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©

Cover Artist // Stevie gee steviegee.com // @_stevie_gee_

IT's all about Our Contributors Stevie Gee, Amy Morrison, Camper Morrison, Justin “Scrappers” Morrison, Marjorie Skinner, Ayla Gilbert, Paul Anson, Bruce Greif, James O'Mahoney, Shaun Daley, Lisa Dougherty, Sarah Kue, Katie Beasley, Sera Lindsey, Hannah Harding, Ashley Snively, Nayung Chang, Gabriel Amadeus Tiller, Jenny Linquist, Sam Sawyer, Todd Gillman, Andrew R. Tonry, Alin Dragulin, Billy Bones, Jacob Lambert, Evan Schell, Tony Vontz, John Hook, Samantha Hook, Allxandra Manalac, Grace Green, Brandon Smith, Gianna Keiko Rankart, Jacob Bottles, John Anderson, Trevor Wells, North, and the brave companies who work with us.

HELLO // Aloha // Hola WebSITE: staywildmagazine.com Instagram: @staywildmagazine Twitter: @staywildmag Facebook: facebook.com/staywildmagazine Tumblr: staywildmagazine.tumblr.com

Dear Art Loverz, You might already know Stevie Gee from what he’s done with brands like Patagonia, Deus Ex Machina, Vans, and Nike SB. But you probably don’t know all this other business about him. What’s your job title? Creative Director/Celebrity Sex Wizard. Where do you live and work? I am an Englishman. I was born in Essex, but I currently call Muswell Hill, North London my home. I live there with my wife, my son, my daughter, and cat. I work by day in Covent Garden, Central London as the Creative Director of a design agency, specializing in creating bespoke events for big-ass companies. By night I work as a Celebrity Sex Wizard, doing drawings and fun stuff for fun cats that like the fun stuff.

ST A

sales@staywildmagazine.com

If people could put your work in their mouths what would you want it to taste like? Like happy-ending sleazy danger… kind of like the taste of blood and whisky in the mouth after getting punched in the face by a drunken gypsy lady, but then you make friends with the gypsy lady, you go for a beer together, wake up in the morning with her, and everything tastes great.

Y WI

LD

advertising info:

They’ll probably tell people how their old man got kicked out of the marines for being too hardcore, but never lived with regret. Hemingway shit. If not, I hope the story they tell will be a happy, loving one, full of adventure, creativity, and fun times. Always fun times.

SCORE SOME STEVIE GEE ART AT THE STAY WILD EXPO PRINT SHOW AUGUST 26-28, 2016. Feature other artists like Bwana Spoons, Souther Salazar, Lori D, Kozyndan, Michael C. Hsiung, Sean Morris, Stephanie Buer, David Wien, Scrappers, Scott Patt, Laura Berger, Jen Lobo, Skinner, Joseph Harmon, David Powell, Brin Levinson, and many more.

submit a story:

scrappers@staywildmagazine.com

What story do you want your kids to tell about you when you’re gone?

STAY WILD MAGAZINE staywildmagazine.com Studio104 2127 North Albina Ave Portland, Oregon 97227 ©2016 STAY WILD MAGAZINE LLC Content may not be reprinted in part or in whole without written consent from the publisher.

MADE

LOCAL

The rain, the soil, the seeds, the trees, the mill, the paper, the printing machines, and the people who physically made this magazine are all hiking distance from each other in and around Portland, Oregon.


SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HOT SPRING & FREE SPIRIT MAGNET PHOTOS AND STORY // SERA LINDSEY // PORTABLESERA.COM


HIKERS // HANNAH HARDING (BROWN HAIR). ASHLEY SNIVELY (RED HAIR), NAYUNG CHANG. (BLACK HAIR)

Deep Creek Hot Springs

34.339393째N 117.176963째W

DEEP CREEK IS HOME TO THE SOUTHWESTERN ARROYO TOAD, AN ENDANGERED SPECIES WHO LIVES IN THE SANDY SHORE OF THE CREEK.


I

typically don’t find myself in what could be called “college-student havens” very often. I didn’t when I was in college, either. “Secret spots” where you were bound to find condoms, broken bottles, cigarette butts, and poorly extinguished bonfires never made major appearances in my life. Perhaps I found it all a bit tacky. Yesterday, however, I ended up at Deep Creek. After a two-mile walk into the canyon, you’re suddenly surrounded by boulders, water, a healthy number of naked people enjoying the hot springs, the cool creek, and a possible 40 or joint. I laughed to myself upon seeing it. Phil and I walked through the cold water to what appeared to be a fraternity on a nature trip. Two boys fell into the middle pool, and one said, “Damn this one is biiiig.” The other in his Beavis & Butthead boxers confirmed: “The bigger the better, bro!” 

I have no idea why, but this shook me into a playful awareness of life. I giggled. Drunk people, stoned people, giddy people, naked people, people unsure of how naked they wanted to be, newbies, tenured elders, big dogs, little dogs, dreadlocked children, brown-skinned babies, pierced nipples, weird tattoos, and plenty of genitalia were all there in the hot water pouring from one pool into another, into another, into another. It was a lot to take in.  I worried about my bag getting wet, the rocky creek floor on my bare feet, and the crowd. I

had expected a quiet Sunday, but expectations can definitely lead you astray, and make you miss whatever greatness is already there. A girl offered snacks to everyone, and we had fresh fruit in the sun. My body felt free, and the hodgepodge of culture was a perfect escape from the humdrum of a typical brunch crowd. People opened up about themselves, asked questions, talked about their lives... it was a great moment of sharing. Everyone was welcome.  On the drive home we managed to sink the car into a ditch. The sun was nearly down and there was a moment’s pause. We laughed. Sighed. Phil got out his AAA card and before he could finish dialing, a car pulled up behind us. There was a novelty license plate which read “REDNECK,” and out from the car emerged two Mexican guys accompanied by a very large redhead. He proceeded to locate and wedge a plank under the tire while the others sat and bounced on the elevated car rear. We exchanged hugs and were gone in less than five minutes.  I quietly considered the people we met. No one had left an individually lasting impression, but as a whole the day felt full of kindness. Humans surprise me constantly, and when I get away and let life simply be, without attempting to cater or shape a situation or experience... that’s when I’m most moved. There was nothing complicated about any of it. Simplicity can be stunningly powerful. 

All the looks featured in this adventure are from our friends at Patrons of Peace @patronsofpeace popcalifornia.com


PHOTO BY ELEMENT ADVOCATE : BRIAN GABERMAN

CONSCIOUS BY NATURE R AY B A R B E E - P H OTO G R A P H E R, M U S I C I A N, S K AT E B O A R D E R

@ELEMENTBRAND


The D ay the

by

Bruce Greif

s ’ y o Z-B Came to Town

U r e t h a n e w h e e l s c a m e t o V e n t u r a w i t h o u t fa n fa r e . T h e r e wa s n o a d v e r t i s i n g c a m pa i g n , or even word of mouth. They just showed up l i k e a g i f t f r o m h e av e n a n d c h a n g e d e v e ry t h i n g. It was after school in November of 1973. The sun was out and we were playing skateboard tag in front of the Big T supermarket on Pierpont when Ross Keck came gliding down the supermarket parking lot on his skateboard. Ross was older and had great style, but it wasn’t his smooth arcing turns that had us gaping—it was the late afternoon sunlight glowing through his wheels. We chased after him, yelling, “Hey Ross, wait up. Wait up, man.” Ross jumped off the board and held it over his head as the four of us surrounded him begging to see. “Okay, back off,” he said. “Back off and I’ll let you try it.“ We each got to take a quick spin, and the wheels were fast and smooth with traction like I’d never imagined. I handed Ross the board back. “These wheels are unreal.” “Yeah, you’ll be able to get ‘em at the shop soon enough,” he said, then dropped the skateboard to the ground, glided away, and just like that our composite wheels had become relics. Ross told us

