Page 1

RG31

The Parish Magazine of Tilehurst St Catherine & Calcot St Birinus December 2019 & January 2020

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31


Who’s Who in the Parish

Vicar Rev Gill Rowell ℡ 0118 942 7786  rowellgill@gmail.com

Licensed Lay Minister

Licensed Lay Minister

Mike Heather ℡ 0118 962 4852

Tony Bartlett ℡ 0118 967 8659

 michaelheather@btinternet.com

 tony.bartlett.ccc@ntlworld.com

Churchwarden Richard Canning ℡ 0118 942 8238

Churchwarden Stuart Poore ℡ 0118 962 4555

 richard@meadowsweet.eu

 stuart.poore@ntlworld.com

St Catherine’s Hall bookings Sheila Drew ℡ 0118 942 7254  hall@stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk Cornwell Centre bookings Tilehurst Parish Council ℡ 0118 941 8833  bookings@tilehurstpc.co.uk RG31 is published 10 times a year on the first Sunday of the month (not January or August) by the P.C.C. of Tilehurst: St Catherine & Calcot: St Birinus and is also available via our website www.stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk Editor:

Tony Bartlett ℡ 0118 967 8659

Assistant Editor: Rosemary Cunningham ℡ 0118 942 0713 Advertising:

Richard Canning ℡ 0118 942 8238

All details and events are correct to the best of our knowledge at the time of going to print. The P.C.C. and Editors are not necessarily in agreement with the views expressed by contributors in this magazine. We welcome contributions of articles or letters for future issues from anyone living in, or connected with the parish. All contributions must be received by the editors by the 20th day of the month preceding the next month’s issue at the latest. Contributions may be sent to magazine@stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk Read your own copy of RG31 (10 issues) - from 2020 the price will be 60p each issue, or £6.00 for a year’s subscription. Details from the editors whose details are above. © Tilehurst St Catherine & Calcot St Birinus P.C.C. 2019 Some material is © Parish Pump Ltd and some © Dave Walker Cartoonchurch.com

Cover Picture

2

Shoebox Sunday

Photo Stuart Poore

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Tony Bartlett The same but different? The above title is the one I used when I wrote page 3 for the February 2013 edition of RG31, my first as editor. Reflecting back on the last 7 years and about this magazine left me with an article quite different from the usual thoughts expressed on this page. So, I scrapped what I had written and will start again, but with the same title; let’s see where it leads me! Of course, with a computer these days it’s almost impossible to completely scrap something, so you’ll find what I had originally written (page 3 version 1) on page 21.

The same but different? version 2 For me that phrase sums up the church’s year. The Bible readings repeat every 3 years, the seasons, festivals and feast days all roll by unchanged, but we who mark and celebrate those milestones in the years change and how we mark them changes too. For the folk who made the journey from the Cornwell Centre in June, to a new home at St Catherine’s, there is an added layer of change; the shape and sound of the worship space we had known and become accustomed to, over (for most of us) many years is different. Whilst the memory of how it was will gradually dim, our recent joint ‘Shoebox Sunday’ celebration was a reminder of ‘the same but different’ as will the joint 10.30 am service of Nativity and Carols on 16th December and the 10.30 am joint celebration on Christmas Day. All these joint services replacing the different ways each church had marked them. For the 8.00 and 9.30 (now 9.15) congregations, even that ‘small’ change of 15 minutes has changed the shape of their Sunday morning. I do hope and pray, that as we celebrate the birth of Jesus together instead of separately this year, our unity will become stronger and reaping the benefits will affect the way we see and carry out the mission of the church. For each one of us this Christmas will be different, with bereavements and births, friends lost and gained; celebrations never exactly the same from year to year. But in Hebrews 13:8 it says ‘Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and for ever.’ At the heart of Christmas one thing remains the same; that the son of God was born in an obscure corner of the Roman Empire and by his birth, life, death and resurrection made it possible for us to enter a relationship with him as children of God. As we look forward to a new year and challenges and opportunities that will undoubtedly come our way, I pray that we might all find encouragement in ‘the same but different’.

Tony

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

3


Services in the Parish The Garden Room at St Catherine's is open during the day and reserved for quiet, prayer and meditation. Every Wednesday 9.30 am

A simple morning service at St Joseph’s or St Catherine's followed by a cup of coffee. See weekly notices at either Church. When at St Catherine’s followed by ‘Meeting Point’ - meeting together and meeting with God, Teas and Coffees, people to listen and pray in the presence of God for you or for those you are concerned about.

Every Thursday 12.15 pm 2.00 pm

Holy Communion or Morning Prayer - Garden Room Community Prayer - Garden Room

Every Friday during term time 9.15 am

Tots Praise - Café Siena st

Sunday 1 December - Advent Sunday Isaiah 2.1-5, Psalm 122, Romans 13.11-14, Matthew 24.36-44 8.00 am Morning Prayer 9.15 am Holy Communion 11.00 am Allsorts@11 On Advent Sunday a new cycle (Lectionary Year A) of Bible readings begins during which the Gospel readings will mainly be from Matthew

Wednesday 4th December 11.00 am

Holy Communion at York House

Saturday 7th December 3.30 pm

Messy Church - Advent

Sunday 8th December - Second Sunday of Advent Isaiah 11.1-10, Psalm 72.1-7,18,19, Romans 15.4-13, Matthew 3.1-12 8.00 am Holy Communion 9.15 am Word and Worship 11.00 am Allsorts@11 4.00 pm Christingle service 4

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Sunday 15th December - Third Sunday of Advent Isaiah 35.1-10, Psalm 146.4-10, James 5.7-10, Matthew 11.2-11 8.00 am Morning Prayer 9.15 am Holy Communion 11.00 am Allsorts@11 6.30 pm Nine Lessons and Carols

Sunday 22nd December - Fourth Sunday of Advent Isaiah 7.10-16, Psalm 80.1-8,18-20, Romans 1.1-7, Matthew 1.18-25 8.00 am Holy Communion 10.30 am Carols & Nativity (All are invited to come dressed as a Nativity character)

Monday 23rd December 12.00 noon & 4.00 pm Churches Together joining Pangbourne Rotary for Carol singing at Tilehurst Triangle

