__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

WINTER 2019 & 2020

The Official Traveler Connecting you with Japan

Feature 4 REASONS YOU NEED TO VISIT GIFU THIS WINTER EDITOR'S PICK: Top 9 Must Eats During Winter


WINTER 2019 & 2020

STNETNOC FO ELBAT

Feature

Four reasons you need to visit Gifu this winter

NAVIGATING NAVIGATING Temples Temples and and shrines shrines ii

iii

iv

Meet our team at STAY JAPAN.

Hear what our chief editor has to say about the current events and make a tasty dish too.

ABOUT COVID-19

MEET THE CREW

1

5

STAY JAPAN values your health. Read our tips on what we recommend and how to stay safe.

9

BLOG:

GOOD EATS

16

19

20

HOROSCOPES

ABOUT STAY JAPAN

ASK THE EXPERT

Living, working, and dating in Japan. FAQ answered with a hint of sass.

NAVIGATING SHRINES AND TEMPLES.

What are your readings today?

5

EDITOR'S LETTER

FEATURE:

FOUR REASONS YOU NEED TO VISIT GIFU THIS WINTER.

1

An amazing list of restaurants, cafes, & bars. All verified by local foodies.

Learn what we're all about and what we can offer to you!

i


Meet the Crew

|STAY JAPAN TEAM

From: United States Currently: Kanto Skills: Photography, blogging, social media.

Chief Editor TERESA FONG

SHANTELL MITCHELL

From: United States Currently: Hokkaido Skills: Videography, graphic design, and Japanese.

From: United States Currently: Kanto Skills: graphic design, videography, blogging.

Magazine Designer

GIOVANNI PEREZ

Editorial Director

Dir Intl. Marketing

MAGAZINE PRODUCTION TEAM

CORY ROTOLO

From: United States Currently: Tohoku Skills: Travel planning and snowboarding.

ALEX LOKE

LILLIAN SEILER

Editor

Blogger

Director of PR/Blogger

Dir Social Media/Editor

ARTICLE CONTRIBUTORS

JOANNE JAMIESON

ERIN SHOAF

AND ALL OF OUR AMAZING SUPPORTERS AT STAY JAPAN! TAKESHI AMITANI

DALTON IWASAKI

KAI SIMMS

CELINE BENNETT

AYUMI KONDO

NATASHA TALIFERRO

EMI CHUBACHI

CHARLEEN LAY

KENNETH VALENCICH

LOUISE CARROLL

MIGUEL MAGTIIBAY

TAYLA-PAIGE VAN SITTERT

SCARLETT HALFORD

MICHAEL SANCHEZ

s ank th O u r ig A b o all ing rs! t maz to a i bu ntr o C

iii


Regarding COVID-19: We at SJ Media strive to showcase the beauty and unique charms of Japan with first-hand accounts from our experts. While our mission involves advocating travel and one-of-a-kind experiences in Japan, we take the current COVID-19 pandemic seriously and do not recommend travel at this time. Instead, we hope by following proper protocol advised by local governments and authorities (washing hands, avoiding crowded areas, social distancing measures, etc.) that we will safely be able to return to our normal lives in the near future. In the meantime, please feel free to utilize the Official STAY JAPAN Traveler as inspiration for future travel plans. Stay safe now so that you and your loved ones can travel later! Japan will be waiting for you.

Tips for Staying Healthy Wash your hands. Research shows that 20 seconds of hand washing can effectivly neutralize the COVID19 virus. Prevention is crucial, so let's all do our part.

If you see signs or symptoms, seek care and stay home to protect those around you.

Take care of physical and mental health by keeping in touch with loved ones, exercise, eating healthy, and engaging in activities you enjoy.


T

he time we were all able to simply put on our shoes and travel feels like a century ago. Anything from visiting a new cafe to hopping to another country was within our grasp. Now, most of us are locked down to protect those most vulnerable to COVID-19. Just because you are staying home to flatten the panemic's curve doesn’t mean you can’t explore new places. This issue explores the refreshing appeal of winter in Japan (p.5) along with a guide to spirituality (p.9).

