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UNIVERSIT Y MAGAZINE

SPRING 2019

PHOTO/NATALIE GROSE ’20

EXPLORING THE WORLD. TRANSFORMING LIVES.


FEAST OF ST. CATHERINE

In November, the University community honored its namesake, Saint Catherine of Alexandria. The celebration included a reception, unity prayer gathering, and tree lighting ceremony.

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT BETH HALLORAN VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS TOCCARA STARK MAOL’09, EdD

EDITOR SARA BERHOW DESIGNER MOLLY ORTH CONTRIBUTORS JILL BRAUN RUTH HAAG BROMBACH ’60 BETH RIEDEL CARNEY ’82 RAINE REMY DE CAMPEAU

KARA DEMARIE MLIS’16 KAYLA FORBES MBA’17 SARA KEIS NATALIE MANION AMY MULLOWNEY ’19 JONATHAN OKSTAD MBA’19 JAYNE STAUFFER ANDY STEINER SARAH VOIGT KRISTEN WUNDERLICH

PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GROSE ’20 REBECCA ZENEFSKI SLATER ’10 ADDRESS CHANGES 651.690.6666 alumnae@stkate.edu ONLINE mag.stkate.edu


F EAT U R E S

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World-Wise

Alumnae build global understanding through international careers BY ANDY STEINER

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St. Kate’s Global Footprint Spans Far and Wide

Students of the public health program gain critical perspectives while improving communities and lives all over the world

TH E CO M M O NS

BY JILL BRAUN 2

PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

St. Catherine University Magazine is published three times a year by the Office of Marketing and Communications with the St. Kate’s Mag Advisory Board. No part of this publication may be reprinted without permission. St. Catherine University was founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet in 1905. Learn more: stkate.edu/ourhistory

FROM THE PRESIDENT

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BOOKMARK

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KATIES IN ACTION

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BY THE NUMBERS

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AROUND CAMPUS

Nearly 400 Katies graduated on December 20, 2018, in a commencement ceremony held at The O’Shaughnessy.

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CLASS NOTES

PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

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IN MEMORY

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KATIE DIARY

ABOUT THE COVER

Front cover: Kalia Vang ’19, Karissa Bolton ’19, Gabby Nordman ’20, and Julia Severson ’20 learn to plant rice on a farm in Thong Mang, Laos during a January-term course. PHOTO/NATALIE GROSE ’20 Back cover: Images from global studies study-abroad photo contest. PHOTO/COURTESY OFFICE OF GLOBAL STUDIES

COMMENCEMENT


AHNA NEIL ’19, SHANNON STRICKLAND ’18, AND ANGELINA BALISTRERI ’18 TRAVELED TO ROME IN SPRING 2018. THEY STUDIED THE HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE OF THE CITY, AS WELL AS THE CULTURE AND PRACTICES IN THE VATICAN. ONE STOP WAS PALATINE HILL, WHERE ROME WAS FOUNDED. PHOTO/COURTESY AHNA NEIL

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019


From the President The vision

of St. Catherine University is to be respected globally for educating women who transform the world. Achieving this goal is part of the work we do every day to provide an academic experience that prepares our students to be successful leaders and changemakers. But to transform the world, you need to have an understanding of the world. That is why travel and study abroad are part of our DNA and the St. Kate’s educational experience. During the founding of the then College of St. Catherine, Mother Antonia took great pride and care in ensuring the faculty of our great institution were scholarly, devoted to the liberal arts, and culturally competent. To this end, she sent the Sisters to study at prestigious universities both in the U.S. and internationally. These Sisters became the first faculty at St. Kate’s and the genesis of a rich endowment that allowed the University to prosper. These educated Sisters laid the foundation for academic excellence grounded in the liberal arts that is a hallmark of our University today. Prepared to meet the diverse and changing needs of students and the community, they established a strong curriculum based in Catholic Social Teaching that prepared students to be compassionate, well-informed leaders. A testament to this strong academic foundation was the establishment of a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in 1937, which nationally recognizes the academic standards and achievements of the University and students. This legacy is why academic excellence is at the heart of our work and central to the University’s strategic plan. As part of our initiatives to strengthen academic excellence, we continue to provide learning opportunities that foster

discovery, inquiry, cultural competency, and inclusion. For many of our students, the opportunity to study abroad provides these lessons and is a defining chapter in their educational experience. For more than 40 years, St. Kate’s global studies program has provided opportunities for students to study and work abroad. Our students can choose from more than 150 short-term, semester-long, and year-long programs in more than 50 countries. Studying abroad builds cultural competency and communication skills — qualities that are in-demand in the workplace, graduate schools, and beyond. A 2017 report from the Institute of International Education found students who study abroad are more adaptable, self-aware, and confident. Additionally, the report found studying abroad expands career possibilities and can have a long-term impact on career growth and success. This issue showcases how our students and graduates are bringing a global perspective to their coursework and into their careers. It is amazing to see, and we are all incredibly proud of the achievements of our students and graduates that bring our vision to life, and of the faculty and staff who help make it happen. These stories are just one proof point of our powerful vision in action. ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76, MBA

Source: Institute of International Education (2017). “Gaining an Employment Edge — The Impact of Study Abroad.”

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PHOTO/COURTESY KELLY RAETZKE ABANDA

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019


KELLY RAETZKE ABANDA ’99 VISITED 21 COUNTRIES OVER TWO YEARS DURING HER “ADULT GAP SEASON.” IN ICELAND, SHE TRAVELED WITH JENNIFER PAKKALA EICHTEN ’98. ABANDA POSED WITH THE RAINBOW AS A REMINDER THAT “THE WORLD REALLY IS IN OUR HANDS, BUT WE OFTEN FORGET AND FOCUS ON OBSTACLES. THE RAINBOW IS A REMINDER THAT WE CAN CHANGE THOSE THINGS AND LIVE LIVES WE’RE EXCITED ABOUT.”

World-Wise Alumnae build global understanding through international careers BY ANDY STEINER

M

aybe it’s the campuswide focus on promoting study abroad opportunities. Perhaps it’s the dynamic student body made up of people from around the globe. Or it could be a deep curiosity and awareness of global issues at the heart of Katies. Whatever the reason, many St. Catherine University graduates have chosen jobs with an international focus. St. Kate’s is a university founded by a group of daring, world-traveling women, so it only makes sense that so many of its alumni are daring world travelers themselves. For today’s Katies, thinking internationally is about more than just travel. It’s about a focus on serving others, on expanding the definition of neighbor to those who live thousands of miles away, on supporting women in developing nations, and on promoting peace worldwide. We spoke to three graduates who’ve created internationally focused careers. While their stories are all unique, they share one common thread: St. Kate’s helped build and support their global interests, preparing them to be true world citizens.

KELLY RAETZKE ABANDA: DESIGN YOUR DETOUR Kelly Raetzke Abanda ’99 tends to rely on her gut impulses. So it was uncharacteristic when Abanda took a job right after earning her bachelor's in speech communication — even though her heart told her she should be doing something else. “I had this feeling there was something missing in my life,” Abanda recalls. It was a good, steady job, one that many young women would be happy to land, but it somehow lacked the sense of adventure she craved. Eventually, after much soul searching, she decided to quit and follow her gut.