Tuesday 24th December - Christmas Eve Isaiah 52.7-10, Psalm 98, Hebrews 1.1-4[5-12], John 1.1-14 7.00 pm Carols under the Old Oak Tree Wrap up warm and bring a mug for Hot Chocolate 11.30 pm Midnight Holy Communion

Wednesday 25th December - Christmas Day Isaiah 9.2-7, Psalm 96, Titus 2.11-14, Luke 2.1-14[15-20] 10.30 am Family Celebration

Sunday 29th December - First Sunday of Christmas Isaiah 63.7-9, Psalm 148, Hebrews 2.10-18, Matthew 2.13-23 9.15 am Holy Communion 11.00 am Allsorts@11 6.00 pm Prayer meeting for the New Year in the Garden Room (Continued on page 6) The Epiphany is an ancient Christian feast day and is signiďŹ cant in a number of ways. In the East, where it originated, the Epiphany celebrates the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist in the River Jordan. It also celebrates Jesus' birth. The Western Church began celebrating the Epiphany in the 4th century where it was, and still is, associated with the visit of the magi (wise men) to the infant Jesus when God revealed himself to the world through the incarnation of Jesus. The season of Epiphany extends from 6th January until Ash Wednesday, which begins the season of Lent leading to Easter. Some traditions observe Epiphany as a single day, in the Spanish speaking world Epiphany is also known as Three Kings Day.

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

5


Sunday 5th January - Epiphany Isaiah 60.1-6, Psalm 72.[1-9]10-15, Ephesians 3.1-12, Matthew 2.1-12 8.00 am Morning Prayer 9.15 am Holy Communion 11.00 am Allsorts@11

Wednesday 8th January 11.00 am

Holy Communion at York House

Sunday 12th January - First Sunday of Epiphany Isaiah 42.1-9, Psalm 29, Acts 10.34-43 Matthew 3.13-17 8.00 am Holy Communion 9.15 am Word and Worship 11.00 am Allsorts@11

Sunday 19th January - Second Sunday of Epiphany Isaiah 49.1-7, Psalm 40.1-12, 1 Corinthians 1.1-9, John 1.29-42 8.00 am Morning Prayer 9.15 am Holy Communion 11.00 am Allsorts@11 6.30 pm Service for the week of Prayer for Christian Unity at Emmanuel Methodist Church, Oxford Rd, preacher Bishop of Reading Rev Olivia Graham

Sunday 26th January - Third Sunday of Epiphany Isaiah 9.1-4, Psalm 27.1,4-12, 1 Corinthians 1.10-18, Matthew 4.12-23 8.00 am Holy Communion 9.15 am Word and Worship 11.00 am Allsorts@11 with Communion

Sunday 2nd February - The presentation of Christ in the Temple Malachi 3.1-5, Psalm 24.[1-6]7-10, Hebrews 2.14-18, Luke 2.22-40 8.00 am Morning Prayer 9.15 am Holy Communion 11.00 am Allsorts@11

Wednesday 5th February 11.00 am

Holy Communion at York House

Sunday 9th February - Proper 1 Isaiah 58.1-12, Psalm 112.1-10, 1 Corinthians 2.1-16, Matthew 5.13-20 8.00 am Holy Communion 9.15 am Word and Worship 11.00 am Allsorts@11 6

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


RG31

The Parish Magazine of Tilehurst St Catherine & Calcot St Birinus February 2020 Included with the magazine is the slip to renew your subscription for 2020, it would be helpful to have this back as soon as possible if you wish (as I hope) to continue receiving the magazine. The next edition is due out on Sunday 2nd February. Please note price increase (first in 7 years) from 50p to 60p (£6 for the year) Tony Bartlett, editor

This year get out of your rut! 'THE LORD SPAKE UNTO ME, SAYING, "YE HAVE COMPASSED THIS MOUNTAIN LONG ENOUGH: TURN YOU NORTHWARD."' DEUTERONOMY 2:2-3 KJV

A Biologist experimented with what he called 'processional caterpillars'. He lined up caterpillars on the rim of a pot that held a plant so that the lead caterpillar was headto-tail with the last caterpillar, with no break in the parade. The tiny creatures walked around the rim of the pot for a full week before they died of exhaustion and starvation. Not once did any of them break out of line and venture over to the plant to eat. Food was only inches away, but their follow-the-crowd instinct was stronger than the drive to eat and survive. The same thing happened to an entire generation of Israelites. They walked in circles in the wilderness for forty years, even though they were only eleven miles from the Promised Land. If you're in a rut today, ask yourself these three questions: 1. Is this rut of my own making? We choose a rut because it's comfortable and requires no risk. And getting out of it requires courage and a willingness to make tough choices you follow through on. 2. Who am I following? We adopt certain patterns because someone has taught them to us directly, or by example. Instead of mindlessly following the crowd, seek God's will for your life and commit yourself to doing it. 3. Where am I going? The Bible says, 'Where there is no vision, the people perish' (Proverbs 29: 18 KJV). If you want to get out of the rut you're in today, ask God to give you a vision for your life - He will! And when He does, pour yourself into it. Pray that you would be able to break out of your rut in the year ahead. This thought is taken from ‘The Word for Today’, Daily Bible reading notes produced quarterly by UCB (United Christian Broadcasters Ltd) PO Box 255, Stoke on Trent, ST4 8YY. If you would like to receive these free notes or those aimed at Secondary School age, please ask Evelyn Bartlett ℡ 0118 967 8659 who is our church rep for UCB.

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

7


Christmas Fair This was a really happy event with lots of local families enjoying themselves playing games, buying Christmas gifts and enjoying tea and cake in our cafe area. There was lots of chat and laughter all around! A huge thank you to all the stall holders and especially to Sue and Sonia for all their hard work in making the afternoon go so well. It was great to see the Brownies on their stall, to see a famous local author selling books and to enjoy Father Christmas and his singing elves! Rosemary Cunningham THANK YOU to everyone who helped and gave donations for the Christmas Fair. Special thanks to the following hall users and businesses who generously supported us: Warings Bakers, Tilehurst Jo Hands, Flamingo Paperie Park Lane Salon Village Florists Tesco Stores, Portman Road The Lemon Plaice 7th Tilehurst Brownies, Cornwell Community Crafts

8

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Every November we hold Memorial Services for our loved ones who we trust are ''Resting in Peace''. We also remember the Armed Forces who fought for Peace. Throughout the year at church services we declare ''peace be with you'' to our brothers and sisters.