P h o t o s c o u r t e sy J a m e s O ' M a h o n e y

the Cadillacs cost two bucks each. That was a lot of money, but it didn’t matter; we would beg, borrow, or steal to get a set. It was after Christmas when our local surf shop, William Dennis, finally got the Cadillac wheels in, and when they did, we were there. The wheels came in four colors: blue, red, yellow, and translucent gold. Dan, Stevie, and I got the gold, Cameron got yellow just to be different. Right there on the shop floor we took off our composite wheels, spilled out the ball bearings, and slid on our new Cadillacs. Carefully, we dropped the ball bearings back in one by one, tightened the bearing nuts just right so that each wheel spun smooth, and headed straight to the four-story Holiday Inn parking lot to try them out. From that day forward the term “sidewalk surfing” took on a whole new meaning. New concrete and asphalt waves seemed to turn up every day. Then, miracles started happening. The city paved the mile and a half road to the Cross on the hill. The Cross, originally erected by Padre Junípe-

ro Serra in 1782, had served as a signal to ships at sea that they had reached the San Buenaventura Mission. But now, for us, the road to the historic landmark was 20 minutes of countless silk-smooth turns on a winding slope. A few months later, St. Bonaventure High School paved a 10-foot embankment around the northeast corner of their football field, creating an asphalt bowl. The school officials didn’t like us skateboarding on their property and called the cops, forcing us to scatter. But as soon as the cops were gone, we were back. Frustrated with us, the school installed rows of asphalt speed bumps to keep us out, but that night we came back with crowbars and shovels and removed strategic chunks of the still warm berms. Surprisingly, the school put down more speed bumps, and we came back with more crowbars and shovels, this time littering the football field with the asphalt debris. Nothing would keep us from riding that smooth, static wave. Soon, William Dennis had a skateboard counter. Kids came in who didn’t even surf to get the


Just before Stevie's turn, t h i s k i d J ay A d a m s g o e s . He’s from the Zephyr t e a m a n d h e q u i c k ly s e t s h i m s e l f a pa r t w i t h a m a z i n g n at u r a l s t y l e a n d f l o w.

Cadillac wheels. If we were hanging around, Bundy the shop manager would let us install the wheels for customers. The sport was growing and people everywhere could now get the sensation of surfing without having to get wet. Then, in January of 1975, word was out that a skateboard contest was coming to town. Some newly formed skateboard association out of Los Angeles had arranged a contest at our Cross Road. Naturally, our first thought was to sabotage the event. The idea of a bunch of Southers coming to town and creating a circus at our sacred spot was blasphemous. Unfortunately, Bundy at the surf shop was on board, and even giving out entry forms. He encouraged us to enter. “Come on man, you guys are experts on your skateboards, why not show the world what you can do?” No way. The idea of an organized event with rules, regulations, and time slots went against our nature. We pledged to boycott it. But when the day of the contest came we were there to take in the spectacle, though in defiance had left our skateboards at home.

Contest Day 1 Southers galore infested our cherished Cross Road. Everywhere people were practicing wacky tricks. We snickered our way through the crowd and ran into Brad Linscheid. Brad was a well-respected surfer in Ventura who’d had his picture in both Surfer and Surfing magazines, which was the ultimate. Brad flashed his ever-present smile, but he looked nervous. “Hey man, any of you guys want to take my place in the freestyle event? I can’t do the stuff these guys are doing.” I felt a surge of opportunity, but didn’t give in. “Ha, no way man, not us. I’m sure you’ll find somebody, though.” “I’ll do it,” Stevie said, “can I borrow your skateboard?” Steve Monahan was two years my junior and over the past few months we’d become great friends. “What are you talking about?” I sneered. Stevie smiled, “I want to enter.” He looked at Brad. “What do I need to do?” I felt a shiver of envy. Stevie could skate okay, but he could barely do a 360. Stevie and Brad hurried off to get things worked

out with the officials as Dan, Cameron, and I watched in disbelief. Dan scoffed, “Man, what the hell got into him?” “Well,” Cameron laughed, “things just got more interesting.” Suddenly there was a commotion as a Rolls Royce came up the only road that wasn’t barricaded off for the contest. All eyes watched to see who it was. The Rolls stopped and the driver got out holding a skateboard. He opened the back door and out stepped Ty Page. We recognized him from skateboard ads in the surf magazines. “What a jack-ass,” Dan said. “Now the circus is official.” We shook our heads and went to find Stevie. Stevie was entered in the boys’ freestyle, and since he was a late addition he was slated to go last. This was good because he’d get to see everyone else’s routine and would have a good idea of what he needed to do. But it was also bad because he had the added pressure of having to watch all of his competitors while waiting his turn. Then, sure enough, just before Stevie’s turn, this kid Jay Adams goes. He’s from the Zephyr team and he quickly sets himself apart with amazing natural style and flow. He walks the nose arching back, then crouches low into a sweeping frontside turn, jumps the rope and lays into an aggressive, yet graceful, bert. The crowd hoots and hollers. I look at Stevie for a reaction. He smiles and without taking his eyes off Jay says, “He’s good.” Stevie seems to be getting a contact high. Jay finishes to a huge applause, and now Stevie is up. He comes out shaky and misses his first attempt at the rope, then blows a power slide. A collective sigh rises from the crowd. Stevie attempts the rope again and this time makes it. The crowd cheers, he smiles and bows. Stevie then breaks into a string of tricks: nose wheelie, coffin, spinner, his own stylish bert, and again the rope. With each success his confidence seems to grow. By the end he looks as polished as anyone there. The cheers are loud, Stevie proves to be a contender, and Jay Adams the one to beat.

Contest Day 2 The next day the contest is interrupted by a hundred or so Hells Angels roaring through on their

B r u c e G r e i f i s a u t h o r o f t h e b o o k , P i e r R at s . r e a d t h e f u l l v e r s i o n o f t h i s s t o ry at w w w. p i e r r at s . n e t

motorcycles. Apparently they have a wedding to attend at the end of the road, at the Cross. Their rumble leaves a tangible edge in the air and anything seems possible. Today is it, and everyone is pushing to the limit: handstands, daffneys on two skateboards, nose wheelie 360s. Stevie will have to amp up his performance from yesterday to win, and who knows what Jay Adams has up his sleeve. “You have anything new?” I ask Stevie. He smiles, ready to go. “I’ve got something,” he says. “You’ll see.” His start is clean and he looks relaxed. Everything is tighter and faster, but he’s just repeating his performance from yesterday; if he’s going to win it will have to be on style points. He pulls off a nice power slide into a 180 turn, then seemingly stops his routine and rolls over to the judges table. The crowd noise goes from cheers to murmurs as Stevie asks the judges to move their paperwork. He jumps onto the table, puts his skateboard down, rides the table’s length, and goes right off the end, landing perfectly on the board. The crowd erupts. Stevie does a few more turns and just before his time is up, he jumps back onto the table and does it again, just to prove he can. Again the crowd erupts. Stevie waves and skates out of the ring to the cheering crowd. Jay Adams follows without a flinch. He rips through his routine, nailing every maneuver. But he has to go off the table, and he knows it—not a big deal to a guy with his talent, but the pressure is on, and sure enough, he misses his first try. “Oooh,” rumbles the crowd. Jay pulls off his second attempt, but it lacks spontaneity and the contest is Stevie’s. When it was over Ventura skaters had swept most of the events, and James O’Mahoney, the man behind the contest, would snatch up Stevie, Richard Vanderwyk, Tom Sims, and a few others to round out his newly minted Skateboard Magazine Team. The magazine’s first issue would debut a few weeks later, with Steve Monahan on the cover. Stevie and Jay would face each other several more times over the coming year, almost always a duel between first and second place. But skateboarding was continuing to evolve, and in June of that year Ventura High School would drain its pool. That would change the landscape forever.


The‘70s have been portrayed as a “pivot of change”: Women were no longer good enough for the same jobs they had worked while men were fighting WWII; the people faced presidential scandal as Nixon resigned; and there was the onset of an oil crisis. The resulting skepticism led to a population that began to place increasing value on political awareness, including on the political and economic liberty of women. As coined by the novelist Tom Wolfe, the 1970s became known as the “Me Decade” as people shifted away from communitarianism and towards individualism. We saw how the Z-Boys dealt with it, but how were the female youth of the ‘70s reacting to the same frustrations, struggles, and general boredom as male youth culture?  

Girls

By taking a well known story told from the male perspective and shaking up gender, we ask the question: Was the female search for answers all that different?

