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is on a roll

Dec e m b e r- J a n u a ry 2 0 16

26

6 MASTHEAD 8 CONTRIBUTORS 10 STATUS MESSAGE 

46 HOLY

STATUSPHERE

FEATURES

13 THREADS 16 SETTING 17 BRICK & MORTAR 18 SCREEN 19 BEATS 

PACK: COLOR COASTER

These chromatic gadgets are to dye for.

47 ELECTRO Seoul

48 QUARTERBACK

23

MAESTRO

52 HIDDEN

PAINT: PLUM DIARY

VANITIES: HEAVY METALS

Rock the holidays with metallic hues.

By Ida Aldana

54 KISS

STREET STYLE

52

By Celene Sakurako

56 CLIMBING

26 ALTERED

STATE

Let cut-outs, painted prints, and sleek silhouettes take you to a different world.

By Celene Sakurako

By Veronica Formos

32 PLEASANT

STRANGER

58 EXTRAMILLENNIAL

By Mike Carreiro

SHOPPING GUIDE READY, JETSET, GO

40 CONCRETE New York

41 LEATHER Milan

42 STREET Tokyo

JUNGLE

CHANNEL FIGHTER

43 KNIGHT

WATCH

44 VALLEY

CAT

London

Los Angeles

45 CITY

SCAPE

Berlin

LIFE

Falling from under the quirk tree, indie pop sushi Reese Lansangan is ready to make the jump from your screens on to a bigger stage with her solo debut, Arigato, Internet!.

Classic trench coats on knits and neutral hues will add a layer of mystery in the air.

Let these holiday musthaves take you to your dream destination.

UPSTREAM

Whitney’s frontman Julien Ehrlich talks about the Chicago-based sextet’s anticipated first album and the unlikely joys of singing country rock tunes behind his drums.

VISION BOARD

38 SWAG:

OF LIFE

After five years and two albums to her name, New York-based vocalist Tamaryn steps out of her comfort zone and dives into a new sound for her third album, Cranekiss.

BEAUTY BITE: ST. NAILS

GO SEE

LEGEND

Stealing the spotlight with her mix of funk and soul, former backup singer Judith Hill brings her cinematic sounds to center stage with her first solo album, Back in Time.

FASHION 24

KICK-OFF

Striding into our stream of consciousness is Calvin Klein’s bronze boy Torin Verdone, making both a scene and an arms race in nothing but his boxers on.

Get some purple haze in your eyes.

23

CUTE

MUSE

BEAUTY 22 FACE

CHIC

By Janroe Cabiles

GADGETS 20 TECH

Paris

By Pola Beronilla

MASTERMIND

60

RETRO FLASH

Packed with a punch and the perfect pop of culture and saturation, photography and directing duo Markus & Koala morph their aesthetics into one vibrant vision. By Janroe Cabiles

62 THE

REELING

Honest hours hide at the bottom of drunken nights and memories, raw and ready for Zachary Chick to capture with his film camera and sense of nostalgia. By Janroe Cabiles


is on a roll

D ec em b er - J anu ary 2 0 1 6

64 AFTER

84

HOURS

In love with his subjects’ curves and concave of skin, Cameron Lee Phan gets lost in his surroundings and finds himself through the nighttime landscapes and lens.

By Janroe Cabiles

66 APERTURE

ATTITUDE

Constantly finding the fuel for his passion, LA-based fashion photographer JM Dayao goes all around the world on the quest for beauty through his viewfinder.

MORE

93 DIRECTORY

HEAVY HITTER

STATUS INVADES 94 MANE ATTRACTION

EYE WITNESS

Frozen moments are caught in every frame Jake Chessum captures. Escaping delusions of grandeur and seizing an elusive rawness by throwing a conceptualized plan out the window, the British photographer sees through his viewfinder and catches fleeting memories spent with his high-profile subjects.

96

By Denise Mallabo

76

60

By Pola Beronilla

By Ida Aldana

68

DID I SHUTTER

Shooting with an improvised creative process, Christian Anwander knows when to press the button. With the likes of Lake Bell, Dane DeHaan, Daft Punk, Zoë Kravitz, and a bunch of editorials and advertisements included in his honor roll, the New York-based photographer really flashes us the good stuff.

Sporting her cool-girl gaze and ways, stylist Jan Aranilla gets the job done in a blink of an eye with her ever-morphing taste of sense and style.

SHOTS FIRED

Living in this digital age, there are a few bona fide photographers who still choose to be negative.

CHASING PAVEMENTS

Collecting memories of shooting for Kinfolk, L’Officiel, Nylon, Coca-Cola, MTV, Reebok, and a whole lot more, husband and wife photography duo We Are The Rhoads have mastered the art of storytelling. From personal editorials to client-based projects, peek through the private eyes of Chris and Sarah Rhoads.

94

By Pola Beronilla

ABOUT THE COVER As we take a peek through his looking glass, New York-based British photographer Jake Chessum looks back towards Pharrell Williams and captures a different side of the singer, songwriter, record producer, art enthusiast, and fashion designer in black and white.

statusmagonline.com

BLOGSPHERE

the pulse of hip at your fingertips

GO SEE

we’re all models off duty. smize! 

FEATURES

there’s more to what’s in print

NIGHTVISION 

who’s spotted partying where

PHOTO DIARY confessional for lensmen

DIGITAL MAGAZINE DOWNLOADS STATUS in pixels, not paper

free mixtapes and wallpapers


is on a roll

December-January 2016 editor-in-chief

Rosario Herrera @RosarioHerrera

managing editor

Denise Mallabo @denisemallabo

art director

Nyael David @nyaels

features editor

Pola Beronilla @HiMyNameIsPola

graphic designers

Carlo NuĂąez @oycaloy

Nadine Layon @nadinelayon

fashion assistant

Jill de Leon @orangetoenails

editorial assistants

Janroe Cabiles @janroetheboat

Celene Sakurako @deerwho

contributing writers

contributing artists

interns

Ida Aldana, Swarley Stinson Miguel Alomajam, Amanda Leigh Smith, Hannah Bell, Mike Carreiro, Mike Chua, Sydney Costley, Sydney Dagal, Ghazal Elhaei, Moriel Flores, Veronica Formos, Alexandra Gavillet, Tashina Hill, Meredith Lacosse, Josh Malcolm, Meetkeso, Tyrene G. Orais, Smallz + Raskind, Bre Tharaldson Faith Aranas, Colin Dancel, Stephen Lim, Ryan Melgar

What’s your STATUS? tell us. editorial editorial@statusmagonline.com advertising advertise@statusmagonline.com marketing marketing@statusmagonline.com general inquiries info@statusmagonline.com follow us facebook.com/statusmagazine twitter.com/statusmagazine instagram: statusmagazine STATUS is published by STATUS Media Group. Reproduction without permission is prohibited.


CONTRIBUTORS VERONICA FORMOS

A self-taught artist and photographer, Veronica shares her emotions through paintings, collages, photography, and performance art. Born in Ukraine but now based in Vancouver, this multi-talented photographer will leave you in an Altered State (26).

SMALLZ + RAsKIND

ALEXANDRA GAVILLET

Identifying as a proper imagemaker, Alexandra Gavillet has dabbled in both decked-out studio and on-location shoots, working with Refinery29, Galore, Vogue Italia, NYLON, C-Heads, and Highsnobiety. Connecting the space between physical photographs and digital reiterations, she redefines her cool aesthetic as she captures shoegazing dream-pop artist Tamaryn (54).

Moving pictures strike the record of what Andrew Small and Jared Raskind capture in their photographs. Using their shared vision to create a cinematic situation, the duo wastes no time on apathetic moments. They’ve shot Scarlett Johanson, Chris Pratt, Tinashe, Angel Haze, and our very own Maestro, Judith Hill (52).

MIKE CHUA To Mike, photography is the gift that keeps on giving. “It’s just a matter of having the right perspective and aligning them with a vision, and of course, putting them in good lighting.” A believer that beauty can be found anywhere, he aims his lens once again to take us to our dream destinations for the holidays in this month’s SWAG (38).

TYRENE G. ORAIS When it comes to makeup, there’s nothing Tyrene can’t do; TV, print, bridal, or runway, she’s done it all. This Cavite-native’s spectrum of work is as colorful as a makeup palette. With local indie pop artist Reese Lansangan’s (xx) face as her canvas, she whips out her brushes to show us artistry loved by Philippine Fashion Week, X Factor Philippines, and Project Runway Philippines.

AMANDA LEIGH SMITH

Throughout 15 years and counting of honing her craft, it’s safe to say that Texas-born photographer Amanda has mastered the art of film. Having captured stills for Vanity Fair France, Elle Japan, Vogue.it, Rookie Magazine, NYLON, Yen Magazine, and Dazed Digital in the past, the talented shutterbug takes us to the mountains with Chicago’s sextet Whitney (56).


STATU S MESSAG E

IS ON A ROLL I

wonder how it feels to photograph an icon, to have an influence on what they look like and how they express themselves on film. Would I be cool under pressure or would I be nervous? Throughout the years, we’ve featured the most amazing visionaries behind the lens, and I’ve always wondered what their creative process is like. I love seeing the final magazine put together, but the Photo Issue is where I pause and take in all the amazing images. LA-based British photographer Jake Chessum leads the pack with 25 years under his belt. From Pharrell Williams and Amy Winehouse to Ice Cube, his photography is packed with life, punch, and personality. You can almost guess that he’s the type of photographer that breaks the rules and never asks for permission. When we Skyped with Jake, he tells us what it’s like shooting famous personalities for a living, how the photographs become part of his life, and the fan moment he had when shooting David Bowie. Looking at Chris and Sarah Rhoads’ photos, there’s a perfect blend of cool and calm with a hint of nostalgia. Known as We Are The Rhoads, this photography duo crossed paths back in their collage days and has been collaborating on their “honest, irreverent, and thoughtful” photographs ever since. Now taking their visual journey to the next level, they’re exploring the art of moving stills—filmmaking. In their feature, they share to us what they feel is the heart of their photography, as well as their magic formula. If we were to choose three words for Christian Anwander’s photography, it’d be: glamorous, conceptual, and mind-blowing. When we asked what his first photo he took looked like, he admits, “I’m pretty damn sure it was shitty.” Though he doesn’t really consider himself as a fashion photographer, but rather “a kid playing with things he likes,” then he must like highly conceptualized glossy shoots with a dark side. And of course, there are the photographers like JM Dayao, the unassuming kid with a killer shot. His portfolio is stacked with beautiful models that have an East Coast style with a West Coast mood, but what caught our attention is his shoot with the then unknown model with platinum blonde hair named Lucky Blue Smith. This may have very well been a prophecy; as months later, he’s shooting with Lucky once again for our November cover. The great wonder is how these photographers see what other can’t see. Is it a gift of sight or vision?