We are definitely beginning to flourish again in our Parish and I certainly find inner peace, meeting together for all sorts of reasons, under the umbrella of St Catherine's Church and Centre. As the Celts would say 'a thin place' where God's Presence is often felt.

What is this Peace and where is it to be found?

Whilst thinking of Advent and the Prince of Peace and St Catherine's, I was reminded of the classic fairy tale 'Sleeping Beauty' who was awoken from a deep sleep by a kiss from a prince. I believe, metaphorically, that a slumbering St Catherine of Siena has also been woken up with a kiss... by the Prince of Peace Himself!

The Hebrew word for peace is 'shalom' and often refers to the appearance of calm, tranquillity, harmony, security and well being of an individual, group or nation. However, in a world filled with war and violence, false promises of peace can be used to deceive us and whilst living in harmony with others can be difficult, living in peace in our own lives can seem impossible. True peace is something everyone searches for but few seem to find. The Bible tells us that we can have peace through our struggles, worries and fear. We only have to ask and God promises us peace "that passes all understanding."

Dec 19 & Jan 20

We look forward to sharing peaceful times this Advent and Christmas with everyone. Isaiah 9:6 NIV For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counsellor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

RG31

Lorraine Roberts

9


A reliable and trustworthy service, for all your general garden and home maintenance. From dripping taps, blocked guttering and general repairs to general decorating, both internally and externally No job is too small ! Please call for a no obligation quote : Mobile :

 07810 321 035

Home : â„Ą 0118 945 4326

Competitive hourly rate, complete with personal recommendations!

10

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Cornwell 0-5s It takes most of the contents of our four cupboards and busy people to transform:

An empty Hall

To This

Since April 2018 Cornwell 0-5s has been under the care of St Catherine's Church, with the support of local childminders. It is a warm, welcoming place for babies, toddlers, pre-school children and their parents, grandparents or carers to meet during the school term time - there is even a great-grandmother who comes along. There is a Tuesday morning session open to everyone and the Thursday morning session is for childminders only (of which there were sixteen attending, at last count).

Dec 19 & Jan 20

During the sessions there are varied opportunities for children's play, a craft or messy play table, drinks and healthy snacks, ďŹ nishing with song time and tidying and sweeping up - many children love to help! Sometimes we enjoy baking, painting or playing percussion instruments. We always welcome new ideas and try to provide activities to develop ďŹ ne motor skills or encourage vocabulary. Through free play the children develop their social skills.

RG31

(Continued on page 12)

11


(Continued from page 11) Every week the children will have a creation of some sort to take home to show their families. We always try and make something special for Easter and Christmas and hold a Summer and Christmas party. We celebrate birthdays with a pretend cake but real candles!

Some days are very busy with twenty families or more. Others are much quieter and the children enjoy the extra space to ride around on the little tricycles. Sometimes a new sibling arrives whilst older children move on to preschool or school.

The church currently has eight regular volunteers who help during the sessions or with necessary tasks including admin, secretarial work, craft and food preparation and shopping. We receive thanks and encouragement from many of the people who attend and its lovely to see the children growing and developing which is reward enough.

On Tuesdays there is a selection of healthy snacks for the children, but always tea, coffee and biscuits for the adults

Mothers and carers invite their friends or bring along relatives (Dad's sometimes), old acquaintances reacquaint, new friends are made. The childminders help and support each other. People can drop in occasionally or come every week, as they wish. Some live virtually next door (the new housing development) and others come from further aďŹ eld, such as Theale or Calcot. We never really know who, or how many, will turn up. We welcome everyone.

12

New session volunteers would be much welcomed, to bring new skills or ideas and so that existing volunteers can more easily take a break. (Continued on page 13)

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


(Continued from page 12) There are dierent opportunities such as helping in the kitchen, with craft or songs or greeting people. As a volunteer you get to know a wider group of people in the community and there is really never a dull moment with the young children. They are invariably fascinating to watch and often make us laugh. Cornwell 0-5s have met at the Cornwell Centre for almost thirty years now, during which time Evelyn Bartlett has been the steady presence and caring force behind it (with the support of her husband Tony). Its future was uncertain for a while until St Catherine's agreed to step in and enable the group to keep running, with support from some childminders. Even this would not have been possible without Evelyn and Tony's continuing love and dedication to their local community.

When I think of the hundreds (well over a thousand?) of people, children and adults, who have met at the group over the years, I hope that Evelyn and Tony will not mind that I have taken this opportunity to demonstrate the love you have shown to your neighbours through Cornwell 0-5s. At a time when many neighbours rarely speak to each other, when young parents often do not have family living nearby and mothers have to work, and when government initiatives such as Sure Start come and go, I don't think that you can overstate the importance of community 0-5s groups such as Cornwell 0-5s. I hope and pray that St Catherine's will continue to show God's Love in the community through Cornwell 0-5s, for many more years to come. Liz Gulley

The Leprosy Mission World Leprosy Sunday will be on 26th January 2020 and once again we are asked to continue collecting donations until April 2020. as I write this; it will not be with us until the beginning of December.

Dec 19 & Jan 20

I have requested a copy of the ďŹ lm that TLM have produced and also hoping that our area rep. Chris Stratton will be able to visit us sometime in March 2020. My thanks to all of you who have so faithfully supported TLM over the years.