STAY JAPAN: WINTER 2020

EDITOR'S LETTER

Need more than text to get out of your headspace? Try this simple Japanese recipe with ingredients you should already have in your kitchen.

Teresa Fong RICE

1 tablespoon of vegetable oil 100 grams or half of a small onion 1 teaspoon of soy sauce

Omurice Serves 2 Prep time 5 mins Cooking time 10 mins

300 grams or 2 cups of white rice 2 tablespoons of ketchup 150 grams or half of a chicken thigh (optional)

PICTURE: CORY ROTOLO

100 grams of corn or carrots, etc. (optional)

If If you you want want some some hot, colorful hot, colorful comfort, comfort, you you can’t can’t beat omurice, beat omurice, a a word word combined combined from from “omelette” “omelette” and and “rice.” “rice.”

OMELETTE 3 eggs

2. Meanwhile, prepare the omelette.

Heat a small skillet over medium-high heat, add the butter until melted. In a separate bowl, beat the eggs with the cream (or milk) and add a pinch of salt. Add the egg mixture into the skillet until the bottom layer of eggs is set. Gently stir the eggs while shaking the pan to create gaps where the uncooked egg can move to. Cook until 70% done. The top layer should still be runny.

3. Add the soy sauce with the

1 tablespoon of cream (or milk) rice. Once the rice is heated through, add the ketchup. Place (optional) it in a bowl to shape it before 1 pinch of salt placing on a plate. 1 tablespoon of butter

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Make the rice. Prepare by adding the vegetable oil over mediumhigh heat. Saute the onions until tender. If adding chicken and vegetables, stir-fry until soft. Doing something else to keep physically and mentally engaged? Let us know.

4. Try your luck in sliding the egg off and over your mountain of rice! 5. If you have a demi-glace sauce, go ahead and top it off with that! If not, drizzle some ketchup on top as a final touch.

@STAYJAPAN

facebook.com/STAYJAPAN

iv


Mood Board

|WINTER 2020


44 REASONS REASONS YOU NEED TO YOU NEED TO VISIT VISIT GIFU GIFU THIS WINTER THIS WINTER WRITTEN BY

EDITED BY

Lillian Seiler

Erin Shoaf

1


Reasons You You Need Need to to 44 Reasons Visit Gifu Gifu This This Winter Winter Visit LILLIAN SEILER

Growing up in the sunny state of Florida, I never had the opportunity to bask in the snowy magic of winter. I remember dreaming of cold weather, rolling around in the pure white snow, and how I wished for it when I blew out my birthday candles. It was not until I moved to Japan that I could make that dream a reality. There are endless beautiful locations you can travel within Japan to experience the breathtaking atmosphere of winter. However, the one place that topped all the rest of my travels was the tranquil prefecture of Gifu. Here are four reasons why you should visit Gifu this winter!

Walkin inaareal real“Winter “Winter 1.1.Walk Wonderland.” Wonderland.” The snow in Gifu is absolutely phenomenal. We’re talking piles of feathery, soft snow enveloping everything in eyes’ view. I went during the middle of January, when snowfall tends to be more significant. Not only was it gorgeous to see, but also feeling the satiny texture of the snow in my hands was an enchanting sensory experience. I was able to live out all my childhood dreams of making snow angels, hearing the fresh snow crunch underneath my feet as I walked, and being in complete awe of my surroundings.

2


2. It’s It’s aa snowboarding/skiing snowboarding/skiing 2. heaven! heaven! Gifu is wonderfully peaceful, but that does not make it any less adventurous! For the sports lovers and thrill-seekers, Gifu is a must for snowboarding or skiing. Out of every other place I’ve snowboarded, Gifu was the best for the most satisfying snow and smooth sailing down the mountain. At Nagareha Resort Ski Park, there were no wet, slippery patches of snow during the entirety of my time on the slopes. It also was not nearly as crowded as other ski parks I have been to. These traits made my time all the more worthwhile, as I could snowboard freely and recklessly to my heart's content.

