THE MOST FOR THE NEEDIEST It’s a classic tactic of philosophy professors: Present students with a moral puzzle, then ask them to debate its pros and cons. So it comes as no surprise when Jeff Johnson, St. Catherine University associate professor of philosophy and department chair, asks students in his ethics course to ponder a particular scenario, posed by philosopher Peter Singer in his 2009 book The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty. “What if you were walking by Dew Drop Pond,” Johnson posits, “and you saw a kid splashing in the water and drowning?” Johnson says that just about every person, his students included, is inclined to say, “even if it means that we'll ruin our fancy shoes or lose our cell phone, we’d rush in and help the kid.” If a person didn’t act to save a drowning child, Johnson says, most would judge them lacking in moral character: “How could we live with ourselves if we didn’t help?” But it gets trickier. Johnson then explains to his class Singer’s argument that since most people believe they have a moral obligation to help a drowning child, they should feel that same moral obligation to save the lives of disadvantaged people around the world through charitable giving. “We find ourselves in a situation today where people in the developing world are dying from very easily treatable conditions,” Johnson says, “and it’s as easily within our reach to help them as it would be for us to wade into a shallow pond and save a drowning child.” In the developing world, saving the life of a poor child often costs very little, he explains. A mosquito net, which can save a child from mosquito-borne malaria, or a worm pill, which can keep a child healthy and able to attend school, costs just dollars or pennies. People privileged with a college education, Singer argues, have a moral obligation to donate some portion of their income to charities that use cost-effective practices designed to help the most people at once. This idea is known as effective altruism, and Johnson, who has committed himself personally to this practice, uses it as a way to get his students thinking about

what it means to give, and what are one’s moral obligations regarding charity. Johnson helps his students imagine what it would take to extend Singer’s argument to their everyday lives. Some counter that they are students, without extra financial resources to give to charity. Johnson’s response? He asks his students to keep a spending diary, where they track their daily spending habits over a set period of time. “In the spending diary, I ask them to carefully distinguish between the things they purchased that they needed, and those that they wanted,” Johnson explains. At the end of the study, almost without exception, Johnson says, students have the same reaction: “They’ll report, ‘I didn’t have any idea how much I spent on junk I don’t really need.’ It takes very little to make a huge difference in other Gifts take many people’s lives, and this exercise empowers students by helping forms, and everyone them see they too may have extra has something they resources to give charitably.” Discussions like this one are can give to others. in line with the St. Catherine philosophy and mission — that gifts take many forms, and everyone has something they can give to others. Johnson, who’s been at the University for more than a decade, says that’s one of the things he loves about the institution — the entire community is challenged to think about their role in the world and what they can do to help improve life for everyone who inhabits it. “It makes the concept of giving feel accessible to just about anyone,” he says. Expanding the definition of philanthropy somehow feels empowering — and what can be more Katie than that? “We all can help,” Johnson says. “We all should. How we do it is up to us.”

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Bookmark What literature tells us about philanthropy — we did the reading for you and busted these myths. BY AMY MULLOWNEY ’19

Philanthropists are all millionaires. Philanthropy is acting

on your humanity, compassion and hope of a better future. In Giving 2.0, Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen defines a philanthropist as anyone who gives any amount of time, money, experience or skills in an act of altruism.

One person can’t make a difference. Every little bit helps.

To put things in perspective, visit givingwhatwecan.org and input your household income into the global wealth calculator to see where you fall. In 2015, an annual income of $11,000, just below the U.S. poverty line, was still richer than 85% of people in the world. Giving something does more good than giving nothing. However, William MacAskill points out in Doing Good Better that it is necessary to research a charity to ensure your donation will make maximum impact.

You never really know what charities do with your money.

To get the best bang for your buck in charitable giving, do your homework. Research is an important step in evaluating an agency’s effectiveness in carrying out its mission. In Successful Philanthropy, Jean Shafiroff shares resources such as charitynavigator.org, a database of organizations that are evaluated on operations and cost-effectiveness.

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A grassroots approach won’t change the world. It’s not just

donors, but also doers that are crucial to any force of change. Volunteering your time, knowledge, skills, contacts and other creative resources can truly make a difference. It’s not about profitability, but impact— exactly the revelation Wes Moore has in his biography, The Work: My Search for a Life that Matters.

Money can’t buy happiness.

The last, and perhaps most controversial, myth. We’ve all heard that money can’t buy happiness, but what if we’re just spending it on the wrong things? In The Most Good You Can Do, moral philosopher Peter Singer discusses the reciprocal relationship between philanthropy and happiness. Studies show altruistic acts correlate with positive emotions and well-being.


Faculty, Staff and CSJs on Philanthropy Recommended reading from St. Kate’s librarians Hooked by the Spirit by Rita Steinhagen, CSJ

Want to read it for yourself? The Most Good You Can Do by Peter Singer

How effective altruism is changing ideas about living ethically, and how living altruistically often leads to the greatest self-fulfillment. Successful Philanthropy by Jean Shafiroff

A roadmap to philanthropy offering accessible tips and strategies to get started. The Work by Wes Moore

Doing Good Better by William MacAskill

MacAskill tackles effective altruism by explaining statistics and scenarios in a way every reader will relate to. Giving 2.0 (2011) by Laura ArrillagaAndreessen

A big picture guide for those who have large resources to share or stakes in charities and nonprofits.

Sister Rita recounts her unexpected calling to religious life and shares stories as a peaceful activist. This Really Happened by Kathleen Judge, CSJ, ’61

The true story of Sister Kathleen Judge’s 40-year missionary journey. Expanding Opportunities for the Next Generation

Co-authored by economics professor Caroline Krafft, this textbook assesses early childhood development in the Middle East and North Africa and suggests policies and programs to address inequality and existing shortfalls.

“Booktalking for Incarcerated Teens: Scalable, Sustainable Success from the Hennepin County Home School” This chapter of Library Youth Outreach: 26 Ways to Connect with Children, Young Adults and Their Families is co-authored by librarian Amy Mars MLIS’12. “Communitybased Collaborative Action Research”

This chapter, co-authored by nursing professor Margaret Pharris, can be found in Philosophies and Practices of Emancipatory Knowing in Nursing: Social Justice as Praxis. Copyright 2014. From Philosophies and Practices of Emancipatory Nursing by Paula N. Kagan, Marlaine C. Smith and Peggy L. Chinn. Reproduced by permission of Taylor and Francis Group, LLC, a division of Informa plc.