Editor-in-chief

Jake Chessum (68)


FASHION

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BEAUTY

@starstyleph

www.starstyle.ph

CELEBRITY

@starstyleph


THREADS / setting / BRICK AND MORTAR / BEATS / SCREEN December - January 2016

OUT-OF-BODY

I

f you’ve had enough of your mundane world, then take a tour around SOULLAND. On a mission to continuously produce a new take on Scandinavian aesthetics, the brand does it again with outerwear in tweed, leather, and suede paired with more laid-back pieces like jeans, button-downs, and pullovers for their Autumn/Winter 2015 collection. soulland.com

DOUBLE VISION

A

ll eyes are on NEO-NE’s latest collection as they give you a spectacle of cool new sunglasses to change your point of view. From the simple yet bold frame of “Morrissey” and the marble-inspired detailing of “Torii” to the coated frames and shape-shifting abilities of “Milo,” you’ll be sure to see ahead of the pack. neo-ne.com

WONDER WOOL

M

ultiple CASE STUDIES about special textile techniques are what spawned this Berlinbased label into what it is today. Specializing in fashion-forward knitwear from coats, tops, and dresses to trousers and skirts, cozy up to their latest collection and feel warm and chic in out-of-this-world pieces like “Comet,” “Granat,” and “Full Moon.” thecasestudies.com

STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 13


THREADS

BRANDS TO KNOW

taken in stride

E

nough with having the same pair of shoes as any other guy on the block; let Stefan Rechsteiner and Patrick Rüegg take you under their VELT. Conceived in Berlin and produced in Switzerland, the duo makes sure that their shoes are always out of the ordinary with vibrant colorways, unconventional panels, and cutouts. Step aside and let the pros take over. velt.ch

a la mod

6

0s preppy school girl style meets ‘90s grunge for a fashionable combination courtesy of DOLORES HAZE. Finding the delicate balance between sweet and feminine and the raw, the New York-based brand highlihghts the adventurous nature of women as evident in their capsule collection with pieces like “Randi plaid halter,” “Anita leather skirt,” and their signature “Dolores Haze bomber jacket.” doloreshaze.com

basic instinct

Y

ou’d want to wear Everything Always from GRIND LONDON’s latest offering of basic wardrobe staples like button-down shirts, pullovers, and sweaters. The loosefitting menswear-inspired silhouette made from denim and cotton adorned with graphic prints, text, and embroidery are perfect for achieving that cool and effortless androgynous style. grindlondon.com

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Words by Jill de Leon and Faith Aranas


THREADS

trouble maker

T

he latest collection from HIGH HEELS SUICIDE will get you in a Love Daze with its ‘90s-inspired lineup of tees and sweaters. Staying true to the cool and sassy looks they’re known for captured in beautiful film photography, the collection features catchy one-liners like “Get out of my life” and “Troublemaker” to help you channel your inner spunky rebel. highheelssuicide.com

SKY WALKER

W

e hope you’re ready ‘cause MLTV’s about to drop a bomb on you. You won’t have to look far, far away to get an early screening of Episode VII as the collection blurs the line between feminine and masculine with a monochromatic palette of black, white, and cream in geometric cuts, paneling, and asymmetrical silhouettes. mltvclothing.com

french connection

I

n the Heart Studio in France, ANDREA CREWS combines the art of fashion with the practice of upcycling materials torn apart to create something new, breathing life to the brand’s Fall/Winter 2016 collection. With tops, outerwear, and sweatpants with bold white text and the mimicry of airbrush strokes, the line boasts of unisex streetwear fit for the bold and brave. andreacrews.com

STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 15


SETTING

PLACES TO GO

SUITE

THE QVEST HIDEAWAY, COLOGNE T aking ground in the heart of the historically rich city of Cologne, THE QVEST HIDEAWAY tastefully blends the past with the present as it pays homage to the original 1897 building’s neo-Gothic architecture. Carefully curated by Michael Kaune, the editor-in-chief of German fashion publication QVEST, all 34 rooms are adorned in mid-century furnishings and modernized with art coming straight out of the pages of the magazine’s previous editorials. With every room distinct in space and design, and complete with a mini-library of fashion, art, and design books, each is like a gallery of its own. Gereonskloster 12, Altstadt-Nord, 50670 Cologne, Germany qvest-hotel.com

GRUB

home away from home awaits you around the corner of BGC’s Icon Plaza in the form of UNIT 27 APARTMENT BAR + CAFÉ. Three stories tall, this all-day brunch spot looks and feels like a loft in the city that you’ve come to call your second home. With fun colorful decors like a bold red telephone, graphic black mail box, wooden hat rack, propped up green bike, and adorable knick knacks you’d typically find in your room, the place offers an artsy yet comfortable space ideal for lounging around in all day. Stick around ‘til the sun goes down and have a taste of their house parties at their hip bar on the top floor. Icon Plaza, 26th St., Bonifacio Global City, Taguig facebook.com/Unit27BarCafe

PLATE

HOME IS WHERE THE FOOD IS There’s no place like UNIT 27 APARTMENT BAR + CAFÉ, where the food reminds you of a hefty Filipino meal.

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JACK DANIEL’S BAGNET��BREAKFAST House-dried crispy pork belly over plain, pesto, or garlic rice served with two kinds of salads and sauces

CHEF’S TUNA Homemade potato chips on the side of a pan-seared tuna ciabatta sandwich, topped with caramelized onions and garlic pimiento dressing

AUSSIE BACON & EGG Wild rice graciously mounted with three strips of thick-cut, twice-smoked, Jack Daniel’sglazed bacon and fried egg

BACON BOMB Bite-sized spam wrapped in honey-cured bacon best dipped in the complementary apple cinnamon cream sauce

Words by Celene Sakurako, The QVEST Hideaway is a member of Design Hotels™, SUITE photos courtesy of Design Hotels™, GRUB photos by Carlo Nuñez

UNIT 27 APARTMENT BAR + CAFÉ, TAGUIG A


BRICK AND MORTAR

STORES TO SHOP

HUTSPOT, AMSTERDAM

Rozengracht 204-210, 1016NL Amsterdam hutspotamsterdam.com Dime to Drop: P1,267-P50,709 (EUR 25-EUR 1000) Don’t leave the store without: a pair of structured frames from Monokel Eyewear

I

f you’re bored lying around and shopping through your computer screen, Amsterdam has a HUTSPOT for all your designer needs. Founded in the summer of 2012 by three childhood friends, the concept store started out as a pop-up and expanded with two branches, with another one in the works, in just a span of three years. Now, their quest to find the best designers, artists, and entrepreneur is here for the long haul. Grab a drink from their bar or dine in their lunchroom, then browse through endless racks of designer pieces from Jutska & Riska, Won Hundred, Penfield, and Mads Nørgaard, as well as accessories and eyewear from Ace & Tate, Afra Amba, Monokel Eyewear, Happy Socks, and Komono, to name a few. With a clean, simple layout and a familiar ambiance, it’s just like shopping in the comfort of your own home–only better.

VENTURER

G

Hutspot photos by Sarah van Rij Words by Jill de Leon

o out of your style comfort zone and be a VENTURER. The Japan-based brand curates pieces that stay true to the Asian aesthetic. With bold graphic prints, unconventional fits and silhouettes, as well as minimalist colorways, go through hot new threads from I Love Ugly, Delanci, knomadik by Daniel Patrick, Unif, OneFourEight, and Rhude and accessories from Fuck Art and Kiss and Helter Skelter by Unif.

venturer.jp

STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 17


SCREEN

SCENES TO SEE

REMOTE CONTROL TICKET

A VERY MURRAY CHRISTMAS (NETFLIX) Directed by Sofia Coppola, Bill Murray plays himself in an ode to classic variety shows. As the show fears of an empty audience due to a snowstorm over New York City, an ensemble of George Clooney, Amy Poehler, Jason Schwartzman, Rashida Jones, Michael Cera, Miley Cyrus, and members of alt-rock band Phoenix make it in time to join him through luck and alternate routes.

SHERLOCK: THE ABOMINABLE BRIDE (BBC) Teasing out an extra episode before its long-awaited fourth season, the 90-minute special reimagines the meeting of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson in 1890s London and the start of their escapades in 221B Baker Street. Faced with a case from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s work, the duo solves the mystery of the murderous abominable bride.

THE HATEFUL EIGHT Legendary director Quentin Tarantino stages a Western film revolving around eight strangers stranded in a stagecoach passover, causing a gradual foray over a wanted fugitive in their midst.

MACBETH Recently competing for the Palme d’Or at Cannes, Justin Kurzel takes on Shakespeare’s Scottish play with Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard at the forefront, contending the famous prophecy.

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS Thirty years after defeating the Galactic Empire in a galaxy far, far away, Han Solo (Harrison Ford) is faced with Kylo Ren (Adam Driver), a dark warrior who is strong with the Force.

LEGEND Playing twins Reggie and Ronald Kray, Tom Hardy is cast in Brian Helgeland’s crime thriller reliving the success and downfall of the famous Jekyll and Hyde-like gangsters of the Firm in 1950s London.

ANOMALISA Based on a play under his pseudonym Francis Fregoli, Charlie Kaufman directs a stop-motion comedydrama following an author who’s unable to connect with people as he falls in love with a stranger.

HITCHCOCK/TRUFFAUT Exploring François Truffaut’s Le Cinéma selon Alfred Hitchcock, Ken Jones along with filmmakers Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, and Richard Linklater discuss the impact both Hitchcock and book had on film.

PL AYBACK THREE COLORS: BLUE (1993) Pretty much what cinema is all about.

REBECCA (1940) I’ve got a real soft spot for anything Hitchcock.

THE GRADUATE (1967) That ending alone made me want to make movies of my own.

LANDSCAPE IN THE MIST (1988) Haunting cinematography.

CHRISTIAN COPPOLA (Filmmaker) THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939) For sentimental reasons.

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Words by Janroe Cabiles

vimeo.com/christiancoppola


BEATS PL AYLIS T

CLAIRITY

clairitymusic.com

JUDITH HILL judithhill.com

TAMARYN

tamarynmusic.com

“Creep” Radiohead Sometimes, you don’t need a pat on the back when you’re sad; you need to just feel your feelings.

“Fix You” Coldplay There’s something melancholically cathartic about this. It got me through some really difficult times.