PHOTOS & WORDS BY SHAUN DALEY CARGOCOLLECTIVE.COM/SHAUNDALEY // @SHAUN_DALEY SKATING BY LISA DOUGHERTY, SARAH KUE, KATIE BEASLEY


S e s c i o n y d t to None i c i l p m i S

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R E R K E A MH A P S

P H O T O // J O H N A N D E R S O N

The first wave I ever caught and experienced pure stoke with was on a surfboard shaped by Skip Frye. It was the board my brother-in-law let me borrow to paddle out at Sunset Cliffs in OB (San Diego). I had no idea that this shaper was a local legend. I had no idea that he shaped this board to surf this exact wave. I had no idea he was the guy picking up trash in the parking lot for everyone. I had no idea how much love, intention, and skill went into the board that got me hooked on surfing. When you don’t know what goes into making a thing, it’s hard to respect the people who make it. Shapers get respect, though. They are the old wise Zen masters that every surfer respects. They are the makers of the craft that a whole culture evolved from. Shapers are special people, but anyone can be a shaper. Heck, it’s just making a toy to play with in the ocean! Anyone can do it. Most of us just lack the tools, the workspace, and the know-how. Or if we have the know-how, we lack the tools and workspace.

Surfboard-making is a messy and expensive business. Whether you’re making it out of wood, foam, or an eco-friendly material, it’s super messy to cut, sand, and glass. You need a special workspace with exhaust vents, special lighting, a weird work table, and some pricey tools. There are a lot of obstacles, but the obstacle has become the opportunity.

SHAPER STUDIOS IS AN OPEN WORK SPACE WHERE ANYONE CAN MAKE A SURFBOARD BY SCRAPPERS SCRAPPERSTOWN.COM @SCRAPPERS

Shaper Studios has created an open DIY studio workspace where anyone can make a surfboard. They teach workshops for people who want to learn super basic stuff and super advanced stuff. If you already know how to shape, they provide all the tools and work space you’ll need, along with a membership. It’s pretty smart, eh? Shaper Studios started in North Park, San Diego, but have since opened shops in other towns like Costa Mesa, and other countries like Canada and Chile. Their brilliant idea is spreading because it’s open to everyone. Turns out a lot of the people who sign up for the classes don’t even surf. They just want to make something cool with their own hands. We can all be wise Zen masters who earn respect and share stoke with the different boards we make.

JOIN S HA PE R S TUDIOS

F OR A S HA PING W ORK S HOP AT T H E E X PO A DV E NT URE F E S T IVA L T IC KE T S AN D M O R E IN F O AT S TAY W IL DMA GA Z INE . COM/E X PO

S H A P E R S T U D I O S . C O M // @ S H A P E R S T U D I O S

P H O T O // T R E V O R W E L L S


Gabriel Amadeus Tiller of Limberlost Limberlost.co // @limberlostco GabrielAmadeus.com // @gabrielamadeus

FATBIKING THE OREGON COAST

“The sand and saltwater conspire with unnerving speed to seize up and destroy your bike.”

We spent a whole week fatbiking Oregon’s rugged and scenic coastline to determine which sections would be accessible and a blast to ride. After riding an entire third of the state’s length, we learned a few things.

bogs and brackish estuaries where they meet the ocean, making formidable barriers. Be prepared to get wet or even turn around—stream mouths can create strong, unexpected currents when they meet the ocean.

The wind is a big deal. For most of the summer, there is a strong wind predominantly coming from the north. This makes it nearly impossible to travel in that direction, but a breeze to cruise south. In the winter the winds aren’t as reliable, so your itinerary requires a bit more flexibility. Either way, it’s only fun with the wind at your back, so figuring out some sort of shuttle is probably necessary.

Dune riding is fantastic fun (and a workout!). The most unique riding you can do is on the Oregon Dunes. They undulate across the landscape creating thousands of square miles of skatepark-like fun. Except it’s a skatepark that doesn’t hurt when you fall down (frequently). The lunar landscape can present terrain that challenges even the most stalwart rider, or easy rolling hills for someone who rarely rides. And it’s fun for everyone. The sand varies in firmness, but winter is actually the best time to go, when it holds more moisture and you stay on the surface easier. Explore the non-motorized areas for an even more serene experience.

The tide is a big deal. Dry sand is too soft and deep to ride on even with fat tires, so we relied on low tides to expose the firm wet sand that makes beach riding fun. Do your research: many rocky outcroppings and streams are only passable at low tide as well. Check your tide tables and plan your day around them! Rivers, even small streams, can be impassible. Talk to locals and look at satellite images — even small creeks can turn into deep

Riding on the coast kills your bike. The sand and saltwater conspire with unnerving speed to seize up and destroy your bike. Stay out of the saltwater and clean your bike every evening with lots of water and baking soda to neutralize the corrosion. Or, just rent bikes that are regularly maintained and reserved for beach riding.


On the road again. The Worn Wear truck is coming to your town. MARCH 20 MARCH 26 MARCH 30 APRIL 1 APRIL 3 APRIL 5

Santa Monica, CA Ventura, CA Flagstaff, AZ Durango, CO Denver, CO Boulder, CO

APRIL 8 APRIL 10 APRIL 13 APRIL 16 APRIL 22-24 APRIL 26

more details: patagonia.com/wornwear

Donnie Hedden Š 2016 Patagonia Inc.

Driggs, ID Missoula, MT Portland, OR Vancouver, BC Terrebonne, OR Reno, NV


War Machine URAL RUSSIAN MOTORCYCLES HAVE BEEN ON THE ROAD TO FREEDOM SINCE WWII WORDS BY JUSTIN “SCRAPPERS” MORRISON // SCRAPPERSTOWN.COM // @SCRAPPERS PHOTOS BY JENNY LINQUIST // JENNYLINQUIST.TUMBLR.COM/ // @JENNYLINQUIST


URAL.COM // @URALMOTORCYCLES


REMEMBER WHO WON WORLD WAR II? FUCKING NOBODY!!! ESPECIALLY THE 60 MILLION WHO DIED IN THE DEADLIEST WAR EVER. WAR IS DUMB. LET’S PROMISE TO NEVER HAVE ANOTHER ONE. OK? OK! I’m a hippy. I was born in the draft-dodging

made in the small town of Irbit, out near Si-

Most of the machines that are still being made

woods of Northern Vancouver Island in Can-

beria in the Ural mountains. The town was

in the mountain town of Irbit get shipped to

ada. I am wholeheartedly against war. I’m a

ideal for making the machines because it

the States. Who’s buying them? Adventure

freedom lover! That’s why I feel sorta funny

was far away from the war, where the factory

seekers just like you! Battle scouts (that’s a

in my tummy when I look at a Ural Russian

wouldn’t be bombed.

job right?) used to drive these bikes out into

Motorcycle and get a big freedom boner.

the war fields looking for trouble, but today a The bike’s parts were designed to hold up on

whole now breed of trouble-hunters ride them.

Ural motorcycles were originally made in

bumpy Russian roads in those mountains,

Moscow by order of Ol’ Joey Stalin to help the

and major improvements have been made

The Ural is a true adventure-mobile. You can

Soviet army battle Nazis. This motorcycle and

to the engine over the years. If you’re handy

travel lighter, cheaper, and go down small-

sidecar helped soldiers move more freely than

and something breaks, you should be able to

er roads than those big ass RV camper vans

any other land mobile. They were cheaper to

work with the motorcycle’s “four-stroke, fu-

the kids are driving these days. Less is more,

make than Jeeps, easy to get out of sticky sit-

el-injected air-cooled, flat-twin engines, four-

right? I like to imagine welding a surfboard

uations like mud and snow, and they’re the

speed gear box with reverse gear, shaft drive,

rack onto a Ural and cruising down the Ore-

most nimble thing a couple folks could travel

two disc dry clutch, spring shock absorbers,

gon coast looking for the perfect place to get

around in during either a blitzkrieg or a mel-

and disc brakes on all three wheels.” The bike

wild and free. Maybe I’m just a hippy dream-

low ride to the mountains.

is pretty basic and totally wrench friendly, but

er, but I love how these bikes have stayed the

it’s fine with me if you just take it to the deal-

same during their journey from war machine

ership for repairs and checkups.

to freedom machine.

Ol’ Joey eventually had the motorcycles

RIDE IN A URAL SIDECAR FOR FREE AT THE STAY WILD EXPO


ANDREW EMERTON // SPECIALTY BRAND MANAGER If you visit the brewery in Fort Collins, Colorado, odds are you’ll get to try some weird, small-batch experimental brew made with a fruit or spice you’ve never heard of. It’s our Specialty Brand Manager, Andrew Emerton, who is tasked with thinking of interesting, esoteric, challenging, culturally intriguing beers, then working with our experimental Pilot Brewery crew to bring those beers to life. I would have a hard time finding the left-field beer styles he helps create anywhere else, and they make pulling the handle and filling a globe feel like a privilege that I haven’t earned. In Andrew’s own words, he makes “celebratory beers.” Dude must like to party, because he has his hand in making some of the world’s absolute best celebratory beer. Sure, many of our Lips of Faith beers are available in stores near my home in Seattle, and if you use New Belgium’s Beer Mode app, you’ll quickly be able to locate the nearest place where you can sample these rare and sometimes wonderfully bizarre brews—but there’s something so different about enjoying 16 ounces of this liquid so close to the source.