The high quality of the snow in Gifu makes it safer and easier for snow sports, but due to my general clumsiness, I still managed to have a few wipeouts. The cushiony snow came in very handy for that! I fell face-first into a giant pile of snow, but it was the most painless and gentle fall I’ve experienced in my life. Grab a few friends to help you out of the snow piles and enjoy the slopes! Want to read the last two tips? Read the rest at Stay Japan Media

LILLIAN SEILER

3


01

To

t

TH rave l is WR AT E to CO ON VER dis ~ A UNT G AB YON c LD RIE OU E IS ove r OU S.” T O SH TH ER UX LE Y

D ORL

IS,

E H T , E S R ” . U F O L E C S F T I O R LD O W HE T N I FUL I T AU E B OST M HE “"T

H T

E

W

NS VE E ST CE A L AL – W

… TI E L M Y E SA E V A T TH A W DA PAUL THEROUX N R U T S T D FYO O U G O A W A Y F O R A L O N G N YOU GO AWAY FOR A LONG A E OST ITH TTIIM B E L A SM MEE A AN ND DR REETTU UR RN NA A TO ~

B

B

N E R

N

. ME

D DIIFFFFEER REEN NTT PPEER RSSO ON N–– Y YO OU U N NEEV VEER RC CO OM MEE A ALLLL TTH HEE W WA AY Y B BA AC CK K


NAVIGATING TEMPLES AND SHRINES

WRITTEN BY

EDITED BY

Joanne Jamieson

Cory Rotolo

5


Navigating

TEMPLES AND SHRINES Joanne Jamieson

Given

that Japan’s two main the religions are Buddhism and and Shintoism, it’s no surprise that there are tens of thousands of temples and shrines to be found all across Japan. Whether it’s a massive complex of buildings, or simply one tucked away in a forest or side street, if you travel to Japan you are almost guaranteed to cross one at some point. For many visitors to Japan, visiting a temple or shrine can be a unique cultural experience. So it’s important to know the differences and similarities between the two, and some general etiquette to be respectful when visiting.

In the main hall of a temple is usually a statue or image of the Buddha, along with other sacred objects, and a table for offerings. The most important date for Buddhists is known as Obon ( ), and it takes place around mid-August every year. During Obon, the spirits of ancestors return to earth and families gather to welcome them.

お盆

Temples:

Temples are places of worship in Buddhism. The names of temples are followed by -tera, dera, or -ji ( ). Some famous examples include Kiyomizudera, and Todaiji.

The entrances to temples are usually marked with gates (shown above), and consist of multiple buildings. When passing through the main gate to enter or exit, often people bow to pay respect to the Buddha’s sacred ground.

Shrines:

Shrines are places of worship in Shintoism. Shintoism is known as, “The way of the gods”. Shinto followers believe that gods are present in all natural phenomena mountains, waterfalls, rivers, fertility, wind, and even sound. Names of shrines are followed by jinja ( ), which means, “god dwelling”.

神社

6


Navigating

TEMPLES AND SHRINES Joanne Jamieson

One

of the more famous shrines is Itsukushima Jinja, which can be seen above and below. The entrances to shrines are usually marked with torii ( ), which are the gateway between the secular and spiritual worlds. People bow when passing through torii to show respect.

⿃居

When visiting a shrine, you should try to do at least 3 of the 4 elements of worship to gain the full cultural experience: 1. Purification: This shows respect for the god and is the most important. Inside the shrine grounds will be a water trough, known as chozuya or temizuya, ( ) with bamboo ladles. Scoop the water with the ladle with your right hand and pour it over your left. Then, repeat this process with your right hand. Pour some water into a cupped hand and swill it in your mouth before spitting it out on the ground beside the temizuya.