“You Know Where to Find Me” Imogen Heap Maybe it’s her voice, the track, or the lyrics, but this song is incredibly soothing.

“Thanksgiving” George Winston I might be a total classical music nerd, but it’s just such a devastatingly beautiful song to me.

“Back To Black” Amy Winehouse I feel like this song. It’s very sad but poignant, and her voice draws me in like no other contemporary.

“Work It” Missy Elliott It’s my workout jam. I rocked this back in the day. Never gets old.

“Everybody is a Star” Sly & the Family Stone This song brings back wonderful childhood memories. It feels like summertime and bike rides.

“Let’s Do It Again” The Staples Singers This makes me smile. Their voices are so soulful. Perfect jam for bike riding.

“Life’s What You Make It” Talk Talk The video for this single is amazing. Profound lyrics and great visuals.

“Firestarter” The Prodigy 1997 at its finest.

“Surrender Your Heart” Missing Persons A great video to match the song. One of the highest points in the new wave sound.

“Slow Dancing” Lindsey Buckingham The music video was rarely seen on TV rotation at that time, but it’s spooky and classic.

MUSIC TO HEAR

RELEASES

California native and rapper on the rise G-EAZY can be seen in good light with his sophomore effort, When It’s Dark Out. Influenced by Wes Craven and Tim Burton, Young Gerald digs deep in his latest record with tracks like “Random,” “You Got Me,” and “Me, Myself & I (feat. Bebe Rexha).”

Three years after her breakout album in 2012, art-pop artist Claire Boucher a.k.a. GRIMES resurfaces to draw an ethereal release with Art Angels. With tracks like “Flesh without Blood” and “REALiTi,” the Canadian singer illustrates more of her weird side in her highly anticipated fourth record.

Get down and dirty with Grammy award-winning group Clean Bandit as they slip and slide their way down to Manila, performing their tunes at The Palace Pool Club. There’s no place you’d rather be than at Taguig City’s finest lounge.

With a rave of acts like Axwell /\ Ingrosso, NERVO, Oliver Heldens, and DVBBS, join the festivities this December 13 as Sonic Carnival 2015: Feast on Sound brings together the biggest dance party at the Mall of Asia Concert Grounds in Pasay City.

Back for its sixth edition, St. Jerome’s Laneway Festival 2016 kicks off in Singapore’s The Meadow at Gardens By The Bay this January 30 with kickass performances from CHVRCHES, The Internet, Shamir, Cheats, Beach House, Grimes, and more.

Prepare yourselves to get drenched in electronic pop goodness as Brooklynbased trio WET finally releases their debut record, Don’t You. After making a splash with a four-track EP in 2013, the synthpop outfit drizzles a lucid and poignant collection of 11 tracks in their upcoming album.

STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 19

Words by Swarley Stinson

MUSIC NEWS


T E C H PACK

COLOR COASTER

DOWNLOADS

Get your cray on this holiday season ‘cause everything is better with hue.

HAPPY PLUGS IN-EAR EARPHONES

• Combines high performance audio, fashionable colors, and a stylish design at the same time • Compatible with all types of smartphones on the market and has a built-in microphone and remote • Choose from a variety of colors including cobalt, mint, cerise, turquoise, coral, etc. SRP: PHP 1,650.30

CHEERO POWER PLUS DANBOARD VERSION FLAVORS SERIES • A 10400 mAh portable battery that can charge two devices simultaneously from its 1A port and 2.1A output port • Equipped with an automatic power function to avoid overcharging, overheating, or short-circuit • Comes in seven different flavors of color: strawberry, chocolate, mint, vanilla, pumpkin, matcha, and banana

SLOW DOWN By Ketchapp Have the patience of a saint as you guide a bouncing ball through a series of neverending obstacles. Keep calm and just roll with it.

SRP: PHP 2,350.80

BEATS BY DR. DRE PILL SPEAKER SYSTEM • Pairs with your phone, laptop, or any other Bluetoothenabled device from up to 30 feet away • Built compact and lightweight, so you’ll always have premium sound anywhere you go • Equipped with a built-in speakerphone, making phone calls easier and better sounding SRP: PHP 12,500

THE COOP IDEA GUMMY 9000

WHAT DROPS NOW By Titel Media UG Scroll through a shopping feed curated by the experts at Highsnobiety and explore the very best men’s fashion, streetwear, and sneakers.

• A 2.4A fast-charging 9000mAh power bank completed with a smooth gummy rubber finish and an LED torch • Comes with a vibrant non-tangling micro USB flat cable • Available in eye-catching hues of yellow, pink, gold, blue, and black SRP: PHP 2,446.42

SKULLCANDY CRUSHER HEADPHONES • Features a Sensation 55™ driver that generates vibrating bass, allowing you to feel your music • Designed with a 3-panel cushion padding wrapped in high quality synthetic leather that creates a noiseisolating seal • Built with dual ear cup articulation and premium materials deliver long-lasting comfort SRP: PHP 4,705.08 20 - STATUSMAGONLINE.COM

DSCO By Visual Supply Company Bringing your GIF game to the next level, capture, edit, and share VSCO-fied animated GIFs straight from your smartphones with this app.


FASHION

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BEAUTY

@starstyleph

www.starstyle.ph

CELEBRITY

@starstyleph


FAC E PA IN T

plum diary

BAREMINERALS Deluxe Original Foundation Collector’s Edition in Medium P2,097.75

A bold color on semi-matte skin is an eye-opener.

GIORGIO ARMANI “Eyes to Kill” Eyeshadow in 16 P1,598.29

DIOR “5 Couleurs Designer” Makeup Artist Tutorial Palette in Rosy Design P2,787.01

DOLCE & GABBANA BEAUTY “Passioneyes” Duo Mascara in Terra P1,473.42 BURBERRY BEAUTY “Cashmere” Concealer in Warm Nude P1,997.86

MAC “Magic of the Night—In Extra Dimension” Skinfinish P1,648.23

NARS #40 Eyeshadow Brush P1,598.29

SMASHBOX “Camera Ready” BB Water Broad Spectrum SPF P2,097.75

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CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Silky Satin Lip Color in Ronron P4,495.19

LANCÔME “Absolute L’Extrait” Ultimate Beautifying Lotion P6,992.51 LAURA GELLER BEAUTY Angled Liquid Foundation Brush P1,248.66

Runway photo from Dior Fall/Winter 2015

BURBERRY BEAUTY “Effortless Blendable Kohl” Multi-Use Pencil in Elderberry P1,498.40


VAN I T IES PRIMERS

Best things do come in small packages as proven by MAC “SIZED TO GO—MINI” PREP & PRIME FIX+. Now, the fresh scent of green tea, chamomile, and cucumber is just one spritz away.

HEAVY METALS Be ready to steel the show this Holiday season with the BOBBI BROWN STERLING NIGHTS COLLECTION. With a sultry luster that mimics the night sky, the set is your ideal gleam team complete with a palette of matte neutrals and sparkle-infused shadows, four limited edition sequin eyeshadows, a face highlighter, a gel liner, mascara, and four shades of semimatte lipstick.

Protect your makeup and skin from the intense heat of the sun with COOLA SUNCARE “CLASSIC FACE” MAKEUP SETTING SPRAY’s weightless SPF 30 and matte finish formula perfect for sensitive skin.

EXPERT ADVICE Sky’s the limit for KIEHL’S “INFLIGHT” REFRESHING FACIAL MIST’s moisturizing cactus flower and Tibetan Ginseng extracts as it makes your long plane rides feel like a trip to the spa.

Finish off your eyeshadow with a dark liquid liner for intense  definition.

BEAUTY BITE

ST. NAILS

Y

Words by Jill de Leon

our rest and relaxation prayers may finally be answered at ST. NAILS SPA. Located in Makati, unwind in their cozy and intimate space as you get pampered with their mani-pedis, scrubs, and nail art services while taking a sip of their soothing hot tea— all of which you can enjoy guilt-free, as each service you avail gives back in helping build homes for the less fortunate. Now, that’s something we can all start doing religiously. G/F NFB Bldg. Brgy. Dasmariñas Village, Makati City (02) 586 0985 stnailsspa.com

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GO S E E

Step into the shadows with new ways to wear your basic black pieces. Photos courtesy of lookbook.nu

@endzel_

@mattthw

@frank_lin_de

@fashionzenblog

@stylnoxe

Fashion designer and stylist KONSTANTINA ANTONIADOU breaks the monotony with bold white lines. @kmeetsstyle

@thestylevisitor

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@kevinelezaj


Dapper and sleek is the theme for stylist and blogger GERAINT DONOVANBOWEN’s ensemble.

@franklinbenitezu

@hisnameisfashion

@chenmiaoda

@blaastyle

@griztriz

@morefashion4u

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dress by Style Stalker

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Photographed by Veronica Formos Styled by Ghazal Elhaei


dress by Zoe Jordan headpiece by WXYJ

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dress by Zoe Jordan

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dress by Jean Pierre Braganza shoes by Christian Louboutin headpiece by WXYJ cuffs by Haati Chai

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top and skirt by For Love and Lemons

Hair Josh Malcolm Makeup Meredith Lacosse Assistant Stylist Hannah Bell Model Rachel from Richard’s International Model Management

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Photographed by Mike Carreiro Styled by Bre Tharaldson


dress, stylist’s own trousers by Emanuel Ungapo

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dress, stylist’s own

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coat, stylist’s own turtleneck top by DKNY beaded top by Bloomingdales trousers by Topshop

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dress, boots, and coat, stylist’s own

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Hair and Makeup Sydney Costley Model Meghan Ann

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SWAG HOL IDAY

SHOP P ING

GUIDE

20 1 6

READY, JETSET, GO Go around the world—or at least dress like it—with these holiday must-haves from your dream destinations. Product photography by Mike Chua Illustrations by Nadine Layon

suitcase by Delsey [TBA], body cream by LUSH [P998], contouring palette by Clinique [P1,530], button-down by Cortefiel [P3,49 bag by Tory Burch [P27,650], foundation by Smashbox [P1,950], blush by Happy Skin [P699], mascara by Benefi


90], iPad case by Marc by Marc Jacobs [P4,500], cap by 21 Men [P565], beanie by Oxygen [P349], heels by Forever 21 [P1,870], fit [P1,300], lipstick by Shu Uemura x Yaz Bukey [TBA], eyeliner by MAC [P780], lip color by Clinique [P850]


NEW YORK

CONCRETE JUNGLE Just your hype.