RG31

Joan Burbidge

13


14

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


St Catherine’s Gardening Club Now, what have we been up to this last month? Well the rain has got in the way sometimes, but some sunshine in between gave us a few opportunities to get outside and do some pruning and tidying. Hazel has planted up the bed behind Gill Howgego’s bench and completely transformed it! We’re looking forward to watching everything grow. The Brownies created a very moving display of footsteps under the oak tree, as part of Turn Tilehurst Red for Remembrance Day, and were highly praised for their efforts.

colours of the wet leaves. There is so much of God’s creation to enjoy, if we will only stop and look. As always, Jo Day 942 1481 or Chris Addison 07966 105056 would love to hear from you if you would like to be part of our friendly little team. We wish you a peaceful Christmas and a blessed New Year. Jo Day “No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden.” Thomas Jefferson

Recently we’ve been meeting to discuss ideas and plans for the Tilehurst Garden Festival early next July. There will be a Flower Festival in the church, and lovely refreshments for our visitors, as well as our gardens looking as good as we can make them. If you have some ideas and would like to get involved, do have a chat with one of us. (phone numbers below). Chris and Shirley have recently done a great job turning out the shed, aiming to make everything we keep in there more accessible. Christmas preparations will probably take our attention away from the garden for the next few weeks, but we’ll be back in action early next year. This autumn I have found myself gasping at the incredible beauty of sunshine glistening on the brilliant

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

15


On the best ways for a vicar to disrupt Christmas The Rectory, St James the Least

My dear Nephew Darren I am sorry I was not alive during that wonderful four-year period when Oliver Cromwell abolished Christmas. Just think! No Christmas parties, no carol services, no cards to send and no frantic last-minute shopping. That man was a hero. Planning for Christmas at St James’ normally starts on 2nd January. By Easter, the flowers for church have been colour coordinated, the seating plans and table decorations for the Christmas party have been allocated (with nominated reserves in case someone should inconveniently die in the intervening eight months). Long before Summer is over, the tree lights have been tested, music for the 9 Lessons and Carols Service has been chosen and the service sheets printed. Way before the dark nights set in, car parking attendants will have been found, those who are to light all the candles will have been rehearsed to perfection and the brass lectern has had its annual polish. We do not do spontaneity at St James the Least of All. If ever there was a service when time for something unexpected was allowed, its place would be announced in the order of service, how long it would happen unexpectedly would have been decided by a committee and who was to be spontaneous would have been allocated on a rota. The one person none of these well-meaning, efficient, committed organisers can control is the Rector. You could call it a staff perk. Carols will (accidentally, of course) be announced in the wrong order; if verse 3 was to be omitted, I announce it will be verse 4. This keeps the organist on his toes while the choir hovers on the point of a collective nervous breakdown. At the Christmas supper, my introductory welcome speech and extensive grace make those in the kitchen wonder if the vegetables being boiled should better be served as thick soup. I offer the helpful suggestion that the tree, having been installed and decorated in the chancel, may perhaps look better in the sanctuary and I turn all the heating off throughout the season, explaining that it will help the flowers to last. All Services will start five minutes early (was my watch rather fast?) so I can look disapprovingly at those still coming in while we are singing the first carol and making it clear that I think they had spent too long in the pub next door. And so we all reach Christmas morning, with 12 months of planning having gone yet again slightly awry, with parishioners exhausted and I exhilarated at the chaos that has been created with such ease. Mr Cromwell, your spirit lives on. Your loving uncle, Eustace

16

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Dates for the Diary See the following pages for more information December Fri 6 Fri 6 Fri 6 Tues 10 Thurs 12 Fri 13 Dec 14 Tues 17 Thurs 19 Thurs 19 Sat 21 Mon 23

Book Club meeting 11.30 am in Garden Room Café Siena closed for WI Christmas lunch 3.00 pm St Catherine’s at Boxgrove House Tilehurst Parish Council meeting 7.30 pm at the Calcot Centre, Highview Children & Youth Action group meeting 7.00 pm Café Siena Christmas Lunch, book early to avoid disappointment Crafty Space 1.30-5.30 pm see page 20 Carols at the Fox & Hounds, City Road Last Cornwell 0-5s session of the term West Berkshire Schools break up for Christmas, some midday The Link closes 2.00 pm for the Christmas break Carols at the Triangle 12.00 noon & 4.00 pm

January Thurs 2 Fri 3 Mon 6 Tues 7 Thurs 9 Fri 10 Sat 11 Mon 13 Tues 14 Sun 19 Weds 22 Fri 24

The Link re-opens after the Christmas break 3.00 pm St Catherine’s at Boxgrove House Schools go back Cornwell 0-5s resumes after the Christmas break Prayer Ministry Team Meeting 7.45 pm in the Garden Room Book Club meeting 11.30 am in the café Crafty Space 1.30-5.30 pm see page 20 PCC meeting Tilehurst Parish Council meeting 7.30 pm at the Calcot Centre, Highview Service of Prayer for Christian Unity 6.30 pm Emmanuel Methodist Service of Prayer for Christian Unity led by John Bell 7.30 pm at The Minster Purley Players ‘Peter Pan’ 7.30 pm Tickets from 0118 941 3259 at The Barn. Other performances Saturday 25th 2.00 pm & 7.30 pm

February Tues 4 Fri 7 Sat 8 Tues 11 Fri 14 Mon 17

Finance Action Group meeting 3.00 pm St Catherine’s at Boxgrove House Crafty Space 1.30-5.30 pm see page 20 Tilehurst Parish Council meeting 7.30 pm at the Calcot Centre, Highview Book Club meeting 11.30 am Half term week

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

17


What’s On In and

Community Event at St Catherine’s Wittenham Avenue RG31 5LN

The Link

Friday Friends

28 School Rd RG31 5AN

Meets weekly from 2.00 pm - 4.00 pm every Friday Price £3.50 (carers free) Offering a mix of light exercise, singing together, table-top games and craft activities in a safe, warm and friendly environment – with tea and cakes. December 6th Cards & Games 13th Carols & Readings 20th Closed 27th Closed January 3rd RahRah Theatre Company presents - Little Red Riding Hood A traditional pantomime with songs and dancing

10th 17th 24th 31st

A Tilehurst Community Café managed and run by volunteers. Opening hours Mon-Fri: 10.30 am – 4.00 pm Sat: 11.00 am – 2.00 pm Sun: CLOSED Christmas Closing Closes Saturday 21st December Re-opens Thursday 2nd January For reasonably priced teas, coffee, snacks, lunches, cards and books.