⼿⽔舎

2. Offering: Make an offering by throwing a coin in the box which can be found in the main building. 3. Prayer: This means praying to the gods at the main building. Make sure to remove any headgear first. The correct way to pray is known as nirei-nihakushuichirei ( ), which means “ two bows, two claps, one bow. The steps are as follows: Bow slightly once you approach the front of the shrine and throw a coin into the offering box. Ring the bell 2-3 times to let the gods know that you have come to pray. Bow deeply twice. Clap your hands twice. Bow deeply once more when you have finished praying.

4. Sacred feast: This usually only occurs after special services or festivals.

Similarities:

While temples and shrines belong to different religions, they have co-existed in Japan for so long that common practices can be found in both. Now it is becoming more common to find temples with torii gates, or temizuya water troughs for purification.At most large temples and shrines you will be able to purchase stamps called Goshuin. The stamps have a similar layout for all temples and shrines including the date, the name of the temple/shrine in calligraphy, the name of the temple/shrine stamped, and the word houhai ( ) which means “to worship”. However, each site has their own personalized stamp. You can purchase the stamp on a piece of paper for around 300 yen, or have it written in a stamp book, Goshuincho, which can be purchased at many temples/shrines.

奉拝

⼆礼⼆拍⼿⼀ Joanne Jamieson Want to learn Joanne's "Dos and Don'ts" of Shrine hopping? Read the rest at: STAY

JAPAN MEDIA

7


STAY JAPAN: WINTER 2020


STAY JAPAN: WINTER 2020

GOOD EATS FOUND BY (SELF) CERTIFIED FOODIE PROFESSIONALS

9


CUISINE

01 04 07

02 05

03 06 09

08 RANKED FOR Your cnsumption pleasure.

10


09

The "baby tap-pi" finally hits northern Hokkaido.

11


CUISINE

09

08

07

LAULE'A

TSUNAGI DOKORO EN

COLORS

Brown Sugar Milk Tea | 500

¥ 〜

Kakiyage Soba | 600

Caramel Pancake | 690

One of the only places to get boba in Northern Hokkaido, Laule'a stands out with it's delicious flavor and welcoming atmosphere.

A small mom and pop restaurant in Sarufutsu, Japan, with delicious hand-made soba.

This is, by far, one of the best caramel pancakes that I have had in my life. Be sure to check out COLORS in Wakkanai. @WILD KITCHEN COLORs

06

05

BAR RUSSO

ASCOT TEA ROOM

Osechi | 690

Salt Beef Sandwich | 1,400

Delicious, locally sourced, beef platter. The restaurant itself is inspired by Italian cuisine and is a popular spot for expats and locals alike.

A restaurant tucked away on a beautiful hill in Fukushima, a must-dine according to our Dir.M. @British Hills in Tenei Village.

RANKED FOR Your consumption pleasure.

12


02 A beautiful and quiet cafe in southern Asahikawa

13


CUISINE

04

03

02

TSUNAGI -DOKORO EN

MARU-GIN

BARISTART COFFEE

Tempura Udon | 800

Dessert Plate | 2000

Biei Latte | 630

An old-fashioned udon shop with a HUGE friendly cat and a nostalgic feel in the Nashitama District of Tokyo.

A delicious restaurant in the fashion hub of Shibuya, this amazing restaurant offers delectable dining options, with both English and Japanese menus.

Amazing place to grab a fashionable latte. Baristart offers a drink with a rich and smooth flavor. The delicious milk they use comes from Hokkaido, leaving you with an exquisite example as to why Hokkaido has a reputation for some of the best dairy in Japan.

RANKED FOR Your consumption pleasure.