jacket by Cortefiel [P7,990], button-down by A/X [P4,950], eyewear by Aeropostale [P995], cap by Obey [P2,250], joggers by Penshoppe [P990], shoes by Nike from Greyone Social [P5,795], face scrub by Groomed from Beauty Bar [P225] 40 - STATUSMAGONLINE.COM


MILAN

LEATHER CHANNEL Lean on these.

jacket by 21 Men [P2,565], sweater by Sfera [P1,449], perfume by Gucci [P6,028], shoes by Sfera [P2,799], pants by Forever 21 [P1,425] STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 41


TOKYO

STREET FIGHTER Knock ‘em out.

camo jacket by The Hundreds [P3,495], button-down by Stussy [P3,690], socks by Penshoppe [P149], beanie by The Hundreds [P1,695], watch by Aeropostale [P1,650], backpack by Penshoppe [TBA], pants by Aeropostale [P2,450], shoes by adidas from Greyone Social [P5,995] 42 - STATUSMAGONLINE.COM


LONDON

KNIGHT WATCH Fit for royalty.

blazer by Cortefiel [P7,790], button-down by A/X [P6,050], pants by Sfera [P1,999], eyewear by Aeropostale [P995], socks by Penshoppe [P149], shoes by Dune [P5,250], shaving balm by Woody’s from Beauty Bar [P495] perfume by Ferrari [TBA] STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 43


LOS ANGELES

VALLEY CAT A ray of sunshine.

sweater by Forever 21 [P1,175], skirt by Penshoppe [P699], bath and shower gel by Creightons Lime & Grapefruit Energise [P350], bronzer by theBalm Betty [P1,025], nail polish by ARTDECO [P325], shoes by Nike from Greyone Social [P6,795] 44 - STATUSMAGONLINE.COM


BERLIN

CITY SCAPE

Dressed to the nines.

sweater by A/X [P6,450], coat by Forever 21 [P2,975], eyewear by Forever 21 [P450], lip color by Laura Mercier [P1,350], bronzer by ARTDECO [P850], jeans by Penshoppe [P999], shoes by Forever 21 [P1,590] STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 45


PA R I S

HOLY CHIC The French connection.

jacket by Forever 21 [P2,815], sweater by Sfera [P1,399], eyewear by Forever 21 [P450], skirt by Mango [P1,915] shoes by Dune [P6,650], face polish by Doll Face from Beauty Bar [P1,299], bronzer by MAC [TBA] lipstick by MAC [P1,200], foundation by Smashbox from Beauty Bar [P1,950], bag by Dune [P3,250] 46 - STATUSMAGONLINE.COM


SEOUL

ELECTRO CUTE Reanimate your style.

jacket by Marc by Marc Jacobs [P17,750], shirt by Aeropostale [P1,450], beanie by Forever 21 [P195], socks by Oxygen [P159], pants by Penshoppe [P1,099], pouch by Marc by Marc Jacobs [P8,000], palette by Shu Uemura x Yaz Bukey [P3,500] lipstick by Happy Skin from Beauty Bar [P699], shoes by Tory Burch [P11,950] STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 47


M U S E

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Teasing us with light turquoise eyes, upcoming model TORIN VERDONE makes a scene with nothing but his underwear and a #MyCalvins hashtag. By Janroe Cabiles Photo courtesy of Streamline Model Management


“[My dream collaboration] was always Calvin Klein, so my dream has already become a reality. To this day, I’m extremely grateful for the opportunity to do what I love.”

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ebuting a modeling career with none other than Calvin Klein is nothing short of promising, but male model Torin Verdone stands tall as he strides into our stream of consciousness via the apparel’s various campaigns, including the modern Fall collection alongside supermodel Imaan Hammam, as well as an editorial for Rollercoaster Magazine, and catalogs for Polo Ralph Lauren and House of Gant. Hailing from the small town of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, he lived with his mother and two younger siblings. “Growing up was a challenge for me, but my mom did a great job raising me as well as my brother and sister. She instilled in me the importance of obtaining an education and never losing site of my family values.” Right off the bat, it was due to family ties that his career took off. “I attended a fashion show done by my mother’s friend,” he recalls. “While attending, the designer asked my mother if I could model some of the clothing. After doing so, I really enjoyed it and got positive feedback, so I thought about attempting to model, but with school and sports as my main focus, I couldn’t really find the time. When I got to my senior year and was able to manage my academic and athletic workload, I reached out to Streamline Model Management, who then took me to VNY Model Management.”

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Of African-American, Irish, and Italian descent, the model puts his flawless olive skin, full lips, sharp jawline, and strong built to use with a humble tenacity surrounding him, no doubt coming from his athletic roots as a quarterback, confidently stepping on the field. When asked what his dream collaboration would be, he answers, “It was always Calvin Klein, so my dream has already become a reality. I’m still fascinated by that fact, and to this day, I’m extremely grateful for the opportunity to do what I love.” Whether he’s down to his underwear or sporting his own preppy school boy style, he always makes it a point not only to bond with the photographer on set, but also to make a connection with the elements around him. With the world at his feet at such an early stage of his career, he has no idea of what’s about to come his way, “I try not to look too far into the future. I am one who believes in living the moment and embracing everything happening now. What is meant to be will be, and I will adjust accordingly.”


MY CALVINS

My first professional shoot was with Calvin Klein. The team showed an extreme amount of patience and understanding, considering I was just a newcomer taking photographs for such a well-known clothing line. I’d say because of such a pleasant experience, it helped me transition into this next phase of my life with open arms.

SCHOOL BOY

Modeling in high school presented sort of a challenge. Aside from school work, I also played football, baseball, and wrestled. I had to learn how to balance school work and modeling by doing homework on trains and in my hotel rooms.

TIMEOUT

I work out at least four times a week. I’ve also established a pretty strict diet, but if I had to pick one guilty pleasure, it would have to be Rita’s Water Ice.

OUT FOR THE NIGHT

An ideal date for me would be taking a young lady out to a fancy dinner. Specifically to a restaurant that requires us to be dressed formal. I enjoy throwing on a nice suit here and there.

BACK IN TOWN

I like watching Kevin Hart movies (that guy cracks me up), and listening to pretty much all types of music, but I prefer hip-hop–mainly anything Drake has touched. I also try to catch up with friends and family, as well as play Xbox online. A lot of people outside my circle wouldn’t know this, but I enjoy coaching youth soccer, football, and basketball teams back at home.

@Torin_Verdone14


M A E S T R O

LE G E N D Finally getting her well-deserved place in the spotlight, JUDITH HILL takes center stage as she releases her first solo album, Back in Time. By Ida Aldana Photographed by Smallz + Raskind

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usic naturally became a part of my DNA,” says Judith Hill, whose parents are both professional musicians. Realizing early on that music is something that’s always going to be in her life, she’s now a musician in her own right, as she brings her distinct and perfect combination of soul and funk, from the set of The Voice and Academy award-winning films, to recording studios with Prince, and being on-stage with legendary artists. One of the artists Judith’s worked with was the King of Pop himself, Michael Jackson, whom she practiced with for his final 2009 This Is It Tour. “We were so lucky to experience that kind of wonderland. Creative ideas kept flowing out of him, and I was blown away by his energy and command of every moment on that stage,” she shares. Later, she took to the stage again and made all chairs turn on the fourth season of The Voice. “I loved performing on TV because it was both visual and musical. Every week, I looked forward to the creative process of collaborating with the band, wardrobe, lighting, etc. The production teams were

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fantastic and I had a lot of creative say in the process.” Then, a few months after she auditioned for the show, she was featured in 20 Feet From Stardom, a documentary film about background singers. “The stories were honest and exposed so much of our vulnerabilities and struggles, as well as celebrated unsung heroes. People were inspired by the stories and learned to appreciate those who pioneered a sound,” she enlightens. Even after all of her achievements, it didn’t stop there. After Prince saw an interview of her saying that she wanted to work with him, the multi-Grammy-winning mucisian gave her a call. “I certainly didn’t expect him to reach out to me when I first said I would love to work with him. So when I got a call from him, I freaked out,” she recalls. This collaboration formualized into her latest Prince-produced debut album, Back in Time. “He finds the essence of the song and weeds out anything else that gets in the way. Working on arrangements with him is like putting a puzzle together. Every instrument fits perfectly with the other instruments to create an undeniable groove.” What was your main goal for Back in Time?  I wanted to celebrate the music I grew up on: funk and soul. It’s a dusty old school sound that makes you feel like you’ve traveled in a time machine back to the golden era of soul. I’m very happy with the outcome. It’s like we’re jamming in the basement of my childhood house.


“I’VE LEARNED THAT BEING AN ARTIST IS EMOTIONALLY EXPENSIVE, BUT THERE’S NO GREATER ACT OF SERVICE THAN TO TOUCH PEOPLE’S HEARTS WITH SONG.”

What have you taken from working with different music legends? I’ve learned that being an artist is emotionally expensive, but there’s no greater act of service than to touch people’s hearts with song. The great legends I’ve worked with have all made great sacrifices to be where they are. Their gift to the world is priceless and their stage is sacred. Every great artist knows how to let the music lead everyone into a euphoric state. However, this takes great discipline and hard work off the stage.  How have you grown as an artist from singing backing vocals, to performing on live television, and now making your own music? As a background singer, I was an observer and a student, but I’ve come a long way since then. Performing on TV was a great way for me to refine my sound and learn what works and what doesn’t. Working on this record has been an incredible journey of sharing my stories and message with the world. I’m a soul singer, and I’m making music that I love.    Do you go through a different creative process for each field? Yes. Working for television is all about making effective arrangements and creating a dynamic, exciting performance. Studio is more about the unique sound and arrangement that leaves the ear satisfied and wanting more, while film is all about connecting the song to the picture and message. I like switching the hats, but my favorite is doing live performances.        Where can we catch you? I’m performing with my band and gearing up for some orchestral performances for next year, as well as touring with Prince.

judithhill.com @Judith_Hill

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KISS OF LIFE New York-based vocalist TAMARYN turns a new leaf in her career as she switches gears and steers away from the familiar for Cranekiss, her third, most introspective album to date. By Celene Sakurako Photography by Alexandra Gavillet

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fter five years and two albums to her name, New Zealand-born, New York-based musician Tamaryn comes out of her shell to create her most sonically ambitious record yet, Cranekiss. As she parts ways with long-time collaborator Rex John Shelverton, and teams up with shoegaze trio Weekend’s frontman Shaun Durkan and multi-talented producer Jorge Elbrecht, she adapts a new sound rich in synths, samples, and processing, void of the past heavy guitars. Drawing inspiration from music by early Madonna, Cocteau Twins, and Care, the troubadour encapsulates her musical journey in ten emotionally-potent tracks. “I had a very specific idea on how I wanted the album to sound like; there was no doubt. The kind of songs, emotions, mood, and aesthetic, those were all in my mind. It was just about