Beetle Drive Alan Copeland Tax Care and Toyboys Seated exercises & TV series

Tuesday get-together

February 7th Cards & Games

Serving the Community

If you think you would like to come, or think you could help, please contact Anne Soley ℡ 0118 942 5407

Café Siena Friday 6th December Closed for private event Friday 13th December, Christmas lunch- pre-booking required th

Friday 20 , Thursday 26 & Friday 20th December Closed

18

th

10.00 am to 12 noon in the cafe area of St Catherine’s Church Centre Tues 17th December FESTIVE FUN! Tues 24th December, Christmas Eve—CLOSED Tues 31st December, New Year’s Eve - FREE RAFFLE! Drop in, meet old friends and make new ones, free Tea & Coffee provided For more information contact info@stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Around the Parish December Weds 4th Flower demonstration 8.00 pm with Jane Haas A very popular annual event

(Postponed from 27th November) Weds 11th Carols & readings 8.00 pm in Church

January Weds 8th Beetle Drive 8.00 pm in the Hall Weds 15th Bible study 8.00 pm at 26 Normanstead Road Weds 22nd Fellowship afternoon 2.00 pm at 32 Longworth Avenue

February Weds 12th Reading Family Aid 8.00 pm in the Hall Weds 19th Bible study 8.00 pm at 2 Laurel Drive

St Catherine's Youth Group

Weds 26th Fellowship afternoon 2.00 pm at 55 Hildens Drive

13th December End of term Christmas Evening

Weds 26th Ash Wednesday 8.00 pm Communion service

th

10 January Youth group resumes For those at secondary school Sessions are £1.50 and are 7.45-9.15 pm at St Catherine’s. For more information see www.stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk or phone Dee Anderson 07821 265 804

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

Our last session of term is Thursday 19th December and we resume on Tuesday 7th January 2020

19


Cornwell 0-5s is a well established Parent & Toddler Group run by St Catherine’s Church in the Cornwell Centre, Home Croft (off Clements Mead), Tilehurst, RG31 5WJ. We offer a stimulating and fun environment for children and a great place for parents and carers to socialise. We run two sessions a week: Tuesdays 10.00 am-12.00 noon, refreshments included And Thursdays, a special session for Childminders, 10.00 am - 12. 00 noon If you are interested in joining, please feel free to drop in at one of the sessions

Registered charity 1006732 - Established over 50 years St Catherine’s Hall, Wittenham Avenue, Tilehurst, RG31 5LN A caring and supportive setting where Children are our heart and inspiration  Ofsted Inspected with a team of qualified staff  Outside Play Area  Sessions Daily during Term Time 9.00 am - 3. 00 pm  Children with Special Needs welcome For more information, or to arrange a visit to come and see us in action, contact us on  07745 909 348 see www.stcatherinespreschool.co.uk

St. Catherine’s Church Centre, Wittenham Avenue, Tilehurst

Saturdays 1.30 pm to 5.30 pm December 14th, January 11th, February 8th We

provide time, space, tea, coffee & cake

You

bring along the craft projects you’ve always meant to do :A donation of around £1.25 per person, per hour is requested to cover the cost of hall hire, tea & coffee.

https://www.facebook.com/CraftySpace Contact Val Poore ℡ 0118 962 4555 email  val.poore@ntlworld.com 20

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


RG31

The same but different?

The above title is the one I used when I wrote page 3 for the February 2013 edition of RG31, my first as editor. With this issue I will have completed 7 years; my predecessor, Stuart Poore managed 9½ years. I have no plans to step down unless someone is keen to take over. Looking back on that February 2013 edition I had made some immediate changes on taking over; different font, services schedule now part of the magazine instead of a separate insert. There were just 28 pages back then, two of which (the cover and paid for adverts) were colour with all the photos in black & white. Over the last 7 years further changes have evolved, not least the use of colour printing. Looking back seven years, those black and white photos would have been so much better had they been in colour. A typical edition this year has had 36 pages, all the photos have been in colour which has raised the number of colour pages (in the November edition 14 of the 36 pages were in colour). If I tell you that it costs ten times as much to print a colour page as a black and white one, you will understand that the cost of producing the magazine has increased substantially over the last 7 years. The cover price on the other hand has been kept at 50p per issue or £5 for the 10 issues. Up to now advertising revenue and sales have covered the production costs but this year we are looking at a shortfall. I really do not want to reduce either the amount of colour or the number of

Dec 19 & Jan 20

pages, in fact I’d like the whole magazine to be in colour. The Finance Action Group has agreed to my proposal that we increase the price to 60p per issue or £6 for the year. This increase will take effect from the next (February 2020) edition, as you will see from the renewal slip enclosed with this magazine. I am grateful to those who already pay more than the cover price as a donation, this enables us to give away some magazines free; to local businesses, Doctors, Dentists, Hairdressers & Vets Surgery waiting rooms where they gain a wide readership to tell of what we do as a parish. I would also encourage anyone to give a free magazine to visitors and people new to the church, they then have the option of subscribing to, and paying for, future issues. If you are willing to pay more than 60p or £6 as a donation, it will enable us to continue this. We now publish the magazine on the internet where there is the possibility of an unlimited readership and I’m grateful to Stuart for doing the work that this involves. I am very grateful to the contributors whose names you will see at the foot of articles every month. I believe that including a wide variety of styles and contents makes for a magazine in which everyone can find something of interest (and maybe some things that don’t appeal – but then we’re all different!) Tony

RG31

21


22

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Encouragement I'm told "perfectionism" is an increasing mental health issue: it can even kill. Surely, kids need standards and discipline to avoid a dismal future; but mixed with love, encouragement and "permission to exist"? Some gurus tell us: "Don't strain, or aim very high." But Jesus said: "Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect." (Matt. 5) Does that sound scary? Our New Testament draws from Greek texts. "Teleios" can mean "perfect", "complete", "grown-up", "enough" and more. Programmers welcome hints like: "Error 6 on line 35". These aren't terrible; they're life-savers. "Carry on!" Oh, I'd so love to be REALLY grown-up and "complete"(!). If only there wasn't so much "barbed wire" - shame, criticisms, judgements for failure etc. yes, and despair! "Aiming too high" can break us IF, REPEAT IF, we feel dark despair and worthlessness when we fall short. At times we can all forget what we've been taught, and feel "worthless". Remember John 8:11, Jesus' words: "Neither do I condemn thee ... " (One literal translation from Greek: "Nor do I come down on you. Carry on. From now on, don't make this mistake.") Some might see this as: "No, lass, you've NOT been on a good path! I urgently want you to grow more perfect and 'complete'! But despair will not help you to do that. You may not know it, but I AM ON YOUR SIDE! I want you to grow a lot better, NOT to die!" Bosses expected "perfection" from us poor programmers! We helped each other to stay cheerful and alert.