One man’s life story of finding purpose. The common thread? Giving back.

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Around Campus ART PROFESSOR TO EXHIBIT CERAMICS WORK Monica Rudquist, assistant professor of art, won the 2018 Carol Easley Denny Award for excellence in teaching, research and community service. With the award, she will mount an exhibition in the Catherine G. Murphy Gallery that will feature a new body of artwork alongside the work of her mentor, renowned sculptor Judy Onofrio. The exhibit will run from February 9 to March 30, 2019, and will coincide with the annual conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts, to be held in the Twin Cities. “I have come to know Monica as a talented ceramic artist, a respected instructor and an energetic collaborator,” explains Nicole Watson, director of the Catherine G. Murphy Gallery. “Her desire to engage students in all aspects of her creative practice demonstrates her commitment to our mission and values. It is an honor to exhibit her work. Her exhibition with Judy Onofrio will place the University’s art department and the gallery in the national ceramic spotlight.” Rudquist, a clay artist, works primarily with porcelain. She is known for her playful, wheel-thrown functional wares as well as her large-scale, abstract wall installations. Her work is included in numerous private and public collections, including the McKnight Foundation, the Minnesota History Center and Life Source of Minnesota, which has the largest permanent installation of her work. Rudquist is co-president of Minnesota Women Ceramic Artists, a member of the Women’s Art Registry of Minnesota and a founding member of the Northern Clay Center. Visit gallery.stkate.edu for more information.

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ST. KATE’S AWARDED TWO GRANTS FROM THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION The St. Kate’s biology department will soon be adding a new piece of equipment to its lab thanks to a $118,176 Major Research Instrumentation grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded to professors Paula Furey, PhD, Andrea Kalis, PhD, Tami McDonald, PhD, and Kay Tweeten, PhD. The funding supports the purchase of a fluorescence microscope, which will help advance research and training at the University. This modern microscope and data analysis software will enhance research programs, stimulate new collaborations among faculty and allow students to be more involved. With its addition, students will have more opportunities to learn microscopy, imaging techniques and image analysis across a variety of disciplines, including ecology, genetics, molecular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Also receiving an NSF grant is the education department, whose late-phase Design and Development project to create a K–12 classroom observation protocol for integrated STEM instruction in science and/or engineering settings will receive $139,049 in funding. This project will use more than 500 classroom videos to design an observation protocol that can be used in a variety of educational contexts through an online platform. Professor Beth Whalen, PhD, serves as project leader on this grant. “Each of these prestigious NSF grants will advance research and scholarship at St. Kate’s, with direct benefits to our students,” said Kira Dahlk, director of Sponsored Programs, Research and External Engagement at St. Kate’s. “From Dr. Whalen's study, education students will learn improved methods for teaching STEM in K–12 settings, with ripple benefits to children in those classrooms. The acquisition of the widefield fluorescence microscope greatly enhances research capacity at the University, and will expand the types and diversity of research questions biology faculty and students can explore.” The NSF provides funds for research and education through grants and cooperative agreements to higher education institutions, K–12 school systems, businesses, information science organizations and research organizations throughout the U.S. Of the approximately 40,000 project proposals received each year, about 11,000 are funded.


2017–18 WILDCAT ROUNDUP BASKETBALL Danica Cambrice ’20 became the first St. Kate’s player to record a 30-point game. She earned First Team All-MIAC honors and led the Wildcats to a conference playoff appearance. DANCE The Wildcats qualified for finals at the USA Championship for the first time, and finished sixth to mark the highest national finish in team history. GOLF Kaitlyn Alvarez ’18 became the first player in St. Kate’s golf history to earn all-region honors in back-toback seasons. SOCCER The Wildcats won the MIAC Playoff Championship and earned the program’s first bid to the NCAA Tournament. Head coach Jesse Campos became the first coach in program history to earn the MIAC Coach of the Year honor, and five players earned All-MIAC accolades. SOFTBALL Kylie Maczieswski ’18 was nominated for the NCAA Woman of the Year Award and earned a prestigious NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship. SWIMMING AND DIVING Fransecka Hernandez-Nietling ’21 finished third in both the 100- and 200-yard breaststroke events at the conference championship, becoming the first swimmer in five years to earn AllMIAC honors.

DANICA CAMBRICE ’20

TENNIS The Wildcats were named an ITA 2018 All-Academic Team with a team GPA of 3.485. Seven players were recognized on the ITA ScholarAthletes list. TRACK AND FIELD Tori Thompson ’19 was the MIAC champion in the long jump, and earned all-region honors for the second time in her career.

FRANSECKA HERNANDEZNIETLING ’21

AUBREY ECKSTROM ’20 MADDY KNOLL ’20

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By the Numbers

Introducing the fall 2018 incoming students.

College for Women CLASS OF 2022

SOCIAL WORK

3% MATH AND SCIENCE

403

EDUCATION

PSYCHOLOGY

LANGUAGE/ INTERPRETING

MULTICULTURAL

6% 8%

OTHER BIOLOGY

8%

DUPLIKATES*

EXERCISE/SPORT/NUTRITION SCIENCE

2%

TRIPLIKATES* WHERE THEY’RE FROM

PROGRAM AREAS

5%

8%

9%

5%

46%

4%

STUDENTS

44%

HEALTHCARE

4%

8% BUSINESS

FRANCE

UNITED STATES VIETNAM

CA CO CT FL

IA IL KS MA

MI MN NH NY

OH UT OR WA SD WI TX

ZIMBABWE

All figures current as of September 20, 2018. College for Adults and Graduate College students also start in spring and summer. These numbers reflect the fall start only. *DupliKates have a parent or grandparent who is a St. Kate’s graduate. TripliKates have both a parent and grandparent who are Katies.

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College for Adults

EDUCATION

3% SOCIAL WORK

OTHER

BUSINESS

4% 6%

PROGRAM AREAS

7% 0

20

40

60

80

80%

HEALTHCARE

432

100

STUDENTS

24%

100

MULTICULTURAL

18–59

FROM

88%

12%

FEMALE

MALE

32

AGES

STATES

OTHER 1% LIBRARY SCIENCE

Graduate College

6%

PROGRAM AREAS

EDUCATION 11%

0

400 STUDENTS

15%

MULTICULTURAL

20–65 40

HEALTHCARE

47%

BUSINESS

20

40

60

80

100

14% 21%

60

80

100

AGES

SOCIAL WORK

FROM

19

STATES 80

89%

11%

FEMALE

MALE

100

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Sarah Petrea Schultz ’17 CHARLES AND ELLORA ALLISS EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FUND AUDREY C. GRUBBS ENDOWED MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP FUND VIRGINIA CLAESSENS MCDONALD AND WILLIAM J. MCDONALD SCHOLARSHIP FUND

April Gross ’17 SISTER SERAPHIM GIBBONS SCHOLARSHIP

Casey Warpeha ’17 EDITH MONTAVON NOWICKI SCHOLARSHIP

Renee Tong ’19 CHARLOTTE DIENHART SCHOLARSHIP


The Legacy and Promise Behind Named Scholarships Each year, St. Catherine University awards 270 named scholarships to its students. Learn the stories behind the names. BY JILL BRAUN

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f you want a glimpse into the history of St. Kate’s, you can simply take a look at the legacy behind our nearly 270 named scholarships. Often established by alumnae/i and their families in honor of someone, these gifts not only represent a legacy left behind, but one St. Catherine University will continue to keep moving forward. Every scholarship, honoree and beneficiary harken back to the mission, vision and core values on which St. Kate’s was founded: Catholic, women, liberal arts, leadership, academic excellence, community and social justice. It is truly remarkable to ref lect on where these scholarships come from and what they mean. They not only pay tribute to the honoree and their inspiring attributes and accomplishments, they will impact the

lives of so many Katies in the future. These scholarships ensure that smart, talented, compassionate women and men have the opportunity to be challenged in an environment that fosters their growth. An opportunity to ask questions, dig deeper, drive change. An opportunity to influence the world. While their names are recognized by some, it’s not often we get to hear the stories behind these scholarships that continue to benefit generations of Katies.

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THE FAMILY OF BARBARA PROBST WOLLAN ’58 WANTED TO HONOR HER LIFELONG CONNECTION TO ST. KATE’S WITH A GIFT THAT WILL HELP EDUCATE FUTURE GENERATIONS OF KATIE NURSES.

BARBARA PROBST WOLLAN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FOR NURSING When Barbara Probst Wollan ’58 was honored with a St. Kate’s Alumnae Award in 2008, her friends and family recounted that “her impact will surely be felt on the countless lives who have benefitted from her clear sense of compassion, dedication to family and faith, and unwavering commitment to serving others.” Ten years later, her family made sure this legacy will continue by surprising her with a named scholarship gift in honor of her 60-year reunion last summer. The Barbara Probst Wollan Endowed Scholarship for Nursing was established as an annual gift to a St. Kate’s nursing student who demonstrates leadership, academic excellence and financial need. Wollan has enjoyed a lifelong connection to St. Kate’s nursing program, beginning in 1954 when she started her bachelor of arts in nursing with 32 other bright, young women. Over the years, relationships with these nursing friends have flourished as they faithfully attend reunions and take alumnae trips together, heading straight to the back of the bus each time, where they laugh and chatter non-stop throughout the journey. They are now known by the trip organizers as the “noisy nurses”! Wollan has been a class representative for the past 15 years, and many classmates credit her for keeping them connected.

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Wollan was encouraged to enter nursing by her grandmother for the same reason many of today’s students choose nursing: to support their families. She went on to have a distinguished 27-year career at HealthEast in a variety of nursing and leadership roles. Mid-career, Wollan decided to return to St. Kate’s to pursue her Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership (MAOL). And she is not the only Katie in her family — four of her six daughters, her daughter-in-law, and even her son-in-law are St. Kate’s graduates. Her son Robert Wollan is an honorary Katie as he is currently a member of the University’s Board of Trustees. Beyond St. Kate’s, Wollan is busy tending to her bustling family of eight children, 22 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. She is active in her parish, Nativity of Our Lord, and serves on the Funeral Lunch committee and the Grandparent Apostolate program. When asked about her reaction to the scholarship, Wollan has two words: “overwhelmed and grateful.” “My mom loves being connected to St. Kates in both big and small ways,” says daughter Anne Wollan Kocon ’82. “We wanted to honor her commitment to St. Kate’s in a lasting way. Each year, she can feel a part of one student’s success. This scholarship is her living legacy, and we hope it inspires other families to do the same."

ELIZABETH ANN BEATSON O’SHAUGHNESSY SCHOLARSHIP FUND Not unfamiliar to the St. Paul community, the O’Shaughnessy name and legacy are especially important in the history and development of St. Catherine University and the University of St. Thomas. Ignatius Aloysius O’Shaughnessy, a 1907 alumnus of St. Thomas, is a legendary benefactor to both his alma mater and St. Kate’s. His philanthropy supported the building of The O’Shaughnessy performing arts center on the St. Kate’s campus. The I.A. O’Shaughnessy Foundation, under the leadership of his son Lawrence (Larry), also made a $1 million gift to help build the Butler Athletic Center at St. Kate’s, and the family has supported numerous other projects and programs at St. Kate’s and St. Thomas alike. Larry served as a trustee at both universities for many years, and was St. Kate’s board chair from 1981–1984. In 1991, Larry O’Shaughnessy established the Elizabeth Ann Beatson O’Shaughnessy Scholarship Fund in honor of his first wife, Elizabeth (Betty), a


THE O’SHAUGHNESSY FAMILY HAS SUPPORTED ST. KATE’S FOR GENERATIONS. SINCE 1991, THE ELIZABETH ANN BEATSON O’SHAUGHNESSY SCHOLARSHIP HAS PROVIDED STUDENTS WITH A FULL FOUR-YEAR TUITION SCHOLARSHIP.

ZOEY ARMSTRONG ’18 Elizabeth Ann Beatson O’Shaughnessy Scholarship Recipient Nursing During my sophomore year, I had the opportunity to go to my birth country, South Korea, and serve disabled children and adults living at Holt International Orphanage, Ilsan. I will start my career as a registered nurse in the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Children's Minnesota in October. I would like to go back to school to become a pediatric nurse practitioner and serve disabled youth both in Minnesota and Korea. 1943 graduate of St. Kate’s who died of lupus in 1989. It is the most substantial and competitive scholarship available at the University, offering four-year tuition to a student demonstrating excellent academic performance, extraordinary artistic talents or outstanding extracurricular accomplishments. But Larry O’Shaughnessy’s influence perpetuates well beyond the campuses of these two distinguished St. Paul universities that he held so dear. A driven scholar, educator, businessman, civic leader and philanthropist, he worked with many organizations on a wide range of issues, from poverty and housing to legal reform and ethical business practices. A fervent believer in education, O’Shaughnessy became very interested in the value of Montessori more than 50 years ago. In 1963, he founded Highland Park Montessori, the first Montessori preschool program in St. Paul. He also established the Montessori Training Center of Minnesota in 1973 to train teachers, and later inspired his daughter Molly to dedicate her career to Montessori education. O’Shaughnessy’s passion for poetry in particular will long be celebrated by many, especially his second wife of 25 years, Bonnie, who would read it with him daily. As his December 2017 obituary states, “Larry’s love and writing of poetry say much about who he was and what he did in his life. The pursuit of truth and beauty, and the life of the mind led him on a path both to an understanding of the human experience, and to actively attempting to improve that experience.”

MEGAN MILLER ’18 Elizabeth Ann Beatson O’Shaughnessy Scholarship Recipient Public Health/Public Policy Graduate Student – Master of Arts in Occupational Therapy My greatest achievements during my time at St. Kate’s are going to the NCAA Division III World Series with the softball team in 2017 and graduating as the valedictorian of my class in 2018. My career goal is to become a registered occupational therapist and find a job I love. I’m thinking about going into inpatient mental health occupational therapy. I also hope to go back to school and complete my doctoral degree in either occupational therapy or a related field.

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THIS PORTRAIT OF SOR JUANA INÉS DE LA CRUZ, AN EARLY FEMINIST IN MEXICO, WAS PAINTED IN 1772 BY ANDRÉS DE ISLAS.

SISTER JUANA INÉS DE LA CRUZ SCHOLARSHIP FROM THE CONSULATE OF MEXICO IN SAINT PAUL Sor (Sister) Juana Inés de la Cruz is often lauded as one of the most brilliant, self-taught scholars and poets in Mexican history. Born in 17th century patriarchal New Spain (Mexico), she was arguably one of the first feminists, a bold and persistent advocate for women’s empowerment, education and gender equality — which sharply contradicted social norms and earned her more enemies than friends. Despite this, many political and intellectual authority figures recognized her brilliance by the age of 13, and she soon became one of the greatest poets, mathematicians and scientists of her era. Sor Juana served the Roman Catholic Church as a nun for 25 years and continued to immerse herself in her studies and literary works. Sor Juana once said, “I do not study to know more, but to ignore less.” Similarly, the Consulate of Mexico in Saint Paul believes in the transformative power of education for everyone, and empowering the community to earn the skills and knowledge needed in a fiercely competitive and integrated economy, ultimately benefiting all of Minnesota and beyond. Every year, the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs, through the Institute of Mexicans Abroad (or IME in Spanish), invites higher education institutions and social organizations interested in fostering education for Mexican or Mexican-American students to apply for a scholarship grant program sponsored by the government of Mexico. In 2011, St. Kate’s used this grant to create the Sister Juana Inés de la Cruz Scholarship in honor of an exceptional woman who challenged the status quo

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through her intellectual pursuits and curiosity. Much like first-generation Mexican/Mexican-American students, Sor Juana Inés was a pioneer and a woman who transcended her time. The IME-Becas local selection committee has continued to award funds to St. Kate’s on the strength of its measurable results toward student success. St. Kate’s is highly regarded for its fantastic first-to-second-year retention rate for multicultural students and the specific services and activities designed to help them succeed. “Through IME-Becas, we seek to instill a sense of national pride in Mexican and Mexican-American students, and we value how St. Kate’s rewards highly accomplished students with this scholarship,” says Consul Gerardo Guerrero. “It not only eliminates access barriers to a first-rate education, but does so while emphasizing and valuing a commitment to social justice.”

RUTH LOPEZ ’18 Sister Juana Inés de la Cruz Scholarship from the Consulate of Mexico in Saint Paul Recipient Biology At St. Kate’s, I helped organize an educational forum where a group of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) students addressed the Sisters of St. Joseph and the larger St. Kate’s community. We sought to put a face on the words “DACA” and “immigrant,” sharing our powerful journeys to the U.S. as children and demonstrating how we are working hard for the good of the community through education. My goal is to continue on to dental school and to serve the community. I want to educate my culture and lowincome populations about the importance of oral care to overall health and wellness.


HEATHER HENDRICKS CHEVAILLIER ’93 (LEFT) AND WENDY HENDRICKS DEGLER ’91 (RIGHT) HONORED THEIR MOTHER SUZANNE HENDRICKS (CENTER) WITH AN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN HER NAME.

PROFESSOR SUZANNE HENDRICKS FCNS SCHOLARSHIP AWARD FUND ENDOWMENT Affectionately called “Dr. Sue” by her students, Professor Emerita Suzanne Hendricks taught fashion merchandising at St. Kate’s for three decades and chaired the family, consumer and nutrition sciences (FCNS) department for 12 years before retiring in 2009. In 2004, Hendricks and her family established the Professor Suzanne Hendricks FCNS Scholarship in celebration of her 25th anniversary of teaching at St. Kate’s. The award supports a sophomore or junior fashion apparel major. The family’s motivation for establishing the scholarship was to recognize Hendricks’ contributions over the years and to do something that would have a direct and lasting impact. Hendricks’ close connections with her students were obvious to her daughter Wendy Hendricks Degler ’91, when she was a young girl tagging along on campus. “She inspired me to have the belief that I could do anything I wanted in my life, without limitation,” said Degler. “Her relationship with her students was inspiring, and it made me want to attend St. Kate’s from the time I was 12 years old. How many people can say they lived with their college advisor?” Hendricks embarked on her career as a home economist and went on to complete her master’s degree in textiles and clothing at Michigan State University. One of her professors there suggested she consider teaching at the college level, so she pursued teaching at the University of Minnesota in Duluth and the Twin Cities before landing at St. Kate’s. Recognized as an exceptional teacher and advisor by students and peers alike, she was very involved in the development of

The Reflective Woman core curriculum, the fashion merchandising and apparel design majors, and student recruitment and retention efforts. “We believe it is important to give back to St. Kate’s for the exceptional education we received,” adds her daughter Heather Hendricks Chevaillier ’93. “It gives us the opportunity to honor our mom and help students do something they might not otherwise be able to do.” The family is particularly pleased that several recipients have used the scholarship to study fashion and design in London and Italy to enhance their studies and broaden their perspective. Hendricks is spending retirement traveling the world herself, and reflects back on her career at St. Kate’s with great pride and gratitude. “I feel very honored to have a scholarship in my name that continues my legacy with students at St. Kate’s."

YOUR LEGACY, THEIR FUTURE Named scholarships are a meaningful way for alumnae/i, families and others to pay tribute to their connection to St. Kate’s and continue to inspire student success. They can take on different forms, primarily endowed and non-endowed. Endowed scholarships require a minimum of $50,000. Donors may make multiyear gifts to achieve that level. Donors — individuals or groups — can also create or add to named scholarships through estate gifts. Endowed scholarships go on in perpetuity, and thus your name is associated with St. Kate’s forever.

Non-endowed named scholarships (meaning they are spent out in support in one to a few years’ time and end) require a $10,000 minimum and are also very impactful for students. Like endowed scholarships, original donors and others can continue to contribute to the fund over time. Large or small, any contribution impacts the success of St. Kate’s students and programs. For more information on the many ways you can make a difference, visit stkate.edu/give.

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Be part of the challenge! Give to St. Kate’s Day • November 14

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2018


SUBMIT A CLASS NOTE CONTACT US Online: stkate.edu/alumnae Phone: 651.690.6666 Email: alumnae@stkate.edu

Class Notes 1959

In June 2018, CATHERINE (KAY) WILHELMY BAUER ’59 was inducted into the WCCO Radio “Good Neighbor Hall Of Fame.” Good Neighbor Award winners are people who do great deeds in the community.

KAY WILHELMY BAUER ’59 1964

CAROL SCHMIT, OSF, ’64 was elected as the community minister and president of the Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, Minnesota. Sister Carol, along with three assistant ministers, will be responsible for the spiritual and ministerial life and mission of the congregation.

1967

CAROL AGNES ’67 was honored for her work in helping to build the athletics department at the College of Saint Benedict from the ground up. Agnes was a 2018

facebook.com/katiealumnae @StKatesAlums

Breaking Barriers Award winner and was celebrated at National Girls and Women in Sports Day at the Minnesota History Center in February 2018.

Murphy is the vice president of patient and health professional services at Be the Match.

1973

TERESA A. SCHULTZ ’84, APRN, CNP was published in the renowned publication Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare, and has been welcomed into the International Nurses Association. Schultz has developed a special expertise in neurosurgery, providing care for children and adults with pediatric onset neurosurgical issues. She currently works as an advanced practice registered nurse at Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare.

LYNNE SCHRIVER-SHEEDY ’73 competed with her dragon boat team, the Dragon Divas, at an international dragon boat festival in Florence, Italy, in July 2018. The festival included 121 teams — all breast cancer survivors — from 18 countries. Schriver-Sheedy and her team placed eleventh.

1984

1986

LYNNE SCHRIVERSHEEDY ’73

TERESA A. RADZINSKI ’86 joined the St. Kate’s Board of Trustees in February 2018. Radzinski is a managing director and private client advisor with U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management.

1976

ELIZABETH SCHRANK MURPHY ’76 won a TRUST 2018 Courageous Women in Health Care Award. Each winner has “found the courage within to tackle risk and vulnerability with grit and determination.”

TERESA A. RADZINSKI ’86

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1990

1988

TERI PARKER BROWN ’88 (center) performed in Sister Act at the Chanhassen Dinner Theater in early 2018. In January, a group of alumnae gathered to watch the musical and chat with Brown after the show.

TERI PARKER BROWN ’88 ANDREA TURBAK, OSF, ’88 celebrated her Golden Jubilee, marking 50 years since her first vows with the Sisters of St. Francis in Rochester, Minnesota.

1989

MARCIA MILLER ’89 was selected as a 2018 Minnesota Super Lawyers honoree. Super Lawyers rates outstanding lawyers who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. Since joining the firm SiebenCarey in 2009, Miller has worked closely with the firm’s trial attorneys to prepare and respond to legal memoranda and appellate briefs.

CLASS OF ’98 THE CLASS OF 1998 CELEBRATED ITS 20-YEAR REUNION WITH A CLASS PARTY ON JUNE 22, 2018.

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MARCIA MILLER ’89

JANE ANDERSON ’90, MSN’95 was named one of the Courageous Women in Minnesota Health Care by the Women’s Health Leadership TRUST. She is the director of MHealth Nurse Practitioners Clinic and clinical assistant professor at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.

JANE ANDERSON ’90, MSN’95 SHARON FREEMAN MAT’90 published two books recently. Spiritual Perspectives: Gifts of a Prayerful Life is a collection of poetry, and Grandfather’s Old House is a children’s book about loss, grief and renewal.

1992

TAMMY LOOSBROCK ’92, MPT’96, DPT’07 was the commencement speaker for St. Kate’s Graduate College in May 2018. Loosbrock is the senior director of Sanford Luvurne and Sanford Rock Rapids Medical Centers, which are part of the largest nonprofit healthcare system in the nation, operating in nine states and three countries.


DARLA MOELLER LYTLE ’92 was named a 2018 recipient of the Mae Berry Award by the Mayo Clinic Health System in Fairmont, Minnesota, where she’s worked for 17 years as an infusion therapy nurse. This annual award is only given to two non-physician employees at Mayo Clinic Health System’s campuses around the country.

1997

ANGELA HALL SLAUGHTER ’97 joined the St. Kate’s Board of Trustees in February 2018. Hall Slaughter is in-house counsel for Aetna, Inc., where she focuses on healthcare regulatory issues with an emphasis on pharmacy benefits.

1995

MARY KUNESH-PODEIN ’95 was elected to the Minnesota House of Representatives in November 2017, doubling the number of Native American representatives in Minnesota. As a single mother, she earned a degree in elementary education at the age of 35 by attending St. Kate’s Weekend College and has been teaching information technology as a library media specialist for the past 22 years. Kunesh-Podein, representing Minnesota House District 41B, is up for re-election in 2018.

1996

KELLY BARNHILL ’96, author and Newbery Medal winner, was the guest speaker at the St. Kate’s College for Women commencement in May 2018. In February 2018, Barnhill’s latest book, titled Dreadful Young Ladies and Other Stories, was published.

JESSICA HINKLEY ’01, DNP’11 joined the oncology department at the Cancer Center at Essentia Health-St. Joseph’s Medical Center. As part of the oncology team, Hinkley will care for patients with cancer, from diagnosis through rehabilitation.

ANGELA HALL SLAUGHTER ANGELA HALL ’97 SLAUGHTER ’97 2001 NANCY JP ANDERSON ’01, MAT’17 was the commencement speaker for St. Kate’s College for Adults commencement ceremony in May 2018. She is the owner of Midwest Sign and Screen Printing Supply Co., and a dynamic champion for women’s education, leadership and community involvement.

CLASS OF ’68

KELLY BARNHILL ’96

NANCY JP ANDERSON ’01, MAT’17

KATHLEEN GANS ’68 SHARES A PHOTO FROM HER ST. KATE’S DAYS AT REUNION IN JUNE 2018.

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2005 2003

MAYA DAHLBERG MEYERSON ’03 married Charlie Meyerson in March 2018, and is in the process of adopting a son. The couple was married by Minnesota’s first Hmong judge, Sophia Vuelo. Meyerson also earned a master’s degree in theology from Saint John’s School of Theology and Seminary in 2018.

MAYA DAHLBERG MEYERSON ’03

SARAH COMPTON ’05, MAED’07, a teacher at Austin Career Education Center in Chicago, was selected as one of Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Grosvenor Teacher Fellows. The 2018 Fellows are 40 outstanding educators from the United States and Canada. COLLEEN STEWART ’05 was hired as the director of programs for Education Through Music in New York City. She will be responsible for the planning, coordinating, implementing, documenting and evaluating of the organization’s educational programming, and will play a vital role in facilitating the expansion of the program in New York City schools.

2008

AMELIA SHOPTAUGH ’08 earned a master of arts in human resource management from Concordia University in 2018.

2009

CLAIRE FROMME LIENESCH ’09 married Elizabeth Lienesch in September 2016.

2007

JENNIFER JOHNSTON KORUS ’07 and Brandon Korus were married on January 20, 2018, in Cancun, Mexico.

2004

ELLIE TAN ’04, MSN, CNM, WHNP-BC was published in the prestigious Worldwide Leaders in Healthcare and was welcomed into the International Nurses Association.

SHUNU SHRESTHA ’07 was honored by the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault for her contributions to the areas of preventing, addressing, and ending sexual violence. Shrestha is the trafficking program manager at Program for Aid to Victims of Sexual Assault, based in Duluth, Minnesota.

DOLPHINS ALUMNAE OF THE DOLPHINS SYNCHRONIZED SWIM TEAM REUNITED FOR A POOL PERFORMANCE AT REUNION IN JUNE 2018.

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CLAIRE FROMME LIENESCH ’09 KELLY POVO ’09, along with friend and writer Phyllis Root, published Searching for Minnesota’s Native Wildflowers: A Guide for Beginners, Botanists, and Everyone in Between. The pair chronicles the 10 years they spent exploring Minnesota for


2011 wildflowers, taking pictures and notes, gathering clues, and mapping the way for fellow flower hunters.

ELIZABETH BERNHARDT ’11 married Viktor Bollen in April 2018. She also earned a doctorate in physics from Washington State University in 2018.

KACEE WEAVER ’13 was published in the March 2018 issue of Montessori Public. Her article, titled “Transitioning to Inclusion: Our three-year journey toward Montessori inclusion,” discusses the progress made in improving the education and lives of students with diverse learning needs.

2014

KELLY POVO ’09 2010

ELIZABETH BERNHARDT ’11 ASHLEY MURRAY MILLER ’11 and husband Paul welcomed their son Ambrose Thomas Miller in September 2017.

In June 2018, MOLLY MULLER RACHOW ’10 opened her physical therapy practice, Rachow Physical Therapy, in Liberal, Kansas. REBECCA ZENEFSKI SLATER ’10 was profiled in SDVoyager in July 2018, where she shared the story of her career journey as a business owner and photographer. Photo/Kylee Leonetti

2016

DANIELLE MENDEZ ’16 is an assistant coach for the University of Montana soccer team. She’s working with Chris Citowicki, the head coach at Montana, who was Mendez’s coach during her career playing at St. Kate’s. Photo/University of Montana Sports Information

AMBROSE 2013

REBECCA ZENEFSKI SLATER ’10

AMY MATHIOWETZ O’KEEFE ’14 and Colin O’Keefe were married on June 16, 2018, at Our Lady of Victory Chapel on the St. Kate’s campus.

ANGELA LOONEY CONLEY ’13 is a candidate for Hennepin County Commissioner in District 4. The seven-member Hennepin County Board of Commissioners plays a key role in advancing housing strategies, accessible transit systems and public health and human services. If Conley were to win the District 4 seat in November, she would be the first African-American ever elected to the board.

DANIELLE MENDEZ ’16 2017

JAMIE TIEDE INHOFF MSN’17 and Nate Inhoff were married on June 2, 2018, at Our Lady of Victory Chapel at St. Kate’s.

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FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS HELD A TEA PARTY IN 1937.

PHOTO/UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

In Memory w Our deepest sympathy to the families of the following graduates, faculty and staff members, friends and supporters of St. Catherine University: Jane Arens, CSJ, former groundskeeping staff w April 6, 2018. Carol Hocking, former nursing faculty w December 31, 2017. Sally Pitman, former Minneapolis campus staff w December 31, 2017. Kathryn Ross, CSJ, retired staff w January 22, 2018. Linda Tyacke, retired health information management faculty w February 6, 2018. Albert J. Vonhof, former St. Catherine University business manager w December 14, 2017. Kathleen Malloy Ellenbecker ’33 w January 9, 2018. Marjorie Braun Wickert ’37 w March 26, 2018. Helen Huber Imboden ’39 w December 30, 2017. Jean Bowing Hayward ’41 w January 3, 2018. Mary Jane Swenson Roedler ’41 w December 30, 2017.

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Bernadette Brazeau Netzer ’42 w March 14, 2018. Jeanne McGillis Casselman ’43 w December 12, 2017. Mary Virginia Micka, CSJ, ’43 w August 14, 2018. Cecelia Murphy Laramie ’43 w January 21, 2018. Rose Oedbauer Gustafson ’43 w May 6, 2018. Patricia Stumm Hebert ’43 w July 2, 2017. Elizabeth Connolly Inserra ’44 w December 15, 2017. Mary Jane Ryan Root ’44 w June 4, 2018. Rosemary Balk Lovett ’45 w May 19, 2018. Marcella Campbell Marshall ’45 w March 22, 2018. Margaret Glasier Maxa ’45 w August 17, 2017. Patricia Griffiths Prevetz ’45 w March 2, 2018. Cecilia Stamschror Owens ’45 w December 12, 2017. Mary Trench Martens ’45 w March 12, 2018. Lois Wilson Schwalbach ’45 w March 9, 2018. Elizabeth Davidson Rockwell ’46 w December 1, 2017. Patricia Davis Busch ’46 w April 30, 2018.


Mildred Mahowald Blesener ’46 w April 18, 2018. Mary Jo Strobel Gallagher ’46 w March 11, 2018. Harriet Hamm Kielsa ’47 w January 11, 2018. Irene Molitor Wittsche ’47 w February 22, 2018. Dolores Stang Cotten ’47 w January 12, 2018. M. Margareta Bertrand, SSND, ’48 w January 29, 2018. Dolores Brenny Stolle ’48 w July 12, 2014. Rosemary Bushnell Kramer ’48 w December 13, 2017. Sheila Dolan Schneider ’48 w March 20, 2018. Emily Novotny Wilkins ’48 w February 5, 2018. Dorothy O’Kane Luebbers ’48 w January 7, 2018. Mary Patricia Crow Wagner ’49 w January 11, 2018. Doris Hady Mayer ’49 w December 6, 2017. Dolores Kasmar Keefe ’49 w November 27, 2017. Mary Ann Oski Kehoe ’49 w July 2, 2018. Margery Smith, CSJ, ’49, w March 14, 2018. Joanne Velz Hart ’49 w April 28, 2018. Frances Dillon Foley ’50 w April 14, 2018. Mary Joanne Kleen Donnelly ’50 w December 27, 2017. Dolores Kohler Pariana ’50 w January 20, 2018. Maureen Mashek ’50 w March 6, 2018. Jacqueline Schmitt Savolainen ’50 w January 18, 2018. MaryAlice Cavanaugh Frawley ’51 w March 24, 2018. Lois Mack Vassbotn ’51 w April 14, 2018. Gertrude Minardi Radasevich ’51 w January 4, 2018. Elizabeth Schultz Halloran ’51 w July 23, 2018. Marian Taintor Davis ’51 w December 13, 2017. Mary C. Hanft ’52 w April 7, 2018. Corinne Koch Engelstad ’52 w January 26, 2018. Alice Richards Pryor ’52 w April 13, 2018. Leone Voegel Jarvis ’52 w February 20, 2018. Roberta Meyer Lombardino ’53 w April 18, 2018. Barbara Shodean Olson ’53 w January 27, 2018. Frances Culligan Galvin ’54 w June 6, 2018. Mary Hamilton Kohanowski ’54 w December 29, 2017. Patricia Keaveny DiMatteo ’54 w November 10, 2017. Joan Lund Reesman ’54 w March 11, 2018. Eileen Vandeberghe Lund ’54 w April 3, 2018.

Marion Mahoney Cottrell ’55 w January 9, 2018. Mary Ann deGrandpre Kelly ’56 w April 11, 2018. Monica DuCharme, CSJ, ’56 w March 13, 2018. Marguerite Magistad ’56 w February 8, 2018. Geraldine Riegel Kowski ’56 w December 25, 2017. Mary Adrienne Dick Donaldson ’57 w December 10, 2017. Mary Alice Dietz Schabarum ’57 w May 1, 2018. Marie Halloran Vorlicky ’57 w July 3, 2018. Rosanne Fox, CSJ, ’58 w May 15, 2018. Margaret Mary Knothe Johnson ’58 w January 7, 2018. Mary Colleen Quirk Healy ’58 w December 7, 2017. Eunice Tussing, CSJ, ’58, w December 25, 2017. Geraldine Wallace Berg ’58 w February 13, 2018. Sandra Fraipont Losness ’59 w June 13, 2017. Anne Grady, CSJ, ’59 w July 3, 2018. Ann Scott ’59 and ANP’85 w December 22, 2017. Patricia Jarosch ’60 w January 12, 2018. Patricia Mason Moon ’60 w March 8, 2018. Shirley Oeffling, CSJ, ’60, ’87 and MTH’89 w April 22, 2018. Mary Slattery ’60 w March 8, 2018. Loretta Joseph Costa, CSJ, ’61 w June 10, 2018. Carole Loch Winkler ’61 w April 21, 2018. Sharon Joyce Greenshields ’62 w December 23, 2017. Yvonne G. Kosson ’62 w December 13, 2017. Ann Redmond, CSJ, ’62 w March 9, 2018. Jean Welch Kolles ’62 w February 28, 2018. Yvonne Wolf Erding ’62 w February 10, 2018. Mary Lou Collopy Hottinger ’63 w April 14, 2017. Marymina (Penny) Donovan Stenger ’63 w March 23, 2018. Mary E. Gelbmann ’63 w November 9, 2017. Judith Larson Packee ’63 w May 20, 2018. Priscilla Takano Maanao ’63 w February 9, 2018. Sheila Aageson Drometer ’64 w January 27, 2018. Dorothy Haberman Johnson ’64 w April 4, 2018. Barbara Wallin Lynch ’65 w February 27, 2018.

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Patricia Hanley Beaubien ’68 w March 19, 2018. Margaret Lawrence Reed ’68 w May 10, 2018. Sharon Mathias ’68 w March 1, 2018. Nancy A. Salscheider ’68 w December 25, 2017. Cheryl Tauber Runchey ’69 w December 12, 2017. Diane Johnson Schauer ’70 w December 28, 2017. Mary Lou Landman Nixon ’70 w January 11, 2018. Rose Marie Linn ’70 w June 27, 2018. Denise Goggin Andersen ’71 w May 20, 2018. Margaret Sellner Mages ’71 w January 21, 2018. Marguerite Turgeon, CSJ, ’71 w June 16, 2018. Teresa Buckley Rippie ’73 w April 13, 2018. Pamela Swendseen Cooper ’73 w June 20, 2018. Mary Winkler Matthews ’76 w November 28, 2017. Linda J. Lewis ’78 w February 18, 2018. Bonnie Benson Nelson ’79 w December 30, 2017. Sandra Rowles Mackey ’80 w June 30, 2018. Anne Krmpotich ’81 w June 29, 2018. Shirley Blondeau Larson ’83 w November 23, 2017. Diane (Dee) Walters Salguero ’83 w November 4, 2016. Cynthia Devine Knapper ’85 w December 19, 2017. Edith Montavon Nowicki ’86 w April 6, 2018. Cynthia R. Nordstrom ’86 w April 11, 2018. Paula Tankoff Cusick ’89 w November 20, 2017. Virginia Furman Morse ’90 w December 6, 2017. Julia Symons Mosman ’90 w November 9, 2017. Andra Ramnarine Sawh ’99 and AGNP’04 w December 6, 2017. Diana DiSalvatore ’04 w December 24, 2017. Beth Madsen Graham ’04 w February 23, 2018. Christine Huesers MLIS’07 w July 5, 2018. Erica Campbell Riedlin ’08 w June 8, 2018. Jaynie Herbranson Halvorson MAOT’15 w January 9, 2018. Lauren Lund ’16 w December 16, 2017.

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MARY VIRGINIA MICKA, CSJ, ’43 Faculty emerita and alumna Mary Virginia Micka, CSJ, ’43 died peacefully at age 96 on Tuesday, August 14, 2018, at Carondelet Village. Sr. Mary Virginia entered the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet community in 1943, after earning a bachelor’s degree in English from the College of St. Catherine. She also holds a master’s degree in English from the University of Notre Dame. In the late 1940s, Sr. Mary Virginia taught English, journalism, and religion at St. Margaret’s Academy in Minneapolis. In 1950, she joined the faculty at St. Kate’s and went on to teach for 42 years in the University’s English department. She inspired countless students with insights into how great literary works speak to us of the human condition. Of her poetry she wrote, “Poetry for me is trying to hear what’s coming up from within. It is very much like the expression of prayer.” Those who knew Sr. Mary Virginia best describe her as a passionate educator, poet and artist, with a sly wit and a keen eye for the large implications of small, everyday events. In addition, she was a dedicated member of the community and generous donor to the University. Her own writing prowess spanned more than 50 years, with published collections of poetry including Three Bridges, In My Own Voice, and Half a Hundred. In retirement, Sr. Mary Virginia entered the art world and created pieces exhibited in many venues. Of note, at 82 years young, she presented a six-week exhibition featuring her watercolor paintings, charcoal drawings and poetry.


ANN REDMOND, CSJ, ’62

MARGERY SMITH, CSJ, ’49 Faculty emerita and alumna Margery Smith, CSJ, ’49 died on March 14, 2018, at the age of 90. Sr. Margery received her bachelor’s degree from the College of St. Catherine in 1949, and went on to earn a doctorate from the University of Chicago. She was a professor in the English department from 1968 to 1993 and served as the St. Kate’s archives director from 1993 to 2011. Her exemplary work earned her the 2010–11 Alumnae Award. Sr. Margery was an enthusiastic educator who inspired a love of learning in her students. Her deep knowledge of and reverence for great literary works —combined with her dry wit and eloquence— provided truly memorable learning experiences during her teaching career. During her years teaching in the English department, Sr. Margery was a trustworthy, stimulating colleague and a lasting friend to many of her students, with whom she kept up a regular correspondence after they had graduated. One of Sr. Margery’s special contributions to St. Kate’s was the founding of the Antonian Scholars Honors Program. To her last days, Sr. Margery’s intellect remained strong, and her faith provided a sure beacon to guide her. Sr. Margery was a courageous woman who possessed a delightfully feisty rebelliousness and knew how to speak truth to power. The impact she had on those around her is immeasurable, from the history and knowledge she preserved for future generations to the young lives she helped guide and educate.

Alumna and faculty emerita Ann Redmond, CSJ, ’62 died on March 9, 2018, at the age of 84. Sr. Ann received her bachelor’s degree in English from the College of St. Catherine in 1962 and went on to earn an MA and PhD from the University of Minnesota. Sr. Ann joined the St. Kate’s English department in 1978 and retired in 2010, having served St. Kate’s in various capacities. Sr. Ann’s excellence in teaching and care for her students earned her the St. Catherine Faculty Teaching Award in 1983 and 1989. She received the Myser Award for Teaching Excellence in 2005. Her passion for justice and legislative action was evident through her work directing the Center of Excellence for Women, Economic Justice and Public Policy. Sr. Ann spearheaded initiatives in “Getting Out the Vote” and coordinated a statewide conference in anti-human trafficking in 2003 — work she continued tirelessly until her death. Colleagues and students looked to her as a sage teacher, an ethical leader, and a tireless advocate with deep respect for how she lived out her faith and convictions with action, integrity and humility. Sr. Ann’s death impacts so many who experienced her gifts as educator, ally, colleague, mentor, Sister, relative and friend.

Would you like to make a memorial or tribute gift?

Please contact 651.690.8725 giving@stkate.edu

Contact us when you have news of a death 651.690.6666 inmemory@stkate.edu

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A note from a Katie

A

s a college student, survival is the first priority. But thinking about others’ needs before my own? Let’s not get ahead

of ourselves here when I’m worried about my own finances, grades and sleep schedule—I’m talking lowest level on the pyramid of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. However, I’ve come to realize that philanthropic practices are ones I’ve grown up with in a range of different ways. They vary from my dad picking up every stray piece of garbage he has ever seen to my grandmother who knits 10 prayer shawls a week (that’s right — she’ll make you one and mail it to you sans charge), to my aunt who’s worked for nonprofits her entire career. Each act is motivated by helping humanity in the hope to better our world. I’m reminded that I wouldn’t be at St. Kate’s if it wasn’t for a scholarship fund set up by a generous alumna. In the cycle of gaining knowledge, becoming empowered and giving back, I am the beneficiary of a philanthropic act that is allowing me to claim an education. I may not be able to give back in large monetary ways now, but I can give back. It’s okay to start small; just start!

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2018

PHOTOS/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

AMY MULLOWNEY ’19


SISTERS MICHELLE MULLOWNEY ’17 AND AMY MULLOWNEY ’19 WERE BOTH RECIPIENTS OF THE SOPHIA BROUGH KAMPFER SCHOLARSHIP, ESTABLISHED BY KAMPFER, CLASS OF 1933, FOR STUDENTS FROM MONTANA.

stkate.edu

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St. Catherine University Magazine Fall 2018  
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