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achieving it,” she says. As she finds catharsis in her own music, Tamaryn presents a palpable artistic growth that flashes us through her somewhat vagabond life of regular relocations from the West to East Coast, since moving out of New Zealand to America when she was seven. In her own words, “I think that the music is definitely about me and my tumultuous upbringing and life. I think that’s informed by the fact that I’ve had a lot of change and movement in my life. I was also experiencing something similar in my romantic life at the same time as well, so it all came hand in hand for sure.” Lyrically touching the topics of relationships, sexuality, and independence, the album inadvertently mirrors Tamaryn’s personal pilgrimage of owning her creative and emotional freedom. “In the previous albums, I was very limited, sonically. For this album, I wanted to work outside of those parameters and have nothing off limits; work with any kind of instruments and any kind of song writing style. Although it may be different, I think you can still feel

that it’s a ‘Tamaryn’ record, and to make the decision of keeping my name and not make a new band is what changed for me. It’s like saying, ‘I can do whatever I want and evolve however I like under my name.’” What sparked the changes in your latest album? I think it was less about changing the music, as much as about wanting to make other music. It’s not so much a change, but an addition; it’s like a new language. What’s the story behind working with Shaun and Jorge? Shaun and I became friends in San Francisco when I was working on the second album, Tender New Signs. He was working with his band, and we were inspired to write some demos together that we didn’t really know would have a home. When I decided to make a new record with Jorge (who was originally the person I wanted to make the record with), Shaun asked if I wanted to use some of our old demos, and that ended up becoming the beginning.


MAESTRO

“Although it may be different, I think you can still feel that it’s a ‘Tamaryn’ record, and for me to make the decision of keeping my name and not make a new band is what changed for me. It’s like saying, ‘I can do whatever I want and evolve however I like under my name.’”

What exactly is “cranekiss”? It doesn’t have a particular meaning, but it’s evocative of several things for me. It kind of reminds me of a picture of being hit by a kiss or being pulled up, being taken over by a relationship. It also reminds me of one of my favorite bands called Cranes. Also, it’s the original name of the demo that Shaun wrote. I don’t know how he came up with it, but I liked it; I was inspired to write lyrics around it. It ended up evolving into an album and became the most appropriate title. What can you say about the whole experience? It’s been incredible being able to achieve these things that I didn’t even think I had access to, creatively. For me, it’s about being able to be in music. It’s not about becoming a rock star or having a mansion and a nice car; it’s about trying to create something that communicates with other human beings from an intense, emotional place. Being a music fan as much as I am and seeing how moved I am by music, it’s amazing to be able to create

something in that same world and create that experience for other people. That’s all I’ve ever wanted to do. Are there any plans of trying out other new things? I definitely have more that I want to do. I’m open to doing different things, but I’m not sure what at this point. I’m on tour now, but I’ve been considering a lot of collaborations. I really want to continue more in a single-based environment, but as far as albums go, I won’t put out albums, unless there’s something and it’s really well-thought out.

tamarynmusic.com @TAMARYNmusic

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climbing

stream up

It’s not every day that you encounter a band with a drummer as their singer, let alone a band with six members that play soulful rock music like WHITNEY. Led by ex-members of Unknown Mortal Orchestra and Smith Westerns, this is one band that defies all odds. By Celene Sakurako Photographed by Amanda Leigh Smith

“IT’S UNUSUAL TO HAVE A DRUMMER AS THE SINGER, BUT WE’VE GOTTEN SUCH A GREAT RESPONSE FROM OUR LIVE SHOWS…WITH THE STYLE OF MUSIC THAT WE PLAY, IT’S TURNED OUT TO BE SOMETHING UNIQUE THAT WORKS TO OUR ADVANTAGE.”

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C

hicago’s emerging six-piece country rock band Whitney is a band that’s got it right in all the wrong ways. They’re the kind of band that gives you the kind of feels that only a bucket of ice cold beers on a scorching hot day can give you. Formed incidentally after two musically prolific mornings between Julien Ehrlich (lead vocals/drums) and Max Kakacek (lead guitar) in the summer of 2014, the band includes Malcolm Brown (keyboard), Will Miller (trumpet), Josiah Marshall (bass), and Ziyad Asrar (guitar). Shortly after uploading a demo of their debut song “No Matter Where We Go” on upcoming LA-based record label LEAD RIDERS’ YouTube channel in May, the sextet hit the road, successfully fueling two tours around North America in the course of six months purely off of word of mouth and the single snippet of their music. Catching the attention of music publications like The FADER and NME along the way, the band gradually revealed more of themselves through


MAESTRO

Stylist by Tashina Hill Creative Director Jacob McNeil Producer Jason Ehrlich Agency Yonder

sporadic premieres of unofficial recordings of songs “Follow,” “Golden Days,” and “No Woman” on elusive platforms like radio interviews and live recordings, foreshadowing a soon-to-come official release, but with scarce information to follow on. After an odd bar session where a 52-year old divorcee lectured Julien and Will about “steering clear of chicks,” the singer and drummer sits down to set the record straight. “Since releasing the demo of ‘No Matter Where We Go,’ we’ve gone on and recorded our first album in California with Jonathan Rado of Foxygen. We’re in the mixing process right now; we’ll be flying out to New York to finish it in just over a week.” Due for release early next year, he jokes about how the forthcoming album is a collection of soulful heartbreaking country songs

that ode to the legendary rock band he’s admired since high school, The Band. “One song was influenced by Shania Twain, but the majority of it was about us discovering our love for The Band and Jim Ford,” he quips. Splitting creative input with Max, who he met (following his departure from UMO) while briefly playing drums for Max’s former band Smith Westerns, Julien admits that jumping wagons from years of being at the back to the front of the stage took some getting used to. “Performance-wise, the only thing that’s different now is that I get to talk to the crowd in between songs. I didn’t like it at first, but now it’s starting to become something I look forward to on tour. Writing-wise, even when I was strictly behind the drums in older projects, I was always into writing vocal melodies.” He goes

on, “With our first album, I learned how to write on guitar a lot more; it was a good feeling. For the songs that Max would come up with a chord progression for, I’d come up with the vocal melody, then everything was passed back and forth between both of our heads until it was deemed done.” With an unconventional structure of the drummer as the singer, Julien nods to the fact that people may be quick to judge or deem Whitney as weird or lame, but frankly, he’s unfazed by it. Although the band was named after an imaginary “weird old man,” there’s definitely nothing strange about them, at least musically speaking. “I know it’s unusual, but we’ve gotten such a great response from our live shows that we don’t even think about it anymore. With the style of music that we play, it’s turned out to be something unique that works to our advantage. This is probably kind of cocky to say, but to anyone who thinks otherwise, come see us live.”

facebook.com/whitneychicago @whitneyband

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Penning songs about the solar system, generative syntax, and Mean Girls, indie pop star REESE LANSANGAN cuts against the grain to separate the wit from the chaff. As the singersongwriter says Arigato, Internet! in her solo debut, we’d like to thank the universe for @reeseypeasy. By Pola Beronilla Photographed by Meetkeso Styled by Celene Sakurako Makeup Tyrene G. Orais for Make Up Store Philippines Hair Moriel Flores Location MNL Boutique Hostel

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weeter than peanut butter cups, but tougher than the streets, Reese Lansangan is a social media heroine. Funemployed at 25, she’s capitalized on the millennials’ daily habit, collecting hearts, double taps, and thumbsups thanks to her online quirks. Apart from her notable work in the fields of art, design, and fashion, she’s also breaking ground with her music career as one-half of an acoustic duo called Reese & Vica and as vocalist of power-pop band Dressed Up Days. But now, she’s ready to make the jump from your screens on to a bigger stage with Arigato, Internet!. “I’d like to thank the Internet because everything started and has been happening because of it; it’s so central to my music and what I am as an artist, so I give it a thank you for my first album,” she adds. Exactly fourteen days before the record’s release date, Reese was still in the midst of wrapping up. “I’m very rushed because of the album; I’m not yet done, and it’s two weeks before my launch,” she gushes. Despite being a self-proclaimed slacker, the crooner’s managed

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to finish her self + friends-produced debut album in time, while simultaneously co-directing her music video, directing the creative direction of all the promotional materials, and planning a wonderland of an album launch that include snacks, intergalactic ice cream, DIY booths, live calligraphy & illustration, a ukulele tutorial station, and a merchandise booth that sold shirts, stickers, post cards, pins, and a whole lot more. “I started conceptualizing this album like around April or May, then I got help from my friends and started planning. I’ve really put my heart, my limbs, and my time into this,” recalls Reese. Tastefully tailored to her eccentricities, Arigato, Internet! demonstrates her flair to capture slices of life in non-conventional ways. Writing songs like “On Wednesdays, We Wear Pink” and “Creeper,” she gives off verbal flights of fancy that most pop music don’t usually offer. “I like shedding light on things that aren’t commonly discussed and stir away from the traditional love songs—not that there’s anything wrong with that—but I just want to offer something else different,” she shares. Cooing in chromatic wit and power, she follows the path of an indie pop artist but intuitively treads on the anti-folk side. “My artistic statement is to write about things that aren’t usually talked about in pop songs, like embedding facts or little bits of


MAESTRO

“I like shedding light on things that aren’t commonly discussed and stir away from the traditional love songs—not that there’s anything wrong with that— but I just want to offer something else different.”

truth to what I do.” Spiking with comic turns of phrase and rap breaks as she sings “You type ‘lose’ with one O if you’re losing your mind / and 2 O’s for describing bowel movements of any kind” in “Grammar Nazi,” she nail-guns emotional truths and wisecracks, moving closer towards her goal to be a hip Sesame Street. “English teachers even started tweeting-slash-messaging me if they could show it to their English class, so that’s what I’m pretty proud of,” she laughs. Though she’s been offered record deals by several labels, she opts to challenge herself a bit more. “I would appreciate the help, but I believe in self-made artists because I’ve seen them happen, or maybe I haven’t found the right label to work with,” she shares. “But for me, that’s really not the end goal. I just really want to make music and share it, and being an independent artist gives me the freedom to do anything that I want; I don’t feel controlled.” Onto the next journey, she marks her next destination towards the unknown. “I just want to be content and happy with my life—contented but not complacent. I want to keep pushing the things I want to believe in. I want to keep on creating the things I love.”