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BELOW: MARNA ANDERSON MAOL’08 IS THE DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNICATIONS FOR NONVIOLENT PEACEFORCE, A JOB WHICH REQUIRES EXTENSIVE TRAVEL. HERE, SHE VISITS WITH COLLEAGUES IN YANGDON, MYANMAR.

That decision led to a cross-country relocation, a job at an inner-city nonprofit in Los Angeles, and then to a senior leadership role with another nonprofit. While these socially conscious jobs satisfied Abanda’s soul, deep down she knew there was something greater she had to do. “I reached a point where I thought, ‘I only get one shot at this life,’’’ Abanda says. “I started making plans to leave my job and do some international traveling.” For many, including Abanda, this move would feel risky, but she leapt despite the fear because it felt like the perfect next step. She announced she was going on what she called an “adult gap season,” several months spent traveling the world with intention to grow and learn. As she threw herself into planning, Abanda’s adventure took on a life of its own. “I had this piece of me that said, ‘I’m not wired to sit on a beach and veg out,’” she explains. “This gap season needs to be different. I want to contribute.” With that goal in mind, Abanda contacted nonprofits in the countries she hoped to visit, telling them, “I’m going to be coming through your country, and I have this set of skills. Does your organization need help?” Nonprofits in Fiji, Tanzania, and South Africa accepted her offer. In June 2016, Abanda set off. “Initially, I thought I was going to go to five countries over two months,” she says. “Instead, I went to 21 countries and was gone for two years.” She returned to the United States in August 2018. Now Abanda felt free to focus on another lifelong goal: starting her own business. Her two-year adventure gave her “a sense of internal transformation” she wanted to share with others. She founded Design Your Detour, a life-coaching business where she helps people figure out how to make room for a transformational gap season in their busy lives. Through classes and one-on-one coaching sessions, Abanda encourages clients to think about these adventures as more than a vacation. “Travel is great,” Abanda says. “It is a key part of transformation. But I’m talking about something bigger that helps you think about your life and how you’d like to change and grow.” Abanda credits her alma mater with making her the adventurous, socially conscious woman she is today. Two

St. Kate’s courses, The Reflective Woman and Global Search for Justice, opened her eyes to the world around her. “Those classes basically forced us to think about things from different perspectives and consider what the world would be like through somebody else’s eyes,” she says. Abanda hopes that with Design Your Detour she’ll be able to help clients embark on similarly meaningful experiences. “I want to work with people looking for a transformative time but also want to give back,” she says.

MARNA ANDERSON: ON A MISSION Blame it on the missionaries. When Marna Anderson MAOL’08 was growing up, her father, a minister at St. Paul’s Central Baptist Church, invited a series of visiting missionaries to speak to his congregation. As she listened to these men and women talk about their experiences traveling the world, Anderson’s interest grew. “They’d show their slides,” she recalls. “I remember being really intrigued with the idea of visiting different cultures and experiencing their way of life.” That strong interest was just a part of Anderson’s personality: “My mom says that when I was three, I started talking about going to other countries. That was

PHOTO COURTESY/MARNA ANDERSON

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019


THROUGH HER WORK, MARNA ANDERSON MAOL’08 (LEFT) HAS MADE CONNECTIONS AROUND THE GLOBE. SHARING A COMMON INTEREST, LIKE KNITTING, HELPED HER START A CONVERSATION WITH THESE BURMESE WOMEN.

PHOTO COURTESY/MARNA ANDERSON

part of my DNA. I always wanted to see other places and was interested in other languages and where other people lived.” Once she had completed her undergraduate degree at Bethel University, Anderson combined her dreams of adventure and sense of social responsibility, traveling around Central America and supporting the Central America Solidarity Movement. Once the Chapultepec Peace Accords were signed in 1992, she moved to El Salvador, working on issues of violence against women for an international organization. After her time in El Salvador, Anderson came home to Minnesota to build a family, but she wasn’t ready to lose her international connections. She worked for local nonprofits that focused on global issues, including Advocates for Human Rights and The Nature Conservancy. Though she found this work satisfying, Anderson knew she wanted more. She researched graduate programs that could broaden her qualifications and found St. Kate’s Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership (MAOL) program. “I wanted to grow professionally,” Anderson says. “I wanted to have more of a leadership role.” And because the MAOL program is designed for working professionals, Anderson was excited about learning alongside people with a wide range of experiences. “I wanted to learn from my peers and from people with experience in different fields.” Anderson appreciated the focus on authenticity and ethics that was interwoven in her MAOL courses. She could leverage what she learned, she thought, “to advance what I care about, what has been interwoven throughout my adult life, which was looking at the rights of women and issues of social justice from an international lens.” Today Anderson uses those skills in her job as director of development and communications for the United States office of Nonviolent Peaceforce (NP).

According to the organization’s website, NP “is an unarmed, paid civilian protection force which fosters dialogue among parties in conflict and provides a protective presence for threatened civilians.” Her job requires extensive international travel, something Anderson relishes. Recently, she accompanied a group of funders on a trip to Kenya for a meeting on the nonprofit’s work in the region. “We have to make sure we are effectively communicating our message and identifying people who really care about our mission and are willing to donate to it,” she says. “That’s a central focus of my job.” It’s important, much-needed work. “There are more people who are fleeing violence in the world now than we have had since World War II,” Anderson says, but her St. Kate’s degree readied her for many of the challenges the work presents. “I think the MAOL program really did prepare people to be leaders in a lot of different settings,” she says. “You had to think outside your comfort zone. That could be applied internationally or cross-culturally within your own community. It had a strong, outward focus that I still rely on today.”

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IN HER 15 YEARS OF SERVICE IN THE U.S. NAVY, COMMANDER ABIGAIL BURROWS WHITE ’03 HAS BEEN ASSIGNED SEVERAL INTERNATIONAL POSTS, INCLUDING OKINAWA, JAPAN. HERE SHE’S SUITED UP FOR PREDEPLOYMENT TRAINING.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019


ABIGAIL BURROWS WHITE: HEAL THE WORLD

PHOTO/COURTESY ABIGAIL BURROWS WHITE

Abigail Burrows White ’03 didn’t go to college expecting to become a world-traveling nurse. She started as a biology major with no clear career plan. Then life intervened. White’s father fell ill during her first year of college. While he had a mitral valve replaced at St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul, White recalls, “My family spent a lot of time there. I got to know the nursing team and observe how they worked.” The experience turned out to be good for everyone: White’s father’s procedure was a success — and White was so impressed by the hospital’s hardworking nurses that she changed her major from biology to nursing. Once enrolled in the nursing program, White learned her new career could take her just about anywhere in the world. During a January-term course called Celtic Care: Nursing in Ireland, she learned about the role of professional nursing in the Irish healthcare system, traveling to many of the country’s cities and small towns. In her senior year, during a Global Search for Justice course focused on women’s health issues in Mexico, she lived with a host family in Cuernavaca, learning about women’s health and the role of nurses in the developing world. These courses, White says, “opened my eyes to travel. The experiences were so inspiring.” Her eyes now wide open, White decided that after graduation she would find a way to work internationally. She’d heard about traveling nurses, health professionals who are hired to work in specific cities for limited amounts of time. The adventure of working and living in a new place felt appealing, but it also sounded lonely. Another option for nurses who wanted to travel was