KATIE WALLACE // ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY Walking the talk is an admirable quality. As a certified B-Corp, New Belgium does an awful lot of good by their employees, their community, and the environment. Assistant Director of Sustainability Katie Wallace did much of the legwork to make that happen. Katie’s a self-described “peacemaker between industry and nature,” and on a given day you could find her in the office learning about waterless urinals, visiting a hop farm, analyzing greenhouse gas emissions, or speaking


Hello Beer, MEET SOME OF THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE NEW BELGIUM BREWING BY SAM SAWYER (THE NEW GUY) @SAMSAWYER PHOTOS BY TODD GILLMAN @TODDGILLMAN

at a conference on behalf of the brewery, encouraging and teaching other business people to become better stewards of their communities and environments. In short, Katie Wallace is a super human who professionally strives to help New Belgium walk the talk when it comes to sustainability. I like Katie and our sustainability team because they make me, as an employee of New Belgium Brewing, look like a better person. They like to say that “everyone at New Belgium works in sustainability, because the sustainability team benefits from the eyes that see the other parts of the brewery, and the minds that understand our opportunities in totally unique and helpful ways.”

T

HE THINGS I DIDN’T KNOW about the beer industry when I started working for New Belgium Brewing could’ve filled the world’s biggest keg (“keg” is a “beer term” I would come to learn, after some extensive training). Through luck and a bordering-on-nepotistic connection, I landed a dream job: a field marketing role for New Belgium Brewing based in the sunny Pacific Northwest—in Ballard, WA, specifically. After spending a decade and a half on the marketing side of the music biz, most recently with venerable record label Sub Pop, venturing into an unknown industry was an adventure that I was very much looking forward to. I can honestly say that those articles calling out New Belgium for being one of the best companies in America to work for are accurate, but for all the wrong reasons. SURE, there are great benefits: we’re a certified B-Corp, we all get company bikes after one year on the job, we’re 100% percent employee-owned, gym memberships of any and all

manner are offered, my company car is a monster truck, we produce some of the best liquid in the world, and of course, that liquid flows freely into the bellies of employees. But the reason New Belgium is one of the best companies to work for isn’t the list of traits in all those articles, it’s the people. When someone new visits the brewery, a Willy Wonka comparison is virtually always made, thanks in part to the forest of two story-high wooden barrels, twister slides taking root with unknown origins above, foosball tables, rolle bolle courts, microbiology labs, and pipes filled with BEER going EVERYWHERE, snaking throughout the brewery. Despite the wacky physical surroundings, and much like Willy Wonka’s army of Oompa Loompas, it’s the employees’ specialties and passion for what they do that make this brewery vibrate with positivity, inventiveness, a love for their community, and that je ne sais what that makes you want to go out of your way to come back for another visit.

MICHAEL BUSSMANN // MANAGER OF THE MOTHERSHIP EXPERIENCE Michael Bussmann runs the Liquid Center (the brewery’s tasting room) and the brewery tour program. He’s in one of those positions where everyone knows of him; he’s consumer-facing (a marketing term for “consumer-facing”), he’s been an employee for years, he’s got some good tattoos, and if you get a job with New Belgium Brewing, his portion of the summer camp-like orientation process is essentially him instructing you on how not to be a dick in the Liquid Center (no bar fights, etc.). If you’ve ever visited the brewery and had a beer in the LC or taken one of our legendary tours, his presence can be felt in the people he hires and leads behind the bar. As the Manager of the Mothership Experience (official title), he looks for “the right stuff” in new employees, which I imagine is just a mixture of great attitude and low levels of “the wrong stuff.” I asked him what he’d do if he wasn’t the Manager of the Mothership Experience, and he said he’d like to be a steamboat captain. Something tells me that in an alternate universe, there’s a happy and talented crew manning a ship-shape steamboat helmed by one Captain Bussmann.


“DUDE, YOU KNOW WE HAVE SCIENTISTS TO HELP ENSURE THE QUALITY OF EVERYTHING WE DO, RIGHT?” I DO NOW, TOUR GUIDE. I DO NOW.

TED PETERSON // WOOD CELLAR POET LAUREATE Ted Peterson’s office is our Wood Cellar, and he makes poetry blending sour beers, or so his business card, and perhaps pickup lines, implies (official title: Wood Cellar Poet Laureate). The Wood Cellar is a collection of 60-ish two-story foeders (giant oak barrels used for aging and developing our sour beers), and this is Ted country. Another thing to know about Ted is that he’s my favorite person to run into when I visit the Mothership, and I’ll tell you why: Dude’s trouble. Chill, manageable trouble—but trouble nonetheless. If you work for New Belgium, but you’re one of the few hundred employees who work remotely, brewery visits tend to have many opportunities for “sampling,” or as you’d call it anywhere else, “drinking.” For example, I may walk through our Wood Cellar, and if I run into Ted on the way, the next thing I know he’ll be zig-zagging me through the maze of foeders to one particular retired whisky barrel where he’s aging a “secret blend of [inaudibly trails off].” He’ll hand me a glass, use pliers to pry out the nail used as a stopper, and unleash a healthy pour of what is most likely a very high ABV sour beer that very few people will ever try—at least as is. Pair this with the beer I was probably already drinking (hey, I’m sort of on work vacation), and the fact that this will probably happen a few more times today, and Ted starts to seem like trouble. I like Ted and I like sour beer. A lot.

ANDY MITCHELL // BREWER Andy Mitchell is a Brewer 3, and despite Andy’s protest, being Brewer 3 level is like having a black belt in the brewing arts. Brewers don’t make beer, they make wort (If you’re saying it correctly, it’s pronounced wert. If you’re like me and mispronouncing it correctly, it’s WART). In short, wort is a malty, sugary feedstock for yeast, and it’s the yeast that makes the beer, by converting sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Not only does Andy know what it takes to make yeast happy and healthy, he specializes in improving the brewing process so we can make more with less—more and better beer with less energy and fewer inputs through constant collaboration between brewers, engineers, and programmers for process improvements. The German engineering-level of precision it takes to make our beer is greatly appreciated.


@NEWBELGIUM // NEWBELGIUM.COM

KELLY TRETTER // MICROBIOLOGIST I’m generalizing here, but it takes more than a goatee and a love of World Cup Soccer to brew great beer. You also need a thorough, PhD-level understanding of microbiology. Which is to say, you need a microbiologist. Quality and consistency in brewing begins with understanding how beer is made on a microscopic level, and that’s where Kelly Tretter comes in to play. Kelly has attempted to explain to me, the beer dummy, how yeast (unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms from the Fungi Kingdom that reproduce asexually through budding and convert sugars into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide) is propagated from 200 milliliters (juicebox size) to 80 hectoliters (big ass vessel) in just one week. Kelly’s role as microbiologist seemed the most wonderfully surprising to me. When I was getting my first brewery tour, we walked into a lab where Kelly works, and I was all, incredulously, “WHY ARE SCIENTISTS HERE?”, and my tour guide was like, “Dude, you know we have scientists to help ensure the quality of everything we do, right?” I do now, tour guide. I do now. The fact that across the hall from the Carhartt-wearing brewers we have white lab coat-wearing scientists makes me feel like I’m with the perfect mix of weirdoes.

SAM SAWYER // FIELD MARKETING MANAGER I’m a Field Marketing Manager and my field is the Pacific Northwest. I live in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, and I work from my apartment with my dog Mars (he doesn’t do shit, but he’s cute as hell). I cover Portland and Boise as well, but much of my focus is on Seattle. Sometimes I work from Reuben’s, the very good brewery across the street from my house, but their WiFi is usually broken, so I just drink beer and talk shop with the great people who work there about how they do what they do. I’m just one of a couple of hundred of our employees who works in the field doing sales, marketing, quality control, or some weird hybrid role, which is to say I’m not special (though my mother would disagree). What we do is work with the sales teams present in our markets to build meaningful relationships and contextualize the New Belgium message for the people in our neighborhoods, cities, states, and regions, because as people who proudly call the #PNW (or wherever) home, we know what our neighbors value, and we try and make a difference on behalf of New Belgium within our communities by identifying opportunities for growth and improvement through partnerships with like-minded people, local companies, and non-profits. But mostly we give away beer at sampling opportunities. Let me be the first to tell you, giving away beer is not a difficult job. Working as a singular satellite in Seattle can become lonely and uninspiring at times. When I’m down about this, which can happen frequently in a damp, dark Northwestern winter, I try to think of some of the people I work with from afar, like Ted, Michael, Katie, Andy, Andrew, and Kelly, about what they do and why it’s important to everyone else’s job at New Belgium, and I can find in them a source of inspiration to keep plugging away.


KEEP IT

KLAMATH OREGON'S SECRET ADVENTURELAND OREGON typically conjures visions of verdant dripping forests thick with moss, rugged ribbons of coastline, and abundant waterfalls. Geographically, however, most of the state tells a very different story. Deep southeastern Oregon provides a stunning and contrasting landscape to explore away from traffic and crowds.

CRATER LAKE Oregon’s most popular National Park, Crater Lake, lives a short drive north of Klamath Falls. While overrun with lines of cars in the summer months, the park is free of cost and only inhabited by the adventurous in winter. Crater Lake is a dormant volcano jutting 8,000 feet into the wet Pacific air, creating

with 360º views of the Outback. While you’re cruis-

at 9,700’ and experience the best star show you’ve

ing through Silver Lake don’t forget to make a res-

ever seen. Hunt for the beautiful Kiger Wild Mus-

ervation at the legendary Cowboy Dinner Tree—fa-

tangs, stay in the historic Frenchglen Hotel, and

mous for their 30oz sirloins and off-the-grid charm.

pack a pair of binoculars for one of the most im-

HOT SPRINGS There aren’t a lot of swimming holes in this high,

pressive bird migrations in North America on the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

wind-swept desert, but pack your birthday suit

FIRE LOOKOUTS

anyway: glorious hot springs are nestled all across

There are a few scattered hotels and resorts across

the countryside. Start your tour off at the popular

this land, and a wealth of amazing campsites, but

Umpqua Hot Springs with its multiple cascading

if you’re looking for an even more unique stay, try

pools stacked high above the roaring river. Head east

reserving a fire lookout tower for a night or two. It’s

and make a pit stop at Summer Lake’s large heated

an arduous hike in, but Hager Mountain Lookout

full crater rim circumnavigation each year.

pool and rustic cabins to rent with stunning views of

can offer views of Mount Shasta all the way to the

Winter Rim. Point your sulphur-boiled butt towards

south and north to the Three Sisters and Mount

OREGON OUTBACK

the Nevada state line and visit Hart Mountain and

Jefferson. There have even been reports of a semi-

Virgin Valley before rounding off the fingertip-wrin-

tame goat living under the deck, so bring some ex-

kling tour at the famous and scenic Alvord Desert hot

tra carrots. Nearby, the Gearhart Mountain Wilder-

springs and the relaxing Crystal Crane resort.

ness offers several rentable cabins like the Currier

turbulent weather systems and getting blanketed by 44 feet of snow each year. This creates a perfect playground for snowshoeing, skiing, or winter camping in a truly unique setting. Go sightseeing on a day trip, or pack your backcountry gear, start training, and become one of the 80 or so people to complete the

Further inland, to the east of the Cascade Range, lies the giant basin known as the Oregon Outback. Once a giant inland marsh, the Outback is now home to dry lake beds and geologic wonders like the Christmas Valley Sand Dunes and the imposing volcanic tuff ring of Fort Rock. Read up on fascinating ghost town history and explore abandoned buildings while keeping your eyes open for golden eagles, antelope, and other wildlife. Scramble through the unique slot canyon of Crack in the Ground—if you can find it—and set up camp on Green Mountain

BIG COUNTRY

Guard Station, Bald Butte Lookout, and the newly constructed Fremont Point Cabin.

This is Southeastern Oregon’s big country: Steens Mountain dramatically rises up from the parched

The Klamath countryside is vast, and easily dis-

lake bed of the Alvord, creating one of the most

missed as mostly empty if you’re not paying at-

stunning settings in the state. Check out when the

tention, but if you turn off the engine, lace up your

land sailing club is planning a regatta, rent a fat-

boots, and start exploring, it’s packed with secrets

bike, or drive the rugged loop road to the summit

that few souls have seen.

Gabriel Amadeus Tiller of Limberlost Limberlost.co // @limberlostco GabrielAmadeus.com // @gabrielamadeus


Stay Wild

EXPO

THE WORLD'S FIRST

ADVENTURE FESTIVAL FIELD TRIPS // WORK SHOPS // TRADE SHOW // PARTY

AUGUST 26-28, 2016 // PORTLAND, OREGON WORLD FORESTRY CENTER // 4033 SW CANYON RD.

THANK YOU SPONSORS

A T Y P I C A L D AY AT T H E E X P O After brunch you’ll ride the MAX to the underground elevator that takes you up to the the top of Forest Park. The elevator doors open across the street from the main Hello Dome where you’ll pick up your guidebook and event schedule.

shop from the guidebook by now. Passing on a ride or one of the hikes, you choose to go to the coast to see some new surfboards and attend a photography workshop.

You’ll stroll through the outdoor Maker’s Market featuring hand-dyed hammocks, leather goods, sign painters, backpacks, and other cool stuff.

When you get back from that epic adventure, you’ll head back to Half Dome Hall for dinner and some drinks before partying to some of your favorite bands in the Adventure Club House (an art installation and performance space).

Head over to Half Dome Hall for lunch, and to see your favorite outdoor adventure brands, who have set up exciting displays of what’s new.

Each of the three days will have a new schedule of bands, workshops, and field trips. It’s everything you love about a festival and a real life adventure together at last.

You might have already decided on a Field Trip or Work-

This is the world’s first adventure festival.

MORE INFO AT STAYWILDMAGAZINE.COM/EXPO


WORKSHOPS & FIELD TRIPS HIKE & HARVEST WILDERNESS PERFUME

JOIN JUNIPER RIDGE FOR A HIKE, AND MAKE WILDERNESS PERFUME BY EXTRACTING AND DISTILLING FRAGRANCE FROM WILDFLOWERS, PLANTS, BARK, MOSS, MUSHROOMS, AND TREE TRIMMINGS THAT YOU HARVEST ON THE TRAIL.

SWIMMIN CLUB

EXPLORE SWIMMIN HOLES AND GO CLIFF JUMPING AROUND PORTLAND WITH FILMMAKER AND CLIFF JUMPING EXPERT JEFF EDWARDS.

DREAM ROLL TO THE COAST

A MOTORCYCLE RIDE FOR WOMEN BY WOMEN. JOIN THE DREAM ROLL FOR A DAY TRIP TO THE COAST WITH A SECRET MAP, GOODY BAGS, AND SOME FUN KIND OF TROUBLEMAKING!

THE 2ND ANNUAL KOOK OUT

A KOOK-FRIENDLY SURF CONTEST, DEMO SURFBOARDS BY SHAPER STUDIOS & GRAIN, AND BBQ AT THE OREGON COAST PRESENTED BY NEW BELGIUM BREWING.

NATURE PRINTMAKING

NATURE IS FULL OF HIDDEN, EVERYDAY BEAUTY. THIS PRINTMAKING WORKSHOP WITH SAN FRANCISCO-BASED 3 FISH STUDIOS AND PORTLAND-BASED PINE FORT PRESS WILL HELP YOU MAKE A NICE EDITION OF PRINTS.

THE MAGDALENA EXPERIENCE

EXPLORE THE FEMININE PERSPECTIVE OF PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY WITH MAGDALENA WOSINSKA IN THIS WOMEN’S WORKSHOP.

MAKE A HANDY LITTLE SURF-CRAFT

GRAIN SURFBOARDS MAKES ALL SORTS OF WOODEN SURF CRAFT. JOIN THEM AND MAKE YOURSELF A BEAUTIFULLY SHAPED HANDY LITTLE SURF CRAFT CALLED A HAND-PLANE.

DYE YOUR OWN SHIBORI-DYED HAMMOCK ADVENTURE IS EXHAUSTING, SO CHILL OUT AND MAKE YOUR OWN SHIBORI-DYED HAMMOCK TO NAP IN WITH THE ESCAPE COLLECTIVE.

MORE WORKSHOPS & FIELD TRIPS COMING SOON


MUSIC

DOMINIC HAYDN RAWLE

THE MATTSON 2

TWINS

are known to develop their own secret languages. The phenomenon is called “cryptophasia,” and it begs the question: could twins bring that preternatural communication to music? The Mattson 2 — identical twins Jared and Jonathan — say yes. “We had to work at it a little bit,” says Jared, “but once we had the motor skills to translate what our minds were thinking musically we could start to read off each other, like we normally do in conversation.”

Despite their shared switchboard, the Mattson brothers never intended to go it alone. Though they perform predominantly as a kinetic, sweeping instrumental duo — Jared on guitar, Jonathan on drums — The Mattson 2 are regular collaborators with prominent musicians like Toro y Moi’s Chaz Bundick and journeyman Farmer Dave, Japan’s Chocolat & Akito, and seminal skateboarders-cum-recording-artists Tommy Guerrero and Ray Barbee. “They obviously have a deeper connection than most bandmates since they have been together since birth,” says Guerrero, who has performed frequently with The Mattson 2. “They know what the other is thinking or going to do before they do it — sometimes before they even know what’s coming next. Since they have that mysterious ‘twin power’ it seems to enhance their ESP ability.” For their part, the Mattsons are just as likely to credit their musical education as their DNA. Both have MFAs in music from UC Irvine. “We really wanted a degree,” says Jared. “We think that degrees are valuable. A lot of people say they can’t find work with their degree but that doesn’t mean that the process of getting the degree isn’t going to help your overall approach and outlook on life. We wanted that balance.” Diving deeply into musical theory and jazz at school, the Mattsons view the rigors of their study as a jumping off point. “What we try to do is make music that’s not totally classified as jazz, but jazz is our favorite type

of music,” Jared says. “We use that kind of artillery as a means to further our own creativity.” But while technically informed and advanced, The Mattson 2 avoid rigidity. “The basic concept that I’ve come to hold fast to is more of a heartfelt playing, creative playing, as opposed to a technical playing,” says Jonathan in a web feature, describing his drumming style. “I’m more interested in a sloppiness of technique that shows identity rather than something that’s very solid and fixed.” “Jazz is kind of a touchy subject,” Jared says. “I think there’s some really great modern jazz artists out there. But I think sometimes a lot of people try to uphold the traditions more than use the traditions as a creative foundation.” And indeed the duo branch out, to twangy surf, atmospheric indie rock, and swinging, pounding, improvisation. The recently-released “Agar” — which is “Raga” spelled backwards — employs Indian drones as the seed for their flowering explorations. What unites The Mattson 2’s numerous stylistic inspirations is a tight, propelling energy and snaking, swelling flow. As much as their studies and their so-called “twinchronicity,” The Mattson 2 consider intellectual and conceptual underpinnings too. Blue Note Records — the canonical, mid-20th century jazz label — looms large for the twins. “I really like the fact that there was a toughness about them,” Jared says, “but they played such sophisticated music.” -ANDREW R. TONRY

ROBBIE AUSPURGER

OZARKS As a photographer, Robbie Augspurger has a penchant for glamour shots — posed studio portraits with a soft focus, hazy sparkle, and odd charm. In them, a sunburnt desaturation suggests the passage of time. Augspurger’s band, Ozarks, values similar aesthetics: a light but highly-sculpted touch and a surreal, backwards-looking melancholy. Both fetishize worlds bygone — turtleneck sweaters, leather gloves, and shag carpet. But where the glamour shots toy with irony, Ozarks’ music, while occasionally playful, is quite earnest. Over twinkling harpsichords, lilting synths, and snappy percussion, Augspurger’s falsetto is mostly unadorned — wispy, naked, and vulnerable. Meticulously recorded with studio-mate Eric Adrian Lee, Ozarks take on a bit more heft in person. Either way, a wistful longing prevails. Ozarks and Augspurger dream of a future past — of delicate, outsider pop. For more of that, see Augspurger’s Tumblr, Beach Boys Beards. -ANDREW R. TONRY

BITCH'N The fivesome Bitch’n sharpened their teeth with of a handful of renowned Portland acts. Members have played with Orquestra Pacifico Tropical, Point Juncture WA, Ioa, Duover, Great Wilderness, and Sallie Ford. What emerges from that divergent cross-section is a lot tougher than its roots might suggest. Bitch’n’s gumbo is a ripping, pointed, thrumming, and livid post-punk, equal turns hummable and aggressive. “Strut’n Tough” stacks fuzzy guitar jabs, bleepy keyboards, and multiple vocalists over crisp, driving dance beats. “Bulldozer” is a thudding, gnarled wash that gives way to dry drum machines, glossy synths, and airy group vocals. The singles are from a forthcoming EP, Messed Out. Should similarly raw, immediate, hip-shaking hooks fill the record, we’ll be hearing a lot more from Bitch’n in the days and months to come. Just don’t call ‘em a “girl band.” No word yet on how they feel about “supergroup.” -ANDREW R. TONRY

CAT HOCH Cat Hoch floats over psych pop’s sugary mountain peaks, her gaze piercing through dark clouds. And while she’s no stranger to chunky riffs, rippling synths, and lilting layers, Hoch’s taught, wormy, melodic compositions stand on solid ground. Strip away the swirling atmospherics and the songs remain sturdy. Hoch released Look What You Found, a dreamy, phantasmagoric, four-song EP, last fall. It was produced by Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s Riley Geare, who added drums and keyboards. The hook-laden title track moves briskly beneath waves of cooing vocals, stacked synths, and fuzzy guitar. From the cloudy bookends of “Celestian” a dreamy, uptempo groove emerges. It’s a crisp debut, whose chords, colors, and choruses are constantly changing. -ANDREW R. TONRY

MORE MUSIC & TICKETS COMING SOON


1

MEET THE MAKERS

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Unlike other trade shows, THE EXPO IS FREE and open to the public, and you don’t have to be a gear junkie to have an appreciation for well-made goods. We encourage industry insiders and outsiders alike to come meet the makers of our favorite things. 8

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1 // CLIF BAR They get the food job done, so you can focus on overcoming your challenges. Psst… we hear they might have a tasty new product to share at the fest, so bring your belly. clifbar.com // @clifbarcompany 2 // GRAIN SURFBOARDS Wooden handcrafted surfboards and kits that you can make yourself. grainsurfboards.com // @grainsurfboards 3 // ALL GOOD Apparel for camping, surfing, climbing, hiking, boating, road tripping, and starting campfires with corn chips. It’s all good! allgxxd.com // @allgxxd 4 // HAVEN & FLORIN Backpacks made in Washington to be used and abused by camera-carrying creative outsiders, mountain berry-picking travelers, and people just like you. havenandflorin.com // @havenandflorin 5 // RED CLOUDS COLLECTIVE As you go on more adventures, you’ll wear into the world and get softer around the edges. So do the goods Red Clouds Collective makes. redcloudscollective.com // @redcloudscollective 6 // JBIRD COLLECTIVE This Portland industrial design house has a focus on the highest-quality backpacks and handcrafted leather goods. Check out their new leather sunglasses! jbirdpdx.com // @jbirdcollective 7 // SEE SEE MOTORCYCLES Portland, Oregon’s legendary motorcycle & coffee shop doesn’t just help people get parts for their old bikes and fuel for their old guts. seeseemotorcycles.com // @seeseemotorcycles

8 // SCOUT BOOKS If you don’t have one of these books in your pocket right now, you’re not really prepared for adventure. scoutbooks.com // @scoutbooks 9 // URBAN BARRELS Imagine an old sail from a sail boat was magically turned into a backpack. Now imagine that backpack magically turns inside out to be a towel. It’s a bag towel! urbanbarrels.com // @urbanbarrels 10 // STRANGE VACATION Historically, motorcycle jackets were made for women in one of two ways: fashion or function. Strange V has found a way to be functional, fashionable, and more fun than a monkey with a machine gun. strangevacation.com // @strange.vacation

15 // SANUK “Sanuk” is the Thai word for “fun”—but it means more than that. It’s about working to achieve satisfaction, pleasure, and a sort of grace that is always comfortable. This footwear totally lives up to the name. sanuk.com // @sanukfootwear 16 // BREW DR. KOMBUCHA There’s a lot of kombucha out there, but only one is brewed with Townshend’s tea to taste delicious and hit you with all those healthy benefits. brewdrkombucha.com // @brewdrkombucha 17 // PROOF EYEWEAR This Idaho-based sustainable eyewear brand is living proof that being small doesn’t mean you can’t do good. iwantproof.com // @proofeyewear