reeseypeasy.com @reeseypeasy

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MASTERMIND

M A S T E R M I N D

With visions of tranquil sights lit with the right pop of saturation, photography duo MARKUS & KOALA make a world of their own. By Janroe Cabiles

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reating an entire universe with nothing but their own visual language is what Markus and Koala do best. Dividing their time between Los Angeles and Paris, the New Yorkbased duo is making their mark across the globe, working with publications Harper’s Bazaar China, Schön!, Elle UK, Photo France, Vanity Fair Italy, Vogue Mexico, and Oui Hours. “While our focus is working with fashion and celebrity magazines, we also have our own projects,” explains the duo. “Last year, we had our Art Basel debut in Miami, and we also have a personal art book in the works called Role Model.” Having a unique approach to vibrance in stills, they compose a steady balance between the glamour of high fashion and the rough edges of youth culture. Honing their individual styles into one identity, they credit their alliance as the key to their aesthetic. “We both have somewhat of an eclectic taste. I’d say that my inspiration comes from the ‘60s to ‘80s era; overall, a glossier, somewhat more classic approach,” says Markus. Sharing a pop of her

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multimedia art background, Koala continues, “For me, [I’m inspired by] anything that draws me in and evokes emotion. In terms of our combined aesthetic, very different types of people gravitate towards toward our work, which is interesting for us to see.” Already armed with an impressive roster of subjects such as Lucy Liu, Ciara, and supermodel Iman in only two years, they’ve built a seamless process of shooting. With the help of espresso, a Bluetooth speaker, and Koala’s phone, they aim to create a fun atmosphere. “We always want our subjects and the entire team to have a great time during our shoots, as if it were a fun party,” Markus says. “We like to be prepared and have concepts planned out, but once on set, we always keep an open mind to be spontaneous and quickly capture an unexpected moment.” Finding harmony in both their resonant aesthetic as well as the raw passion they share, the duo admits that it’s a fluid process. “The key is to respect each other and realize that we are stronger as a team,” Koala says. “The

challenge to convince each other on how to approach a project forces us to dig deeper.” What made you decide to pursue fashion photography? Koala: Fashion has always interested me. I come from a very conservative Chinese family. They were very disapproving of my interests because fashion was viewed as vain or superficial—I think I wanted to be rebellious at the time. These old school views are definitely changing in the East, so I think it’s an exciting time for fashion and the arts in general. When it comes to working with clients, how does the collaboration work out in terms of having creative freedom? Markus: Fashion/celebrity photography is almost always based on teamwork. We are equally at ease working with clients or art directors who bring very precise concepts and demands to the projects and with clients who entrust all the creatives in our hands.


MASTERMIND

“The challenge to convince each other on how to approach a project forces us to dig deeper.”

Are there any differences in approach when it comes to commercial and highend fashion photography? M: One would think so, but in reality, the techniques are often interchangeable. It’s more the intent and the mood or expression of a particular image that brands it more as commercial versus editorial or high fashion. What quality do you look for in your subjects? M: Charisma—although it comes in many different forms. K: I love when someone embraces their individuality or what makes them unique, rather than trying to fit in the mold of what they think society believes is beautiful. What’s next for you? M: We’re preparing for several shoots in China, which will be very exciting. This will be the first time for us to go to China as a team.

markusandkoala.format.com @markusandkoala

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MASTERMIND

A F T E R H O U R S

Lost in sunsets, at nighttime, and in the hues of his views, photographer and art director of Théorie CAMERON LEE PHAN finds solace in the flash of fleeting moments. By Janroe Cabiles

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can’t say that I’ve had a muse completely of my own, but I’m definitely entranced by the idea of a mutual muse–two complementary entities to love and inspire one another,” says Cameron Lee Phan of his collaboration with his subjects. “They exist in the forms of strangers, friends, lovers, and even in the coexistence of nature and humanity.” With eyes closed,

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remorseful, or piercing, the exchange of emotion on both sides of the lens takes form in his photographs. Before moving on to working with Republic Records and American Apparel, as well as publications including Interview, V, Juxtapoz, Austere Magazine, and his and Nicola Wali’s start-up zine Théorie, he was just an average teenager with his headphones on. “When the Internet became kind of a thing, I spent a lot of time discovering art, music, fashion, and photography,” he recalls. “I knew I found an outlet for my creative urges, and ultimately, that became the first step in defining my path. And then, I started taking pictures about five years ago, when I received my first camera for my birthday.” Quipped with his Canons, both

digital and film, he has his way with shadows and reflections, borrowing light from the streets and the night. Finding fragility and gentleness in everything around him, he draws out a soft and somber reality from his subjects. “I’d like to say that my work can be a little lonely and elusive, but also present and attentive.” Despite his method of an auteurist in everything he’s shot, there’s a level of release he’s found in the paradise of deserts and empty highways at dusk. “I’ve spent so much of my time as a photographer trying to perfect things I can’t control, but I’ve learned to relax and improvise when I no longer have control over a situation. My creative process is simply to live and pay attention to what’s going on in real


MASTERMIND

“When I feel like something has completely mystified me, I obsess over it. Then, I create.”

life and counteract with why I can imagine. When I feel like something has completely mystified me, I obsess over it. Then, I create.” In the curves and concave of flesh, the slopes of skin and bones, and landscapes behind, Cameron captures an intangible essence in portraits between him and his subjects, regardless if they are strangers or loved ones. “There’s something incredibly enticing about the spectrum of our own interpersonal relationships. Creating with a stranger undoubtedly generates an incredibly enchanting high. It’s kind of like a first date or the first time using a drug; if it’s good, it leaves you wanting more,” he says. “But for some people in my life, there are endless moments of inspiration and an integrated perspective for which there are no limitations and no competition, just trust. Nothing will ever take away from those moments of synchronization between an artist and their muse, which reveals a certain kind of hope for connectivity we have in human nature.” When he isn’t driving at night with the windows down, blaring out good music, he’s taking photos and falling in love with them, which is what he advises for other photographers. “Be intuitive, maintain integrity, and be willing to grow. Fall in love, and don’t ever feel stuck; we’re all learning about ourselves and what we want to communicate. It takes time.”

cameronleephan.com @cameronphan

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the reeling Screaming of muted beauty through stills in silence, photographer ZACHARY CHICK captures his muses on the streets and tangled in sheets with his fair share of “outtakes, bastards, and B-sides.” By Janroe Cabiles

U

nder the surface of a drunken memory, there are true moments; hazed albeit focused images that bring you back to that time, that place, that night, that feeling, whether real or imagined. “Like sentimentality at the end of an electric rainbow. Or like playing Rainbow Road on Mario Kart with your best friend at 5 AM, drunk as a skunk, but never getting hit by that goddamn giant dog,” says Zachary Chick about the aesthetic of his photos, which has been featured by the likes of Live FAST, C-Heads, This is Junk, Juxtapoz, i-D, and Cake Magazine. “Seriously though, if you look at a photo that was taken yesterday of a person you’ve never met, you can get the same feeling that you get from a photo of your parents when they were kids. You didn’t know them then, but you’re emotional, nonetheless. It feels like you know them, like you could’ve been right beside them in the picture. That’s what I want in my photos, that kind of nostalgia.” While this kind of deeply-felt emotion interlaces with an irreverent abandon featuring the gazes of the placid and the deranged, his immortalizing aesthetic is sharpened by what’s around him. “Inspiration constantly changes. Sometimes, I’m highly uninspired, but it’s best to just leave it be. It’s like falling in love; you’ve got to let it find you,” he says. “It wasn’t a childhood dream of mine to be a photographer. I wanted to work at the carnival— the ones that come through town once year. Everyone always gets a

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big laugh out of that, but in all honestly, photo shoots aren’t any different. They’re eerily similar, the more you think of it. It’s never been about the camera or photos per se, it’s about not letting something come and go without being aware it even happened; maybe I got my wish, in a way.” What features or traits do you tend to focus on? When you’re in love with someone, you don’t focus on specific features or traits—it’s just an overall feeling when you’re around them. I try to look for that quality in subjects. We humans are so similar; all of the insecurities you think are just yours, we’re all carrying them around. We’re all covered in scars from these experiences. If you can find an idiosyncrasy in a person that stands out to you, I’d say focus on that. With the amount of projects and collaborations you’ve had with

publications, how important is creative freedom for you? To be honest, realistic magazine compromises are a life-saver. I respect the duality. My ideas are usually a bit bombastic; I probably wouldn’t get anything done. I’m too busy trying to make Citizen Kane every time I touch a camera. Thank the gods they keep me in check with deadlines and compromises, otherwise, I’d probably still be on my first project. What’s an image that has stayed with you to this day? When I first moved to New York, I went into a store to upgrade my cellphone. Inside, they had all that stock imagery on the walls, you know? In one, there was a mother laying in a pile of freshly fallen autumn leaves, and her child is in the act of jumping in with her. On the other side of the lens, you just know the dad who raked all those leaves is smiling so huge, even though he’s going to have to re-rake the whole


MASTERMIND

pile. I think about that picture all the time. Even though I know it’s just an ad trying to get me to buy a new phone, I really love that photo. Describe the romance of living in New York City as a photographer. Love-hate-love-hate-hate-love. Lovehate relationships are sexy though. You know when you go to a diner and they have a 20-page menu with every type of cuisine ever made, and you sit there stressed as fuck trying to make what seems like the hardest decision of your life over something so simple? Something similar to that. Overwhelming and wondrous. What advice would you give to photographers starting out? In a world where there’s a million photos per second popping up and disappearing, if you can figure out what makes people stop scrolling through their feed and just look for a moment, there’s a start. 

“It’s never been about the camera or photos per se, it’s about not letting something come and go without being aware it even happened.”

zacharychick.tumblr.com @zacharychick

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MASTERMIND

APERTURE

attitude From one end of the world to the other, JM DAYA0 takes on the world of fashion photography while holding on to his roots and distinct sense of humor. By Ida Aldana

I “

moved to California completely in 2006. Transition is always fun. It helps that I brought a pocketful of English in my back pocket,” quips JM Dayao when asked about his relocation. Since making the move from the Philippines to the United States, the fashion photographer has been bouncing between Los Angeles and New York, capturing the latest fashion trends for different magazines and features. Apart from lending his lens for last November’s cover shoot with Lucky Blue Smith, his work has been published in Reflex Homme Magazine, Schön!, Lab A4 Magazine, and Forbes. Despite the fact that his formal education was in the sciences, it was his curiosity that got him started on photography. “I thought cameras were cool. I like beauty; that’s why I was magnetized to doing fashion photography.” It’s exactly this fondness for beauty that defines his aesthetic on film. “I like big, bright, beautiful light. I hate too much shadow or darkness in pictures. I always try to capture beauty, so I need to see it.” Armed with his Canon 5D Mark II and five vintage Polaroid cameras, which he insists still work, he admits that he doesn’t really look for anything very specific in his search. “I just shoot what I like at the moment. Everything changes; even the perfect photo today is not so perfect tomorrow. It’s like food, unless you’re talking about wine or adobo,” he muses. For someone who continuously has to be creative, it’s a good thing he can fuel his vision from his shoots. “I get inspired when I see my face in the reflection of a model’s eye on my picture, and I say, ‘Hey that’s me!’ It’s no wonder he counts himself among his favorite photographers along with Daniel Jackson and Karim Sadli. “‘Love your own,’ they say,” he exclaims. “I try to be consistent with my work. Consistency is the reason why people hire specific photographers. Not everyone can be like Terry Richardson, nor can they

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MASTERMIND

be like Annie Leibovitz.” He continues, “I try to be myself. Sometimes, I copy some pegs, but then again, there’s no such things as an original idea.” His consistency likewise goes hand in hand with building rapport with his subjects. “I just chat with them and talk to them about other things other than how pretty they are. I tell them jokes and all that jazz.” He jests, “Sometimes, I also tell them that I need to photoshop their pictures a lot, and that I’ll spend countless of man-hours to edit their faces–that always breaks the ice.” Booking projects from coast to coast, JM shares that he doesn’t have a particular favorite photo shoot. “All of them are great, but I, too, suffer short-term memory loss like any other millennial. Any time I can tell people what to do is memorable to me, so that means every shoot.” There’s no doubt he still manages to keep his quick wit with him even after his success. When asked about what he thinks about before walking on set, he answers, “‘When is lunch?’ I always feel hungry.” As for what’s next for him beyond lunchtime, JM adds, “I’ll let the wind blow, as it always does. Who knows, I might be a pastry chef next week.”

jmdayao.com

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H E A V Y H I T T E R

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Sean Lennon. NYC, 2011, For The Lab Magazine, Unpublished


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For over 25 years, British photographer JAKE CHESSUM has been capturing moments through his lens, collecting them as priceless treasures every step of the way. By Denise Mallabo


"I THINK PART OF MY SKILL IS I CAN GET PEOPLE TO BEHAVE NATURALLY IN A VERY UNNATURAL SITUATION. I ALWAYS TRY TO MAKE PEOPLE LOOK AS GOOD AS I THINK THEY WANT TO LOOK."

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Amy Winehouse. London, 2004, Unpublished

hen it comes to recollections of his shoots, New York-based lens man Jake Chessum is an apologetic storyteller and a self-confessed fan boy. With every unnecessary apology to start his detour of a flash-filled tale about that time he shot Kate Hudson, Heath Ledger, Tom Hanks, or Robert de Niro, the accomplished artist makes this clear: regardless of his already high-profile portfolio, his job will never get old. Beginning his career in photography in the streets of London, he ultimately found his footing when he and his wife moved to the USA. “I started working for The Face magazine, and they sent me to Los Angeles to shoot Ice Cube, The Beastie Boys, Russell Simmons, in pretty quick successions. That was the first time that I’ve really been to the States to work,” says Jake. Working with numerous personalities from actors to athletes, musicians to politicians, Jake has shot for publications like Esquire, GQ, Entertainment Weekly, The New York Magazine, and Time Out New York since then. Yet, he still remains nonchalant about his portfolio, enjoying each minute of every project. “Every assignment is exciting and different. It’s a weird thing because these celebrities and actors do hundreds of photo shoots; some of them might enjoy it, some might think it’s just a job. But I live with those pictures,” shares Jake. “I’m kind of a collector; I’ve always collected stuff ever since I was a child. It might just be something fleeting for them, but for me, I spend hours looking at the pictures, printing, and retouching; they become this weird part of my life.”

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Can you describe to us your aesthetic?

It doesn’t rely on technique; it’s always graphic. I learned this through shooting my book, The New York Look Book. I think part of my skill is I can get people to behave naturally in a very unnatural situation. I always try to make people look as good as I think they want to look, and I think it’s about being relaxed. I still feel that I try to allow people to be themselves and reflect that on to the picture.

How do you prepare for an entire day of work?

I try to read up about my subject, especially if it’s someone who I’m not that familiar with. Just to find some kind of connection with their past and to know things that you shouldn’t mention. When you’re dealing with somebody famous, you’ve got to be careful not to say something rude. Also, I scout the location to try and pre-plan a set of shots. Once I get these plans, I can relax a little bit, because when I have a plan, I can be spontaneous a little bit. The worst thing for me is when I’ve already taken the picture before even shooting, when I already know what the picture is going to look like in my head. Maybe I’ve got delusions of grandeur, but I try to do something that surprises me or not what I’ve expected to shoot. I didn’t shoot film for three to four years, but just recently, I started taking film cameras again to editorial shoots. It’s really exciting to shoot film again because you can’t see what it looks like, they can’t see what it looks like, and nobody in the shoot knows what you’re getting. Just trust your judgment and instinct.

Charlotte Kemp Muhl. NYC, 2011, For The Lab Magazine, Published

What’s your most memorable shoot to date?

Just the idea of meeting David Bowie and having a moment with him was just amazing. I remember when we went to a little house to photograph him, his assistant opened the door, and I could see him sitting on the stairs. In a professional position, you obviously have to control yourself from having a visceral fan reaction; if you’d react like that, you’d never work again. Your job is to take the picture that transcends that kind of visceral reaction, which is to go, “Oh my God! I’m in a room with David Bowie!” I took all my records to have him sign because I’m such a fan. I’m so lucky that my job allows me to access people that I can fulfill another aspect of my personality. I also photographed Amy Winehouse in 2004. I spent an entire day with her, which was obviously more significant for me than it was for her, especially in light of her tragic death years after. I can’t pretend to know anything and have a great insight about Amy, but that short time I spent with her is significant. After she died, I was really upset and shocked. I really didn’t know her, but obviously, she was an amazing singer.

Thorn Yorke. philadelphia, 2006, Spin Magazine

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"MAYBE I'VE GOT DELUSIONS OF GRANDEUR, BUT I TRY TO DO SOMETHING THAT SURPRISES ME OR NOT WHAT I'VE EXPECTED TO SHOOT." Alec Baldwin. The Hamptons New York, 2009

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Heath Ledger. Calgary, 2004, Edit sheets

"THAT ' S THE THING WITH STREET PHOTOGRAPHY, YOU DON'T ASK FOR PERMISSION BECAUSE IT RUINS THE MOMENT."

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Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl. NYC, 2011, For The Lab Magazine, Published

You’ve published two books, The New York Look Book and Rubbish. Any plans of releasing a third one? Earlier this year, I cleared out a storage space full of stuff, and I found a huge box of polaroids from shoots dating back to 1990, so I’m thinking maybe there’s something there. I have a friend, an art director who’s interested in working on it with me. We’re probably a third of the way through editing. Possibly a book of polaroids, who knows? Some of them are a bit funky, some got a bit folded and busted up, but that’s part of its charm. You also like taking unusual photos when you travel, what’s the story behind this? When I lived in London, I didn’t shoot a lot pictures on the street. Coincidentally, I discovered the work of William Eggleston and Harry Callahan when I started traveling to America to shoot. Their works are just so amazing and brilliant, and that inspired me to shoot pictures of anything and everything. Since I got an iPhone, that’s what I carry and shoot with all the time. I shoot pictures on the street, and that’s what you’ll see on my Instagram feed. My daughter gives me hell, she’s like, “You just took a picture of that man, didn’t you? Why are you taking pictures? You have to ask for their permission.” I’d just tell her that that’s the thing with street photography, you don’t ask for permission because it ruins the moment.

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CHASING PAVEMENTS Capturing a visual imagery rooted in the art of storytelling, Chris and Sarah Rhoads, together known as WE ARE THE RHOADS, are treading the right path. Seeing double with two sets of eyes through the viewfinder, the collaborative duo draws a focal point. By Pola Beronilla


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HEAVY HITTER

Self-portrait

“ It wasn’t until I met Sarah

that I started to realize that photography was more than just a side talent,” says Chris, one-half of LA-based collaborative duo We Are The Rhoads. “I just knew I loved stories and people, and meeting Chris was what really solidified photography as a big part of my journey,” adds Sarah. Everybody knows the tale when two roads diverged, but this story starts when two Rhoads met. First crossing paths in college, it only took a few clicks before the duo let their photographic nature take its course. “We were both pursuing our own independent endeavors: Chris with music and photography, and me with writing and photography,” recalls Sarah. “The first four years we were together, we were really coming into our own, independently as well as together. By the end of college, we were both creating together.” With Chris having a degree in Philosophy while Sarah holding a degree in Journalism, these tracks ultimately guided them towards the right path. “[Photography] is a constant excuse to stay curious about people and the world around us. There are always things to see, take in, and learn about,” shares Sarah. “We always loved telling stories, but now, it’s primarily through the visual medium. One of our favorite parts of photography and directing is how it allows you to explore and be curious about people and life in a very nonjudgmental and exploratory way, much like a philosopher.”

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“[Photography] is a constant excuse to stay curious about people and the world around us. There are always things to see, take in, and learn about.�

Josh Tillman for Rolling Stone


HEAVY HITTER

for Rollercoaster Paris

Describing their imagery as honest, irreverent, and thoughtful, they have since collected memories of shooting editorials for publications like Kinfolk, L’Officiel, Teen Vogue, and Nylon, advertisements for companies such as Coca-Cola, Disney, MTV, Reebok, Gap, and Target, as well as celebrities like Carrie Brownstein for Rolling Stone, Taylor Swift for a Keds campaign, and Kendall and Kylie Jenner for their clothing line. Aside from their honorable film roll, they’ve also been featured in Photo District News’ “30 Photographers to Watch” in 2014 and were included in New York Magazine’s “9 Emerging Fashion Photographers to Watch” in 2015. Though trying to remember their first ever shoot is a bit blurry, Chris gives us a clear recollection of their first glimpse at their published campaign for Sony. “It ended up being everywhere, including these 90foot banners on Madison Avenue,” he recalls. “I’ll never forget the mix of vulnerability, excitement, and pride all combining in that moment. Seeing our work that large for the first time still sticks with me six years later.” However, working with megacorps as such can sometimes put the duo’s artistic vision out of balance. “Brands have their important derivatives that must be considered, as well as the creative directors/art directors’ thoughts and opinions. The outcome of shoots like this is definitely more of a ‘collective consciousness’ vision versus just the photographers’ vision,” admits Sarah. But soon enough, they eventually get an equal footing. “It really teaches you how to be collaborative and to work with opinions that may be very different than your own, and in turn, it also teaches you what’s crucial to fight for as it pertains to the creative.” for Darling 2015 80 - STATUSMAGONLINE.COM


HEAVY HITTER

“One of our favorite parts of photography and directing is how it allows you to explore and be curious about people and life in a very non-judgmental and exploratory way, much like a philosopher.”

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HEAVY HITTER

“Most people want there to be some kind of magic formula, but the real secret is to be yourself and learn how to channel that into what you create.”

for Rollercoaster Paris

More recently, the duo has been dabbling into moving their stills. Shooting videos for the likes of Bose, Subaru, and Dockers, they execute their vision, capture an emotion, and create a connection as they hit record. “At the heart of both photography and filmmaking is storytelling, so building some kind of narrative through the visuals is extremely important,” expounds Sarah. “Filmmaking strengthens our storytelling muscles and forces us to really think through everything in a more narrative way. Photography is so moment-driven; you don’t have to be as concerned about what comes before or after that image. But with filmmaking, what comes before and after is equally as important and must be considered. You can really set a mood and tone, create something cinematic in a scene, and tell a story with more senses with sound involved.” They say that a picture is worth a thousand words, but if you want pure imagery that no set of words could ever express, then all roads would lead to Chris and Sarah. “I think most people want there to be some kind of magic formula, but the real secret is to be yourself and learn how to channel that into what you create,” quips Sarah. With over 12 years of experience under their lens, their hard work has taken them all over the world. “We’ve grown and evolved leaps and bounds from where we were when we were just kids and had just met. Our control over lighting is much more advanced; we’re able to work with our talent in a more natural and organic fashion, and creatively, we have many more tools in our proverbial ‘tool box,’” she shares. “Had we not met, it’s hard to say what we’d both be doing. I know I’d definitely still have a camera with me all the time, but there’s no doubt our work wouldn’t be what it is today without the collective vision and work that both of us bring to the table.”

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Gazing beyond his mind-frame, CHRISTIAN ANWANDER shoots to thrill. From the quick release of his shutter straight to the glossiest pages of fashion’s finest, the New Yorkbased photographer flashes us the good stuff. By Pola Beronilla

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Daft Punk for GQ

“If I would remember the first photograph I took, which I don’t, I’m pretty damn sure it was shitty,” quips fashion photographer Christian Anwander. “I don’t really see myself as a fashion photographer; I’m more like a kid playing with things that he likes but doesn’t like sticking to boundaries.” Though his sly remarks may seem timid, his portfolio boasts of flashing editorials for Italian Glamour, Dossier Magazine, Le Monde, L’Officiel, and Numero Homme China, as well as advertisements for Armani Exchange, Hugo Boss, and Baldessarini. Ever since making his move from Vienna to New York in 2005, he’s been focusing on the big picture. Aside from shooting for the glitziest agencies and publications, he’s also shot Lake Bell for Twelv Magazine, Dane DeHaan for Flaunt, Daft Punk for GQ, and more recently, Zoë Kravitz for Complex. On working with such a diverse clientele, the photographer says, “My creative process is very improvised. I’m taking it where it is, and I’m trying

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“One thing that I really, really love about photography is that it’s never the same; you should always do something different.”


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HEAVY HITTER

“A good photographer has to be able to be himself in the picture he makes.” to transfer it into the best way possible. You need to be able to tilt your mind in certain ways where it works with them. You become a little wider, a little more accessible to everybody.” As Christian perpetually captures a refined rawness within the borders of his mind-frame, we had a tête-àtête with the photographer to talk about his passion for his craft and what makes him snap. Hi Christian! Any projects you’re currently working on? I’m prepping on something that I can’t speak of yet. Also, I’ve just finished all kinds of pictures that I took for the past six months, and I’m gonna work on them now. Putting them all together, having it all make sense. How long does it take you to conceptualize, set up, shoot, and release each project or editorial you make? Occasionally, there are shoots that you plan really straight up, but I think you can only plan to a certain degree. For instance, this person isn’t in a good mood, we couldn’t get this piece of clothing, we couldn’t get the weather right, you know? You got to start improvising. I remember I did a shoot with Tony Ward for Ten Magazine a long

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while ago. It was a very good shoot. It had a lot of set design involved, but it was very improvised. We knew what clothes we were going to get, what girl we were going to get, but what we had in the end was a cube truck full of garbage. Like metal leftovers, all kinds of garbage. They didn’t have any budget, so we transformed whatever we had in the truck and put it on the model. It’s quite challenging to be a photographer in the fashion industry nowadays, with the growing number of competitors. What do you think makes you stand out from the crowd? It’s a little bit like a cooking recipe. Take 1/4 of confidence, add 1/4 of good luck, mix it with 1/4 of skills, and sprinkle 1/4 of craziness on top of it. Voilà! A fashion photographer is born. Bon appétit! You’ve shot for an eclectic range of publications from Vogue, L’Officiel, Ten Magazine, and Flaunt, to GQ, Complex, and SPIN. Do you have a specific approach for each variation? I think to be a good photographer, you have to be able to transform, to translate your character into the work. A good photographer has to be able to be himself in the picture he makes. One thing that I really, really love about photography is that it’s never the same; you should always do something different. Like you have all those different styles of photography,

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all those different themes, and all those different people who want a different artistic outcome from you, and you kind of want to play with each individual job you have. You want to create the perfect shoe for each foot. And that’s beautiful ‘cause it’s very challenging. The editorials you’ve work on vary in so many fields, but you seem to never run out of fresh ideas. What fuels your creative juice? You have to see everything; you have to be a sponge and suck everything up. Like literally picking up a can of Coca-Cola in a grocery store and drinking it can be inspiring, if you’re sensitive enough. Everything in the world can inspire you, and that’s the beauty of it.

  What are you looking forward to most in the next couple of months? Fishing in the Spring. No projects you can mention to us? I do look forward to doing a lot of projects, but I’ve learned in the past that I don’t like talking about my projects anymore because I’m very superstitious. I’d rather enjoy the project once it’s done and I’m happy with it. But I really am looking forward to a great day of fishing.   Complete the statement: A good photographer always… Knows when to press the button.

christiananwander.com


HEAVY HITTER

“You have to see everything; you have to be a sponge and suck everything up. Everything in the world can inspire you, and that’s the beauty of it.”


DIRECTORY BRANDS AÉROPOSTALE Glorietta 2, Makati City ARMANI EXCHANGE Glorietta 4, Makati City ARTDECO artdeco.com BAREMINERALS bareminerals.co.uk BEAUTY BAR Glorietta 2, Makati City BURBERRY burberry.com CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN christianlouboutin.com CLINIQUE clinique.com CORTEFIEL Glorietta 3, Makati City CREIGHTONS beautyatcreightons.co.uk DIOR dior.com DOLCE & GABBANA dolcegabbana.com DOLL FACE dollfacebeauty.com DUNE Greenbelt 5, Makati City ECCO Glorietta 3, Makati City FOREVER 21 SM Makati, Makati City

FOR LOVE AND LEMONS forloveandlemons.com GIORGIO ARMANI armanibeauty.com GROOMED groomed.uk.com HAATI CHAI haatichai.com HAPPY SKIN happyskincosmetics.com JEAN-PIERRE BRAGANZA jeanpierrebraganza.com LANCÔME lancome.co.uk LAURA GELLER laurageller.com MAC maccosmetics.com MAKE UP STORE PHILIPPINES The Podium, Mandaluyong City MARC BY MARC JACOBS Greenbelt 5, Makati City NARS narscosmetics.com OXYGEN Glorietta 3, Makati City PENSHOPPE Glorietta 3, Makati City SFERA SM Makati, Makati City SMASHBOX smashbox.com STYLE STALKER stylestalker.com

THEBALM thebalm.com TORY BURCH Greenbelt 5, Makati City WOODY’S woodysgrooming.com WXYZ wxyzjewelry.com YONDER bravelyimagine.com ZOE JORDAN zoe-jordan.com ARTISTS Miguel Alomajam (Photographer) miguelalomajan.wordpress.com Amanda Leigh Smith (Photographer) aleighsmith.com Mike Carreiro (Photographer) mikecarreiro.com Mike Chua (Photographer) instagram.com/michaelanthonychua Sydney Costley (Hair and Makeup) instagram.com/hairbysydneycostley Sydney Dagal instagram.com/syddagzy Ghazal Elhaei (Stylist) ghazalelhaei.com Veronica Formos (Photographer) veronicaformos.com Alexandra Gavillet (Photographer) alexandragavillet.com

Tashina Hill (Stylist) tashinahill.com Meredith Lacosse (Makeup) meredithlacosse.com Meetkeso (Photographer) instagram.com/meetkeso Tyrene G. Orais (Makeup) makeupstore.se Smallz + Raskind (Photographer) smallzandraskind.com


S TAT U S IN VA D E S

mane attraction Caught in her cool-girl gaze and ways, there’s a resilience in celebrity stylist JAN ARANILLA’s sense and structure of fashion. With her ever-morphing taste she adapts to her clients, she never loses sight of her own.

@janaranilla Portrait by Miguel Alomajan Product photography by Carlo Nuñez Special thanks to Croque Cafe + Bakery


HERMÈS PERFUME

My favorite day scent! It’s so light, almost bordering on cologne territory.

BOXING GLOVES

I started Muay Thai last year and really got into it. I try to hit the gym at least three times a week to de-stress and try to be healthy.

NARS BRONZER + MAC LIPSTICK

Without a bronzer on, I feel like I look oddly pale. Lipsticks are my obsession as of now, but most of the time, I pick either nudes or maroons.

BEACH ESSENTIALS

If I’m not in the city, you’ll probably see me at the beach. Along with my swimwear, this beautiful mandala from Purple Beetle is perfect whenever you want to lay out and chill.

JEANS

My favorite specs at the moment. Perfect accessory for when you want to cop that ‘70s vibe.

BATISTE DRY SHAMPOO

I have to keep my locks fresh and clean.

DENIM JACKET

I have always been a fan of denim jackets. It’s a classic staple in my wardrobe.

Hair and Makeup by Sydney Dagal

GAULTIER SUNNIES

You’ll rarely see me in a skirt or dress. I move around a lot, and being in jeans is just too comfortable. I prefer them ripped; the disheveled, chic look has always been my style.

STATUSMAGONLINE.COM - 95



STATUS Magazine December-January 2016 feat. Jake Chessum