Dec 19 & Jan 20

When something pointed to a mistake, we didn't groan: we were grateful for clues! We humbly accepted all the help we could get, to bring "perfection" a few steps nearer. It seems some ancient Churchmen made GRIM demands. If you bowed to them (or paid) you might be 'pardoned'. But folk often "failed", grew ashamed, frightened and despairing. And despair was ANOTHER BIG SIN! To many, it seemed dark. This is history, but it can still inuence a few 'outsiders', unconsciously? Phil French

After the Flood Noah opens up the ark and lets all the animals out, telling them to "Go forth and multiply!" He's closing the great doors of the ark when he notices that there are two snakes sitting in a dark corner. So he says to them, "Didn't you hear me? You can go now. Go forth and multiply." "We can't," said the snakes. "We're adders."

RG31

23


24

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Shoebox Sunday Sunday 17th November was ‘Shoebox Sunday’ the day when we hold a special service and people are encouraged to bring a shoebox filled with toys and supplies to donate as part of Operation Christmas Child. Through Operation Christmas Child, we send shoeboxes packed with gifts and supplies to needy children around the world to bring some Christmas cheer to children in the poorest parts of the world who might otherwise get nothing. At our special joint service, we explained a little of the history of Operation Christmas Child, showed a video of the boxes being processed and distributed, a video of some children opening their boxes, and a final video of the impact a single box had on a young receiver - now all grown up. And delivering boxes themselves.

On Monday morning they were taken down to our local collection point, and we boxed them up ready to ship to the nearest processing depot in Uxbridge. Those of you making the packing donation on-line may have received a tracking barcode to learn where your box went. We know that last year, many of our boxes went to ex soviet states, including the Ukraine. Please let us know if you find out where this years boxes go! A big thank you to Tony Bartlett and Joanne Freeman for doing most of the organising. Stuart Poore

We prayed for the children who would receive our boxes, as well for the many volunteers who would help our boxes on their way. A total of 110 boxes were collected, with many coming from different groups not least the Cornwell 0-5s Play Group.

The boxes at St Catherine’s

Help loading Tony’s car

The Collection Depot

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

25


Tilehurst Triangle WI We knew our November meeting was going to be different and it surpassed expectations. It was called, ‘Have a Go,’ and gave members the chance to have a go with various crafts and activities.

Under the guidance of some talented members, we were able to try our hand at various crafts including learning to knit, ceramic painting, decorating a glass, making a cross stitch Christmas card, card making or water colour painting.

There was also the opportunity for some to learn Cribbage. The evening also enabled us to socialise whilst crafting. Every member present had a go and some great cards, paintings and decorated glasses were produced. One of our younger members was very pleased as she learned to knit and our oldest member enjoyed ceramic painting.

The Strollers’ group enjoyed a walk around Whitchurch on Thames with the beautiful autumn colours, visiting the church and Whitchurch Maze with its brick paths.

The walkers’ group have been very fortunate with the weather, enjoying a lovely sunny autumn walk by the (Continued on page 27)

26

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


(Continued from page 26) Thames at Purley, ending up in the outdoor gym for a bit of fitness training, before lunch in Pangbourne! Later in the month, the group walked in the Peasemore area with beautiful open countryside views. The cinema club have a number of films planned to watch and we continue to enjoy our monthly ‘Cuppa and a Chat’ at Café Siena.

Tilehurst Triangle WI meets in St Catherine’s Hall on the third Wednesday of each month, except August, at 7.30 pm. Visitors are welcome. We have a Facebook page; so check us out and see what we have been doing and have planned.

Unfortunately worded Church Notices Let us join David and Lisa in the celebration of their wedding and bring their happiness to a conclusion.

The church will host an evening of fine dining, superb entertainment, and gracious hostility.

Helpers are needed! Please sign up on the information sheep.

Ushers will eat latecomers.

The outreach committee has enlisted 25 visitors to make calls on people who are not afflicted with any church. Low Self-Esteem Support Group will meet Thursday at 7 to 8:30p.m. Please use the back door. The 1991 Spring Council Retreat will be hell May 10 and 11.

Miss Charlene Mason sang “I will not pass this way again” giving obvious pleasure to the congregation. Women’s Luncheon: Each member bring a sandwich. Polly Phillips will give the medication. Don’t miss this Saturday’s exhibit by Christian Martian Arts.

Today’s Sermon: How Much Can a Man Drink? with hymns from a full choir.

We are grateful for the help of those who cleaned up the grounds around the church building and the rector.

The audience is asked to remain seated until the end of the recession.

Diana and Don request your presents at their wedding.

The choir invites any member of the congregation who enjoys sinning to join the choir.

The rosebud on the altar this morning is to announce the birth of David Alan Belzer, the sin of Reverend and Mrs. Julius Belzer.

Announcement in the church bulletin for a National PRAYER & FASTING conference: “The cost for attending the Fasting and Prayer conference includes meals.”

Dec 19 & Jan 20

The music for today’s service was all composed by George Friedrich Handel in celebration of the 300th anniversary of his birth.

RG31

27


28

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Memorial service

A new member

On Sunday 16th November an increased 8am congregation were thrilled to welcome Gill as the newest member of our Mothers Union. On 3rd November we held our annual memorial service which was sensitively led by Gill. Over 30 people joined together to remember those they had loved and lost.

We were delighted that Jean Vaughan our Area Vice President was able to conduct the official enrolment of Gill into the St Catherine's Mothers Union.

Candles were lit in memory of our loved ones and there was a time for quiet reflection.

Gill was duly presented with her membership card and a Mothers Union badge. Gill was then welcomed with a big round of applause.

Afterwards there was an opportunity to stay and chat over a cup of tea and enjoy some delicious cakes.

We welcome Gill into our Mothers Union and look forward to her joining us at our meetings when she is able to.

Hilary Smee

Hilary Smee

Mothers’ Union Prayer Chain—Prayer in Emergencies A call to one of the following numbers will start a chain of prayer straight away.