11 // JAMES BRAND These knives are nice and simple. They’re sharp as a man-eating tiger shark too, so be careful! thejamesbrand.com // @thejamesbrand

18 // MOWGLI SURF Mowgli is based in Southern California, and stands for everything awesome and unique about the place they come from. mowglisurf.com // @mowglisurf

12 // THE ORIGINAL NOMAD Maybe you’ve been to one of our past events and got to jump into a portable hot tub with us? If you did, the tub was made by the Original Nomad. theoriginalnomad.com // @theoriginalnomad

19 // MOKUYOBI THREADS We love every freaking backpack, hat, patch, and banana-patterned fanny pack Mokuyobi makes. mokuyobi.com // @mokuyobithreads

13 // URAL Adventure is more fun when you have someone to share it with. Ural makes motorcycles that perform for fun-seekers. imz-ural.com // @uralmotorcycles 14 // CELESTRON The universe is freaking awesome when you get a good view of it! The fine folks at Celestron make stuff that helps you see stars, microscopic things, birds, and in the dark. Yay science! celestron.com // @celestronuniverse

20 // FOREST & WAVES This Vancouver brand knows that beautiful place where the forest meets the ocean, and it shows in their home goods and apparel. forestandwaves.com // @forestandwaves 21 // ESCAPE COLLECTIVE A gang of talented and skilled friends who can make anything they want. Right now they want to make motorcycles, hammocks, and geodesic domes. esccollective.com // @esccollective

22 // EDGEVALE This apparel brand makes clothing in Oakland, California to help people get out and enjoy that special mixing zone of urban and natural environments. edgevaleusa.com // @edgevaleusa 23 // REVIVE PDX Can a couch have more personality than the person sitting in it? revivepdx.com // @revivedesigns 24 // BUREO Super fun skateboard decks and sunglasses up-cycled from old fishing nets removed from the sea. bureo.co // @bureo 25 // SWIFT INDUSTRIES Bike bags and adventure gear made in Seattle for weekend dirtbag adventurers and daily bike commuters. builtbyswift.com // @swiftindustries 26 // TRIBE & TRUE Handmade textiles, jewelry, and pottery from cultural practitioners of the human arts. tribetrue.com // @tribeandtrue 27 // TREEHOUSE CHOCOLATE Drinking chocolate is like pouring smooth sweet lava into your soul. Treehouse makes it easy for you to bring this experience anywhere. treehousechocolate.com // @treehousechocolate 28 // NEW BELGIUM BREWERY This Colorado-based craft beer is a big freaking deal, and we’ve drank more of it than we can remember. But the way they make their beer to be socially and environmentally responsible is an even bigger deal. newbelgium.com // @newbelgium

MORE MAKERS & EXHIBITORS COMING SOON


Made in A CONVERSATION WITH TONY VONTZ FOUNDER OF APPAREL BRAND EDGEVALE Story by Evan Schell // evanschell.com // @theslipperysaltwaterchronicles

Hiking & Modeling by Peter Kegler & Madeline Carruthers


“Hiking locally, I love to go to Sibley and love to go to Tilden, which are two regional parks. You go there and you see these gigantic redwood trees. You can’t hear any cars. You barely see any other people. You may as well be all the way up in Humboldt in the middle of nowhere. That’s a rad thing about living in Oakland. We can leave here and in 12 minutes be out in the middle of nowhere, but still kind of be in the city. That’s also why the business is here. We can design something here, go test it, go make it, go iterate on it, and it all happens in, like, a 15-mile circle.” Having been overseas a lot on sourcing trips, and manufacturing trips with other brands, I knew that I always wanted to keep it as local as possible. It is cheaper to make stuff overseas, but as a new brand we get a lot more quality control over the process by keeping it in our backyard and by supporting local jobs. People eat local, drink local, and I think they’re starting to wear and shop local, too. The coolest thing about making everything in Oakland is that we get to react quickly to what our customers say, what their feedback is, what our product testers say, and immediately bake it into the products.”

I met the gentleman who runs the factory when I was working for another brand, so we’ve known each other professionally for probably 10 years. The genesis of every outerwear piece, which are our biggest sellers, starts with a crumb of an idea from me, a meeting with one of the fabric mills we work with, and then we take it to him and we bounce ideas. He’s an expert in production and how to make things better. He knows where all the bodies are buried. He knows all the nitty-gritty of what goes into making something fit better, or just getting that extra one percent that can make the product better. We’re with him almost every day working on that sort of stuff.” “There’s nothing that you or I do throughout the day that we can’t erase on a computer screen, can’t control+alt+delete, force restart, or whatever. What they’re doing is highly skilled. It’s difficult. It’s laborious, and they really can’t make mistakes because mistakes cost material, cost money, and cost time. So, they’re just, like, radical badasses. We try to get them involved in our process as much as humanly possible. They’re not just people pressing machines. They have a vested interest in how well we do and making our product better, because there’s not many brands doing it. They’re part of the community that we’re part of. And we’re all working together.”

“Now we’re making what we had in our mind’s eye. Adding that extra level of sophistication. We’re making more lightweight technical hiking gear that’s super packable, super breathable, four-way stretch stuff in all these rad colorways, with fabrics made to our spec.” “Our brand is built for that less technical, less involved, less intense outdoor experience that people have every day all around the country. It’s riding your bike to and from work. Getting a quick hike in. That weekend road trip, car-camping with your friends. Our stuff is built for that. It’s got a lot of utility, it’s super versatile, it holds up. Those moments are what we focus on.”

edgevaleusa.com // @edgevaleusa


“It is cheaper to make stuff overseas, but as a new brand we get a lot more quality


control over the process by keeping it in our backyard and by supporting local jobs.�


Sanuk claims their footwear is “Never Uncomfortable�, so we asked some of our Honolulu friends to test the theory. The results came back positive.

comfortable

always


Fun-tography by John Hook johnhookphoto.com // @john_hook Fun-testing by Allxzandra Manalac // @allxfoo Brandon Smith // @brandonsmithphotography Grace Elizabeth Green // @theangelgrace All the footwear featured in this adventure is from our friends at Sanuk // @sanukfootwear // sanuk.com


It’s time to meet me in Klamath. Get on down here. Seriously. Right now!

FIND OUT WHERE AT MEETMEINKLAMATH.COM


THE MEMBERS OF THE ESCAPE COLLECTIVE ARE MAKING COOL SHIT TO GET OUT THERE, TOGETHER. BY AYLA ROSE GILBERT // AYLAROSEGILBERT.COM // @AYLAROSALITA

ESCAPE COLLECTIVE IS Hill Hudson, Andy Carlson, Kara Jean Caldwell, Conor Kennedy, Marshall Birnbaum, and Trevor Thorpe. It’s a mild, grey Portland day when I meet Kara to talk about all things Escape Collective. We order our coffees and sit down by the window. Kara stirs the foam of her soy latte with her finger and licks it off.

work even harder.” They’ll stay up all night setting up a dome, racing against the clock, and then at the final moment it comes together. That’s the moment that makes it all worth it.

When I ask her what the magic glue is that holds the team together, Kara says, “I think it’s really important that we’re all friends. We are able to be honest and open about our dreams and visions.”

We start by discussing Escape Collective’s three main products: geodesic domes, motorcycles, and hammocks (among other things). But it becomes clear that when you purchase something from the Escape Collective, you’re not just getting a killer handmade product. You’re also sharing in the good vibes that come to life through the people who make it up. The Escape Collective crew are having what seems to be the time of their lives. They’re camping, hiking, and getting outdoors. They’re manifesting things they love and think others will love, too.

Kara leads me into the small garage that functions as their sewing room. I’m baffled as to how they’ve made the cover for a 36-foot geodesic dome in this tiny room. Kara climbs over a table in the cramped space to show off some hammocks. She holds up the Sunset Hammock and the Shibori Hammock. Their fabrics are so, so soft. She hands me a slide toggle, the metal piece that cinches the rope to the tree for hanging the hammock without having to tie a knot. It’s a piece they also make in their shop, because the Escape Collective team wanted to make sure that when you buy their hammock, you have every single piece you need to be up and running (or relaxing, in this case) right away. “Everything we make aids someone in some method of escape, whether you bring your hammock to the forest or hang it up in your bedroom.”