military service. While military nurses are stationed around the globe, White learned they have built-in support and community wherever they go. When she got an unexpected call from a recruiter asking if she’d ever considered applying for the Navy, White felt like it was divine intervention. She filled out the paperwork, was accepted, and began officer-training school shortly after graduation. White’s first posting was at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Okinawa, Japan. When she arrived, she had to jump in feet first. “I was the lowest-ranking officer there,” she recalls. “They said, ‘You are going to be an ER nurse.’ I had never worked in an ER, but I said, ‘Okay. Let’s do this.’ It was a very steep learning curve.” At first, White says, the experience was “very isolating and kind of scary,” but after a brief period of homesickness, she began to love her new home. “In the military you very quickly gain a new sense of community. Everybody is in the same situation. You form a new mini-family overseas.” White was stationed in Japan for two years before being sent back to the United States, where she met and married her husband. Later, she was transferred to the U.S. Naval Hospital in Naples, Italy. The young couple lived there from 2009-2012, with a nine-month break while White was deployed to Afghanistan. White says she considered their time in Italy a once-in-alifetime experience. “I like to call that my three-year honeymoon,” she says. Today White, her husband, and their two young children live in Washington, D.C., where she works at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. During her 14-year career, White has risen in the ranks, earning her MSN as a clinical nurse specialist and holding the rank of Commander. She plans to stay in her job until she retires. White credits her time at St. Catherine University as early inspiration for her globe-trotting life. “While I was at St. Kate’s, I learned there is a much bigger world out there,” she said. “It gave me the confidence I needed to follow my dreams around the world.”

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Bookmark Maria Nhambu, a 1967 graduate, is an educator, dancer, mother, philanthropist, and writer. She recently released the third and final installation of her memoir, Dancing Soul Trilogy. BY AMY MULLOWNEY ’19

T

he three-part series describes Maria Nhambu’s immense struggles from growing up in an abusive environment in an orphanage to adapting to life in the United States as an African woman. She felt her unique biracial identity marked her as an outcast wherever she traveled. Any reader will be inspired by the way Nhambu overcomes each challenge with faith and strength, finding courage to embark on momentous adventures of her own.

MARIA NHAMBU ’67

Africa’s Child “What I wanted just as intensely as I wanted a mother was an education.” This captivating coming-of-age story deals with issues of race, abuse, abandonment, love, and loss. Africa’s Child is told through the eyes of Maria Nhambu, who goes by Nhambu, a biracial girl growing up in an orphanage in East Africa. When we meet her at age five, she has no idea of her identity or family of origin, much less her tribe. Throughout the hardship and mixed blessings of her childhood, readers are taken on a journey as Nhambu finds her own way through love of learning and of dancing. It is at the end of Africa’s Child when Nhambu, at age 19, meets Catherine (Cathy) Murray Mamer ’61, a high school teacher. Cathy helps Nhambu get a four-year scholarship to her alma mater, St. Catherine University, bringing her to America and, essentially, becoming the mother Nhambu never had.

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Join Us in England This September, alumni will celebrate the lives and works of three renowned women authors on a literary journey in England.

America’s Daughter

Drum Beats, Heart Beats

“Discovering dance and its power to heal my soul played a key role in my survival.”

“Having my own family — a husband and two children — was deeply fulfilling and meaningful to me. It was the promised land, the payoff for having endured such suffering, doubt, loneliness, and misery as a child.”

America becomes Nhambu’s new home. Besides mastering her studies and American culture, she is forced to learn the unexpected prejudices that come with being a black American. After college, Nhambu begins teaching African studies at a high school in Minneapolis. After 10 years in America, a soul-shaking trip back to Africa reconnects her to the land and people of her birth. In response, she creates Aerobics With Soul®, a fitness program based on African tribal dances.

Visits to sites relevant to the personal worlds and fictional settings of Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, and Virginia Woolf will be integrated with discussions of Persuasion, Jane Eyre, and Night and Day led by Geri Chavis, PhD, professor emerita of English. Space is still available. Learn more at stkate.edu/travelingscholars

Married life does not play out as Nhambu imagined, and she is devastated to make a decision that could “break” her family. Traversing through a web of mixed identities — African immigrant and African American — Nhambu writes on marriage and parenthood, ultimately finding passion and fulfillment in sharing her African cultural roots through dance all over the world. In this final volume, Nhambu’s continued search for her origins takes her back, once again, to Tanzania on a powerful and revealing quest to unearth her biological father.

Jane Austen’s House, Chawton, Hampshire

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PHOTO/REBECCA SLATER ’10, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019

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Katies in Action

Alumna works toward success of the global community BY SARAH VOIGT

Growing up in Nepal, Shunu Shrestha ’07 had a front row seat to the pervasive and damaging effects of discriminatory practices toward women and girls. While living in a middle-class family afforded her a basic education and opportunities to earn money, what she witnessed set the direction for where she would pursue her life’s work: prevent, address, and ultimately see an end to violence against women and girls. It was a pursuit that would begin with a journey to the United States to find the right learning environment at St. Catherine University. “I wasn’t a traditional, 18-year-old freshman starting at St. Kate’s,” Shrestha explains. “I was a married young adult, and had worked in different fields since I was a teen, including nongovernmental organizations promoting women’s human rights.” Recognizing how her experiences promoting human rights and fighting for a just society for women and girls in Nepal had shaped her worldview, Shrestha understood the ideal higher education experience would be one that recognized her whole self and helped her grow the skills that would support her life’s mission. “I wanted to find a place where I wouldn’t be looked down upon, where I would be seen and heard. St. Kate’s did just that,” said Shrestha. “It provided a community and made me feel I absolutely belonged there.” Shrestha completed her degree in women’s studies at St. Kate’s and went on to get a master’s from Columbia in human rights, with a focus on gender-based violence. She returned to Minnesota in 2009, when she began work with the Program for Aid to Victims of Sexual Assault in Duluth, as the trafficking and prostitution task force coordinator. Her work coordinating the Duluth Trafficking Task Force and helping to develop a regional response in Northeast Minnesota was recognized at the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault’s 2018 awards gala. Under her leadership, the organization supervised Safe Harbor grants that

were used to develop a regional response, including supportive services for sexually exploited and trafficked youth. Last year, Shrestha returned to the Twin Cities to become the City of Minneapolis’s first senior advisor for human trafficking prevention. Minneapolis was one of three cities in the country to be awarded funds from Pathways to Freedom, an anti-trafficking challenge organized by Humanity United. The objective of the program is to develop coordinated, citywide solutions to trafficking. Reflecting on how her experiences as a student at St. Kate’s made her career possible, Shrestha says, “It challenged and helped me to explore the path that I would never have dared to — even in my dreams. It instilled confidence in me that I could be whatever I wanted to be. I could lead or follow and do it with utmost sincerity and conviction. It reinforced the value that there’s no greater purpose than working toward a common good — our existence and ‘success’ are tied to the existence and ‘success’ of the global community.” That self-confidence and dedication to a common good are critical to Shrestha’s work. She applies her understanding of survivor issues to city systems, to create programs that will benefit the greatest number of victims possible. In Minneapolis, it starts with labor trafficking, focused on issues such as wage theft and exploitative employment practices. As progress is made, the hope is to expand programming to further minimize trafficking. The future holds great potential for Shrestha to realize the dream that first took root in her childhood, back in Nepal. Critical to her forward momentum, though, was her experiences as a Katie. “Whatever I am today, it is because of the wonderful four years I spent at St. Kate’s,” said Shrestha.

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VIETNAM

FRANCE

By the Numbers Where in the world? More than 170 St. Kate’s students

*All figures current as of November 2018. Graphics do not include student participation in study abroad programs for a semester or year-long duration.

across all majors and disciplines spent the month of January traveling to 21 countries in every corner of the globe.

BY KRISTEN WUNDERLICH

NUMBER OF STUDENT PARTICIPANTS BY COUNTRY

ENGLAND 35 FRANCE 29

LAOS 20

ECUADOR

ITALY 28

THAILAND 20

NETHERLANDS

CUBA 22

NEPAL 19

CHILE

GUATEMALA 21

NEW ZEALAND 11

TANZANIA

INDIA 20

GERMANY

COSTA RICA

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1921

The first recorded St. Kate’s student to study abroad was

Geraldine Haley,

class of 1921. Haley continued her studies in France for one year after her formal graduation.

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SPAIN

7

5 4

6

2

GREECE

1

MEXICO

1

ROMANIA 2

ZAMBIA

1 1

150

St. Kate’s Office of Global Studies offers around 150 study abroad programs each year. Approximately 10 percent of those programs are led by faculty members.


All-Region MIAC All-Conference School record holder Easton/NFCA Scholar-Athlete

ANNA HINDERAKER ’19 Exercise and sport science Pre-physical therapy

Give today to support the next generation of women transforming the world.

stkate.edu/giveback

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HAMDI ALI MPH’19 (CENTER) REALIZED THE IMPACT PUBLIC HEALTH WORK CAN MAKE WHEN SHE SPENT 10 WEEKS IN KENYA DEVELOPING TRAINING MANUALS FOR LOCAL HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS.

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St. Kate’s Global Footprint Spans Far and Wide Students of the public health program gain critical perspectives while improving communities and lives all over the world BY JILL BRAUN

L PHOTOS/COURTESY MPH IN GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAM

ast summer, when Hamdi Ali MPH’19 started a 10-week practicum in Kenya as part of her public health graduate program, she never imagined she would develop nationwide training manuals to help local healthcare providers respond to violence against young women and children. Or, have an opportunity to mentor at-risk adolescent girls and empower them to be resilient, determined, safe, and AIDS-free. “I met a number of smart and ambitious young women who live in conditions and environments that present unimaginable challenges,” recalls Ali. “Working with our partner organization, LVCT Health, we provided these girls with mentors, school uniforms, and cash allowances that helped alleviate the barriers for them to attend school. That moment is really when I saw the difference public health work can make.”

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BELOW: COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS, KNOWN LOCALLY AS KADIRS, IN INDONESIA.

This year, Ali is continuing to work with other partner organizations and her St. Catherine University faculty mentor, Leso Munala, MSW, PhD — a Kenyan native — to explore the issue of sexual violence against schoolaged girls in Kenya. According to Munala, this is a problem in numerous low-income countries where the stark inequality of women persists and violence against them is fueled by social challenges, economic hardships, and tribal traditions. These are just a few examples of how St. Kate’s faculty and students are addressing pressing global health challenges — and the “global” part is central at the University. “You have to be thoughtful. You have to step back and look critically at the needs of individual communities and diverse populations in order to understand the issues and how to help,” says Mary Hearst, MPH, PhD, director of the Master of Public Health (MPH) in Global Health program at St. Kate’s. Hearst joined St. Kate’s six years ago when talk of starting a master’s program at the University had just begun. There was no other MPH program in Minnesota with a true global focus. Having a mission that so closely aligns with the fundamental priorities of global public health — social justice and women — and a diverse student body made up of 34 percent students of color (68 percent in the undergraduate public health program) — who better to build this? “Our goals for this program are about equity and achieving diversity in the workforce,” adds Hearst. “We need to be educating the students who will be working in the communities they represent.” Thanks to a generous grant from the GHR Foundation — which addresses global development, education, and health — the first cohort of St. Kate’s students pursuing an MPH in Global Health degree kicked off the program in 2016. This spring, 21 students in the program’s second class will graduate, continuing to temper a severe shortage of skilled public health professionals to meet the needs of global populations. According to the Association of Schools and Programs in Public Health, three times the present number of students will need to

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be educated over the next 11 years to meet the needs of the U.S. population alone, and the shortfall is estimated to be 250,000 professionals by 2020. Public health needs on a global scale are even more considerable. St. Kate’s public health students are currently working with faculty to advance research in Kenya, Ghana, Thailand, Bangladesh, Zambia, Chile, New York, and Minnesota. In 2018-2019, students will conduct an

estimated 43 practicums exploring public health issues in 12 countries across five continents — including several working with immigrant and refugee communities locally in Minneapolis and St. Paul.

BUILDING A FOUNDATION Hearst and her faculty agree the intentional focus on global health and social justice is what draws students to St. Kate’s and elevates their education and training to a level necessary for them to navigate complex global health issues. Like Ali’s work in Kenya, students have invaluable opportunities to collaborate with partner organizations and faculty to gain practical knowledge and real-world experience. And true to


St. Kate’s values, and commitment to the liberal arts, the program engages students to draw from their own diverse perspectives to understand how to work effectively and ethically with populations all over the world. Personal experiences, current events, and articles on culture, race, and privilege fuel discussions in the classroom, where students and faculty check judgement at the door and create a safe space to learn, take risks, and offer differing opinions. “Because we have institutionalized our mission, we can raise the tough, ethical questions that lead to productive and respectful conversations about what social justice and equity really mean,” says Hearst. “That’s what we’re talking about with global health: basic human rights and the opportunity for everyone, regardless of lineage and geography, to lead full and healthy lives.” Public health faculty member Liz Allen, MPH, PhD, has spent much of her career exploring disparities in access to healthcare and related issues. She adds, “The focus on social justice in this program is huge. You can’t talk about public health without talking about disparities. It opens the students’ eyes to the world outside of themselves and they begin to understand how varying perspectives shed light in different contexts.”

GIVING THE UNHEARD A VOICE It’s easy to relate public health to the issues we hear more about on a global scale, like infectious disease, clean water, and disaster relief, for example. But St. Kate’s public health faculty and students understand the real X-factor when it comes to fostering the health of global communities: listening. Where Munala is working in the Lua community — the third largest tribe in Kenya — widows are often subjected to violence as part of a traditional cleansing ritual. Usually, this is at the hands of a male family member who is “inheriting” them, and the widow endures this as the perceived way to remain in her home with her children. Munala spent time interviewing widows who underwent the sexual cleansing ritual, and met with community leaders to better understand their knowledge and attitudes about it. Ultimately, she hopes to work with the Kenyan ministry of health and local health management team, using this information to explore how they can support widows moving forward. “Widows in this community believe they are only important when they are attached to men,” adds Munala. “When I meet with them, they are touched that someone even recognizes this as an issue and asks for their opinion about it. Someone just needs to start the conversation for change to happen.”

About 800 miles away in a Rwandan village, secondyear student Inga Mumukunde MPH’19 partnered with the American Refugee Committee in summer 2018 to address rapidly growing teenage pregnancy rates and a lack of adolescent sexual health resources. Amidst cultural barriers of shaming for contraception use and perceptions of promoting promiscuity, Mumukunde worked with community members to understand their perspectives and how to address this issue. “By the end of our focus group sessions, key community and church leaders agreed to start regular sex education with their congregation and committed to encouraging parents to have these conversations with their children,” recalls Mumukunde. “This experience really demonstrated the importance of working directly with a community and listening to their needs in order to develop a sustainable program.”

BRINGING IT HOME While the profound public health needs of low-resource countries can’t be denied, St. Kate’s students are also applying their global lens to serve and strengthen growing diverse communities in the Twin Cities. When People’s Center Health Services in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis — home to one of the largest Somali-American populations in the U.S. — developed plans to build a new community wellness center in their clinic, Megan Precht, MPH’18 and her practicum partner jumped in to seek the community’s input. “Involving the community in these discussions was incredibly important because it offered them a chance to articulate what their needs are and how the wellness center can address them,” explains Precht. “My partner also had a number of community connections and spoke the language, which was incredibly valuable to the work we were doing. We often said how grateful we both were to have the opportunity to work together, because we brought different viewpoints to the table.” Precht graduated in May 2018 and is still working in the Twin Cities with populations from all over the world who now call Minnesota home. She says her understanding of global health helps her both serve and advocate for these communities in a comprehensive and culturally-aware way.

COLLABORATION IS EVERYTHING The global impact of the St. Kate’s public health program wouldn’t be possible without the work of partner organizations who are committed to supporting underserved populations both in developing countries

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NURSING STUDENT ERICA CARLSON ’19 (SECOND FROM RIGHT) AND PUBLIC HEALTH STUDENT SABRINA KUBISA ’22 (RIGHT) SPEAK WITH A MOTHER AND YOUNG CHILD AS PART OF THEIR WORK WITH THE CATHOLIC MEDICAL MISSION BOARD IN ZAMBIA.

and here in the U.S. St. Kate’s public health department works with nine international partners and seven who serve the Twin Cities area. The programs that these organizations lead serve as practicum sites for students and also as a conduit to organically mine relevant issues for academic research. “Our partnerships are carefully and strategically cultivated with the intent of developing long-term, mutually benef icial relationships,” says Christina Bliss Barsness, MPH, RD, program and fieldwork coordinator. “We evaluate them regularly to ensure we have the right balance of organizations and locations to meet student and program needs.” The Catholic Medical Mission Board (CMMB) is one such organization. Its focus on the global health of women and children, and faith-based service mission, fosters a viable partnership with St. Kate’s. For over 100 years, CMMB has been working in some of the most remote and underserved corners of the world, providing health and wellness services to millions of people. Volunteers and partners like St. Kate’s students and faculty provided more than 90,000 hours of service in 14 countries. With such a robust global impact, the partnership with CMMB is rife with opportunities for meaningful work. In 2014, a grant from the GHR Foundation allowed CMMB and St. Kate’s to partner on the Kusamala Child Protection Project, which seeks to improve the lives of disabled children and their families living in Lusaka, Zambia. Over the last three years, Hearst and an interdisciplinary team of faculty from programs such as occupational therapy, physical therapy, social work, and physician assistant studies, as well as colleagues from the University of Minnesota, collected data about the challenges these vulnerable children face in order to discover what community-based programs can help them stay in their homes with their families, reduce stigmas, and improve quality of life. “We interviewed 760 community members and 560 families who have a child with a disability and learned a lot,” explains Hearst. “Often disabled children in Zambia are put in orphanages, are hidden from society

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019

due to stigmas, and can be subjected to abuse and very deep poverty. We want to create systems of support to promote stable family environments and reduce institutionalization of these children.” The second phase of the Kusamala project launched in 2017 and provides opportunities for graduate students to help test interventions designed to mitigate these challenges, including family and community engagement, education, advocacy, and skill building. St. Kate’s faculty will also develop a curriculum for training local health professionals. “It’s amazing how a partnership with a university can open the eyes of an organization, shining a light on the most vulnerable, and responding directly and effectively to their needs,” said Batuke Walusiku-Mwewa, CMMB country director, Zambia. “St. Kate’s students are gaining valuable experiences while improving the lives of children with disabilities and their families.” CMMB representatives from four countries will be on the St. Kate’s campus in mid-April to share the impact of another project called the Children and Mothers Partnership, which provides medical care for pregnant women and newborns fighting disease and poverty. “The partnership with CMMB is reciprocal based on our shared values of pursuing social justice and the commitment to sustainable, community-based global health work focused on those most in need,” explains Bliss Barsness. “It has been a great fit for St. Kate’s and the MPH program on many levels. CMMB has been extremely welcoming to our students and open to exploring various ways our organizations could collaborate.”


The GHR Foundation Academic Excellence Grant aims to improve societal health and well-being by preparing high quality providers capable of practicing in emerging healthrelated environments focused on interprofessional collaborative practice, cultural fluency, and ecological approaches to health with particular emphasis on global health, senior living, and primary care.

St. Kate’s Public Health Global Research Projects Elizabeth Allen, MPH, PhD Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence on Myanmar/Thailand Border With the American Refugee Committee

Sr. Angela Ekwonye, MS, PhD, CPH Impact of Stressful Life Events on Spirituality of Nigerian Catholic Sisters With the GHR Foundation and the Congregation of the Daughters of Mary, Mother of Mercy

Carie Cox, MPH, PhD Infertility Care in Ghana With the GHR Foundation

Mary Hearst, MPH, PhD Improving the Well-Being of Children with Disabilities in Zambia With the Catholic Medical Mission Board

Cross-Cultural Non-Medical Practices to Enhance Fertility With the GHR Foundation

Health and Education Interventions for Underserved Children and Families With the Better Way Foundation

Couple Communication and Child Spacing in the Minneapolis Somalian Community With WellShare International

Meghan Mason, MPH, PhD Eco-Epidemiology of Leptospirosis in Los Rios Region of Chile With National Science Foundation and the University of Minnesota School of Public Health

Committed to Global Learning and Engagement Opportunities for global experiences are deeply ingrained in a St. Catherine University education. Through the global studies program, more than 240 undergraduate and graduate students take advantage of opportunities to study and work abroad each year. In 2018–19, St. Kate’s is offering eight undergraduate and six graduate global studies courses ranging from exploring sustainability through a business lens in Chile, to perspectives on health and healing in India, to immigration and belonging in Europe.

Leso Munala, MSW, PhD Sexual Violence Against School-Aged Girls With the GHR Foundation Sexual Cleansing Rituals as a Public Health Issue in the Luo Community of Kenya St. Kate’s Academic Professional Development Committee Grant Health Practitioners’ Mistrust of Rape Survivors in Nairobi, Kenya With LVCT Health

Further demonstrating St. Kate’s commitment to global learning, the University recently signed the Declaration on University Global Engagement, a joint effort from the United Nations Institute for Training Research and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. St. Kate’s is among 84 higher education institutions across the world pledging to develop the global competence of all students so they have the skills to productively engage with individuals from different cultural and national backgrounds, and have increased understanding of the most pressing economic, social, and environmental challenges facing the world today.

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Around Campus WINTER CLASS OF 2018 Nearly 400 Katies joined the alumni family at St. Catherine University’s Commencement on December 20 at The O’Shaughnessy. Erin Murphy MAOL’05, former state legislator and gubernatorial candidate, was the guest speaker. “The world is hungry for authentic leadership. Wherever you go from here, I expect — we expect — you to lead and influence for the good. You are ready.” –Erin Murphy

ST. KATE’S RECEIVES HOLISTIC NURSING ENDORSEMENT St. Catherine University undergraduate nursing programs have been endorsed by the American Holistic Nurses Credentialing Corporation (AHNCC). St. Kate’s is the 14th university in the country, and only the second in Minnesota, to gain this endorsement. AHNCC’s goal is to support and facilitate curriculum development that advances holistic, integrative nursing which is consistent with current and future healthcare trends. Graduates of these programs are eligible for certification in holistic nursing. Nurses with this certification are highly sought-after in the industry.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019

MAAKWE CUMANZALA ’19 ST. KATE’S STUDENT NAMED RHODES SCHOLAR FINALIST Maakwe Cumanzala ’19 was named a finalist for the Zimbabwe Rhodes Scholarship program. Cumanzala, an international student from Zimbabwe with a double major in economics and mathematics, traveled to Harare, Zimbabwe in mid-December for her final interviews. While another student was chosen to move forward as a Rhodes Scholar, the St. Kate’s community feels immense pride in her many accomplishments that brought her to that interview in Harare. She has embraced several leadership opportunities while a student at St. Catherine University, including president of the International Students Organization, peer mentor with Multicultural and International Programs and Services, co-president of the Economics Club, and a transfer orientation coordinator. In her current role as the Student Senate president, Cumanzala is working with other student leaders to effectively advocate for inclusive change and empowerment of students on campus through student initiatives. “This is an extremely competitive award, so being named a finalist is a remarkable achievement,” says Lynda Szymanski, interim provost and professor of psychology at St. Catherine University. “Maakwe is an extraordinary student and campus leader. Faculty, staff, and alumnae recognized her potential and encouraged her to apply for the Rhodes Scholarship; it is a fabulous example of how we live our mission to educate women to lead and influence. We are proud of Maakwe, and we are thankful for all members of our community who have helped prepare her to be a competitive applicant.”


NEW EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM APPROVED FOR LICENSURE The early childhood education program at St. Kate’s has been approved for licensure by the State of Minnesota. Students are now qualified to take the required tests upon graduation from bachelor’s degree programs to earn teaching licenses. Once certified, graduates can teach children ages 0–8 in public schools across the state.

SOCCER TEAM EARNS RECORD NUMBER OF POSTSEASON AWARDS Six Wildcat soccer players received Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) recognition in 2018, a record number for the program. Each earning their first all-conference award were forwards Allie Bird ’20, Lauren Witte ’21, and Sofia Campbell ’22. The trio scored an impressive combined 18 goals and 12 assists in the 2018 season. Midfielder Kaitlin Machovec ’19 and defender Iryana Talkachova ’19 were All-MIAC Honorable Mention selections. Defender Amanda Carey ’20 was named to the All-MIAC Sportsmanship Team.

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ST. KATE’S CELEBRATES WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH March is Women’s History Month, and St. Kate’s has a variety of events and tributes planned. BONNIE JEAN KELLY AND JOAN KELLY DISTINGUISHED VISITING SCHOLAR LECTURE On International Women’s Day, March 8, St. Kate’s will host the Bonnie Jean Kelly and Joan Kelly Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture, featuring Toshi Reagon. Reagon is the composer and musical director of the operatic adaptation of Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower, which will be performed at The O’Shaughnessy on April 26. Tickets for the lecture are available at oshag.stkate.edu. In support of the Kelly Lecture, the University will host a Parable of the Sower book discussion on February 24, the anniversary of author Octavia E. Butler’s death. The discussion will be led by Tarshia Stanley, PhD, founder of the Octavia E. Butler Society and dean of the School of Humanities, Arts, and Sciences at St. Kate’s. Visit stkate.edu/womenshistorymonth for details.

PARABLE OF THE SOWER

HONOR WOMEN WHO INSPIRE On March 12, honor an inspirational woman in your life by participating in Give to Honor Her. Make a donation to St. Kate’s in honor of a woman who has made a difference in your life, and in turn, contribute to the education of the next generation of inspirational women through scholarships. Visit stkate.edu/honor-her for details. FEAST OF ST. JOSEPH Join the Feast of St. Joseph celebration on March 20. The St. Kate’s community will honor the living legacy and commitment to social justice work by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, our University’s founders. Visit stkate.edu/feast to learn more.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019

TARSHIA STANLEY, PHD


SUBMIT A CLASS NOTE CONTACT US Online: stkate.edu/alumni Phone: 651.690.6666 Email: alumnae@stkate.edu facebook.com/katiealumnae @StKatesAlums

Class Notes 1962

JOAN MITCHELL, CSJ, ’62 and ANSGAR HOLMBERG, CSJ, ’62 have collaborated to produce the recent book Holy Women, Full of Grace. The book features women in Mark's Gospel, and brings light to the stories of the women who were always there in the Jesus story.

1963

CLASS OF ’49 1949

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1949 gathered on November 9, 2018, for their annual luncheon. In front, left to right: Helen Boening Bambenek ’49, Gerry Sonnen Bradford ’49, Margaret Pieters Stringer ’49. In back, left to right: Joan Young Cobb ’49, Mary Dornack Faricy ’49, Marcella Flaten Wartman ’49.

ELLEN O’LEARY ’63 competes with USA Fencing, and is currently ranked no. 1 in the U.S. in the Veteran +70 category. She won the saber bronze medal with Team USA at the 2018 Veteran World Championship in Livorno, Italy on October 14.

1965

JEANETTE KRAEMER ’65 joined the faculty at Marquette University as associate professor of foreign language education and French and Quebec studies.

1975 Are you an alum with a business to promote? Submit your business or service to our free online listing of Katie professionals. Check out stkate.edu/businessdirectory.

CHRISTINE PALUMBO ’75 received an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 2018 Medallion Award. She was one of eight registered dietitian nutritionists to receive an award in recognition of outstanding service and leadership in the Academy and the nutrition and dietetics profession.

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STUDENTS AND ALUMNAE CRAFT POTTERY BOWLS FOR THE EMPTY BOWLS PROJECT, WHICH RAISES MONEY TO FIGHT HUNGER IN THE TWIN CITIES. EMPTY BOWLS WAS ONE OF 12 NONPROFITS SERVED BY ST. KATE’S VOLUNTEERS DURING THE ANNUAL CITIZEN KATIE DAY OF SERVICE IN OCTOBER 2018.

1994

LYNN MATTSON ’94 is chief operating officer at Best & Flanagan. Mattson previously spent two decades at Briggs and Morgan, where she was director of finance.

CITIZEN KATIE 1977

1990

1981

Wildcat swimming alumna LINDA WALLENHORST GROEBNER ’90 was featured in the Star Tribune in October 2018 with her high school daughter. Thirty-one years after Linda's medley relay team set a pool record that still stands, her daughter joined the leaderboard at the very same pool.

SARA MURPHY-BUCKLES ’77 received the Practitioner of the Year Award from the Minnesota Occupational Therapy Organization in October 2018. She is an occupational therapist in Minnesota School District 622, which includes North St. Paul, Maplewood, and Oakdale.

PATRICK TSCHIDA ’81 earned a doctorate in public health, focusing on international health and human nutrition, at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. In 2018, he married Gennifer Georges-Tschida and began teaching as an adjunct faculty member at St. Kate’s.

1982

JERILYN REINHARDT ’82 was named vice president of clinical services and performance excellence at Benedictine Health System.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019

2004

ALISON DVORAK NEWTON ’04 and husband Jerome welcomed a son, Noah Michael Newton, born in March 2017.

ROXANNA GAPSTUR ’90 was named the CEO of WellSpan Health. She is the first female president and CEO in the company’s history.

1992

HALA (HELEN) BAHMET ’92 was a nominee for a 2018 Emmy Award for Outstanding Contemporary Costume Design. Bahmet is the costume designer for NBC’s “This Is Us.” She was also nominated for Outstanding Costumes for a Period/ Fantasy Limited Series for FX's “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story” at the 2016 Emmys.

NOAH 2007

BECKY BLACKHAWK ’07 obtained a master of science in nursing education from Mount Saint Mary’s University in Los Angeles. She then accepted a fulltime tenure track professorship in nursing at College of the Desert in Palm Desert, California.


PAMELA SAN MIGUEL ’07, ’10, nurse manager for Ramsey County (Minnesota) Correctional Facility, was honored by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) with the first-ever Young Professional Award. This award was created in 2018 to recognize new and upcoming leaders in the correctional healthcare field. In addition to receiving the award, San Miguel has been invited to serve as an honorary member of NCCHC’s Young Professionals Committee for one year. CHRIS SEXTON MLIS’07 joined the Briggs and Morgan research services team and is working to expand the traditional law library function into a business-intelligence center that will foster collaboration with the firm’s client development and marketing teams. SHUNU SHRESTHA ’07 is the new senior advisor for human trafficking prevention in Minneapolis. In her position, she focuses on raising awareness not only of sex trafficking, but of labor trafficking and labor exploitation. See story on pages 12–13.

2008

SINUDA HALL KAPALCZYNSKI MAED’08 wrote an article in October 2018 for the online media platform unreasonable.is entitled “Pipeline Expansion Proposal Divides Akwesasne Mohawk

Nation.” Sinuda is a member of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation in New York and began hearing about the pipeline issue. She says her article is an “example of a small outcome of the wonderful education I gained at St. Catherine.”

2010

MELANIE NICOLAI THIESSE ’10 started a new position with the American Montessori Society as the director of school accreditation in New York city. ELIZABETH KRINGEN TURNER ’10 earned a master of arts in anthropology at Boise State University in 2018.

MIPS 40TH ANNIVERSARY

2012–13

ANNIE HEJNY ’12 exhibited work at the Minnesota Marine Art Museum, located in Winona, in fall 2018. Her “Waterlines” collection was met with critical acclaim. St. Kate’s librarian AMY MARS MLIS’12 and TRENT BRAGER MLIS’13 were two of three librarians awarded the 2018 Association of College & Research Libraries Innovation Award.

2018

SARAH HILGER MAOL’18 joined St. Kate’s in fall 2018 as a member of the College for Adults admission staff.

EMAAN SOLIMAN ’18 (LEFT) AND NURSING STUDENT SADIA FARAH ’19 (RIGHT) CONNECT AT THE WOMEN OF COLOR FULL CIRCLE GATHERING IN NOVEMBER 2018, WHICH MARKED THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF MULTICULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES (MIPS).

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In Memory w PHOTO/UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

Our deepest sympathy to the families of the following graduates, faculty and staff members, friends, and supporters of St. Catherine University:

All are welcome at St. Catherine University’s annual Memorial Mass, which celebrates the lives of those who have died. Join us at

Carolina Bradpiece, former director of Corporate and Foundations Relations w August 4, 2018. Shirley Connelly, former St. Mary’s Junior College staff w August 26, 2018. Mary Margaret (Meg) Wilkes Karraker, PhD, former faculty in sociology w November 26, 2018. (Edward) Terry LeMay, former University post office staff w November 2, 2018. Perry Lueders, former professor in the Learning Center w August 13, 2018. Cecelia Marrin, former staff w August 25, 2018. Grace McDonald, former associate professor of nursing, w September 10, 2018. Ida Rapoport, former social work faculty w November 8, 2018. Margaret Jeanne Soshnik, former student affairs staff w October 26, 2018. Sharon Tolbert-Glover, former vice president of institutional advancement w September 21, 2018.

Our Lady of Victory Chapel on Sunday, October 27, 2019.

Mable Hartman Turner ’40

w

August 13, 2018.

Elaine Hurley Malchow ’40

w

July 29, 2018.

Rosemary Rochford Quayle ’41 Mary Martin Nelson, CSJ, ’42 Elizabeth Delmore, CSJ, ’43 Geraldine Faricy Mach ’43

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019

August 10, 2018.

August 28, 2018.

November 15, 2018.

October 16, 2018.

Kathleen Meuleners Skillen ’43

w

September 21, 2017.

Roberta Bradley MacDonell ’45

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October 26, 2018.

Odile Gendreau Netko ’45

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w

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August 22, 2018.


Margaret Schlegel Lerach ’45 Eleanor Soukup Freer ’46

August 29, 2018.

w

Marion Chrosniak Lindgren ’47 Dorothy Hagen Raway ’47 Ellen Malone Salter ’47

Eileen Leahy Odean ’48

August 16, 2018. September 17, 2018.

w

August 15, 2018.

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Beverly Marlow Allen ’48

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Ethel Schneider Kurtz ’48 Joan Boulger Walton ’49

August 11, 2018.

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July 30, 2018.

John Ellen Rogers, CSJ, ’60

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November 11, 2018.

Dorothy Rogers Stuhr ’60

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Jean Fallon Thorson ’61

August 3, 2018.

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July 15, 2018.

Madonna E. Egan ’62, former St. Catherine assistant professor of English

August 6, 2018.

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Mary Courteau, OSB, ’63

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August 29, 2018.

July 31, 2018.

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November 24, 2018.

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Dolores Bowman Lammers ’50

October 18, 2018.

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October 5, 2018.

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Rosemarie Strizich Stonich ’50

January 14, 2018.

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Mary Catherine Goodrich Ferris ’51

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November 5, 2018.

May 22, 2016.

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May 3, 2018.

w

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Patricia De Blieck, CSJ, ’60

October 17, 2018.