Valerie Forrow ℡ 0118 942 9319 Evelyn Bartlett ℡ 0118 967 8659 Lorraine Roberts ℡ 0118 942 6189 Dec 19 & Jan 20

Hilary Smee ℡ 0118 941 2895 Jo Day ℡ 0118 942 1481 Shirley Horsnell  07872 315 506

RG31

29


Established 1961

You could advertise here Quarter, Half or Whole page Black & White or Colour Circulation 200 printed copies with some in public places RG31 is also published on the internet - readership unlimited! Contact Richard Canning â„¡ 0118 942 8238  richard@meadowsweet.eu

TREE SURGEONS WITH OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN THE WORLD OF TREE CARE

Tree removal, Tree pruning Trees supplied and planted Hedge Work Stump Grinding Grounds Maintenance FULLY INSURED, NPTC QUALIFIED Tel/Fax : 0118 971 2224 Mobile : 07876 232282 Email : Arumtreeservices@gmail.com Web : www.arumtreeservices.co.uk

CALL NOW FOR A FREE QUOTATION! 30

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


From the ‘Parish Pump’ Church engages millions through apps and social media Church of England prayer apps were used more than five million times over the last year as a record number of people sought Christian contemplation and reflection online, according to new figures published today. Apps allowing users to pray the ancient ‘Daily Office’ of morning, evening and night prayer were used 4.2 million times on Apple devices alone in the last 12 months, an increase of 446,000 on the year before, new figures show. The figures do not include other social media prayers, reflections and posts by the Church of England, which now have an average reach of 3.6 million every month, an increase on 2018. The digital figures were published alongside the Church of England’s Statistics for Mission 2018, and showed that some 4,400 churches – more than a third of those responding – run courses teaching the basics of the Christian faith. These included the Pilgrim Course, launched in 2013, and the Alpha Course which introduces participants to the Christian faith through a series of talks and discussions. The figures showed 3,200 churches reported running activities such as youth groups or youth-focused services for children and teenagers aged between 11 and 17 years old.

The statistics showed 1.12 million regular worshippers at Church of England churches in 2018. There were nearly eight million attendances at Church of England Christmas and Advent services combined in 2018, including special services for civic organisations, schools and local communities. The Church’s reach on social media throughout Advent and Christmas 2018 with the #FollowTheStar campaign was 7.94 million – up by 1.14 million from 2017. On average, 871,000 people attended Church of England services and acts of worship each week, 2.6% lower than in 2017. A further 175,000 people attended services for schools in Church of England churches. Other figures from the digital report show that AChurchNearYou.com, the church finding website, received more than 38 million page views in the last 12 months, a big increase on the year before. Since launching in May 2018, the Church of England’s Alexa skill has been asked more than 100,000 questions by Christians and people exploring the faith. The Bishop of Ripon, Dr Helen-Ann Hartley, said: “The Church’s digital innovation is enabling people to hear the good news of Jesus Christ in ways that weren’t previously possible alongside regular Sunday worship and at (Continued on page 32)

Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

31


(Continued from page 31) significant moments such as Christmas and Easter. “It is also really striking just how many churches are running courses in the basics of Christianity. This shows a readiness to explore the Christian faith.”

Homeless people at risk of modern slavery Staff and volunteers at night shelters are being urged to be on the lookout for signs of exploitation among guests in a campaign recently launched by the Church of England’s anti-slavery initiative. More than 1,000 posters and other materials aimed at raising awareness of the dangers of modern slavery amongst homeless people have been distributed to night shelters across the country by The Clewer Initiative, the Church of England’s response to modern slavery. The Let’s Talk initiative is encouraging night shelters and other outreach services such as soup kitchens to share concerns with the Modern Slavery Helpline or local support services. The signs of modern slavery amongst homeless people could include: • Unusual anxiety about people in positions of authority and extreme fear of being watched • Working for no or little pay • Working in the most common sectors for modern slavery such as construction and hand car washes • Not being allowed to leave their place of work • Having no control of their ID

32

• Being approached on the street, outside a shelter or at drop-in by someone offering work • Signs of physical abuse or untreated injuries The Let’s Talk initiative includes a poster illustrating the typical journey of a homeless person trafficked into exploitation. There are also guidance notes for project managers and volunteers in night shelters on the steps they can take to safeguard their guests from this danger. These include warning guests of the dangers of modern slavery. The Rt Revd Dr Alastair Redfern, Chair of The Clewer Initiative, said: “With rising numbers of homeless people on our streets, it is even more important that we are able to recognise the signs. With the Let’s Talk resources we will equip the Church to understand what modern slavery looks like, and how they can respond to protect the vulnerable.”

The History of Christmas The Bible does not give a date for the birth of Jesus. In the third century it was suggested that Jesus was conceived at the Spring equinox, 25th March, popularising the belief that He was born nine months later on 25th December. John Chrysostom, the Archbishop of Constantinople, encouraged Christians worldwide to make Christmas a holy day in about 400. In the early Middle Ages, Christians celebrated a series of midwinter holy days. Epiphany (which recalls the visit (Continued on page 33)

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


(Continued from page 32) to the infant Jesus of the wise men bearing gifts) was the climax of 12 days of Christmas, beginning on 25th December. The Emperor Charlemagne chose 25th December for his coronation in 800, and the prominence of Christmas Day rose. In England, William the Conqueror also chose 25th December for his coronation in 1066, and the date became a fixture both for religious observance and feasting. Cooking a boar was a common feature of mediaeval Christmas feasts, and singing carols accompanied it. Writers of the time lament the fact that the true significance of Christmas was being lost because of partying. They condemn the rise of ‘misrule’ – drunken dancing and promiscuity. The day was a public holiday, and traditions of bringing evergreen foliage into the house and the exchange of gifts (usually on Epiphany) date from this time. In the 17th century the rise of new Protestant denominations led to a rejection of many celebrations that were associated with Catholic Christianity. Christmas was one of them. After the execution of Charles I, England’s Puritan rulers made the celebration of Christmas illegal for 14 years. The restoration of Charles II ended the ban, but religious leaders continued to discourage excess, especially in Scotland. In Western Europe (but not worldwide) the day for exchanging gifts changed from Epiphany (6th January) to Christmas Day. By the 1820s, there was a sense that the significance of Christmas was declining. Charles Dickens was one of

Dec 19 & Jan 20

several writers who sought to restore it. His novel A Christmas Carol was significant in reviving merriment during the festival. He emphasised charity and family reunions, alongside religious observance. Christmas trees, paper chains, cards and many well-known carols date from this time. So did the tradition of Boxing Day, on 26th December, when tradesmen who had given reliable service during the year would collect ‘boxes’ of money or gifts from their customers. In Europe Santa Claus is the figure associated with the bringing of gifts. Santa Claus is a shortening of the name of Saint Nicholas, who was a Christian bishop in the fourth century in present-day Turkey. He was particularly noted for his care for children and for his generosity to the poor. By the Middle Ages his appearance, in red bishop’s robes and a mitre, was adored in the Netherlands and familiar across Europe. Father Christmas dates from 17th century England, where he was a secular figure of good cheer (more associated with drunkenness than gifts). The transformation of Santa Claus into today’s Father Christmas started in New York in the 1880s, where his red robes and white beard became potent advertising symbols. In some countries (such as Latin America and Eastern Europe) the tradition attempts to combine the secular and religious elements by holding that Santa Claus makes children’s presents and then gives them to the baby Jesus to distribute. From: https://christianity.org.uk/thehistory-of-christmas/#.W9LmchNKhsM

RG31

33


St Catherine’s Hall - Regular Bookings Monday

7.30 am - 3.15 pm 3.30 - 6.00 pm 7.00 pm - 8.00 pm (In term time) 8.15 pm - 9.15 pm

Tuesday

Wednesday

Friday

Jemma Fulbrook

Yoga

 07584 208 989

7.30 am - 3.15 pm

St Catherine’s Pre-school

Contact as above

2.00 pm - 4.00 pm

W.I. (3rd Tuesday)

 tilehurstafternoonwi@gmail.com

3.30 - 6.00 pm (in café 3rd Tuesday)

After– school club

Sharon Sheppard Contact as above

7.30 am - 3.15 pm

St Catherine’s Pre-school

Contact as above

1.15 pm - 3.30 pm (In church not hall) 3.30 - 6.00 pm

Vivace Voices Ladies Choir www.vivacevoices.org.uk After– school club

Contact Sue Hennell ℡ 0118 966 1291 Sharon Sheppard Contact as above Tilehurst Triangle W.I. 3rd Weds ℡ 0118 941 6838  tilehursttrianglewi@berkshirewi.co.uk

7.30 am - 3.15 pm

St Catherine’s Pre-school

Contact as above

3.30 - 5.30 pm

After– school club

Sharon Sheppard Contact as above

5.45 pm - 7.15 pm

7th Tilehurst Brownies  katielou98@sky.com

Contact Katie Taylor

7.30 am - 12.15 pm

St Catherine’s Pre-school

Contact as above

2.00 pm - 4.00 pm

Friday Friends

See page 18

6.15 - 7.00 pm

Exercise class  mrsjfulbrock@yahoo.co.uk Church Youth Group (fortnightly)

Jemma Fulbrook

7.45 pm - 9.15 pm Saturday

Exercise class  mrsjfulbrock@yahoo.co.uk

 elenaharris1010@yahoo.com

7.30 pm - 10.00 pm Thursday

St Catherine’s Pre-school Contact www.stcatherinespreschool.co.uk  07745 909 348 After– school club Sharon Sheppard  sharonsheppard2000@yahoo.co.uk

Contact Dee Anderson  07821 265 804

Antonella Carraro 10.15 am - 11.30 am Yoga  Antonella.Carraro@laithwaiteswine.com. 1.30 pm - 5.30 pm

Crafty Space (monthly)

See page 20

3.30 pm - 5.00 pm

Messy Church (monthly)  Info@StCatherines-Tilehurst.Org.Uk

7.30 pm - 10.00 pm

Short Mat Bowls Club

Contact Anne Soley ℡ 0118 942 5407

St Catherine’s Hall is available for hire at competitive rates for groups or individuals, both regularly or for one off events. It is especially popular for Children's Parties. For booking details, contact Sheila Drew on ℡ 0118 942 7254  hall@stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk

34

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20


Dec 19 & Jan 20

RG31

35


The Anglican Parish of Tilehurst St Catherine & Calcot St Birinus ST CATHERINE OF SIENA Wittenham Avenue, Tilehurst, RG31 5LN www.stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk www.facebook.com/tilehurst.st.catherine Sunday 8.00 am Our early service of Communion (2nd & 4th Sundays) or Morning Prayer (1st & 3rd Sundays), is quiet and reflective, with no singing. An opportunity to start Sunday thinking about God. Refreshments served afterwards. Sunday 9.15 am Communion (1 st & 3rd Sundays) and Word and Worship (non communion) (2nd & 4th Sundays). Praise and teaching, and usually including a time of sharing what God is doing amongst us, followed by prayer for healing, for those who would like it. Refreshments served afterwards. Sunday 11.00 am Allsorts@11, an opportunity for the whole family to meet with God in an informal setting through praise, prayer and teaching with fun activities for children (Sunday school). Refreshments from 10.45 am and also afterwards with cakes and fresh coffee. Occasional Afternoon and Evening services are also held - see notices & website for further information.

Thursday 12.15 pm - Communion or Midday Prayer. An informal short (approx. 30 minutes) service with a brief discussion on the day’s readings in the Garden Room. You are invited to stay and eat in the café afterwards Friday 9.15 am - Tots Praise. Jumping, singing and dancing, Bible story, a simple craft and a prayer followed by refreshments. Time for babies and toddlers, parents and carers to enjoy their own dedicated time of worship (term time only). activities for all, followed by a meal. Quality time for families. Children must bring an adult!

For further details on any of these services email info@stcatherines-tilehurst.org.uk

See pages 4 & 5 for a full listing of church services in the Parish For initial enquiries regarding baptisms and weddings, please telephone ℡ 0118 942 7786

36

RG31

Dec 19 & Jan 20

Profile for St Catherines

RG31 - December 19 and January 20  

The Parish Magazine of Tilehurst St. Catherine and Calcot St. Birinus

RG31 - December 19 and January 20  

The Parish Magazine of Tilehurst St. Catherine and Calcot St. Birinus

Advertisement