Next we head over to the shop where Hill and Trevor are working. Hill gives me the tour. Their shop is full of tools, machinery, and cool vintage cabinetry. Much of the equipment was passed down from Hill’s great-great-grandfather to his grandfather at their paper products and doily-making factory. Called Brooklace Paper Co., it was active from 1886 to 2003 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Hill and crew aren’t making doilies, but they carry on Hill’s grandfather’s legacy through the use of his tools.

They’re working really hard, as well. “So many projects, at the end of it, I’m like, ‘That’s the hardest I’ve ever worked,’” Kara says. “‘I don’t think I can work this hard again.’ But then another project comes along and we

PHOTOS BY ALIN DRAGULIN alindragulin.com // @alindragulinditcom

Hill shows me a pair of red tail lights he’s working on. He made the tool to make the snap rings for them on their metal lathe. I’m impressed that he made the thing to make the thing. Hill has an easy laugh. He points out an engine from India that’s the inspiration for his next project— which he intends to build almost entirely from scratch.


“WE DON’T PUT LIMITATIONS ON WHAT WE CAN BUILD. IT DOESN’T MATTER IF WE DON’T KNOW HOW TO DO SOMETHING WE ARE GOING TO FIGURE IT OUT,”


“Every single thing we’ve done has been trial and error,” Hill admits with pride. At one point he even purchased FigureItOutIHadTo.com. It was a joke, but it was also true. “We don’t put limitations on what we can build. It doesn’t matter if we don’t know how to do something—we are going to figure it out,” Kara adds. I meet Trevor and ask him what he’s working on. “Just drawing up ideas for some furniture,” he says. Trevor has a friendly smile and endearing dimples. He is a builder/fabricator, but also went to school for business. They’re all there, getting after it. Getting up every day to take ideas out of their heads and put them onto the page. To create things in space that didn’t exist before. “We are just trying to have the best time we possibly can,” says Trevor. Their genuine and authentic passion is infectious. It’s something you immediately want to be part of. You want to be on one of Hill’s motorcycles, racing to the next adventure, the wind against your skin. You want to be setting up a dome, feeling the magic moment when it’s finally complete. You want to be hanging in hammocks inside the dome, chilling out with your closest friends. One day some years back, Andy had a 9-5 job, from which he would come home every day holding a briefcase. His friends would joke with him—“Dad’s home!” they’d say. So amongst their group, Andy became “Dad.” And when the gaggle of pals went to Sasquatch (the birthplace of Escape Collective’s very first geodesic dome), they realized that no one’s dad was probably at Sasquatch, so it could be how they found one another—by yelling out “Dad!” If someone was calling for Dad, they knew it had to be a person from their group. A few years and a few dozen geodesic domes later, this tight-knit group of friends have first and foremost one another to thank—their fellow Dads. I’m grateful I got to have a peek inside the world of the Escape Collective. Thanks for showing me around, you guys. And thanks for calling me “Dad.”

SEE ESCAPE COLLECTIVE DOMES, BIKES, HAMMOCKS, AND MORE AT THE STAY WILD EXPO


BOBSLED SARAJEVO


Skating // Words // Stuff // Billy Bones // @billy_bones Photos // Jacob Lambert // jacoblambert.blogspot.com // @maxicasj

When I find myself in situations like this, I can’t help but laugh. I mean, why not fly across the world to skate the bombed-out ruins of the 1984 Winter Olympics? It may sound ignorant that I didn’t know how close Bosnia was to Yugoslavia, but to be honest, I knew very little about Eastern Europe until traveling there earlier this summer. Like most uninformed travelers, I sat down and watched a documentary on YouTube to learn more about the area I’d be flying to, with the intention of skating down an abandoned bobsled track. I quickly realized that this area went through a serious military conflict (within my lifetime) that had left its mark on the region. Occasionally I’d forget about the war and start to enjoy life in Sarajevo. The locals were friendly, food was good, and the coffee was hot. Only when I glanced up at bullet-riddled buildings was I reminded of what happened not so long ago.          It wasn’t a long drive from downtown Sarajevo into the hills, to get to the war-torn bobsled track. In America, this is the kind of place that would be fenced off to prevent people from hurting themselves on it. The track is .8 miles of rough, winding, partially blown up concrete covered in a thick layer of graffiti. Despite the condition it was in (and the fact that there were still land mines in the area), it was in good enough condition to skate. Still, after scoping the track I realized I was not prepared to ride down this beast. One of the things I love the most about skateboarding is that it is a form of self-expression, but when it comes to skating down a bobsled track, there is no room for expression. You don’t have time to get creative. This steep, twisting tube of downhill concrete picks your path for you, and you’re forced to just hold on for the ride. So I tightened my trucks, blocked out mental images of a brutal slam, and thought about how good the Turkish coffee would taste once I finished the run.

This adventure was made with our friends at Landyachtz @landyachtzlongboards landyachtz.com


Proof Eyewear Redefines the American Dream By Gianna Keiko Rankart

giannakeiko.com // @giannakeiko Proof Eyewear is small, young, and living their motto: “Do good.” Proof started like any good passion project—in a garage with two brothers, some ideas, a little money, and a few hours after the day job. Since 2010, it’s grown to sell consciously sourced, environmentally friendly eyewear in over 20 countries. It all started with a truck driver in rural Utah named Bud Dame. A man who owed Bud money made good on the debt by giving him lumber equipment. Playing the hand he was dealt, Bud started a sawmill in 1954 with zero education or professional background and became the successful CEO of a company with over 2,000 employees internationally. “Wood was always the passion,” explained Proof's COO and co-founder Tanner Dame. Proof’s founders—the Dame brothers—grew up working in the family wood mill, and had an intimate relationship with sawdust and the Idaho outdoors. Today, brothers Taylor, Brooks, and Tanner breathe life into the original dirtbag Yvon Chouinard’s philosophy: “Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.”


P H O T O S B Y J A C O B B O T T L E S // @ J A K E F R O M T H E L A K E


staywildmagazine.com/shop

Elm Co. + Stay Wild = Awesome Hat


Can an eyewear company source natural materials from this continent, avoid the allure of quick-fix philanthropy to complex global problems, and make super, on-point frames? Yes. Every collection is hand cut and finished. The ECO Collection is crafted from cotton based acetates—plastics made from cotton harvested from sources within the US and Canada. Purified, aged, stretched, wound, spun, infused, cut. The Skate collection, made from Canadian-based Maple wood, is basically a lasagna of vibrant skate decks. And of course the start of it all, the Wood collection, is harvested from only sustainable forests, making only premium cuts—shaping perfect, stylish frames. Hand stained and waterproofed. Proof recently got a Kickstarter campaign way over-funded to produce their new recycled line The Aluminum Collection, prooving the demand for a product that didn't exhist. Manufacturers today are producing the new American Dream, where sustainability is at the forefront. The old American Dream taught us that anything was possible. Combined with the paradox of choice, we could, if we choose, show up to this commerce landscape and get lost in opportunity. With solid core values and a little gumption and grit, the understanding of heritage and giving back inspires Proof to work globally, enacting their Do Good projects around the world. The logo of a bird with a mechanical crank represents Proof’s belief that, “Everyone has wings to fly, some just need a little help.” In the El Salvador project, over 1,000 students were examined and given eyeglasses or surgery if needed, 19 homes were built following tidal wave destruction, and over 500 cocoa trees were donated as an additional source of income for the community. Proof has built eye clinics in India and rehabilitated child soldiers in Africa. Their latest Do Good project in the Philippines rebuilt orphanages, provided health screenings, and scheduled over 100 cataract, cleft lip & club feet surgeries. This isn’t a company mindlessly donating at fiscal year-end to hide profits or get a tax write-off.

The People of Proof (Left to Right) Molly Horn, Marketing & Event Coordinator Dan Benjamin, Customer Service Manager Jacob Bottles, Graphic Designer Vierra Reid, Marketing Director Glen Carscadden, Senior Sales Director Bryce Baker, Sales Director Tanner Dame, Chief Operating Officer Lance Williams, Creative Director Joey Martinez, Operations Manager

Even if the planet feels broken, it’s providing us an opportunity to draw from multiple inspiration points. To vote with our dollar, to not fit into boxes or career paths, to see life as art and art as life and use that philosophy to do a little good for the earth and its people… and look real good doing it.


The Chapter thejamesbrand.com


STAY WILD // SPRING 2016  

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