October 18, 2018.

Mary Ann Meis Rawley ’51

Annette Zeug Roberts ’59

November 22, 2018.

August 6, 2018.

Agnes McHale Wood ’50

Frances Kwiatkowski Ostertag ’64 Marilyn Rubald ’64

Elizabeth Leahy Stein ’65

Kathleen Crowley Bakke ’66 Gloria Schmid Speiker ’67 Marguerite Mader ’69

w

August 26, 2018.

w

September 4, 2018.

Deborah Krantz Rapacz ’71, ’75 Judy Parker Stelzer ’72

September 12, 2018.

w

w

Margaret Olson Corr ’73

December 8, 2017.

w

May 26, 2017.

Mary Diane Seibel Cronin ’53

w

September 8, 2018.

Maureen White O’Connor ’84

Jodell Stirmlinger Rahr ’53

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November 13, 2018.

Andrea Bennett ’92

Marylyn Dolan Joseph ’54

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October 16, 2018.

Elizabeth Gagnon Bryn ’92

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June 21, 2018.

Cheryl Lee Mann ’99

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October 7, 2018.

Laura Nigon ’00

Joyce Poferl Huppert ’56

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October 22, 2018.

September 12, 2018.

Patricia Kramper Messner ’57

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October 2, 2018.

Mary Anne Menard Pietrzykowski ’57 w August 28, 2018. Joanne Juliani Thomas ’58

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Janet Dittberner Williams ’59

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Kathleen Wilson Streater ’96

Eileen Breault, CSJ, ’55

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October 2, 2018.

w

w

w

August 30, 2018.

w

August 17, 2018.

November 28, 2017.

November 10, 2018.

Daniel Carl Wallstedt MLIS’00 Julie Troyer MAED’02

w

w

w

May 11, 2018.

July 29, 2018.

Tessa March Kleinschmidt ’10, ’13 Tamara Freiborg ’17

October 22, 2018.

October 25, 2018.

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Mary Maus Bentley ’54

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September 15, 2018.

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Marilyn Hasti Ellingboe ’73 Donna Cox Sandhofer ’75

Charlotte Kramer Prentice ’56

October 10, 2018.

w

November 26, 2018.

October 1, 2018.

July 16, 2018.

October 22, 2018.

w

w

w

w

October 14, 2018.

w

Rosemary Campion Keefe ’52

Willis Grathwol Scott ’54

January 31, 2018.

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Elizabeth Plumbo Mischke ’49 w

w

JoAnn Fischer Schmitt ’62

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w

Mary Ann Stenger Rohleder ’59

August 6, 2018.

Ann Colleen Coffey, CSJ, ’49

Helen Herrick Rask ’52

August 24, 2018.

November 5, 2018.

w

Mary Bowler Furth ’50

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July 10, 2018.

w

w

Mary Richardson Boo ’47 Nora Hoey Brihn ’48

October 25, 2018.

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w

September 18, 2018.

October 5, 2018.

April 14, 2018. w

August 18, 2018.

Joan McGinty, CSJ, ’59, St. Catherine University trustee from 1999 to 2008

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October 25, 2018.

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PHOTO/SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH OF CARONDELET,ST. PAUL PROVINCE ARCHIVES

A REPRESENTATIVE OF FAITH ON DECEMBER 22, 1981, ELIZABETH DELMORE, CSJ, ’43 LEADS A PRAYER DURING THE 72ND SESSION OF THE MINNESOTA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. FATHER WILLIAM MERTZ WAS THE OFFICIAL CHAPLAIN OF THE HOUSE, BUT ON THIS DAY SR. ELIZABETH SERVED AS CHAPLAIN FOR A DAY.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019


ELIZABETH DELMORE, CSJ, ’43

JOAN MCGINTY, CSJ, ’59

Faculty emerita, alumna, and Alumnae Award winner Elizabeth Delmore, CSJ, ’43 died peacefully on November 15, 2018, at Carondelet Village. She was 97 years old. Born in Roseau, Minnesota, on August 11, 1921, Sr. Elizabeth was an earnest proponent of women in the Church. She joined the CSJ community in 1948, five years after earning a bachelor’s degree in library science from St. Catherine University. She went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in English in 1951, followed by a master’s in English and art history from the University of Minnesota in 1966. While studying and earning her degrees, Sr. Elizabeth also launched what would become a 40-year career as a librarian at high schools including St. Mary, Blaine, Minnesota; Holy Angels, Minneapolis; St. John Academy, Jamestown, North Dakota; and St. James Academy, Grand Forks, North Dakota. Sr. Elizabeth returned to St. Catherine University, serving 10 years as library director and more than 20 years as a faculty member. During her tenure as library director, she recognized the need for sound materials for scholarship on women and established a collection on women. After her retirement in 1984, Sr. Elizabeth served seven years as chaplain in the cardiac unit of HealthEast St. Joseph's Hospital, and later at Sisters Care, a CSJ service program offering dignity and aid to the elderly. At her 60-year St. Kate’s reunion, Sr. Elizabeth was recognized with the Alumnae Award in recognition of her dedication to education and lifelong commitment to St. Kate’s.

Compassionate listener, innovative educator, and respected leader and administrator, Joan McGinty, CSJ, ’59 died peacefully on October 25, 2018, at the age of 87. Sr. Joan was born and raised in Minneapolis, the oldest of six children. In 1948, she entered the community of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Three years later, she was given her first vocational assignment as a Catholic elementary school teacher. For more than a decade, Sr. Joan taught fourth through eighth grades. Sr. Joan earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology and education at St. Kate’s in 1959 and later earned a master’s degree in education at the University of St. Thomas. In 1964, she was assigned principal of St. Mary of the Lake School in White Bear Lake, the first of four principal posts in the Twin Cities area. She went on to lead Ascension in Minneapolis, St. Peter in Richfield, and St. Luke in St. Paul. She was known as a strong mentor to new teachers. Sr. Joan retired from education in 1993. In 1998, she joined the Board of Trustees at St. Kate’s, a position she filled for 10 years. Dear to Sr. Joan's heart were the years she spent as director of Sarah’s…an Oasis for Women from 1999–2002. This community home is dedicated to providing safe haven and dignity to women from around the world escaping war, violence, trauma, and torture. Joan inspired them to believe they were good women and could begin anew with rich and productive lives. In turn, they regarded her as someone they could trust completely. In 2002, she entered full retirement and spent much of her time volunteering on committees for the nonprofit Earthjustice.

Would you like to make a memorial or tribute gift?

Contact us when you have news of a death 651.690.6666 inmemory@stkate.edu

Please contact 651.690.8725 giving@stkate.edu

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PHOTO/UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • SPRING 2019


Katie Diary Piazza del Campidoglio. A snapshot. An experience of a lifetime. In 1956, a group of 25 students, led by Phyllis Gleason ’53, toured Rome during their 74-day European tour. The trip, which cost each student $1,250, was the longest European Summer Seminar organized since the program began in 1949.

Travel today for Katies is just as meaningful, amplifying how — individually and collectively — we are each called to lead and influence.

stkate.edu

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St. Catherine University Magazine Spring 2019  

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