14


Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

札幌、北海道、⽇本

Shelter Cafe is by far one of the most unique cafés I have been to in Hokkaido. It's hidden away in the basement floor of what looks like an apartment complex. Once you open their doors, you are immediately hit with the delicious aroma of their Italian-inspired cuisine. Moments later, you'll be blown away by their Alice in Wonderland-like interior design. Not only is the staff amazing, the cafe itself is a peaceful and vibrant space to study, read, and enjoy a delicious meal.

STAY JAPAN: GOOD EATS WINTER 2020

NO.1 SHELTER CAFE


xpert Ask the Expert

living one day at a time

WITH SHANTELL.M

16


Ask the Expert Your questions about living in Japan as an expat answered by me or our team of experts!

05

What is a fun weekend anywhere in Japan? The best advice that I can give for a fun time anywhere in Japan is to find a local cafe and chat up the owners! Some of the greatest people I have met, I met in a dive bar or a tucked away cafe .

What is your experience as a black woman in Japan ?

04

My experience comes with ups and downs, but I love where I live. Both my students and the locals have an overwhelming curiosity for both me and my culture. I couldn't be more happy to share!

ASK ME ANYTHING Hey! I'm Shantell and I have been living and working in Japan for about 3 years now. Throughout my time, I've learned a lot about Japanese culture, what it means to be an expat in Japan, and most importantly, I learned about myself. In this column, it is my goal to answer the questions that come my way and hopefully give you a reason to STAY JAPAN.

03

How's life romantically abroad? Do you find it difficult to connect with people? Yes! Living in a very rural part of Japan, connecting on a deeper, more romantic level, is definitely difficult. Cultural difference, language difficulties, among other things, make it a tough time. Still, it's definitely possible to find love!

17


Ask the Expert Your questions about living in Japan as an expat answered by me or our team of experts!

Is living in Japan all you thought that it would be? I am glad you asked. It totally isn't! I know that sounds bad, but honestly, it has exceeded my expectations. Both the people and the culture are so fulfilling. Being able to live and work in the place of my dreams has been a blessing!

01

02

Can you survive only speaking English and what are the safe places for tourists? Language honestly just depends on where you are. I want to say that if you are on the main island, or stick to the big name cities like Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, and Fukuoka, it is totally possible to get by with just English. In more rural place, Japanese becomes more necessary. As far as safety, in my experience, Japan is an incredibly safe country. Japan is like any other place; practice safe habits and you’ll be fine!

18


WHEN THE STARS ALIGN...

Aqaurius A deal isn't a deal if it blows your budget.

Pisces Simplify your space and slow down.

Aries An opportunity is coming; trust yourself.

Taurus Be in the moment. Take notes for later.

Gemini Your idea could bring change.

Cancer Reach out to someone you haven't for a while.

Leo Tap into your creativity to help your mind fizz.

Virgo It's a good time to focus on that project.

Libra Self-reflect and adopt a neutral tone.

Scorpio Social distance doesn't mean you can't talk.

Sagittarius Feng shui your room for better vibes.

Capricorn Ask for support if you need it.

Don't be a stranger! Stay connected with STAY JAPAN.

@STAYJAPAN

facebook.com/STAYJAPAN

STAY JAPAN: HOROSCOPES WINTER 2020

Horoscopes

19


A Japanese Travel Magazine A multi-media platform of city guides backed by local experts. Our guesthouse booking site providing unique stays, as well as concise, informed, and fun reviews.

Visit

Stay

How-to

Food

There are over 10 prefectures on our guides with more coming soon.

Over 3,000 unique guesthouses in both rural and urban areas throughout Japan.

Read insider tips and secrets to make traveling easier in Japan.

Our authors can be trusted to direct you to delicious eateries

Coming Soon New guides are due in June: Spring Edition

Start reading now: via stayjapan.com/media/

20


Don't be a stranger! Stay connected with STAY JAPAN. https://www.pinterest.jp/stayjapan/

@STAYJAPAN

facebook.com/STAYJAPAN

Profile for STAY JAPAN MEDIA

The Offical Stay Japan Traveler  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded